Church History Books Online

Login / Free Registration

We apologize for the need for an account, but it serves to protect the integrity of the works and prevent their being used without permission.

Log In
Join our Newsletters
  • Our monthly newsletter includes updates on the newest additions to our free book listings and notice of upcoming publications. Subscribing to this newsletter gives you free access to our online books.

    -OR-

  • Our weekly newsletter showcases the latest in our auctions of rare Christian books, autographs and theologically related ephemera. Includes our Dust and Ashes monthly newsletter also and of course gives access to our online books.

Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 4.2 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER II.

 

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1856, to March 5, 1874. Practical remarks, letters from donors, &c.

 

The donations, which it pleased the Lord to send for the support of these four Objects of the Institution, were so many, that I can only refer to such of them, as appear more particularly important to be brought before the reader.

June 14, 1856. A private tutor sent me £20 for the Orphans; £20 for Foreign Missions, and £10 for the other Objects. So contrary to human expectations are the donations and the donors.

Dec. 5. During the last 4 weeks the income has been altogether only about £300, and the expenses have been about £850 Had not the Lord previous to this period sent in more than was needed, we should not have had enough; but thus He supplied our need beforehand. I particularly besought Him this evening, before leaving the Orphan House, that He would be pleased now again to send larger supplies. When I came home, I found a half sovereign from Weston-super-Mare for the Orphans, and this letter from a private tutor: "Beloved Servant of the Lord, it is my privilege to send you the enclosed cheque for £40, to be expended for the objects of the Institution for Home and Abroad, as you deem best, reserving £3 for yourself, if you will thus suffer me to minister, though seldom, to your need. May the God of all mercies keep and uphold you in His work, and, as it increases, take the care of it," etc. The whole of this £37 was taken for these Objects. This is the donor, who, on June 14, sent me £50. Admire, dear reader, the hand of God in these instances, who, as the work increases, does indeed, as the writer of the letter says, take care of it, in every way, by influencing not merely the wealthy among His children, but also those who have comparatively little, and who labour for that little, to give comparatively much.

Dec. 26. For 6 weeks and a half the income has been very small, both for these Objects and for the support of the Orphans; for there has not come in more than about £450 altogether, while the outgoings have been above £1,000; and we should have been needy indeed, had not the Lord previously supplied us with much. Now, however, He has been pleased again to send in more bountifully. On the evening of the 24th I received £10 from a donor whom the Lord raised up three years since, most unexpectedly, and who since then has been the means of supplying the work with hundreds of pounds. This £10 I took for these Objects. Also £1 5s. for the Orphans from Cotham, and 5s. for Missions. Yesterday morning I received from Yorkshire £50, of which the donor kindly wished me to take £5 for myself, to give to Mr. C. £5, and to use the £40 as most needed. I took, therefore, half of this sum for the support of the Orphans, and the other half for Missions, and the gratuitous circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts. Also £2 from Bicester, and in the evening £1, which I took for these Objects. In the afternoon I received 5s. for the Orphans; from Nailsworth 10s. 6d. for Missions and 2s. for the Orphans; also anonymously in postages from Newcastle for the Orphans 2s. 6d. This morning I received £183 15s., which being left to my disposal, I took half of it for the support of the Orphans, and the other half for these objects. Thus, within about 36 hours, after a season of little income, I received £239 5s. The Lord be magnified for His kindness! I knew that, after a season of small income, He would again help more abundantly!

Jan. 1, £185. With a gracious letter from a believing clergyman near Bridgewater, £2 for Missions.

Jan. 9. This evening I posted, on my way home, two orders for £40 each for two brethren labouring in China, £10 for a brother labouring in Scotland, and £10, for two brethren labouring in Devonshire. At home I found a registered letter, containing £100 for foreign labourers, the exact sum I had just sent off. Thus, while I am enabled to send out means to brethren who labour in the gospel, the Lord continues also to supply me with means. £238 have been already spent for missionary objects, during these few days in the new year.

Feb. 17. Received £160 As the amount was left at my disposal, I took the whole for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.

May 13. From a Portuguese Christian of Madeira, now residing in Demerara, £20 for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts.

May 14. Early this morning a Christian brother from a distance called at my house, and brought me £28, which sum I took, with his approval, for Missions, and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.

May 21. From a Christian gentleman of Madras £50, which being left at my disposal, I took half for the support of the Orphans, and the other half for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts.

I have thus out of more than 600 donations, which came in for these Objects, between May 26, 1856, and May 26, 1857, referred to a few.—In the heading of this chapter it is stated "Supplies sent in answer to Prayer." Regarding this I make the following remarks:

1, I never apply by letter or personally to any one for means; nor have I any agents whom I request directly or indirectly to ask for means for the Institution; but I spread the wants of this work either alone, or with my fellow-labourers, in prayer before God, or they may pray in secret for help, or many other Christians who feel interested about this work, may pray for its being supplied with means. And thus, alone in answer to prayer, am I supplied with means.

2, The Reports are written to give an account of my stewardship, to give information of the work as to its enlargement, as to its operations, as to the blessing of the Lord resting upon it, and these Reports He, no doubt, uses frequently as a means of supplying us with funds for the work; but the Reports are not my confidence. Did I trust in them, and not in the Living God, I should soon be confounded.

3, When funds are needed or anything else for the work, I give myself unto prayer; for every thing needed I give myself unto prayer: for fellow-labourers, for suitable servants, for the preservation of the buildings against fire, for the health of the children, for blessings on the means used when they are ill, for rain when the cisterns get dry, for enlargement of the work as to Missionary operations, and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, for spiritual blessing to rest on all the various parts of the Institution, such as the conversion of the Orphans, the Day School children, the Sunday School children, and the Adult Scholars now under our care; and for the conversion of the many thousands who were once under our care, if they know not yet the Lord; or, if they know Him, that they may be kept in His ways and in His truth; or, if they have departed from Him, that they may be reclaimed by Him. I pray, especially also, day by day, for the preachers of the Gospel, whom I seek to assist with means, that they may be helped in the work of the Lord with bodily, mental and vocal strength; that they may be happy in their own souls; that they may be sustained under trial, difficulty, temptation, hardship, and necessity; and that their labours may be abundantly blessed, both in the conversion of sinners and in the building up of the saints, among whom they labour.—The hundreds of various matters, concerning which we feel we are in need, are brought before the Lord. It is expected, concerning them, that God hears us, and that in His own time and way, when and how it would be best for us, He will help us. Answers to prayer are confidently looked for; and answers to prayer are obtained in thousands of instances, year by year, not concerning one or the other thing, but concerning all our various necessities. The spiritual prosperity of the work is greater (we may say confidently, to the praise of God) than even its temporal prosperity, though that astonishes thousands.

4. This, then, esteemed reader, is the position of the work as to funds: suppose the outgoings of the work are after the rate of £1,000 per week, and often they have been much greater still; and suppose little or nothing were to come in for some time; we should not send out circulars, we should have no agents going through the country, no public meetings in various places, nor should we write letters to friends to make known our wants, nor even indirectly give hints to wealthy believers, who are interested in the work, to let them know that we are in need. If we were asked, under such circumstances, how the funds were, we should give no reply whatever whereby an inference could be drawn, that they were low: we should only give ourselves to prayer for means; but we should not trust in the Reports, and expect that they would bring in something, but trust in the Living God, who has the hearts of all in His hands, and to whom all the gold and silver belongs. And this mode we have uniformly pursued, without the least wavering, from the commencement of the Institution. We began in this way, more especially in connexion with the Orphan work, and we have gone on in this way all these years, in order to make ourselves joyfully the helpers of the Church at large, to strengthen the faith of young or weak believers, and to teach saints generally, who know it not already, how blessed it is, really to know God and trust in Him for everything. We have done it, also, to show to an unbelieving world at large, that there is reality in the things of God. As a means to obtain these two ends, I write the Reports; this is the chief reason why I write them.

5, To suppose that we have difficulty only about money would be a mistake; there occur hundreds of other wants and of other difficulties. It is a rare thing that a day comes without some difficulty or some want; but often there are many difficulties and many wants to be met and overcome the same day. All these are met by prayer and faith, our universal remedy, and we have never been confounded. Patient, persevering, believing prayer, offered up to God in the name of the Lord Jesus, has always, sooner or later, brought the blessing. I do not despair, by God’s grace, of obtaining any blessing, provided I can be sure it would be for my real good, and for the glory of God. I relate here, for the benefit of the reader, one instance, out of many, to show what are the difficulties under which we give ourselves to prayer; and under which we are helped.

It was towards the end of November of 1857, when I was most unexpectedly informed that the boiler of our heating apparatus at No. 1, leaked very considerably, so that it was impossible to go through the winter with such a leak.—Our heating apparatus consists of a large cylinder boiler, inside of which the fire is kept, and with which boiler the water pipes, that warm the rooms, are connected. Hot air is also connected with this apparatus.—The boiler had been considered suited for the work of the winter. To suspect that it was worn out, and not to do anything towards replacing it by a new one, and to have said, I will trust in God regarding it, would be careless presumption, but not faith in God. It would be the counterfeit of faith. The boiler is entirely surrounded by brickwork; its state, therefore, could not be known without taking down the brickwork; this, if needless, would be rather injurious to the boiler, than otherwise; and as for eight winters we had had no difficulty in this way, we had not anticipated it now. But suddenly, and most unexpectedly, at the commencement of the winter, this difficulty occurred. What then was to be done? For the children, especially the younger infants, I felt deeply concerned, that they might not suffer, through want of warmth. But how were we to obtain warmth? The introduction of a new boiler would, in all probability, take many weeks. The repairing of the boiler was a questionable matter, on account of the greatness of the leak; but, if not, nothing could be said of it, till the brick-chamber in which it is enclosed, was, at least in part, removed; but that would, at least, as far as we could judge, take days; and what was to be done in the meantime, to find warm rooms for 300 children? It naturally occurred to me, to introduce temporary gas-stoves; but on further weighing the matter, it was found, that we should be unable to heat our very large rooms with gas, except we had many stoves, which we could not introduce, as we had not a sufficient quantity of gas to spare from our lighting apparatus. Moreover, for each of these stoves we needed a small chimney, to carry off the impure air. This mode of heating, therefore, though applicable to a hall, a staircase, or a shop, would not suit our purpose. I also thought of the temporary introduction of Arnott’s stoves; but they would have been unsuitable, requiring long chimneys (as they would have been of a temporary kind) to go out of the windows. On this account, the uncertainty of their answering in our case and the disfigurement of the rooms, led me to give up this plan also. But what was to be done? Gladly would I have paid £100 if thereby the difficulty could have been overcome, and the children not be exposed to suffer for many days from being in cold rooms. At last I determined on falling entirely into the hands of God, who is very merciful and of tender compassion, and I decided on having the brick-chamber opened, to see the extent of the damage, and whether the boiler might be repaired, so as to carry us through the winter.

The day was fixed, when the work men were to come, and all the necessary arrangements were made. The fire, of course, had to be let out while the repairs were going on. But now see. After the day was fixed for the repairs, a bleak North wind set in. It began to blow either on Thursday or Friday before the Wednesday afternoon, when the fire was to be let out. Now came the first really cold weather, which we had in the beginning of that winter, during the first days of December. What was to be done ? The repairs could not be put off. I now asked the Lord for two things, viz., that He would be pleased to change the north wind into a south wind, and that He would give to the workmen "a mind to work"; for I remembered how much Nehemiah accomplished in 52 days, whilst building the walls of Jerusalem, because "the people had a mind to work." Well, the memorable day came. The evening before, the bleak north wind blew still; but, on the Wednesday, the south wind blew: exactly as I had prayed. The weather was so mild that no fire was needed. The brickwork is removed, the leak is found out very soon, the boiler makers begin to repair in good earnest. About half-past eight in the evening, when I was going home, I was informed at the lodge, that the acting principal of the firm, whence the boiler makers came, had arrived to see how the work was going on, and whether he could in any way speed the matter. I went immediately, therefore, into the cellar, to see him with the men, to seek to expedite the business. In speaking to the principal of this, he said in their hearing, "the men will work late this evening, and come very early again tomorrow." "We would rather, Sir," said the leader, "work all night." Then remembered I the second part of my prayer, that God would give the men "a mind to work." Thus it was: by the morning the repair was accomplished, the leak was stopped, though with great difficulty, and within about 30 hours the brick-work was up again and the fire in the boiler; and all the time the south wind blew so mildly, that there was not the least need of a fire.

Here, then, is one of our difficulties which was overcome by prayer and faith.

For nearly three months all went on well; but at the end of February another leak appeared, which was worse than the previous one. But out of this difficulty also we were helped through prayer, so that without any real inconvenience the repairs were accomplished within about 30 hours. Thus we were carried through that winter, and in the spring a new boiler was ordered to be made.

July 1, £185 Being desirous of sending out again at least £300 to labourers in the Gospel, I had been further praying for means this evening, as usual, before leaving the Orphan House. When I came home, I found that a letter had arrived since I left home in the morning, containing a Bank order for £277. 13s. for the work of the Lord, as it might be needed. I took, therefore, the whole of this sum for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.—July 19. From Philadelphia, U. S., £12.

Aug. 7. From Manchester £100, of which the donor wished me to use £50 for the support of the Orphans, and the other £50 was left at my disposal, which I took for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. This is a new donor, from whom I had only yesterday received £10 for the support of the Orphans. Thus the Lord, as the work increases, is also pleased to raise up new donors.

Jan. 15, 1858. For several days past I have especially prayed for more means for Missionary purposes, and for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, as the means in hand are becoming comparatively small, as there are 80 labourers in the Gospel to be helped, and as the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts does not diminish. Now today I have received from a great distance £200, of which the donor kindly wished me to keep £20 for myself, and to use the other as most needed. I have, therefore, taken the whole £180 for Missions and for the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts, and am now again able to send out help through this donation, with what was before in hand.

Feb. 8. The following letter, without a name, containing £25 has been brought to me this afternoon: "Dear and honoured Sir, Accept the enclosed trifle from the writer and admirer of your Christian faith and benevolence, but who, when you read this, will have ceased to be. Please to apply it in any way you may see fit." The confidential servant, who brought me this, said that her mistress had died in December last, and that she herself who had engaged to deliver it into my own hands, had been ill since then. The £25 was taken for Missions and for the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts.

March 16. From South Australia the following letter, "I enclose a draft for £7 10s., which you will please to use, as the Lord may direct you. About a year since you will remember I sent you a draft for £5, and have now increased it by half. I feel much pleasure in sending it, and hope, by the Lord’s help, to increase the amount every year. Blessed be the Lord who has shown me kindness in a strange land! Part of the amount is the first-fruits of increase, the other part is fruit of increase, but not first-fruit."—March 18. From Kent £50 for Missions, with £50 for the Orphans.—This donor had sent me a few times before donations of about £10, but now has thus more largely helped me. The work increases more and more, and with it the expenses; therefore the Lord does in His kindness and faithful love, in answer to my daily prayers, raise up many new donors, and also incline the hearts of those who have given before to give again and again, and many to give more largely than formerly.

April 16. From Nottinghamshire £20 for Missionaries on the Continent.—April 23. From a Christian gentleman, residing on the Continent, £5, with the following letter: "When I visited the Asylum lately, the Orphans made such an impression upon my mind, and the whole work, that I determined to give 10s. for every new pupil I get; and now I have nine, and have never had as many at once before. I enclose the half of £5, and the other half shall follow in another envelope. May the Lord bless it and the whole work! £3 for the Orphans and £2 for Missions." See, esteemed reader, in what a variety of ways the Lord helps me; but all comes from the Lord, without my ever either directly or indirectly asking anyone for anything; nay, by God’s help, I would rather go through the greatest difficulties, hardships, and self-denial, than ask any one but the Living God; yea, I would rather give up the work entirely, than ask either directly or indirectly any human being for anything, in order that the testimony be not hindered, that to trust in the Living God is enough. Be therefore encouraged, dear reader, to do this yourself regarding everything. If it would be for your real good and the glory of God, that you should have any want supplied, whatever that want may be, you may trust in God for the supply, nay, you ought to trust in Him for it; and you will not be confounded. Therefore, with confidence make your requests known to the Lord; be assured that He is able and willing to help you; ask the blessing in the name of the Lord Jesus; continue to wait patiently, yet perseveringly, and it will be granted at last. It may be that you have to wait long for an answer, but it will come at last. I myself have for twenty-nine years been waiting for an answer to prayer concerning a certain spiritual blessing. Day by day have I been enabled to continue in prayer for this blessing. At home and abroad, in this country and in foreign lands, in health and in sickness, however much occupied, I have been enabled, day by day, by God’s help, to bring this matter before Him; and still I have not the full answer yet. Nevertheless, I look for it. I expect it confidently. The very fact that day after day, and year after year, for twenty-nine years, the Lord has enabled me to continue, patiently, believingly, to wait on Him for the blessing, still further encourages me to wait on; and so fully am I assured that God hears me about this matter, that I have often been enabled to praise Him before-hand for the full answer, which I shall ultimately receive to my prayers on this subject. Thus, you see, dear reader, that while I have had hundreds, yea, thousands of answers to prayer, year by year, I have also, like yourself and other believers, the trial of faith concerning certain matters.

But are you living in sin, viz., wilfully, knowingly, going on in an evil course? Are you regarding iniquity in your heart, as the Psalmist calls it ? Psalm. lxvi. 18. If so, the Lord will not hear you. Or are you asking for things to feed your vanity, pride, love of pleasure, etc.; then you are asking amiss, as James says (chap. iv, 3), that you may consume it upon your lusts, and therefore you receive not.

Perhaps you are not a believer in the Lord Jesus? You may walk on in carelessness about the salvation of your soul, or you may depend upon your own goodness and worthiness as a ground of acceptance before God; if so, do not be surprised if you do not obtain blessings, though you make many prayers. Even to such persons God often gives blessings, when, without really knowing Him, they ask for them; but they have no ground for expecting an answer to their prayers: for whatsoever is asked is promised only in the name of the Lord Jesus. To the unbelieving reader, therefore, I would say: flee from the wrath to come! Believe in the Lord Jesus. Trust in Him alone for the salvation of your soul. Depend on what He did and suffered to save sinners, and your sins shall be forgiven, you shall be saved, and then, through faith in His name, you become a child of God, and all the privileges of the children of God, regarding prayer, as well as every other blessing, become yours. See John iii, 16. Acts x, 43. John iii, 36. John i, 12.

Nov. 10, 1858. From Oxfordshire, £15, for Missions and the support of the Orphans.—Respecting this donation I learnt afterwards, that a Christian young lady had this amount left to her as a legacy, and that, two days before she fell asleep in Jesus, she had asked her father, a Christian clergyman, to allow her to send it to me, as she should not want it to buy anything. Before my acknowledgment of the donation had reached her, this young disciple had fallen asleep, to be with the Lord Jesus.

Dec. 8. From a clergyman in Rutlandshire: A gold watch, the bowl of a silver ladle, a barometer, a box of pens, a pair of coat links, a penwiper, a box, and 5 books.—Dec. 9. £5 from a donor as "A thank-offering for the restoration of his sick children."—Dec. 20. From the North of England £25 for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, with £25 for the Orphans—Dec. 31. This evening between 9 and 10 o’clock I received £5 from a Christian tradesman in a small way of business.

Little only, comparatively, had come in for some time, either for these Objects or for the support of the Orphans, whilst very much had been going out. My hope in God was, that He would again cause the stream of His bounty to flow more abundantly, after having exercised my faith and patience. In the mean time, however, we had enough, yea were amply provided for by what the Lord had been pleased to send in previously. The funds for these Objects, however, had been reduced to about £80. Now the £5 given at the close of the year, was the beginning of such an abundant inpouring of means, as the Lord never had given before, during so short a time, as in the two succeeding months of January and February, 1859.

Jan. 1, 1859. This morning I received the following letter from a considerable distance: "Dear Brother in the Lord Jesus,—It has pleased the Lord to send me very unexpectedly £1,000, which He has led me to devote to His service. I am, therefore, happy to send it to you for the Lord’s work in your hands, and should like it divided thus: £500 for the Orphans, £300 for Missionaries at home and abroad, £120 to be divided between the Schools and the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts. Will you please to accept £40 for your own use, and give £40 to Mr. Craik."

The donor received this money "very unexpectedly," and is led to send it to me for the Lord’s work in my hands. Do you perceive the hand of God, dear reader? Do you see how blessed it is to wait upon God? I had no more expectation of receiving from this kind donor £1,000 on Jan. 1, 1859, than any of my readers have of receiving £1,000 from me, on the day they read this. Thus did the Lord begin to cause His stream of bounty to flow more widely, more deeply, and continuously for two months than had been the case for the twenty-five years previous. Reference has been made already to several large donations in writing about the income for the Building Fund, and further reference will now be made to other donations, especially when writing about the income for the support of the Orphans.—The £1,000 just referred to was especially refreshing to my spirit, because my prayer had been continually, that I might be able to do much for missionary brethren.—On Jan. 1st I received also from Guildford £3 2s. 10d. for Missions, and from Sherborne £1 for Missions. Also £1 from a Bristol donor for Missions.—On Jan. 2. I received £1 from a very aged and poor Christian man, which was taken for these objects. A large donation for him.—On Jan. 4th, receiving £7,000, I took for these objects £2,000, as I desired to the utmost, to do what I could for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.

Feb. 1. It has been already stated in writing about the Building Fund, that on this day I received a donation of £1,700, and another of £1,000, of which I took for these objects £1,000 and £500—Thus I had obtained the full answer to my prayer, brought before the Lord more than a hundred times, that I might be enabled during this period to do as much for missionary objects, and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts as during the last period.—I had thus means even to a considerably greater extent, than during the former period.—How precious it is to trust in God, really to trust in Him! Only try this way, dear reader, and you will know the sweetness and blessedness of it for yourself. But there must be more than merely saying I trust in God. Your heart must really look to Him alone; and, if you do so, then, contrary to all natural prospects, you will find how able and how willing He is to help you. As already stated, I had no natural prospect of being able to accomplish as much, regarding these objects, especially missionary operations, as before; natural prospects were all against it; yet God, the rich Almighty God, whose resources never fail, who is always the Living God, the same Faithful and Unchangeable God, was able to help me: and to Him I betook myself in my need: He did help me: and in Him I desire to make my boast. So fully is my heart assured of His ability and willingness to help me, that, by His grace, no amount of need, difficulties, or natural improbabilities, would discourage me, if I could only see that He would have me to act, and that my acting would be for His honour and glory. To such a conclusion, however, I desire to come most slowly, most patiently, most prayerfully, and only upon Scriptural ground. In this way I desire grace to proceed. The very opposite to rashness or enthusiasm, is what I desire to aim after; and having once come to the decision, that it is God’s will I should act, I have no ground to fear any difficulty.

Feb. 8. Received the following letter with £25, from a distance: "I enclose Bank notes to the amount of £25 for your disposal in the blessed services that you are engaged in, also hoping, at the same time, that you will not hesitate to spend it upon yourself and yours, if you think fit.—It is part of my little property which last year I dedicated to Him who has given me much blessing, and who has crowned me with many mercies in our blessed Lord and Saviour, leading me through a troubled and sinful youth into the peace of His children in Christ: so that for all these mercies, including increase of health after my coming of age last year, I wish to give some expression of my gratitude, as an earnest also that I feel all I have and all I am is His, who hath loved me and given Himself for me," etc. The letter of this young disciple refreshed my spirit. I took of this sum £15 for Missions and the Bible and Tract Fund, and the remaining £10 for the support of the Orphans.—Feb. 14. This evening I had drawn a cheque for £55, and another for £220 About 9 o’clock was put into my hand a little packet, containing £75 in bank notes, 29 old guinea pieces, 10 old half guinea pieces, and 3 old seven shilling pieces, with the following lines, from an entire stranger, living at a considerable distance,whose name was not even given: "The enclosed is from a steward of the Lord, whose wish is, that Mr. Müller shall retain £10 for himself, and that the residue be equally divided for the support of the Orphans and for Missions." About half an hour, after having received that valuable packet, when I came home, I found the following letter from a distance of about 500 miles, enclosing an order for £300 "Dear and honoured Sir, I thought of you not long ago, and recommended a friend to apply to you, and intended to send you nothing.—A few days ago a sad thing was told me about a sick person I had been visiting, and I determined to send you £100 for Missionary purposes, £10 for your own expenses, and £40 to be applied as might be most needful. This night a happy letter has reached me, so that I can offer the gifts I bring to God’s altar. Matt. v, 23, 24. Therefore, as I have it to spare, in thankfulness to God, I add another £150 for the Missionaries. I give to them in preference to other objects, because, in the case before mentioned, I have felt how precious is one soul saved. We seem to have nothing to compare it with: to be turned from darkness unto light, and from the power of Satan unto God, and to have an inheritance among them that are sanctified in His kingdom, through the Saviour. Then, how precious the office of the minister seems! If in temporal things, which are but as dung, it is blessed to give, what a precious thing to minister the things of God, whereby a soul may believe and be saved. Dear Sir, according to the commandment I send this, and remain, in the name of the Lord Jesus, * * * *." Observe! 1, I had paid out much that very evening, and the Lord sent in again much. 2, Both these donors are entire strangers to me. 3, In both cases large donations were again sent for Missionary objects, about which I had been praying so much previously. Of this £290 I took £250 for Missionary objects, and £40 for the Bible and Tract Fund.

Feb. 16. From Berkshire £25 for Missions, with £25 for the support of the Orphans.—Feb. 26. From Cornwall £2 for Missions, £1 for the Tract Fund, and £2 for the Orphans. The donor, in sending the £5, writes, that it is sent in order to lay up treasure in heaven.—Have you considered, dear Christian Reader, that you may as really lay up treasure in heaven as the men of the world lay up treasure on earth? And, if so, do you do so?—On the same day I received from Glasgow a draft for £20, with the following letter: "Being deeply impressed that it is the duty of the children of God to promote the circulation of the gospel in India, China and other places, which are now open to the Missionary, and having confidence in the labourers whom you are led to select, I send you £10 to assist in their support. I also send £7 for the Orphans and £3 for yourself, which please to accept; and I pray that our Father in heaven may bless the offering for the purposes that they are respectively sent."

March 13. The late P. C., Esquire, of Clifton, in a will dated April 24, 1849, left to the "Scriptural Knowledge Institution, together with its Orphan Establishment," the sum of £100 free of legacy duty. This gentleman, whom I never saw, whose name I never heard whilst living, died a few months since, and this £100 was paid to me on March 13th by his executor. I took £50 for these objects, and £50 for the support of the Orphans.—See, dear reader, in this legacy another instance of the way in which God helps me!—March 16. From a hardworking man in Yorkshire £3 4s. This Christian man has sent me perhaps thirty similar donations, and many pounds yearly I receive from him.—March 21. From Yorkshire £20 for foreign Missionaries.

April 1. From the neighbourhood of Adelaide, South Australia, £3 and £2—Apr. 4. From Ireland £12—Apr. 5. From Manchester 13s. This donor has, periodically, sent me many times the same amount, which is the fruit of self-denial.—Apr. 9. From Wiltshire £10 from an aged and comparatively poor disciple, who has of late repeatedly sent me donations, considering, I suppose, that the privilege of using his means for the Lord may be but short.

May 5. From Port Elizabeth, Africa, £5—May 7. From London £10 for Missions in India.—May 24. Anonymously from the neighbourhood of Exmouth £10 for Missions.

I have thus, out of 828 donations for these Objects, which were received between May 26, 1858, and May 26, 1859, referred to a few as specimens, to show in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to supply me with means. I receive donations not only from England, Ireland and Scotland, but also from the East Indies, the West Indies, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Nova Scotia, Canada, France, Switzerland, Italy, Germany, etc. For the most part these donors are entire strangers to me; I am not personally acquainted with the twentieth part of them and in many instances the donations are given anonymously, and that not merely in the case of small but even large sums. Out of the 828 sums entered as donations for these Objects in the account books, between May 26, 1858, and May 26, 1859, I find that 452 were under £1—115 of £1—78 between £1 and £2— 119 between £2 and £5—32 between £5 and £10— 12 between £10 and £20—10 between £20 and £50—one between £50 and £100—three of £100, one of £150, one of £290, one of £420, one of £500, one of £1,000, and one of £2,000

I now go on, giving a few specimens of the donations, received for the first four Objects of the Institution, between May 26, 1859, and May 26, 1860.

When the year, just now referred to, began, I had for these objects £2,009 11s. 2½d. in hand, a balance far greater than I ever had had before. This arose not from unwillingness to spend the means with which the Lord had been pleased to intrust me, but chiefly from the fact that some large donations had come in during the last part of the previous year; and I had not, as a steward who desires to act in the fear of God, had opportunities brought before me, to spend all. But much as the balance was, all the various schools, directly or indirectly connected with the Institution, required means; the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, needed much, in order to enter every suitable open door; and lastly, and especially, the 91 preachers of the Gospel in various parts of the world, on my list on May 26, 1859, required a large sum to aid them. All these various objects, therefore, needed so much, that the balance, large as it was, would have lasted but a short time, had not the Living God, who has been my helper from the beginning, and to whom I have looked alone, opened; in answer to our prayers, His bountiful hands, and sent in more, before the balance was expended; so that, though without any human probability of meeting even one-half of the probable expenses in connexion with these objects, not only were we able to meet the whole; but, also, so bountifully God helped, that though the expenses were £1,584 7s. 3d. more than during the preceding year, we had not only enough, but even a larger balance was left than at the end of the previous year. I will now refer to a few of the donations given for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.

May 31, 1859. A visitor from Staffordshire, an entire stranger to me, went through the New Orphan House No. 2, and afterwards desired to see me. He gave me £100, the disposal of which he left to me. I took it for Missions.—Thus the Lord is beginning to answer my prayers again, for means for missionary objects, during this period also.

June 13. From Cardiff, for these objects, £30—June 29. From Kent £50 for the Orphans, with £50 for these objects.—July 13. From Limerick £15 10s.—July 22. From Cumberland £20—July 26. From a Christian Nobleman £10 for Missions, with £10 for the support of the Orphans.—July 28. From Philadelphia £10— From India, for labourers in the Gospel, £75—Aug. 8. Received from Somersetshire £100 with these words, as to the application of the money: "£50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £25 for foreign missionaries, the remainder either for your own expenditure, or for any object most near your heart at present." I took this latter £25 one half for the circulation of Tracts and the other half for foreign missionaries.—Nov. 7. £100 from London, with these words, "Dear Sir, I enclose a cheque for £100, in the name of the Lord Jesus, to whom I owe myself and all that I am and have. May He bless its use in any of the objects which you have in hand. I am most affectionately and obliged for His sake, * * * *." I took the whole for Missions.—Nov. 8. Left at the New Orphan House, No. 2, by a Gloucestershire donor, £20—Nov. 9. Received from Manchester £3 5s. 9d., being small amounts set apart for every order and every payment received in the donor’s business.—Nov. 19. £50 from London, as "A thank-offering for having received deliverance from an impending trouble, in a most providential way," £30 for the Orphans, £15 for Missions, and £5 for the Bible Fund.

Dec. 5. £2 with this letter: "I have for some years past paid £2 per annum for an assurance on my life, in case of accident; but, after reading your last Report, which I purchased at the Orphan Houses a short time since, I resolved to send you the premium, which I intend doing annually, believing that by paying the premium to the Lord, He will, in His kind providence, protect me from accident. You will please to appropriate it to the object you most require it for, etc."—Dec. 7. £1, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, having discontinued insuring my horse, (feeling that it is good and right to trust in the Lord for all things), I enclose the amount, which I should have paid as premium for the ensuing year, as a thank-offering to Almighty God for His past mercies towards me; which you will please to take one half for the Orphans, and the other half for missions, etc."—Dec. 21. From Jamaica £4 for missions, £4 for the Orphans, and £2 for myself.—From Norwich £5 "The donor had asked it of the Lord, for this work, two or three weeks."—Dec. 24. £50 from Lancashire "As a thank-offering for mitigation of great sufferings."—Dec. 29. From Worthing £10 for the circulation of Bibles and Testaments.—Dec. 30. From the North of England £25, with £25 for the Orphans.

Jan. 31, 1860. On this day I received a donation of £3,000, of which I took for these objects £2,000. Day by day, during this period also, I had been asking the Lord for means for these objects; and day by day I had been entreating Him that He would be pleased to enable me to accomplish, during this period, as much as during the former one, in the way of circulating the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and in aiding missionary operations, though I had no natural prospect whatever of being able to do so. My eyes were alone directed to the Living God, who year after year, for many years past, had allowed me to increase the operations of these three objects, notwithstanding the continual increase of expense in connexion with the Orphan work; and thus I fully expected, though all appearance was against it, that during this period also we should be again helped by the Living God. Think, then, Christian reader, how great was my spiritual refreshment, when, by this one donation, in a great measure, I saw these my daily prayers being again answered.—In like manner may you, in your sphere of service, in your family affairs, in your business, in your profession, in your various temporal or spiritual necessities, have your prayers answered. Make but trial of this precious way. I have, since the year 1830, walked in this road, looking to God alone for every thing; and He has never failed me. Prayer and faith are my universal remedies under every difficulty, and under every necessity; and though I have daily difficulties and trials, He ever helps me. These are not merely regarding money, but concerning hundreds of other things; but the Lord helps continually so that, year after year, as I prove in my happy experience the Lord’s readiness to show Himself strong on behalf of those who trust in Him, my heart, by His grace, becomes more and more ready to trust in Him for every thing, and under every circumstance, even the most difficult and the most trying; for my heart believes, what His word declares, that He has almighty power, infinite wisdom, and infinite love, which He exercises concerning all those who believe in the Lord Jesus.

May 14, 1860. From Sussex £100—May 22. £2000 for these objects, whereby the Lord allows me the great joy of entering upon the new period with a considerable balance in hand for these objects.—May 26. From Manchester £5, being small amounts set apart on each order, and on each payment received in business.—From Somerset East, Cape of Good Hope, £5.

I have thus, out of the 999 donations received for these objects, between May 26, 1859, and May 26, 1860, referred to a few. Out of these 999 different sums, entered in the account books, I find that 328 were under 5s., 171 above 5s. and not exceeding 10s., 177 above 10s. and not exceeding £1, 92 above £1 and not exceeding £2, 147 above £2 and not exceeding £5, 40 above £5 and not exceeding £10, 19 above £10 and not exceeding £20, 7 above £20 and under £50, 5 of £50, 1 of £55, 3 of £60, 1 of £75, 2 of £80, 4 of £100, and 2 of £2,000.

I will now further refer to a very few of the donations, received between May 26, 1860, and May 26, 1861, for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund; but request the reader kindly to keep in mind, that the operations of all these various Objects were enlarged year by year, and that, therefore, year by year more means were required. The preachers of the Gospel, at Home and Abroad, for instance, aided by the funds of this Institution, amounted already to One Hundred and One.

June 18. From the neighbourhood of London, from a Christian Gentleman, £10, with £10 for the Orphans. The donor, when sending this donation, was in health; yet the last time, that he used his pen, was when he wrote to me. Before my acknowledgment reached him, he had entered into the presence of his Lord. Pause, dear reader. Are you prepared to be called hence so suddenly, so unexpectedly? Do you trust alone in the atonement and perfect obedience of the Lord Jesus as the ground of acceptance before God? This worthy donor did so, and therefore it was well with him, as it will be well with all, who, like him, rest on this sure foundation; but if it is not so with you, let me earnestly beseech you, dear reader, to flee from the wrath to come. Ponder carefully John iii, 14—18, 36. Acts x, 43. Romans x, 9, 10.—There is also to the believing reader a word of admonition in the fact, just related, even that we should work while it is day; for the night cometh when no man can work. How very soon may all the precious opportunities, we now have, to labour or spend for the Lord, be taken from us.

July 11. From Switzerland £8—July 16. From Oporto 5s. for Missions, with 5s. for the Orphans.—July 23. From a Christian nobleman in London £10, with £10 for the Orphans.—July 24. From Glasgow £20 for Indian and £10 for other missionaries.—July 25. Received a cheque for £58 9s., with the following statement: "Upon reading your Report last year, I determined, the Lord helping me, to dedicate a fixed portion, or rather a per centage, upon what the Lord blessed me with, to certain purposes, connected with His cause; your Orphan work and Missionary work to receive a proportion of the per centage. I have during the past year at three times sent you £30; the enclosed is your further proportion, as I then determined."

Aug. 2. From Scotland £100 "for the use of the Lord’s servants, who labour in the Gospel without charge."—Aug. 3. £50 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."—Aug. 7. From Cornwall £20 for missionaries in foreign lands.—Aug. 11. From Scotland £40 for missions.

My prayer had been from the beginning of this period, from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, day by day, that the Lord would enable me during that year again, contrary to natural prospects, to accomplish as much for missionary objects, as during the previous year, though I had then been able to expend more than ever before. When praying thus, I knew well that I had no natural reason to expect as much as during the previous period; but I hoped in God, looked to Him for an answer, and fully believed, that, as for about 20 years He had enabled me to enlarge this object more and more with every succeeding year, so He would during this year also grant unto me this honour and privilege. How precious and refreshing therefore to me, dear reader, were such donations as are mentioned in the last paragraph!

Aug. 18. £60 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."—Had another precious answer to prayer for means for missions, in particular, by the reception of the following information: "My Heavenly Father has been pleased again to send me unexpectedly £1,000, which He has given me the desire to give to His service. I am happy to send you £800 for the Lord’s work in your hands. I have kept the £200 for the Lord’s work in L—. Will you please to divide it thus: £300 for the Orphans, £300 for missionaries, £120 to be divided between the Bible—, Tract—and School Fund. Will you kindly accept £40 for your own use, and give £40 to Mr. C."—Aug. 25. Received £10, with the following letter. "My dear Brother, This time last year I wrote to you under the initials of A. G. W., telling you that I felt I ought to systematize my gifts to God’s work, having been led to this conclusion from the account of the merchant who did so. Since that time I have been enabled to give a certain proportion of all my receipts, and I have not been the loser temporally; for God has so prospered me, that my means this year have exceeded that of last by more than I have set apart for the Lord’s use; and I have still the greater satisfaction, that I am permitted to do something in the Lord’s vineyard. Etc."—On the same day was received from Philadelphia, U.S. £8—Aug. 31 From Brighton £25, with £25 for the Orphans, as "A thank-offering to the Lord, for what He has done for the donor’s soul."

Sep. 8. From Dublin £13—Sep. 10. From Ireland £30—Sep. 18. From Cornwall £13, "for the English Servants of Christ, labouring among the heathen."—Sep. 24. From Limerick £16—From Dublin £100 for "Labourers in the Gospel at home and abroad, and the distribution of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts."—Day by day am I praying for means for these objects, and I do not wait upon the Lord in vain. He helps me.—Sep. 27. £50 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."

Nov. 9. £50 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."—Dec. 21. £20 From the same donor.—Dec. 31. £20. From the same donor.

Jan. 12. 1861. £30 from the same donor.—Feb. 8. £30 from the same donor.—Feb. 20. £30 again from the same individual.—Feb. 26. Received two donations of £500 and £700 from different donors, which being left to my disposal, were taken for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund. Thus the Lord is pleased to answer my daily prayer, for means for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts; and to enable me to enlarge missionary operations yet further and further.—March 21. £30 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."—Apr. 17. £30 from the same donor.—Apr. 18. From Ireland were sent the following valuable articles, to be sold for the spread of the Holy Scriptures: A gold necklet set with diamonds and rubies, a gold necklet set with diamonds and emeralds, a large gold brooch set with five pearls and four diamonds, a large gold brooch set with two carbuncles, a gold opal brooch, a gold bracelet set with emeralds and diamonds, a gold ring set with opal and four diamonds.—It is remarkable that, shortly after the receipt of this donation, a precious and large opening was brought before me for the spread of the Holy Scriptures in Italy.—Apr. 27 From a military gentleman at Fort Hard, Cape of Good Hope, £16 17s. 4d.—May 2. From Glasgow £56, with £14 for myself.—May 3. From Cardiff £15—From Hamilton, Canada West, £2 10s.—From Clanfield £12 6s. 11d., "being the profits of a missionary basket during the last 11 months."—May 25. £50 "From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven."

I have thus, out of the 1342 donations, received for these objects, from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, referred to some. The reader may ask, and what was accomplished by the funds, given year after year for these first four Objects of the Institution? I reply, that, for instance, in the year from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, (though the work was then small in comparison with what it is now, in 1874, while I am preparing this volume for the press), even then there were four Day-Schools entirely supported, and ten assisted. One Sunday School was entirely supported, and twelve were assisted; and one Adult School was entirely supported. Further, during the year referred to, 3017 Bibles, 1732 Testaments, 42 copies of the Psalms, and 66 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were circulated. Further, during that year 116 preachers of the Gospel, at Home and Abroad, were assisted by the funds of the Institution, and on this object alone was expended during that year the sum of £5,527 5s. 2d. Lastly, during that year there were circulated above Two Millions and Seven Hundred Thousand Tracts. The total of the expenditure for these four Objects, irrespective of the Orphan Work, amounted during that year to £7,883 17s. 3d. I will now refer to a few of the donations, received during the year, in order to show to the reader the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means, to meet these expenses.

At the commencement of the period, May 27, 1861, I had left for these objects a balance of £1,067 0s. 1d. This was the visible treasure to go to for meeting the necessities of the various schools, in connexion with the Institution, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for the Missionary operations, which were assisted out of the funds of the Institution. I needed therefore about seven times as much more, to be able to accomplish even as much as during the previous year, for which I had no natural prospect whatever, But, while the visible treasure was but small, comparatively, the invisible one, to be drawn from, through the instrumentality of prayer and faith, was, as ever, inexhaustible; and to this invisible treasure, in the possession of my never failing Almighty Friend and Helper, I looked, and to Him alone. And now hear, dear Reader, how we were helped with means for these objects during another year.

May 27, 1861. On this very first day of the new period I have received from Cambridgeshire £5 as "The first fruits of a legacy;" from Aska in India £24; from Perth 3s., and from two Bristol donors 3s. and 2s. 6d. This I take as God’s earnest, that during this year also He will be pleased to help me with means for these Four Objects.—Aug. 26. From a believer in business £10, with the following letter: "My dear Brother, It is now nearly 14 years since I commenced business, and in looking back upon that time, I feel I have abundant cause for praising the Lord, for the many mercies bestowed upon me, both temporal and spiritual. Soon after commencing business, I began to give out for the Lord about 5 per cent., and I found He blessed me in the business, and prospered me, and then I gave 10 per cent. for the Lord’s work. After this I felt so happy in my soul, and constrained by the love of Christ, to go forward to 20 per cent., and now I feel very happy to give 25 per cent. for the Lord; and as, constrained by love to Jesus, I give out, so the Lord gives back. He has blessed me far above all my expectations. I do desire to say it to the praise of His holy name, that I have felt the Lord more precious to my soul than ever before.—I have it in my heart to send you a mite for the work of God in your hands, and herewith enclose you £10, half for the Orphans, and half for Missions. I feel it to be a sweet privilege that God has given me the means, and He makes me very happy in giving. Etc."—Aug. 30. From Lockerbie £10 10s. for "Evangelization in Italy, or for Italian Bibles, the undivided Word of God."

Sept. 3. From a clergyman near Exeter £1 10s. for Missions, £3 for the Orphans, and 10s. for myself.—Sept. 4. From Belfast, for Foreign Missions, a gold watch, 2 old silver watches, a piece of a gold pin, a purse, containing 31 old silver coins, 2 guinea pieces, and 3 half guinea pieces.—Sept. 14. From an officer of the Madras Army, at Jubbulpore, £5 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £5 for Missions, and £5 for the Orphans.—Sept. 20. From Adelaide, South Australia, £50—Oct. 23. From Holland a Dutch Bank Note for 200 forms (£16 13s. 4d.)—Day by day I am asking God for means for these Objects, and especially for means for labourers in the Gospel, whom I seek to help. How refreshing, therefore, to receive means from all parts of the world. In the last mentioned instance it came from a Noble Lady in Holland, whose heart God had moved to remember this work.—On the same day I received from the neighbourhood of Adelaide, South Australia, from a Christian German Lady £1 for Indian Missions, £1 for the Bible Fund, and £1 for the Orphans; together with £1 14s. and 6s. from other donors, for the Orphans. Before my receipt could reach the donors, the German Lady had entered into her rest, having since her conversion been actively employed in winning souls for the Lord. In going over my account books, whilst writing this, I find the names of not a few donors, who are no more in the body. Let that speak to your heart and mine, esteemed Reader, and let us seek to live and labour for God, while we have the opportunity of doing so. We have but one life on earth, and that one life is a very brief one. Remember, also, that there are certain privileges connected with this life on earth, which we shall not enjoy even in heaven.

Nov. 8. Last evening, though I had only a balance of £389 14s. 1d. remaining for these Objects, I had portioned out £156 for Missions, and proposed in a few days to send at least £200 more to foreign labourers in the Gospel, trusting in the Lord to replenish the funds. Now observe the Lord’s kindness! The first letter I opened this morning, contained a Bank order for £150, with these words: "My dear Brother Müller, I have at times, for years, been much desiring again to help with a little cash the work of the Lord in your hands, and now cheerfully do so, hoping the inclosed £150 will be an acceptable offering to the Lord Jesus our Redeemer. Surely, in our right minds, we must all say, ‘Of thine own have we given thee.’" Etc—I received besides, for Missions £5 from Dublin, from Clifton £5; also from the neighbourhood of Liskeard £2 10s. for Missions. Thus £168 10s. came at once for these Objects to replenish the funds.

Nov. 9. Saturday evening. When this week commenced, I received only £3 19s. by the first delivery. Shortly after there came in the course of my reading, through the Holy Scriptures, Isaiah xxvi, 4, "Trust ye in the Lord for ever; for in the Lord Jehovah is everlasting strength."—I laid aside my bible, fell on my knees, and prayed thus: I believe that there is everlasting strength in the Lord Jehovah, and I do trust in Him; help me, O Lord, for ever to trust in Thee. Be pleased to give me more means this day, and much this week, though only so little now has come in.—That same day, Nov. 3rd, I received £10 from Surbiton, £5 from a donor residing in Clifton, £2 from a Bristol donor, and in the course of the week altogether £457 came in; thus Jehovah again proved, that in Him is everlasting strength, and that He is worthy to be trusted.—Dear believing Reader, seek but in the same way to trust in the Lord, if you are not in the habit of doing so already, and you will find, as I have found thousands of times, how blessed it is. But if the reader should be yet going on in carelessness about his soul, and therefore be without the knowledge of God and His dear Son, then the first, and most important thing, such a one has to do, is to trust in the Lord Jesus for the salvation of his soul, that he may be reconciled to God, and obtain the forgiveness of his sins. Without this trusting in the work and suffering of the Lord Jesus for salvation, there will be little, if any, real trust in God for other things; for it is faith in Jesus which gives happy confidence with reference to God.

Jan. 14, 1862. From a Missionary box at Newton Abbot £2 4s. 8d. On this day I received also a donation of £2,000 (already mentioned in connexion with the income for the Building Fund), of which I took £1,200 for these objects. This donation has been a great help to me with regard to them, and is the precious fruit of hundreds of prayers, which day by day, during the whole of this period, have been again brought before God, viz., that I might be able to accomplish still more regarding Missionary objects, and respond to every suitable application for Bibles and Tracts being sent out gratuitously, which hitherto invariably has been the case. The Lord be magnified for thus helping me, and bringing me in this way nearer the full answer to my prayers!— Jan. 17. From Boston, United States, £2 for Foreign Missions.—Jan. 20. From Cumberland £30—Jan. 25. From the missionary box in a meeting room at Weymouth 10s.—From Yorkshire £10—Jan. 28. From Cheltenham £5—Received also £2,500, of which I took for these objects £1,500, and thus I have the precious prospect of having the desire of my heart fully granted, as to the extension of operations in connection with them during the present period. Not a single day has passed away, since May 27, 1861, on which I have not requested the Lord to send means for them, besides, especially, asking His blessing to rest upon them spiritually; and fully have I expected answers, though I had no natural prospect of obtaining them. How precious, how prosperous, how truly easy, how truly pleasant is the path of faith! But it must be real trust in God; full trust in Him. Merely to say, we trust in Him, and in the time of trial turn aside into bye-ways, forbidden paths, will never bring the blessing. Remember this, dear Reader. It is said by one who has proved the blessedness of this way since 1829, though he knew it not for more than four years after his conversion, but walked the common road, often, yea almost habitually acting, in these matters, like those who walk by sight and sense.—Feb. 24. The following letter was received from a Christian physician, enclosing a donation of £10 "Dear Brother, I enclose you a Bank order for £10, to apply as you think fit. I will give you a short account of myself, and how the Lord has dealt with me. When a young man, I felt myself to be a sinner, and became very religious; but my religion was the religion of terror, not repentance unto life. As might be expected, under temptation I fell into sin, and sinned with less compunction than before: all my desire was, to lead a respectable outer life, and that by no means a religious one. About mid-life, when I was married, I began again to think seriously. It was good and respectable to be pious, I thought, to attend church, and have the worship of God in the family. And well I remember, on the first day of my married life I read the 24th chapter of Joshua, and in self reliance took his words, ‘As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.’ This was the religion of duty, and signally failed; for in a few years I gave up the worship of God in the family, and sinned more grievously than ever, nay, sneered and scoffed at all marked godliness. The good Shepherd all the time was seeking me, to bring me into the true fold, by teaching me the unsatisfying nature of all sinful pleasure, and all earthly good. After a severe attack of illness, upwards of two years ago, however, the Lord broke up the fallow ground of my heart in a wonderful manner. I came out of that illness with a yearning after some loving object to fill it I could not account for. My wife, my family, every loveable object about me, or wherever I could find one, I took to my heart with a depth of feeling to which I had been hitherto unaccustomed. I loved every loveable thing, and hated everything sinful. It was God saying unto me, ‘My Son, give me thine heart!’ Still, however, sin and Satan, for a time, were too strong for me, and I again fell into evil. This was, however, with great distaste to myself. At last, Jesus, the beloved One, came and occupied the aching void of my heart. I saw God, the loving Father, giving Jesus to be the sin-bearer—my sin-bearer, and found peace and joy in believing. Thus in my life having passed through the religion of terror, the religion of duty (those false religions of multitudes), I came to the religion of Love. I apprehended the love of God in Christ Jesus, reconciling the world unto Himself, me unto Himself, not imputing unto me my trespasses. How simple, how satisfying now to me, seems the plan of salvation, as laid down in the Word; and how strange it seems, that I did not for thirty-five long years see or comprehend it!

In my days of darkness I was a great admirer of flowers, and had several houses put up, in order to cultivate them. There was a deal of self-love in this. I liked to be spoken about as possessor of a fine garden and fine plants; flower culture was my hobby, their possession my idol. The ten pounds sent is the price of one of the plant houses I had; I had it taken down and sold to a friend. The money sent to you, as to God, is therefore the price of an idol cast down by His mighty power, as He Himself, I trust, now dwells in its room in the temple of my heart. ‘Thanks be to God for His unspeakable gift!’ Oh! the unsearchable riches of Christ. Believe me very affectionately yours, * * * * M.D."

I have given this deeply interesting letter at full length, in the hope that some of the readers may be benefited by the experience of this Christian physician, and that, if they have not yet found the forgiveness of their sins, and power over sin, through faith in our Lord Jesus, they may with all earnestness seek after it.

March 3. From Hong Kong, China, £20 "Not given out of the donor’s abundance, but because he loves the work of the Lord, and desires now to live to His praise rather than to trust to any future ability."—From a professional gentleman in London £15 with the following letter: "My dear Brother in the Lord, Since I last wrote to you I have continued to set apart, for our Master’s use, a fixed proportion of my income every month; but I find the claims around me so many, that a long time has elapsed since I have been able to send any portion of the sum to you, though your work certainly has a prior claim; for it was from one of your Reports that I first heard the suggestion.—I find the habit a most valuable one, serving to remind one continually of the responsibility that the possession of money brings, and so, in some measure, to arrest the tendency which I fear we all have, of setting the affections on the worthless treasures of this world, as they increase, instead of on those which are laid up for us in heaven. With sincere respect and affection, yours in the Lord, * * * *."

March 8. Anonymously, a One Hundred Pound Note from Liverpool with the following words: "For Missionary purposes, as Mr. Müller may see good to apportion it."—Day by day I am intreating the Lord to send me means for this object, and I do not wait upon Him in vain. My prayer has been again daily, during this period also, that I may be permitted to accomplish still more in connexion with Missionary objects, than during any of the former periods, and I look for, and confidently expect, the answer to these prayers.

May 4. During the last two days had come in only about the twentieth part as much as had been expended. When I thought of the greatness of the outgoings, and the smallness of the amount which had come in I remembered the words in Isaiah xxvi, 4, "Trust ye in the Lord for ever: for in the Lord Jehovah is everlasting strength;" which portion had come before me some time since; and my heart responded: "In the Lord Jehovah is everlasting strength, and in him I will trust." A few minutes after, I received a letter from Canada, containing a Bank order for £100 currency, or £81 9s. sterling as a thank-offering from believing parents, that their daughter was brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus in answer to prayer, when very ill, and was not removed before she knew the Lord. "Now, for this grace," the father writes, "we desire to praise Him—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—one God, and, as portion of a thank-offering to the Lord for this grace I send you £100 currency, or £81 9s. sterling, out of that which He has given me, all which is His. I send it to you, because I think it honouring to the Lord, whom you trust; and in such way the servant may do his Master’s will; for if you have been by grace called to work in faith, His followers are called to honour him, by sending of that which is His, to you, wherewith to work. Receive, therefore, as from the Lord, this money for use for Missions, Orphan Schools, or such other work as you may think will at the time most honour the Lord, and seem most directly in answer to prayer," &c. I took of this sum, £50 for Missions and the Bible and Tract Fund, and £31 9s. for the support of the Orphans.—The next letter was from Ireland, containing £15 for the Lord’s work, and £5 for myself—May 10. "From several brethren in Christ at Sealkote, Punjab," £5—"As a thank-offering from a widow, whose only son has begun to read the Word of God, and which she regards as an answer to prayer," £5—May 22. I had within the last two or three days gone over the whole list of the Labourers in the Gospel whom I seek to assist with means, and had portioned out £1,005 to be sent to them. This left but a small balance in hand for these Objects. This evening, before I left the Orphan Houses I had begun sending out the money, and had also asked the Lord that He would be pleased to increase the balance. These two occupations had been among the last I was engaged in. When I came home, I found £200 had arrived from a very great distance, but the donor desires no reference to be made to the place whence the money comes, but simply to state that it is "From a friend." The whole of this £200 I took for these Objects, and thus our balance is already somewhat increased.—May 24. "A birthday memorial from an aged pilgrim," £20.

I have thus, out of the 1,222 donations, received for these objects, from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, referred to some.

When brought to the close of the year, I found the Lord had fully answered the prayers, which day by day, during the whole year, had been brought before Him with reference to means; so that all the demands in connexion with the various Schools, either entirely or in part supported by the funds of the Institution, could be amply met; further, every suitable application for gratuitous supplies of Bibles, New Testaments, and Tracts, though there were many hundreds of such, could be fully responded to; and, with regard to Missionary operations, I was able, during the year, to expend more than during any previous year since the work began, on March 5, 1834. I, therefore, praise and adore and magnify the Lord, for condescending again so bountifully to answer our prayers, though we had no natural prospect whatever, at the beginning of the period, that it would be so, but the very reverse.

The following pages give now a few instances, how from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, it pleased the Lord to help us with means but, as the narrative proceeds, these instances must become fewer on account of the size of the book.

Aug. 25, 1862. From London £20, with the following letter from the donor, who is a professional gentleman: "My dear Brother in Christ, On the eve of my leaving town for my holiday, I am putting my house in order; and, on looking through my accounts, I find that I have £20 due to the Lord, in addition to what I have found means of giving during the last few months. I enclose a cheque for that amount, as I am indebted to your Reports for the hint, which has led me to adopt this most valuable habit of laying aside a fixed proportion of all my earnings for the Lord’s work. May our Father continue to work by you and with you, and dwell richly in you, is the earnest prayer of your affectionate brother, * * * *."

Sept. 3. £35 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Oct. 25. £20 from the same donor.—Nov. 19. £50 from the same donor.—Nov. 28. Received £14, which, being left at my disposal, I put to the fund for these objects. The donation was accompanied by the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I hereby send you £12, the amount which I have still in hand to give away, at Five per cent. on my gross receipts, as well as £2, the sum which would be required to insure my corn and stock from fire, as my God has given me faith to believe, that everything is in His hand, and nothing happens without His divine permission. Oh! to have more faith. These two sums together make £14, which please to use as you see best. I remain, yours very affectionately in Jesus, * * * *." When this letter arrived, our fund for Missions, Bible and Tract Circulation and the Schools was exhausted, as I had expended all I could in helping labourers in the Gospel, and in sending out Bibles and Tracts.

Dec. 17. £35 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Jan. 1, 1863. As repeatedly, since May 27, 1862, the funds for these objects had been exhausted, and the Lord then had kindly again sent means; so, when this day commenced, there was only £47 left. Now see how the Lord helped. I received today, from a distance of several hundred miles, £100 for Missions, £40 for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, £20 for the Orphans, with £13 6s. 6d. for myself.—Also from a working party at Newton Abbot £3 for Foreign Missions.—Jan. 2. Received altogether today £36 3s. 9½d. for these objects in 17 donations.—Jan. 5. Received from the neighbourhood of London £24 15s. 6d. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have again the privilege of sending you a cheque (£24 l5s. 6d.) for the furtherance of your good work. Please appropriate it as most needed. I feel it my duty to devote more and more to the service of my precious Saviour. It is now some years since I commenced putting aside a tenth of my entire income. From year to year I have increased the amount, and how abundantly have I been blessed in the act. "It is the Lord’s doing, and it is marvellous in my eyes." Would that all, calling themselves Christians, might but make the trial! Accept my kind regards, best wishes and prayers for a blessing on your labour of love. I am, my dear Sir, yours very truly, * * * *."—I make the following remarks in connexion with this letter: 1, The donor, though he has repeatedly contributed similar amounts, is otherwise an entire stranger to me; up to the present I know not even his profession or business. See how God helps! Take this also in connexion with the little there was left on the morning of Jan. 1st. 2, The donor says, that he commenced with putting aside a tenth of his entire income, but that he feels it his duty to devote more and more to the service of his precious Saviour, and that he has increased the amount year by year; but he adds, "how abundantly have I been blessed in the act!"—Jan. 20. From Whitby, a gold watch and seal, to be sold for Missions.

"A gold watch and seal, to be sold for Missions." Allow me, esteemed Reader, to say a few words on this subject. There are on my list, now, 187 servants of the Lord Jesus, whom I seek to assist. These preachers of the Gospel have no salary; they have (by far the greater part) no regular income at all; but are supported as our adorable Lord Jesus was, and as His apostles were, by the contributions of godly persons, voluntarily offered. Through the ordering of the Lord I have had these 187 labourers in the Gospel brought before me, not only as such as who do the work of God, and whose labours are owned by Him, but who also are in need of temporal supplies. When such brethren have been discovered by me, I have sought to help them; and, when means were exhausted, I have given myself to prayer on their behalf. But, as the number of these brethren amounts now to 187, the reader will see that £2,000, yea, £4,000, are soon spent, in order that each of these labourers may be supplied with a little only. Large sums, therefore, may be profitably expended in aiding these servants of the Lord Jesus, and large sums will I gladly expend on them, as God may be pleased to intrust me with them, though these brethren are not the missionaries of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, but the Lord’s servants, and are only assisted by this Institution. Will the Christian Reader allow me, then, in connexion with this subject, to ask him the question, whether caring for those who preach the Gospel is laid on his heart, and whether, as the Lord gives him the ability, he seeks to aid them, both at Home and Abroad? In aiding them, we do the work of God, and become fellow-labourers with those who preach the Gospel. Every one, according to his ability, should help on this blessed work; and, because these 187 brethren, here referred to, have no salary as preachers of the Gospel, they are, on that account, not the less to be cared for; for they need the things connected with this life. Many of them, I know, have been often, like the apostles of old, in great straits and necessities; and not a few have written to me, that, were it not for the help they receive, through my instrumentality, they should, humanly speaking, be unsupplied and unable to go on. Ought we not to pray then for such servants of the Lord Jesus; and ought we not, also, according to our ability, to help them with our means? In what a variety of ways we may help, is shown by the last mentioned donation of the gold watch and seal, to be sold for missions. If we consider what we can do for such preachers of the Gospel, it may be found that we cannot give large donations in money, yet we may give perhaps small donations; or, should we have no money at all for this purpose, it may be found, that we can spare some needless articles, which may be turned into money for such an object. A little, surely, every child of God can do and if we do what we can, that is all the Lord looks for.

Jan. 28, 1863. £800—Feb. 4. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Feb. 10. £600—March 26. £100 from Scotland.—March 27. £40 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 22. £32 from the same donor.

The end of the year was now at hand, and in winding up the accounts, it was my earnest desire to do once more all I could in sending help to needy labourers in the Gospel. I went therefore through the list, writing against the various names of those to whom I had not already recently sent, what amount it appeared desirable to send; and I found, when these sums were added together, the total was £476, but £280 was all I had in hand. I wrote therefore a cheque for £280, though I would have gladly sent £476, yet felt thankful, at the same time, that I had this amount in hand for these brethren. Having written the cheque, as the last occupation of the day, then came my usual season for prayer, for the many things which I daily, by the help of God, bring before Him; and then again, I brought also the case of these preachers of the Gospel before the Lord, and besought Him that He would even now be pleased to give me yet a goodly sum for them, though there remained but three days to the close of our year. This being done, I went home about nine o’clock in the evening, and found there had arrived from a great distance £100 for Missions, with £100 left at my disposal, and £5 for myself. I took, therefore, the whole £200 for Missions, and thus had £480 in hand to meet the £476 which I desired for this object. Those who know the blessedness of really trusting in God, and getting help from Him, as in this case, in answer to prayer, will be able to enter into the spiritual enjoyment I had in the reception of that donation, in which both the answer to prayer was granted, and with it the great enjoyment of gladdening the hearts of many devoted servants of Christ.

May 26, 1863. "From B. P. and B." £1 5s.—From Leicester £1—From Yorkshire £30 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and £20 for Missions, as "a Birthday Memorial. May 24." This last donation of the period enabled me yet further to send some help to Missionaries.

Having to the utmost of my ability aided Schools, sought to circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and aided Missionary operations, the balance left at the end of the year for these objects, is only £3 11s. 9¼d.; but I have had the joy of spending, on them, during the year, £7,170 6s. 7½d.; and I look with calmness and the confidence of faith to my Heavenly Father with reference to what will be needed for the year before me.

May 27, 1863. When on this day, the new period of the Institution began, the balance in hand, for these objects, as has been stated, was £3 11s. 9¼d. This was our visible treasure to look to, while the expenses for these objects alone had been from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, £7,170 6s. 7½d. But whilst our visible treasure was only £3 11s. 9¼d., we had the invisible treasure of the Living God to go to, and felt ourselves, therefore, as rich as if we had had Thousands of Pounds in hand. I will now refer to some of the ways, whereby it pleased the Lord to enable us to meet the heavy expenses which were before us, if, as in previous years, we desired to go on supporting the schools, which had been supported, circulating the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and aiding Missionary operations.

May 27, 1863. On this very first day of the period were received from "P. G." 2s. 6d., from Walworth £5, from Exeter 7s. 6d., from T. P. at Frome 2s. 6d., from Sudbury 5s., and from Liverpool £5—Thus the balance was already increased, and so the Lord helped further.—May 28. From London £5 for Labourers in the Gospel.—June 1. From Clevedon £15.

Aug. 1. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Oct. 1. There were left today at my house two One Hundred Pound Notes, with the following lines: "The donor leaves the disposal of the enclosed £200 to Mr. Müller, with the exception of begging him to accept five pounds for himself, and give five pounds to Mr. C." I am daily praying for means, and am longing to send out help to the brethren who labour in the Word, and am longing to go on with the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. I received this when there was but little in hand for these objects, and therefore took the whole £190 for them. Only half an hour before receiving it I had been again in prayer for means for them.—Oct. 3. From Oxton £2—Oct. 2. "From C. S. J., Surrey," £5 for Missions among Romanists in Ireland, £4 ditto in France, £4 ditto in Italy, and £7 for Missions to heathen in British India—£35 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in Heaven.—One of the last things I was occupied about this evening at the Orphan Houses before leaving, was portioning out £280 to be sent to brethren who labour in the Gospel, spending to the very last pound I had for this object. Gladly would I have sent out more, had I had the means. When I came home, about nine o’clock, I found a letter from Glasgow with an order for £60 and the information that the amount was sent for "brethren labouring in the Gospel at Home and Abroad." Thus, in this answer to prayer for more means for Missions, I had the desire of my heart granted, and was able to send out more.—Oct. 5. From a Christian lady in Scotland, £3, with the following deeply interesting letter: "My dear Mr. Müller, a simple hearted brother in the Lord (a fisherman,) has lately had his mind a good deal exercised about giving of his substance to the cause of Missions; and during the herring season he resolved to give the proceeds of one night’s fishing. So, before going out, he made it a matter of prayer, and that night was more successful than he had been during the whole season, which he looked upon as a token of the Lord’s approval. Out of the amount, he yesterday handed over £3 to be sent to you, in aid of Foreign Missions, which I have now the pleasure of enclosing. I am not at liberty to give his name, but I am sure you will ask the Lord to shower down upon him His blessing a hundred-fold. Yours in Him, * * * *." In this you see, dear reader, again what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to use in supplying us with means; it also shows how, if there is really a hearty desire to help on the work of God, He will supply us with means, that we may be able to do so, as in the case of this Christian fisherman.

Nov. 18. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 24. From a shipowner £220, who sent this money instead of insuring his vessels, committing them into the hands of God. The donor wished £100 to be used for Missions, £100 as I might deem best (which was equally divided between the School—Bible—and Tract-Fund, and the support of the Orphans); £10 he sent for Mr. C., and £10 for myself. Within the last four days, before receiving this donation, I had sent out £345 10s. 5d. for foreign labourers in the Gospel and Italian Bibles. Gladly would I have sent to labourers in the Gospel still more, but the means were exhausted. I could only continue to pray, and this letter came to hand. See, dear reader, the blessedness of prayer. Nov. 28. From Manchester £4 15s. 4d.—From a Bristol donor £3 for Foreign Missions.—From Lincolnshire 10s.—Evening. All the money I had in hand for these Objects had been portioned out last evening for tracts and labourers in the Gospel, and only £1 6s. 10d. was left, having expended last evening £267 9s. 10d., and, within a few days previously, for Spanish Bibles and Testaments, Italian Bibles and Testaments, and foreign labourers in the Gospel, £384 10s. 7d. I was going now through the whole list of labourers in the Gospel. This evening, in answer to my daily prayers, which especially had again been brought before God, when I had so little left, I received anonymously £5 from Norwich, of which the donor desired me to keep £1 for myself, and to use £4 as I thought fit, which I took for these objects. I found also from Dublin the following letter, with a Bank Post Bill for £100 "Beloved brother, I rejoice to have fellowship with you in making known the glad tidings of the Gospel, both through servants of the Lord who preach in His name, as well as through Bibles and Tracts; and therefore transmit you the enclosed Bank Post Bill for £100, which I shall thank you to divide equally between those two objects, &c."

See, esteemed reader, how again in this instance God sent further help in answer to prayer, and by it be encouraged for yourself. See, also, how I sent out to the last I had, without anxious reckoning as to the future; and how the Lord sent in more, and thus gave me still further the precious privilege of continuing to spend for Him in connexion with Missions and the circulation of he Holy Scriptures and Tracts. And thus it has now been for sixty years. His help has never failed. The means may have been almost, or entirely exhausted, but He has not failed us, but has proved Himself continually the self-same wise and unchangeable Friend and Helper. Make but trial of His readiness to help, and you will find Him to be the same to you.

Dec. 31, 1863. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

January 1, 1864. The new year commenced with blessing as to means, with reference to these Objects also, as was the case with the Orphan Fund. There came in on the first day of the year, for them, 25 different donations, of which I will only refer to £2 from Huntley, instead of insuring the donor’s life.—From a Christian Shipowner £100 for Missions, £15 for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, and £15 for the Orphans. The whole was sent by the donor, instead of insuring his ships, committing them simply into the hands of God.—On January 2nd came in again 10 donations, of which I only mention £23 18s. 1d. from Dalston.—Jan. 13. £1 15s. 9d., with the following text and letter : "Fear not, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom. Sell that ye have, and give alms; provide yourselves bags which wax not old, a treasure in the heavens that faileth not, where no thief approacheth, neither moth corrupteth. For where your treasure is there will your heart be also." Luke xii, 32—34. "Dear Sir,—This is a word that I wished to be deeply impressed on my mind, so that all my earthly labour may be done with this one object in view. It teaches us to look for the Kingdom, as the one object worth striving for, and to esteem earthly good only as the means by which we may "lay up in store a good foundation for the time to come." During the past year a merciful Providence has helped me in a difficult and trying time. My business has increased, and I have been preserved once from fire, which happened during the night, and which endangered my property to the extent of £200, being close to it. Twice during the year I have been preserved from robbery. Once thieves broke into my place, and passing me on the first floor, took property valued at £30, from another occupant of the same building. In the last case thieves were breaking in by the window, and would have got in, but the police came upon them, and they ran away. This last has set my mind on the text ‘where no thief approacheth,’" etc. The writer of the above is a man of business in one of the most busy towns of England. He has often sent donations of £3, £5, £7 and upwards, as the Lord hath prospered him; his testimony is, that God had helped him in a difficult and trying time, during the past year, that his business had increased (while the very reverse naturally might have been expected); and that he had been protected against fire and thieves. Do you see, dear reader, how, even in this life, and as to temporal things, the Lord is pleased to repay those, who act for Him as stewards, and who contribute to His work or to the poor, as He may be pleased to prosper them? But how much greater is the spiritual blessing we receive, both in this life and in the world to come, if constrained by the love of Christ, we act as God’s stewards, respecting that, with which he is pleased to intrust us!

Feb. 10. £1,350 This donation was a precious answer to many prayers for more means for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund, whereby I was enabled to accomplish much, which I had desired.—Feb. 23. £1,100 The Lord be magnified for this sum! It is the fruit of very many prayers. I am thus still further supplied with means for these four Objects.—Feb. 27 From Yorkshire £30 for Foreign Missions.—From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £4 10s.

March 1. From London £100 for Foreign Missions. Day by day I am labouring in prayer for means for Missionary objects, and entreating the Lord, to condescend to allow me to accomplish more and more in connexion with this part of the work. This donation, therefore, from an unexpected quarter, was very refreshing to my spirit.— From the neighbourhood of Goole £10 for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—March 2. £148 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to Lay up treasure in heaven.— March 23. £10 with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I herewith enclose you two Five Pound Bank of England Notes, being part of proceeds from the sale of unnecessary books and pictures, which please to use for the Lord’s work. ‘Sell that ye have, and give alms; provide yourselves bags which wax not old, a treasure in the heavens that faileth not, where no thief approacheth, neither moth corrupteth,’ hath indeed a meaning," etc. That which was obtained by the sale of unnecessary books and pictures, furnished me with means for sending out Gospel Tracts and copies of the Holy Scriptures, and for aiding preachers of the Gospel at Home and Abroad, who labour without being connected with any Society, or having any regular salary. Thus many children of God, if there be first a hearty desire to help on the work of God, would sooner or later, be able to have the privilege of doing so, though sometimes it might only be accomplished by either abstaining from the purchase of some needless articles or by the sale of such articles already in their possession.—May 25, 1864. As tomorrow will be the last day of our present year, I had within the last three days gone through the whole list of labourers in the Gospel, portioning out all I could for them, £1,300. Our Missionary fund being thus exhausted, my prayer was that the Lord would be pleased to give me more means for this object. This prayer He has already begun to answer; for I received this morning from Uppingham £1 1s. for Missions.—From a ship owner, who sends the amount instead of insuring his vessels, and commends them into the hands of God, £100 for Missions, £50 for Bible—, Tract—, and School Fund, £50 for the Orphans, £10 for Mr. C., and £10 for myself.—From Reading £5 for Home Missions.—From Acton 14s.—May 26. From London £1 for labourers in the Gospel.—"As a birth-day memorial, 24th May," £25 for Missions and £25 for the Bible Fund.—From Gloucester 10s. for Missions.—From East Moulsey £2 for Missions.

May 26, 1864. At the close of the period from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864, I stand before the Lord with admiring gratitude, not only with regard to the help given for the support of the 1,241 Orphans under our care during the year, and for having allowed me to add to the Building Fund £6,956 13s. 6¼d., but also for giving me the means for expending more than ever on the support of Day, Sunday, and Adult Schools, and more than during any one of the 30 years of the existence of the Institution upon Missionary Objects; for enabling me fully to respond also to every suitable application for the gratuitous circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts; and all this whilst we began the year, with only a balance of £3 11s. 9¼d. in hand. See, dear Reader, what may be accomplished simply by faith, and habitual, expecting prayer. Look at it for encouragement with reference to your own affairs, and make use of these precious, never failing means for yourself.

Thus we have been helped year after year, and generally, year after year, the Institution has been enlarged, and the expenses therefore have increased. Such enlargements were never made, because we had more friends, or any certain amount of income, or promises; but simply because we saw the need of such enlargement, and trusted in the Living God for the needed means. This faith in Himself He has always honoured, and now, at the close of the fortieth year of the existence of this Institution is honouring more and more, though at the present time, the total expenses yearly amount to more than Forty Thousand Pounds. For all this, without the least regular income, we look to the Lord alone. He does, year after year, carry us through the expenses, without our ever going in debt, without our ever asking for anything, without directly or indirectly giving hints to donors in writing, to send us help; and all this we do, in order that it may be seen, how much can be accomplished even in the second half of the Nineteenth Century, simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith. As, however, I have yet a period of about ten years to write about, with reference to the income for the first four Objects of the Institution (the total expenses of which considerably exceeded One Hundred Thousand Pounds), I must now mention only a very few of the donations each year, simply as specimens. May the reader seek to own the hand of God, in helping us more and more every year!

Aug. 23, 1864. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Aug. 26. Anonymously from P. B. £90, with £15 for myself.—Sept. 17 The following letter, received with 2s. 6d. in postage stamps, from Worcestershire, shows what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to use in order to supply us with means for His work; "Dear Sir,—Having read your Report, I felt it my duty to give to the Lord the fruit of a little tree in my garden, for you to do what you think best. I have given the tree to the Lord, and the fruit to His glory, which amounts to 2s. 6d., myself being a poor man, but, I hope, rich in faith, an heir of His kingdom. Dear Sir, Yours in Christ * * * *." I have received donations of Thousands of Pounds, as much as £8,100 at once; and during this year also £5,000 at one time. I have received also Thousands of donations amounting only to £1, one shilling, or one penny. But whether one penny or £8,100: all the donations come from God. In every one of them I seek to realize His hand whilst feeling grateful to donors even for the smallest contribution; I would particularly seek to recognize that it is God who moves their hearts, to help me in His work. The above donation shows, that even the very poor may have the privilege of contributing to the spread of the Gospel. Here is a poor man, who gives a little tree in his garden to the Lord, and purposes, that what the tree bears, shall be the Lord’s. At last the fruit is ripe, it is sold, and the proceeds, amounting to 2s. 6d., are sent. Another, in more prosperous circumstances, may be able to send £2 10s. Another, by the blessing of God upon his business, £250; another £2,500; and another still more; but whether little or much, to do what we do unto the Lord, constrained by the love of Christ, is the great point; and to give according to our ability, whether great or small, is another important point.—The reader is also requested to notice that donations come not only from various parts of the United Kingdom, but almost from all parts of the world. There are few countries from which I have not had donations. They chiefly come from strangers, and, in many instances, anonymously. But all come as the result of prayer, unasked for on our part. We wait on God, day by day, expecting answers to our prayers; and, as the days come, so come the answers. A day seldom passes without many donations being received, from very unlikely quarters, to make the hand of God more manifest, to encourage us more and more, to wait on Him, and to ascribe all to Him. We gladly give Him all the glory in this matter; and so He honours us, uses us, and enlarges our stewardship more and more. Were we to ascribe the help we receive to the Reports, to our personal influence, to anything we have done or could do; we should soon be confounded; God would soon let us see how powerless we are in ourselves. When the second Report of the Institution was published, giving an account of the first 14½ months of its operations, the total income for that period had been £617 l9s. 8d. When the Eighth Report was published, giving an account of 26 months and 4 days, the income had been during that period £3,588 7s. 8d. When the Seventeenth Report was published, in 1856, the income for that one year had been £14,588 5s. 10d. When the Twenty-sixth Report was published, in the year 1865, the total income of the year had been above Thirty Thousand Pounds; and since then it has been even Forty Thousand Pounds and upwards. See what God can do, simply through prayer and faith! I doubt not, the simple-hearted Christian reader will be ready to say prayer and faith have indeed accomplished much in the history of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. Well, dear Reader, let me affectionately advise you to make use of faith and prayer, at all times and under all circumstances. The very object of the Orphan Work was primarily, the glory of God, to show (for the benefit of the Church at large), how much prayer and faith could do; because while the writer saw that many things were wanting in the Church, he judged that nothing was so much needed as an increase of faith; and therefore would gladly be a servant, to this end, for the benefit of his weaker brethren in the faith.

The joy which answers to prayer give, cannot be described; and the impetus which they afford to the spiritual life is exceedingly great. The experience of this happiness I desire for all my Christian readers. If you believe indeed in the Lord Jesus for the salvation of your soul, if you walk uprightly and do not regard iniquity in your heart, if you continue to wait patiently, and believingly upon God; then answers will surely be given to your prayers. You may not be called upon to serve the Lord in the way the writer does, and therefore may never have answers to prayer respecting such things as are recorded here; but in your various circumstances, your family, your business, your profession, your church position, your labour for the Lord, &c., you may have answers as distinct as any here recorded.

Should this, however, be read by any who are not believers in the Lord Jesus, but who are going on in the carelessness or self-righteousness of their unrenewed hearts, then I would affectionately and solemnly beseech such, first of all to be reconciled to God by faith in the Lord Jesus. You are sinners, you deserve punishment. If you do not see this, ask God to show it unto you. Let this now be your first and especial prayer. Ask God also to enlighten you not merely concerning your state by nature, but especially to reveal the Lord Jesus to your heart. God sent Him, that He might bear the punishment, due to us guilty sinners. God accepts the obedience and sufferings of the Lord Jesus, in the room of those who depend upon Him for the salvation of their souls and the moment a sinner believes in the Lord Jesus, he obtains the forgiveness of all his sins. When thus he is reconciled to God, by faith in the Lord Jesus, and has obtained the forgiveness of his sins, he has boldness to enter into the presence of God, to make known his requests unto Him and the more he is enabled to realize, that his sins are forgiven, and that God, for Christ’s sake, is well pleased with those who believe on Him, the more ready he will be to come with all his wants, both temporal and spiritual, to his Heavenly Father, that He may supply them; but as long as the consciousness of unpardoned guilt remains, so long shall we be kept at a distance from God, especially as it regards prayer. Therefore, dear reader, if you are an unforgiven sinner, let your first and especial prayer be, that God would be pleased to reveal to your heart the Lord Jesus, His beloved Son.

Oct. 3. £10 for Foreign Missions, with the following postscript in the donor’s letter. "You know there are many opinions among Christians, who desire conscientiously to devote their talents to God’s service, as to how much to give. What I think Scriptural is some such plan as I adopt, viz., many years ago, I gave 5 per cent. on my gross earnings; then, as my business increased, 10 per cent.; and now, that it is by God’s blessing still larger, bringing in more than my large family (eight children) need for their support and good education, I give 15 per cent, as the minimum."

I add the following remarks to this postscript. 1, The writer says, "There are many opinions among Christians, who desire conscientiously to devote their talents to God’s service." This, undoubtedly, is true; and, as the Lord bears with these different opinions, so should we bear one with another regarding them. Moreover, there is no command given as to the amount which the believer in Jesus should give of his property back to the Lord, as under the former dispensation, when the tenth part was enjoined; for it is His will concerning us, that we should seek to enter into the depth of that grace and love of God, which led Him not to spare His only begotten Son, but to deliver Him up for us. When this is done, the heart says, according to the Scriptures, "I am bought with a price, I am not my own." "The precious blood of the Lord Jesus has redeemed me, I am not my own. With all I have, and am, I am the Lord’s. What I would, therefore, especially advise my fellow believers in the Lord Jesus to aim after is, to seek more and more to enter into the grace and love of God, in giving His only begotten Son, and into the grace and love of the Lord Jesus, in giving Himself in our room, in order that, constrained by love and gratitude, they may be increasingly led, to surrender their bodily and mental strength, their time, gifts, talents, property, position in life, rank, and all they have and are to the Lord. By this I do not mean, that they should give up their business, trade, or profession, and become preachers; nor do I mean that they should take all their money and give it to the first beggar who asks for it; but that they should hold all, they have and are, for the Lord, not as owners, but as stewards, and be willing, at His bidding, to use for Him, part or all, they have. However short the believer may fall, nothing less than this should be his aim. The writer humbly confesses, that nothing short of this has been his aim, and, by God’s grace, his practice too, during the last sixty-five years; and, as he has practised these principles, habitually and unhesitatingly, during these sixty-five years, he may be allowed to say, that the blessing resulting from thus acting has been unspeakably great. Notice 2, the experience of the writer of that postscript. He began with 5 per cent. on his gross earnings. If only this were done, how much would many children of God have to give, who now, comparatively speaking, give exceedingly little. He gave after a time 10 per cent., and still later 15 per cent. Do you know the reason? I can tell you. The privilege of giving is found to be so great, the blessing to the soul so rich and abundant, and the repayment of the Lord so bountiful, that not only does the heart desire yet further to partake of this blessed privilege, but those who act thus have, also, the power of giving more and more, according to that word: "There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty. The liberal soul shall be made fat: and he that watereth shall be watered also himself."—Prov. xi, 24, 25. "Give, and it shall be given unto you: good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over shall men give into your bosom! For with the same measure that you mete withal it shall be measured to you again."—Luke vi, 38. Notice also 3, what the writer of the postscript says : "I give 15 per cent, as the minimum." If any of the children of God are as yet unable to surrender themselves with all they have and are to the Lord, I strongly advise them, while they seek for higher attainments in the divine life, for fuller apprehensions of their heavenly calling, their heavenly possessions, and heavenly realities, that, in the meantime, they fix upon a certain proportion to dedicate to the Lord for His work, or for the benefit of the poor. Let this be never so small, at the beginning, yet it is better to introduce systematic giving, as the Lord may prosper, than to give only as the feelings are wrought upon, or certain impressions are made. This proportion may be increased, as God gives more means or more grace; and blessing and happiness, I say it deliberately, will increase yet more and more.

Before leaving this subject, I must refer to one point, viz., how have we to act if prosperity in our business, our trade, our profession, etc., should suddenly cease, notwithstanding our having given a considerable proportion of our means for the Lord’s work? My reply is this. 1, "In the day of adversity consider." It is the will of God that we should ponder our ways; that we should see whether there is any particular reason, why God has allowed this to befall us. In doing so, we may find, that we have too much looked on our prosperity as a matter of course, and have not sufficiently owned and recognized practically the hand of God in our success. Or it may be, while the Lord has been pleased to prosper us, we have spent too much on ourselves, and may have thus, though unintentionally, abused the blessing of God. I do not mean by this remark to bring any children of God into bondage, so that, with a scrupulous conscience, they should look at every penny, which they spend on themselves; this is not the will of God concerning us; and yet, on the other hand, there is verily such a thing as propriety or impropriety in our dress, our furniture, our table, our house, our establishment, and in the yearly amount we spend on ourselves and family. If, in these respects, we have acted with impropriety, let us not be surprised, if we are not further intrusted by the Lord as stewards, until we have made confession of our sin before God, and sought forgiveness at His hands through the blood of the Lord Jesus. Another reason why prosperity ceased, may he this, that, while we have given away a considerable proportion of what the Lord has given us, in comparison with those who give very little, yet, this proportion may be small, in comparison with the blessing, success, and prosperity, which the Lord had granted previously; and His end, in causing prosperity to cease, for a time, may be, that we should consider this. But suppose the believer in the Lord Jesus, after self examination, considers none of these reasons applicable to himself; then it may be that the Lord, for the exercise of his faith, and to prove him, whether he will still continue to act as His steward, has tried him thus, by temporary adversity. What is to be done under such circumstances? The first point to be settled is this: If the person owes more than he possesses, if he is insolvent, it is plain he has not to give out of that which is not his. Or, if, by giving when prosperity had ceased, he would make himself insolvent, it is plain that he has to refrain from giving; but if there is accumulated capital, though no present increase, the very best thing to do (if there is only grace for it) is, to give out of the means obtained by former success and prosperity, as good stewards of God, to prove our gratitude to Him for former prosperity. Natural reasoning, I know, would say the very opposite; but faith in God acts thus. At the end of the last century a very godly and liberal merchant in London was one day called on by a gentleman, to ask him for some money for a charitable object. The gentleman expected very little, having just heard that the merchant had sustained heavy loss from the wreck of some of his ships. Contrary, however, to expectation, he received about ten times as much as he had expected for his object. He was unable to refrain from expressing his surprise to the merchant, told him what he had heard, how he feared he should scarcely have received any thing, and asked whether after all there was not a mistake about the shipwreck of the vessels. The merchant replied, It is quite true, I have sustained heavy loss, by these vessels being wrecked, but that is the very reason, why I give you so much; for I must make better use than ever of my stewardship, lest it should be entirely taken from me. Consider, esteemed reader, what the merchant said!

Oct. 5, 1864. From Glasgow £90 for labourers in the Gospel, with £6 for myself. Day by day I am labouring in prayer for means for Missionary objects; having an abundance of opportunities of spending much in this way, this donation is especially refreshing to my spirit. With what was left in hand, I was thus enabled, two days later, to send out £275 to the labourers in the Gospel.—Oct. 12. £40 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Dec. 26. £20 from India as "A thank-offering from the Himalaya."—Dec. 31 From the North of England £50 3s.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £80.

Jan. 1, 1865. As I am day by day labouring in prayer for means for the support of the Schools, connected with the Institution, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for Missions I also gladly respond to applications for copies of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, gratuitously, and send out help to the labourers in the Gospel, according to the ability which the Lord is pleased to give. And thus by the end of the year almost all the means were again spent, which, instead of casting me down or discouraging me, only led to further believing and expecting prayer. With the commencement of the year came fresh supplies, of which I only mention £200 for Missions from a ship-owner, instead of insuring his vessels. Also from Worcestershire £10 for the Schools, £10 for Bibles, £10 for Tracts, £50 for Missions, £50 for the Orphans, and £14 for myself.—Jan. 2. Received £37 13s. 3d., with the following interesting letter: "My dear Sir, Again I am permitted to send you a cheque for £37 13s. 3d., being the balance of a fund, which I have now for five years regularly set aside out of my income for the work and people of the Lord. So much have I been blest in thus doing, that the fifth year has more than doubled the first, thus proving the truth of Proverbs xix, 17 My kind regards and very best wishes. I am, dear Sir, yours truly, * * * *." Jan. 25. £80 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Jan. 28. From a ship-owner, instead of insuring his vessels, £200, for Missions, and £l00 for the School—,Bible—, and Tract Fund.

Feb. 8. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and who, having received a present of £150, gave £148 for these Objects.

March 1. From a Bristol donor £40—March 2. The following articles were sent from Scotland, and taken for Missions: 6 silver dessert forks, 6 silver tea spoons, 8 silver egg spoons, 7 silver salt spoons, 7 gold seals, 1 gold watch chain, 3 gold finger rings, 1 watch ring, 2 watch keys, 1 breast pin, 1 case with shirt studs, 1 spring yard measure, 1 polished stone, 1 glass syringe in case, and 1 gold locket.—March 11 From Madras £55 15s. 9d.— March 14. From Yorkshire £30 for Foreign Missions.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and who, having received a second present of £150, gave £148 for these objects.—March 17 From the neighbourhood of Bath £1 and a gold chain for Missions.—From Surrey £150, 0s., 6d.—From Somersetshire £50—March 22. £100 for Italian Missions.—March 24. From Yorkshire £30 for Foreign Missions.—March 30. From Ramsgate £50.

April 6. From Redland Park £20—From the United States Ten Dollars.—April 8. "From a ship-owner instead of insuring his vessels," £150 for Missions and £50 for School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund—April 10. From Dublin £4 15s., with the following statement: "I have been in the habit of paying a yearly premium of £2 7s. 6d. for fire insurance upon my furniture, &c.; but, since reading your Report, I have come to the conclusion to trust in the Lord for the preservation not only of my person, but of my effects, and to send you the amount of the premium. I therefore have the pleasure to enclose a draft for £4 15s., the amount of this year’s premium, and an equal amount added, to be applied in the Lord’s service, according to your discretion."—April 15. From Norfolk £20 for Missions.—From Demerara £5—April 28. From Clevedon £15—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £80.

May 1. From Birmingham £12 10s. for the printing of Tracts, with £12 10s. for the support of the Orphans.—From Glasgow £60 and £15 for myself.—May 3. From Herefordshire £10—May 15. Mrs. J. B. sent by desire of her late husband, for Missions, £11 5s.—May 19. From London, E. C. £50—May 23. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £70.

Within the last few days I have sent out £608 to labourers in the Gospel, and this evening, being now near the end of the period, I sat down with the list of 122 labourers in the Gospel in various parts of the world, to portion out as much more as it appeared desirable to send to them. After having written under each name in pencil the amount I desired to send, on reckoning it up, I found that it altogether amounted to £466; but I had only £374 left; £92 more therefore was needed. I was not discouraged, however, but wrote down on a piece of paper: "£466 I desire to send out, at least, yet further, if it please the Lord, for which I pray still, and ask Him still to give me the full amount of means yet needed. George Müller, May 23, 1865." This matter was especially brought before the Lord that very evening, before I went home. And now see, dear reader, how the Lord dealt with me. On reaching home, a little after 9 o’clock, I found a £5 note had been left at my house from H. B. of Clifton, the disposal of which being left to me, I took for this object. On the next morning, May 24th, I received from London £100, which had been placed some time since by a Christian lady in the hands of a Christian gentleman for Missions, but was now, by the wish of that lady, sent to me, for that object; and thus, as the fruit of earnest, believing, and expecting prayer, came to hand in answer to my prayers. I also received, as "A Birthday Memorial," £50, which being left at my disposal, I took for Missions. I had thus a precious answer to prayer, and the desire of my heart given to me, and was able to send out even a little more than I had written down, viz., £503 instead of £466.

May 26, 1865. I add the following remarks in connexion with the fund for Missionary operations during the past year.

1. During the previous year we had been able to expend more on Missionary operations than during any one of the thirty years the Institution had been in existence.

2. When the last year commenced, we gave ourselves to prayer, that during the year upon which we had entered, we might be able to expend still more, and that the Lord would be pleased to send in the means accordingly, though we had no natural prospect that thus it should be, nay the very reverse. However, we continued in prayer. Day by day I brought this matter before God, and looked out for answers. The nearer the time came, the less it appeared likely, I should have as much to send out for Missions as the previous year; much less that I should be able to accomplish more. But I was not discouraged, but continued in believing prayer, day by day, looking out for help; and means came in. In the mean time, I sent out, to the utmost of my ability; for, in order to have more in the way of stewardship, we must first use aright what we have already. At last it came to the evening of the 23rd of May, of which I have spoken, and the reader has seen the result; by means of those three donations of £5, £100, and £50, I was able to accomplish all I desired for the last period, and was enabled to expend £5,669 9s. 5½d. for Missionary operations, whilst during the previous year only £5,600 7s. 9d. had been expended. But all this will appear the more remarkable, and as an encouraging answer to prayer, when the reader understands, that between £2,000 and £3,000 or more, which I had formerly for this Object, year by year, from certain quarters, entirely failed this year through particular circumstances. My own soul, however, was not discouraged. I had no doubt that I should obtain means from the Lord, though those sources had failed this year; nay, I entreated the Lord with greater earnestness, on this very account, that He would be pleased to help me, that it might be manifest this work was supplied by Him, and was not dependant upon circumstances, nor confined to certain donors, who might be willing, but unable to give, or who might be removed by death, or otherwise lost to the Institution. Be then encouraged, dear reader, to trust in God, and in confiding, believing, expecting prayer, to bring your requests before Him; and you will reap, if you faint not.

3. With regard to the servants of the Lord Jesus at Home and Abroad, whom I seek to assist, I would mention that the means I have sent to them, often came to hand at a time when they were greatly in need, having no stated salary, and being dependant on what the Lord may be pleased to give them. The harvest not only is great, and the labourers in the Gospel, everywhere, comparatively few; but often the very men, who may be most earnestly seeking to labour in the Gospel, may be little thought of as to their temporal necessities. God, no doubt, is mindful of them. But while he does not forget them, that is no reason why we should not be, also, mindful of them. But let the Christian reader bear with me, when I affectionately ask, whether it is thus with him; whether he remembers the temporal needs of the preachers of the Gospel at Home and Abroad? It was, at first, the need in which I saw Evangelists, both in Foreign lands and in our own country, which led me especially to earnest prayer for a greater amount of means for aiding them. And ever since 1845 I have particularly sought to aid those who are not connected with any Society or regularly supplied with means. The more, however, I was able to send to them, the more I saw how great the need of those servants of Christ was; and as I laboured on in prayer for means, and became yet further acquainted with holy, devoted but needy brethren who preach the Gospel, at Home and Abroad, the openings for spending means in this way became larger and larger with every year. The will of our Lord Jesus is, that the Gospel should be preached to all nations, and the Christian reader, who desires to help those men of God, has an opportunity of doing so now; but this opportunity will not be always given to him; for the Lord Jesus will come again, and then this going forth to preach the Gospel, or to aid the preachers of the Gospel, will be taken from us.

May 27, 1865. We began this period with the balance of £34 8s. 5d.; a small balance indeed for meeting the expenses connected with these Objects, yet it was a balance in hand, and not a balance owed. I have always from the very commencement of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, acted on the principle of not going in debt; for it is plain to me, that if our work is the work of God; and if He will have us to be occupied in that work; and if His time is come, when we should do this work, He will surely, if in believing prayer we ask Him, give to us the necessary means for it. Should, however, the means be wanting, we have not to rush forward in self will and say, I will do the work, and I will trust the Lord for means, this cannot be real trust, it is the counterfeit of faith, it is presumption; and though God, in great pity and mercy, may even help us finally out of debt; yet does this, on no account, prove that we were right in going forward before His time was come. We ought, rather, under such circumstances to say to ourselves:—Am I indeed doing the work of God? And, if so, I may not be the person to do it; or if I am the person His time may not yet be come for me to go forward; it may be His good pleasure to exercise my faith and patience. I ought, therefore, quietly to wait His time; for when it is come, God will help. Acting on this principle brings blessing to the soul; the opposite way, going in debt for the Lord’s work, as if God were too poor to pay for what He wants to be done, brings trials to the soul, and has, in many instances, brought dishonour on the Lord.

On the very first day of this new period, when, as stated, we had a balance of only £34 8s. 5d. in hand, I received £150 with the following registered letter: "My dear Sir, Enclosed herewith I beg to hand you £150, which please apply in the following manner, viz., for Missions £100, as the Lord may show you £50. The £100 note sent herewith came into my hands unexpectedly, and is the first money I have received as part of my wife’s portion. I have now been married rather more than six years, and I was not at all aware that I should receive this money. I felt tempted to invest it on behalf of my children, but have been led to send it to you instead, with my dear wife’s approbation. It has pleased the Lord to grant unto us four children, the last one was only born two days ago, and He has also seen fit to make me a steward over much earthly substance. My desire is, to use it for His glory. Pray that I may be enabled to do so.—I am, Yours very truly, * * * *." The £50 was taken for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, and the £100 for Missions.—Thus, on the very first day of the new period, the Lord greatly increased our balance.

July 26, 1865. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 1. From a Missionary £250 for Missions.—Aug. 12. From Somerset £30—Aug. 14. From one of the former Orphans, now in service, £4 for Missions, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have been so pleased with the Report you sent me, and also blessed in my soul by reading the Missionary Notes, to know that there is such a glorious work going on amongst the heathen. I have a great desire to help that work in giving my mite, with the sincere motive that sinners may be brought to know God as reconciled through Christ, and that they, being enlightened, may enjoy all the rich blessings of the Gospel. For that purpose I ask you to accept the inclosed, and I feel it a great honour to be allowed to do even so little for the advancement of so important and so precious a cause. My fellow-servants are very much interested in the Report, and one purposes to send an offering the next money she draws. I should like your prayers, dear Sir, that I may be preserved to the end faithful. I am very much tried at times with the fear that I may turn back, or find myself deceived. It is during the last 18 months that I have felt myself to be a believer in Christ, so that I am very young yet; but I know the delight it must give you to hear of any, whom you have trained, finding peace in God. I now thank you for all your past love and care, and ever wish to remain, Your grateful, happy Orphan, * * * *." This dear girl, having been 14 years under our care, was about ten years since sent out for service.—Aug. 31. Anonymously £50 for Missions, with £50 for the Orphans.

Sept. 9. £2, with the following letter: "Beloved Brother, Accept of £2 for use, as before. Though you have not received anything since last year, yet the systematic tithing of all that has come in, has been persevered with, and much satisfaction has resulted. One feeling has struck me, that, after laying aside the Lord’s portion, there is such an entire ceasing to call it one’s own, that, in going to it for distribution, one feels as if it were another’s and not one’s own. I have often felt as if I must add something of my own to that which is given from the Lord’s fund.—We have never given away so much in one year, perhaps in several years, as we have done during last year; and the opportunity seems to increase with the amount given. I sometimes wonder we did not think of it before, as it seems to be a spontaneous feeling of the thankful or devoted heart. Thus, long before there was any law on the subject, Abraham (Genesis xiv, 18-20,) and Jacob (Genesis, xxviii, 22,) felt bound to consecrate the Lord’s portion as a definite amount. It is true, the Gospel demands our All; but I fear, that, in the general claim on All, we have shortened the claim on every thing. We are not under law. True; but that is not to make our obedience less complete, or our giving less bountiful rather, is it not, that after all claims of law are settled, the new nature finds its joy in doing more than the law requires. Let us abound in the work of the Lord more and more. Yours in Him, * * * *."

It is now twenty-nine years since I first wrote for the press on "Stewardship," "Systematic Giving," "Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal; but lay up for yourselves treasure in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: for where your treasure is there will your heart be also." Since writing on these subjects, in the third part of my Narrative, the minds of many children of God have been led to the consideration of these subjects, but especially that of systematically contributing of their substance, as the Lord is pleased to prosper them. The writer of the above letter had been led through the Report of 1864 to see the importance and blessedness of systematically contributing as God might prosper him; and as he stated to me in the year 1864 how greatly his soul had been blessed through the adoption of this plan, so he again repeats, after further experience, the same statement, being only more fully convinced of the blessedness of this way. Such confirmatory statements I have had in great numbers, and I therefore again dwell on this subject, if by any means it may be made a blessing to those Christians who have not yet considered the subject.

I therefore make the following remarks on this letter:

I. "The systematic tithing of all that has come in, has been persevered with." Our giving to the poor, to benevolent or religious objects, should not depend upon our feeling, upon being excited by particular circumstances, by charity sermons, &c.; but in the fear of God, with a steady purpose to live for Him, we should systematically communicate out of that which God first gives to us. He delights in giving to us that we may give back again to Him. The principle for systematic giving we find in 1 Cor. xvi, 2, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store as God hath prospered him," As God had prospered the believers at Corinth, so they were to set apart. We have to notice in connexion with this the following points: 1, The setting aside for God was to be done regularly: it was not to be left to particular occasions and circumstances, or particular stirring addresses, but it was to be attended to weekly. This can now be done. But should any one not know to what degree it has pleased the Lord to prosper him during the week, then let him put aside as nearly as he does know, giving more, in proportion, when he finds out that he gave too little; but, should he have given too much (speaking after the manner of men), and he did this to the Lord, he may be quite sure that it will be only seed to spring up and bear fruit, of which he will reap a harvest. 2, It may be said, How shall I put aside? Must I actually separate this money from my other money? The answer is, That is the simplest and in many respects the best way; but it is not absolutely needful that it be done thus. A memorandum book may be kept, in which on one side is entered what is put aside for the Lord, to be expended on the poor, or for other benevolent or religious purposes; and on the other side may be put down what has been expended, and from time to time a balance may be struck. 3, The amount thus put aside for the Lord, is, of course, faithfully to be used for Him, else it would be mocking God: and, therefore, instead of obtaining a blessing, it would rather be a curse. 4. It is further to be noticed, that every one of the Church at Corinth was to do this; not the rich only, but the poor also. This is a point of deep moment. Many of the middle or poorer classes may lose much blessing, because they may think that, because they cannot do very much, they have not to do anything. The middle and poorer classes may have but little, comparatively, to give; but at certain times the Lord may especially prosper them,. At such times they may be able to give much; and, if done unto the Lord, this would be the sowing the seed for a more bountiful harvest. Whilst, on the other hand, if possessing but little be continually made a reason for refraining from giving, individuals who do so, among other reasons, on this account also, will remain poor. 5, After laying by in store, according to the above passage, there is something for the various calls which the Lord may bring before us; and we shall give out of that which was previously set apart for Him. 6, It only remains to answer the question, In what proportion shall I give out of that, which the Lord, in prospering my labour, my business, my profession, &c. has been pleased to give me? The reply is, No rule can be laid down. It is left to each believer to act according to the measure of light and grace he has; and according to the various habitual necessities of his family. A farm labourer, with 10 or 12 shillings wages a week, 4 children and a wife to provide for, would give much indeed, were he to give out of his earnings 6d. a week; whilst a journeyman, with 26s. per week, and no children or wife to provide for, giving 1s. 6d. per week, would give very little, though he actually gives three times as much as the farm labourer; and still less would he give, who, with a salary of £20 per week, and no wife or children to provide for, gives only £1 per week. The Lord looks not merely at what is actually given, but He considers also what is left behind. Hence arose the high commendation of the poor widow in the Gospels, of whom the Lord Jesus said, "Verily I say unto you that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury, for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living." Mark xii. 43, 44.

II. The Writer of the above letter says, with reference to himself, "and much satisfaction has resulted" from this systematic tithing. I have had hundreds of similar testimonies. There is verily truth in that word of our Lord, "It is more blessed to give than to receive" (Acts xx. 35) and those who act on these principles will have the joy of knowing this in their own happy experience.

III. The writer says, "We have never given away so much as we have done during last year." How came this? Because, as systematically there was the contributing as the Lord prospered him, so it came that he was entrusted with more. This I have found invariably to be the result, if God is honoured with our substance, according to the following statements in His own Holy Word: "Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the first-fruits of all thine increase: so shall thy barns be filled with plenty, and thy presses shall burst out with new wine." Prov. iii. 9, 10. "There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty." Prov. xi. 24. Notice here the word "more than is meet;" it is not said, withholdeth all; but "more than is meet," viz., while he gives, it is so little, in comparison with what it might be, and ought to be, that it tendeth to poverty. "Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom." Luke vi. 38. "He which soweth sparingly, shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully, shall reap also bountifully." 2 Cor. ix. 6. I have now been more than sixty-nine years a believer, and I never knew one single instance, in which children of God acted according to these four passages of the Divine testimony, but God proved that He was faithful to His word; and I never expect to find any one acting honestly, according to these passages, but it will be thus invariably, as God has said. If it be not thus, it is certain that these principles have not been fully acted out.

IV. The writer lastly says "It is true, the Gospel demands our All; but I fear, that, in the general claim on All, we have shortened the claim on everything," etc. We must hold it fast, that the believer is bought by the precious blood of the Lord Jesus, with all he has and is, and that he is not his own (1 Cor. vi, 19, 20; Rom. xiv, 7, 8). On this account his bodily and mental strength, his talents, his time, his possessions, all he has, belong to the Lord, and he is the Lord’s steward. The believer in the Lord Jesus should, therefore, be satisfied with nothing short of this; and, by God’s grace, nothing but this has satisfied me for the last sixty-five years; but if it has not yet been attained to, it is most helpful to the child of God (who cannot yet from the heart say, "Lord, here is my all, take it how and when Thou pleasest") to give a certain proportion of that which the Lord has intrusted him with. Let him begin at a low rate, if he has little acquaintance with God, and little trust in Him; but let him give that little heartily, habitually, faithfully, as God prospers him. He will soon see the blessed result, both temporally and spiritually. Let him then increase, as he has light and grace, and he will find further blessing to his own soul, and further blessing temporally. There are children of God in these days who stand with their all before God, as His stewards; and there are children of God in these days, who delight in being allowed to give to Him three-fourths, and more of all He is pleased to give to them; and they are prospered more and more, as to temporal things, and intrusted by Him with more and more.

Sep. 12, 1865. From Slapton £4 5s. as "a thank-offering at a harvest thanks-giving meeting."—Sep. 27. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Oct. 5. From Ireland £3 with this statement of the donor; "The amount which I had intended paying for a game license for the season, but think this way of spending it is more pleasing to the Master, whose steward I am."—Oct. 14. From Yorkshire £30 for Foreign Missions.—Oct. 30. From Glasgow £60—Nov. 1. From London £100 for Missions in Heathen Countries.—Nov. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £40—Nov. 28. During the last few days I had sent £550 to Missionary Brethren, and paid also a considerable sum for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for the support of the Schools; so that there was only 7s. 11d. left for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund. This lowness of the funds only led me to more earnest prayer, and to look out the more expectingly for fresh supplies. Accordingly I received this morning, Nov. 28, from Clifton £10 for Missions, from the neighbourhood of Stroud £5 for Missions, through Bethesda Chapel boxes 2s. 6d. for Missions and from "West Kington Box" 4s. 11d. for Missions.—Nov. 29. From Glasgow 13s. 3d. and from Cotham £4—Nov. 30. From Dublin £100 for Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund. See, dear Reader, how soon the Lord again supplied us with fresh means, after we had been reduced to only 7s. 11d, for these four Objects.

Dec. 1. Received £1 with the following letter "Dear Sir, Accept the inclosed for the Lord’s work, from a mother and daughter, who have put a farthing, half-penny, and penny from each article of their own make, that they sold during the year. May our Father long spare you for the glorious work He has given you to do. Yours in all Christian love, * * * *." Observe, dear Reader, the variety of ways in which the Lord is pleased to help me! Notice, how the poor have their goodly portion also in helping me! And learn, my poor brother and sister in Christ, from this, how you too, poor though you are, if there be only a willing mind, may have the sweet privilege of helping to circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and how you may aid in the support of Missionaries, and Schools established for the benefit of poor children.—Dec. 11 From India £15 6s. 9d. for Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.—Dec. 23. From Devonshire £60 for labourers in the Gospel.—Dec. 29. From one of the believing Orphans now in service, £2, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have great pleasure in sending the enclosed order for two pounds, either for your own personal expenses, or the Orphan Work, or Missions, just which you feel requires it most! It is but a mite, but I desire to give it in the same spirit, that the widow’s mite was given, which made it acceptable. I hope the work will prosper in your hands more and more, and that the consolations of God may be many and great with you. With best wishes, dear Sir, for you and yours, I am gratefully, * * * *." "P.S. Pray for me that my faith fail not; for the fervent effectual prayer of a righteous man availeth much. I am still very happy in striving to live by faith in Christ for eternity. I hope you will yet have many seals to your ministry." The above two pounds were taken for missions.—Dec. 30. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £45.

Jan. 1, 1866. The new year brought fresh and bountiful supplies for these Objects. There came in for them alone £303 19s. 6d. I only refer to one donation from Worcestershire, being £60 for Missions, £20 for the Bible Fund, £20 for the Tract Fund, £20 for the School Fund, £60 for the Orphans, and £20 for myself.—Jan. 16. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Jan. 18. Received from Norfolk 1s. 8d. for Missions, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you be pleased to accept of this small mite as from the Lord. I have read your last five Reports and have been much blessed by them. Dear Sir, I have had it in my heart to help you in so great and blessed a work, but had not the means. The last year, however, I said to my husband, we will give to the Lord one of our young hens, and I now enclose you 1s. 8d. in postage stamps, the sale of her first eggs. May the Lord be honoured in this small offering. We send it for the Mission Fund. I wish to tell you my husband is a very poor working man, with five children. May the Lord bless you, and prosper you in this good work, is our earnest prayer. * * * *." There is a worldly proverb, dear Christian reader, with which we are all familiar, it is this, "Where there is a will there is a way." If this is the proverb, of those who know not God, how much more should believers in the Lord Jesus, who have power with God, say: "Where there is a will, there is a way." Look at the case of the wife of this poor working man and their five children. Sovereigns she had not to send, nor half crowns. But she dedicates to the Lord the eggs of one of their young hens, sells them, and sends the money for the Mission Fund. It is indeed only as a drop in a bucket. But these dear poor people do what they can, and the gift is as great and as precious, considering their circumstances, as if a large sum had been sent by one of the Lord’s stewards, who has been set over much. It is accepted by Him "According to that a man hath, and not according to that he hath not," 2 Cor. viii. 12.—Jan. 20. From Rangoon, Burmah, £1—Jan. 24. From Ireland, a cameo brooch for Missions. —Jan. 31. From a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £100 for Missions.

Feb. 1. From one of the Orphans, formerly under our care, a believer, and now in service, £4 for Missions, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, You will be surprised to hear from me again so soon, but I will give you my reason in the history of the enclosed sum, which I am thankful to he able to offer for the Missions. I had saved a nice sum from my earnings, until I was moved in reading your Narrative to send you a portion of it. The inclination was again renewed, and I put a certain small portion by, intending it for a last resource, in case of sickness, or death, that I might not prove a burden to any one; thinking it would be presumptuous to leave myself entirely without, as I had no one, humanly speaking, to look to for the least help. But, dear Sir, I have received such benefits, such manifestations of God’s care and goodness towards me, I was constrained to return Him the little in my power, to help forward the glorious work of spreading the Gospel, that others thereby may be brought to enjoy the same unspeakable blessings, through the knowledge of that Gospel; and I felt I was doing a very ungrateful, neglectful act by keeping this money lying, when there is much to be done. I was very much encouraged in making this small sacrifice by the thought suggested in Matthew vi, 26th and 30th verses, feeling assured, that, if I continue faithful, all will be right at last, though no earthly possessions be mine. I have encroached upon your time, but I wished you to know one of the many ways, in which your Lord and Master shows His knowledge of your need, for means to carry on the great work in your hands. Hoping, dear Sir, yourself, and family are well; I am gratefully, * * * *." Feb. 5. From W—, Esq. £70, with £20 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.—Feb. 21. From Worcestershire £20 for Chinese Missions.—Feb. 28. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and who, having received a present of £150, gave £148 of the amount for Missions.—March 29. From a Christian Orphan now in service, £1 for Missions, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I have again the pleasure of offering my mite for the support of Missions, and hope the work may continue to prosper in your hands. You will be pleased to know that I am still able to rejoice in a pardoning God, and am daily aiming at sanctification. Hoping you and yours are well, I am, in much gratitude and esteem, * * * *."

April 2. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.—April 14. From Clifton £100 for Missions.—April 26. From Glasgow £60, with £15 for myself.—May 15. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—May 17, 1866. From Leicestershire £184 6s. 6d. for Missions.—From Heywood £5 for Missions. After having received the last-mentioned donations for Missions, as the close of the year for the Institution drew near, I went through the list of the 125 labourers in the Gospel, who have been assisted out of the Missionary Fund of this Institution, during the past year, writing down the smallest amount that it would be desirable to send to them (though my own heart would gladly have sent three times as much). After adding up the various sums, allotted to each, I found the total to be £1,064; but I had only £891 in hand, and needed therefore £173 more. As, however, the Lord had often, under similar circumstances, given me the desire of my heart, in answer to prayer, I looked to Him and asked Him for the amount. And now see how He acted. Late in the evening I found at home a registered letter, in which a Christian shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, sent me £100 for Missions; the next morning I received from an officer of the Indian Army £20 for Missions; from Bath £2 for Missions, and from Malvern Link £2 5s. 6d.—On the 19th came in 10s. from Hereford, 2s. 6d. from Westport, and £1 from Kentish Town for Missions.—On May 21st £4 10s. from London, £4 from Alford, 10s. from Castle Martyr, 4s. from a Bristol donor, £2 10s. from Forres, and £8 from Exeter for Missions.—On May 22nd, £10 from a London donor for Chinese Missions, 10s. from Banstead, £10 from Gloucester, £2 from Alnwick, and £2 from Malvern, all for Missions. Received also today the following letter, with £10: "A poor afflicted widow who has to work for her living at her needle, has by the help of her Heavenly Father been enabled to put a little into the Savings’ Bank, against sickness and want; but since reading your 24th Report, given me by a lady, I feel constrained by the love of Christ, who has done so much for my soul, to send you the widow’s mite, to help His great work in your hands, to be used as most needed. And may He give me grace, to put my whole trust in Him for all my temporal supplies, who has promised by Paul to supply all our need, according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.—Hoping the Lord has enabled me to do this in a right spirit, that you may safely receive Post Office Order for £10, and that our Heavenly Father may long spare you to be His faithful servant, will pray your afflicted Sister in Christ, * * * *." I put the whole of this £10 to the Mission Fund.—Received also, the same day, from Plymouth £2; from Tunstall 3s. 1d.; from Peterstow 10s., and through Salem Chapel Boxes 5s., all for Missions.—May 23. From Reading £5—From New Brunswick £5—From Hereford 10s.—From Pimlico £2 14s., and 6s.—From Belgium £1 0s. 6d.— May 24. From Plympton £2 10s.—From Dublin 10s., and from some Orphans 5s. 9½d. all for Missions.— Through the boxes in New Orphan House No. 3 for Chinese Missions 10s.—May 25. From Gloucester £15 for the Bible and Missionary Fund.—From the neighbourhood of Chippenham 6 guinea pieces, 4 half guinea pieces, and 6 seven shilling pieces for the Bible and Missionary fund.—May 26. From Clevedon 10s., and from Devonshire £100, for Missions. Thus I not only had the £173 which I wanted more on May 17th for Missionary purposes, but I could send even more than the £1,064 which I had portioned out for Missionary brethren. In the course of this last day of the year of the Institution I received still further some small sums for Missions, and in the evening I found at home a donation of £45 for Missions from Berkshire.

I now enter upon the new period in connexion with this Institution, from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, in which again very large sums were needed for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund; and the reader will see how again, during this year also, the Lord helped us.

We began the year with a balance of £163 10s. 8¼d. in hand for these Objects, which, to some persons, may appear a large sum, but which, in our case, on account of the heavy weekly expenses, was a very small amount. The Lord, however, supplied us with more, before the means in hand were gone; and though, afterwards, a few times, almost all was expended, yet the Lord was pleased soon, in answer to prayer, to give us further supplies. I refer now to a few of the donations.

July 4. From Worcestershire £100 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, £25 for the School-Fund, £20 for the Bible-Fund, £100 for the Orphans, and £30 for myself.—July 20. £100 for Missions, as "The first dividend of a new investment."—July 21. £12 for Missions, "From a Friend in Auckland, New Zealand."—July 28. From Yorkshire £50 for Foreign Missions.—July 30. From a Bristol donor £100 for Missions, £100 for the Bible-Fund, and £100 for the Tract Fund.

Aug. 1. From Clifton £50 for Missions.—Aug. 2. From Yorkshire £50 for Foreign Missions.—Aug. 24. From Clifton £50 for Missions.

Oct. 25. From Scotland £100 for Missions to the Heathen.—Oct. 29. From Scotland £56 for School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract-Fund, with £14 for myself.

Nov. 27. From Yorkshire £50 for Foreign Missions.

Dec. 7. Received £50 for Missions and £50 for the Orphans, with the words, "Only believe."—Let us pause a few moments, dear reader, and ponder these words of the Lord Jesus, "Only believe." As long as we are able to trust in God, holding fast in heart, that he is able and willing to help those who rest on the Lord Jesus for salvation, in all matters which are for His glory and their good, the heart remains calm and peaceful. It is only when we practically let go faith in His power or His love, that we lose our peace and become troubled. This very day I am in great trial in connexion with the work in which I am engaged; yet my soul was calmed and quieted by the remembrance of God’s power and love; and I said to myself this morning: "As David encouraged himself in Jehovah his God, when he returned to Ziklag, so will I encourage myself in God;" and the result was peace of soul. Again, this day six weeks ago, a great trial befell me in connexion with this work, which continues still; but I trust in God for help and deliverance. Some of my readers may imagine, that, because I obtain so many answers to prayer, and am signally helped in so many ways, that I have no longer such trials, as I used to have from 1838 to 1843, or at other times. This would be a great mistake. It is quite an exception that a day comes, which does not bring its difficulties and trials; and the only difference between the present time and former years is this, that my difficulties are now ten times greater than they were during the years referred to, because the work is now ten times greater than it was then. Moreover this might be expected; for the Lord gives faith, for the very purpose of trying it for the glory of His own name, and for the good of him who has it; and, by the very trial of our faith, we not only obtain blessing to our own souls, by becoming the better acquainted with God, if we hold fast our confidence in Him, but our faith is also, by the exercise, strengthened: and so it comes, that, if we walk with God in any measure of uprightness of heart, the trials of faith will be greater and greater.—Dec. 26. From a Bristol donor £50 for Missions.—Dec. 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.

Jan. 1, 1867. From Worcestershire £25 for the School Fund, £20 for the Bible Fund, £100 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, £100 for the support of the Orphans, and £30 for myself.—Jan. 7. Received 12s. for Missions, with the following account about the donation from the lady through whom the money was sent: "The history of this 12s. is as follows. It was given to me by a very poor old woman, whom I have known for the last 18 years, always suffering, apparently dying of heart complaint, always in poverty, earning a scanty living. She has reared a numerous family as a widow, bearing the character of a Christian; supported in all her trials by faith in the Son of God. This dear old woman said, as nearly as I can remember, the following words: ‘We ought to keep our promises to God, ought we not?’ I did not quite understand her meaning, so she explained. ‘When we have vowed to do anything for God we should do it.’ She then added: "Many years ago I went to a Missionary Meeting, and when I heard the Missionary tell what great things the Gospel had done for the heathen amongst whom he had laboured, I was so stirred up, that I was ready to cry because I had nothing to give; and I said in my heart how happy are the rich, who can do something to help the cause of God. I can do nothing, for I can barely earn a living for myself and children; and then I vowed in my heart, if ever the Lord should give me anything that I did not expect, and had not worked for, I would give it to the Lord for Missions to the heathen. The Lord has made me wait a long time; but He has given it to me at last. Ten shillings were given to me by my sister on her marriage, and 2s. by another friend. I have had the money some time by me, and did not know how to send it; for if I gave it to the minister it might seem like boasting, &c.’"

Allow me, dear Reader, to give you the following hints in connexion with the donation of this poor widow. 1. It shows, that, if we are desirous to help on the work of God, He will surely fulfil the desire of our heart. 2. Notice the variety of ways in which God is pleased to supply me with means; how even the very poorest are influenced by Him to send help to me. 3. Remember the word of this poor widow "How happy are the rich, who can do something to help the cause of God." Is the opportunity, to the full, embraced by us, to whom the Lord has given more than to this poor widow? Is it really the Godly aim and purpose of our hearts to lay up treasure in heaven? Do we habitually keep before us, that we have but one brief life to spend on earth, and that this is the sowing time for eternity? Let us think of these weighty matters.

Jan. 10. From a clergyman £1 1s. for Missions, as "A thank-offering for the privilege of preaching the Gospel."—Jan. 12. From a Staff-Sergeant 5s., saved by giving up smoking.—Jan. 16. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £60—Jan. 21. From Hyers, France, £5 for Missions.

Feb. 7. Sent as the legacy of the late Miss E. A. H. £50 for Missions and £50 for the Orphans. —From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £80—Feb. 8. The last work I did yesterday evening at the Orphan Houses was, to go through the list of Missionary brethren, whom I seek to assist, and portion out £439 for some of them, writing down to the last Pound all I had left. After this, in my usual long season for prayer, I asked the Lord, among many other things, for more means for Missionary Objects. Now see how soon the prayer was answered. This morning I received from Devonshire a cheque for £200, which was left at my disposal, except that the donor kindly wished me to keep £25 for myself. I took, therefore, £125 for Missions, £25 for the Bible Fund, and £25 for the Tract Fund.—Feb. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Feb. 26. A servant of the Lord Jesus having received a present of £150 and desiring to lay up treasure in heaven, gave £148 of it for Missions.

March 7. From a Scotch donor £200 for Missions.— March 22. From Nelson, New Zealand, £2 For Missions.—March 27. Received £2 3s. for Missions and 7s. for the Orphans, with the following instructive letter: "Dear Sir,—Having experienced much of the Lord’s goodness through many afflictive circumstances, I felt constrained to devote a small sum out of what the Lord has given me, viz., one penny in the shilling of what I make of butter and eggs, and five shillings for each calf that we breed. We have lost three calves by an epidemic, nevertheless I send the money, as it was devoted; and the trial to our faith is, no doubt, a more precious gift to us, than the retention of the calves would have been.—We lent one of your Reports to a Godly dressmaker of our neighbourhood. She felt desirous to help in the good cause, and desired that the progeny of a favourite rabbit should he sold, and the proceeds given to the Orphans. When the rabbits were fit for sale, she changed her mind. A part must be kept back, she thought, to help the cause of God at home. That very part, two rabbits, were found dead on the day they were sold. The proceeds from the sale of the young ones, amount to seven shillings, which she wishes to be applied to the maintenance of the Orphans. I also send you £2 3s., from the sale of butter, eggs, etc., for the purpose of helping Evangelists who labour in Popish countries. Etc."

April 1. From a donor then in Devonshire £200 for servants of God who labour among the heathen.—April 2. From Somersetshire £50 for Missions, with £50 for the Orphans.—April 10. As a birth-day thank-offering £28 10s. for Missions, with £28 10s. for the support of the Orphans.— April 13. From Gloucestershire £50 for Foreign Missions.—April 17. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £150—April 18. From Scotland £70 for Foreign Missions with £30 for the Orphans.—April 20. From South Australia £4 10s.—From an Army Schoolmaster in India £1 10s., and from a Christian widow, through him, 10s.—April 24. £20 with the following letter: "My dear Sir, As God gives me grace, I give to Him a fourth part of all money He gives to me. From this Satan tries hard to move me. Pray that he may not succeed. I have lately come into the possession of a little, of which the enclosed £20 is a portion. Please take it for Missions. Affectionately yours, * * * *."

From Yorkshire for Foreign Missions £25—April 26. From Scotland £60—April 29. From Yorkshire for Foreign Missions £25.

May 4. A valuable gold watch and a gold neck stud to be sold for the benefit of Missionaries amongst the heathen—May 9. A legacy of the late Miss L. L. for Missionaries at Home and Abroad £10, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £10, and £100 for the support of the Orphans.—May 13. Received 10s. with the following letter from Ipswich: "Dear Sir, The enclosed 10s. is given by a very poor Sister in the Lord for His work under your care, to be used as most needed. She gave it into my care by two-pence weekly insta1ments. I remain, Sir, Yours in Jesus * * * *." Notice, esteemed Reader, this donation. Ten Shillings made up by weekly instalments. It took this poor Godly woman sixty weeks to give this amount; yet she goes on, steadily, week after week, giving to this brother in Christ her two-pence, until this little sum was made up. She had not a Ten Pound nor a Five Pound Note to send; nor had she the means of sending even ten shillings at one time; but she does what she can, she gives two-pence per week. It is not the amount that the Lord looks at; but He looks at the spirit in which we give, and at the amount left in our hands, after we have given. By this the Lord judges of our gifts. The above ten shillings were taken for the Bible—, Missionary— and Tract-Fund.—May 22. From Scotland for Missions £100—May 23. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £148. By the donations for Missions during the last two days, with what was previously in hand, I had the great joy of being able to portion out on May 23, 1867, the sum of £1,267 for brethren who labour in the Gospel, whereby the total amount, expended on this Object, during the year, amounted to £5,010 l8s. 2d.

I have thus given a few specimens of the way it pleased the Lord to supply us with means for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund, from May 26, 1866 to May 26, 1867. We were thus helped through another year with regard to means for the first four Objects of the Institution, and though about Seven Thousand Pounds on them alone had been expended, through waiting upon the Lord and the exercise of faith, we obtained all we needed, and had at the end of the yearly period a balance of £90 3s. 1½d. in hand. With this amount, we entered upon the year from May 26, 1867 to May 26, 1868, having before us to assist 133 Missionaries at Home and Abroad, to support entirely, and assist a number of Schools, to seek to circulate many thousand copies of the Holy Scriptures, and to circulate millions of Tracts in the course of the year. Yet, we were helped this year also and were enabled to accomplish even more than before. I refer now to a few instances, as specimens, how the Lord was pleased to supply us with the needed means.

We began the year on May 27, 1867, as stated before, with £90 3s. 1½d. in hand for these Objects, which was indeed little for our requirements; but we called upon the Lord, and before this balance was expended, received far more than the amount with which we began the year. On May 28th, altogether, in 10 donations, came in £9 8s. 5d. One of these donations was from a Christian shopkeeper, who sent 3s. 5d., being one penny in the pound of the sum he had taken during the previous week. This donor has sent, week by week, about the same sum. One penny in the Pound seems little, yet, even this little, amounted in the end to about £8 during the year. I refer to this to show how important it is to give as the Lord prospers us. On May 29th we received From London £50. On May 29th £11 14s. 6d. Of this amount £10 was sent by a Christian mercantile gentleman, who, month after month, during the whole year, sent £10, £15, or £20, just as God was pleased to prosper him. On May 31 from Kent £100. And as it pleased God to supply our need during the first five days of the year, so did He also during the whole of the period, for the sake of our Lord Jesus, listen to our supplications, and give unto us continually the needed help.

June 3. Received today £51 5s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I enclose my cheque, value £51 5s., to be applied £20 for Missions, £20 for the dear children under your care, and the balance for yourself £11 5s. I send this in acknowledgment of God’s mercies, having had great losses in business, and feeling truly thankful that I am in a position to bear them, and still to carry on my business as usual, with the prayer that God may keep me humble at the foot of the cross of Christ. Etc." Observe 1, The donor takes his losses out of the hand of God. So should all do, under similar circumstances. It is deeply important to own His hand in all that befalls us. 2, He is grateful that not all is taken from him, as might have been the case. In this the donor should be imitated by all under similar circumstances. We are entirely dependant upon God, and therefore not only a part of what we have might be taken, but all. 3, The writer of the letter brings his thank-offering to God. For what? Not for a large increase of his means, but that the Lord has not taken all from him, and that, notwithstanding great losses, he is able to carry on his business as usual. In this many Christians in business fail. When difficulties and losses come, instead of cleaving the more to God, and being the more grateful to Him, that they are as well off as they are, He is less remembered; and as to being more faithful in stewardship, while it is continued, the losses are only dwelt on, and exceedingly little can now be afforded for the poor or the work of God. And what is the result? The losses increase yet more and more. Oh! that the saints would be wise, and learn; but they frequently act so as to oblige God, in very love to them, to take by Thousands and Tens of Thousands that of which they were unwilling to give Him in Tens or Hundreds.

July 3. From Worcestershire £25 for the School Fund, £20 for the Bible Fund, £100 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, £100 for the Orphans, and £30 for myself.

Aug. 14. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.

Sep. 18. From Christians at Melbourne, Australia, £2 for Missions with £3 for the Orphans.

Oct. 7. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Oct. 12. From France Fifty Francs and also One Hundred Francs.—"From a willing giver" £15, with £25 for the Orphans and £10 for myself.—Oct. 23. Received from Yorkshire £2 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, In another note I hand you a Post Office Order for £2 10s. Please to take £1 for the Orphans, £1 for the Missionary Fund, and 10s. for yourself. This is a portion of what I lay aside weekly, as the Lord prospers me; and truly I find, as I honour the Lord with my substance, He honours me with His blessing upon my labours. Believe me yours faithfully, * * * *." Oct. 25. From Devonshire £100 for Missions to the heathen.—Oct. 31. From Scotland £60.

Nov. 9. From Calcutta £9 for Missions, £9 for the Orphans and £2 for myself.—Nov. 19. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Dec. 27 From I. W. N. A gold watch and a gold chain, the proceeds half for Missions and half for the Orphans.—Dec. 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—From Australia £10 for Missions.

Jan. 1, 1868. At the end of the year we had not much left for these 4 Objects; but the Lord remembered our need and answered our prayers. There was received today from a Scotch donor £100 for Missions, £29 7s. 2d. for the School—, Bible— and Tract-Fund, with £50 for the Building Fund.—There came in also, from a donor in Worcestershire, £150 for Missions, £25 for the support of the Schools, £20 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £40 for the circulation of Tracts, £100 for the support of the Orphans, and £30 for myself.—13 donations were received besides, amounting to £7 17s.— Jan. 7. Legacy of the late Mrs. P. £110—Jan. 20. Received from Rome £2 for Missions, £6 for the Orphans, and £2 for myself.—Jan. 28. £3 10s. "Instead of paying the money to a Life Insurance Office."

Feb. 5. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £150—Feb. 6. From Leicestershire £50—Feb. 11 "By sale of canaries," from some young ladies, £1 14s. 3d—Feb. 21. £20 with the following letter from Lancashire: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in fulfilling a vow made to the Lord, months ago, that, if He would kindly give me the means, and raise me in health, I would send you £20, to apply to whatever purpose you liked. I enclose registered Post Office Orders for Twenty Pounds, as a thank-offering to Jesus for great deliverance in a dreadful catastrophe, by which several persons were killed and many injured, myself also being seriously injured. I am, dear Sir, very faithfully yours, * * * *." Feb. 26. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £80.

March 2. Received £15 with the following letter: "Dearly beloved Sir, The Lord has prospered me exceedingly, since He put it in my heart to assist you. May He bless you and the thank-offering I herewith enclose, a cheque for £15. Ten Pounds for Evangelists in England and Five for your own necessities, or the Orphans, as you may require." "His gentleness hath made me great." Yours faithfully, * * * *." The £5 left to my disposal was taken for the Orphans.—March 12. From New Brunswick £4—March 13. From Ohio, U.S.A., £41 7s. 8d.—March 17. A devoted Evangelist, labouring for years as a preacher of the Gospel in dependence upon the Lord for his temporal supplies, and who had at least fifty times sent to me donations of £1 or £2 at a time, sent me from his death-bed 15s. for Missions, and 15s. for the Orphans. I have never seen this dear brother in Christ, but God laid this work on his heart to help me, according to his ability. His donations were chiefly for Foreign Missions.—March 18. Received from an Irish servant the first halves of three One Pound Notes with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have good news to tell you. There is another child born of the Spirit, even she who wrote to you the last time, saying ‘there is no peace to the wicked.’ God has chosen another base thing; He can polish it, and He has done it, and will do it more. And now I want to leave all and Follow Jesus. I was left an Orphan as early as five or six years old, and all that time, up to now, He has provided me with food and clothes far better than most poor children. I have laid up a little treasure in an earthly Bank, but I want to lend it to the Lord, and have taken it out, to send it to His cause. What I want to say is, if He supported me, when I was young and an unbeliever, shall He not much more than support me now that I am reconciled by the blood of Jesus? * * * * £2 18s. I had in the Bank, the interest came to 1s., and I added another Shilling, which makes it Three Pounds. You know best where it is wanted. Your obedient Servant, * * * *." The money was taken for these Objects. Here is another remarkable instance of the manner in which God is pleased, to supply me with means. The writer is an entire stranger to me. Whether I receive large sums from the wealthy or small amounts from the poor, all comes in answer to prayer. I wait on God for help. I do so repeatedly every day, and He helps me. Even my most intimate friends, though never so wealthy, have never been asked by me for help; they have never even had hints given to them, that their help would be acceptable. From this I have refrained, because one of the primary objects of this Institution is, to bring before the world and the Church a tangible proof how much even in this Nineteenth Century can be accomplished simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith; and to give a clear demonstration, that God is now as much the Living God as He was Four Thousand years ago. To this object I have joyfully devoted my whole life and energy; and, by God’s grace, have gladly passed through the difficulties which have befallen me in this service. Moreover, though I have been carrying on this Institution in this way ever since 1834, I am not tired of this way; though the work increases, and though the difficulties multiply instead of decreasing: I joyfully confess to the glory of God, that I find Him a present helper in difficulties and trials, and am not allowed to call upon Him in vain, though sometimes I have to wait long for the answer. May my dear fellow-believers be encouraged more and more to trust in God, under all circumstances; and may those, who do not know God, be stirred up, to seek after the forgiveness of their sins, by faith in the atoning death of the Lord Jesus, so that they too maybe reconciled to God, and find in Him a never failing Friend.

March 21. Today I received from Belgium £1 13s. for Missions with 14s. 6d. for the Orphans. "Of this amount 18 Francs 57 Cs.," (the missionary who sends the money writes,) "come from the box of our brother the tinker." This box is in a dark corner of a very small shop, crowded with broken pots and pans, etc. When I broke the box this morning to take out the money, it was so covered with dust and damp, that it needed to be washed; but it is not less precious on that account, for it comes from a heart which sincerely loves the Lord."—From a private soldier in India £1 16s. 11d—March 24. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—March 30. A valuable gold watch and watch key, the proceeds to be taken for Missions and for the support of the Orphans.—From the neighbourhood of Southampton £1, with these words "A thank-offering for the Lord’s goodness to me in restoring two cows that were very ill, and not expected to live."—From Herefordshire £3 8s. as "The first fruits of a slate quarry."—Received also from a labourer in the Gospel, who trusts in the Lord for his temporal necessities, 12s., with this statement: "Dear Mr. Müller, I desire to enclose 12s. for your work for the Lord, and trust He will continue to supply all your need. He loveth a cheerful giver; for He is the most cheerful giver, who gave us His dear Son, and with Him freely gives us all things. The Lord led me, 5 years since, to begin with a tenth to give to Him of all He sent me for my use; and, by His grace, He has helped me to go from a tenth to a seventh, then to a fifth, now to a half of all He gives me. As the work increases, and helpers come forward to the work, so He has enabled me to share with them. Etc."

April 22. A servant of the Lord Jesus, having received a present of £100, constrained by the love of Christ, gave this £100 for Missions.

May 4, 1868. Received the following letter from Copenhagen from a Christian Danish master of a vessel, with Ten Pounds: "Coming up the Channel with a dirty southerly wind the 19th of April and a low barometer, falling rapidly—in fact so low, that I could not look at it any more, I was troubled about the safety of the ship. Sail was taken in after sail, till at last only time three lower topsails remained on. The ship heeled over and went through the swelling waters snorting, the rain pouring down, with a heavy blow. As my hope was strengthened in prayer, that God would help me to find the way, I promised to send £10. At 1:55 a.m. saw Dungeness light and came through, thank God! This is a thank-offering to the Lord, with prayer for His further protection and grace to confess His name, where He thinks proper. £5 for yourself, the rest as you desire. Etc." The £5 was taken for these Objects.—May 9. From a Shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £100—May 11 From Ohio, U.S.A., £43 13s. 5d.—May 12. From one of the former Orphans, who has for more than 25 years walked in the ways of God, and who is in service, 5s. for the Bible and Tract Fund, and 5s. for the Orphans. May 15. From a donor in Somersetshire £75, with £50 for the Orphans.—May 25. From Madras £87 16s.—May 26, 1868. From a servant of the Lord Jesus (having received a present of £150, and who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven), £148.

I have thus referred to a few donations to show the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means for the first four Objects of the Institution, from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868.

After the year was ended, during which we had been enabled to expend for these Objects above £7,500, we had yet a balance left of £375 2s. 10¼d., whilst the year had been commenced with £90 3s. 1½d. These expenses were exclusive of those for the Orphan work, and which amounted to more than Thirty-Three Thousand and Seven Hundred Pounds during that year. Will you not admire, esteemed Reader, the blessedness of trusting in God alone, and expecting help from Him alone? Verily we do not wait upon God for naught! And this help we have enjoyed, ever since this Institution was begun on March 5, 1834. He has never forsaken us. We have never been confounded. The longer we go on in this way the more we find how able not only God is to help us, but how willing; and this not only with reference to pecuniary supplies, but in every other way, in which we may require His help.

As stated, we had, on entering upon the year from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, a balance of £375 2s. 10¼d. in hand, yet what was this, in comparison with the expenses before us, connected with the Schools, the circulation of many Thousands of copies of the Holy Scriptures and Millions of Tracts, and in aiding 141 Missionaries at Home and Abroad? But our hope was in God, and He helped us during that year, and enabled us to accomplish more than ever. I shall now refer to a few donations, as specimens, which came in during that year.

Aug. 5, 1868. Received the following letter from Ireland: "My dear Mr. Müller, I have been an invalid for some time and am now nearing my happy home, where I shall be ever with the Lord. I have much pleasure in enclosing you a Bank Post Bill for £600, to be used in the various branches of the Lord’s work in which you are so happily engaged. May the Lord continue to strengthen you in mind and body for His service, and abundantly crown all your labours with success. Yours affectionately in Jesus, * * * *." This dear Christian lady I never saw, but she had for 20 years and upwards sent about £5 annually for the work. She was not rich, but laboured for her bread, and I should not be surprised to hear, that this £600 was the bulk of what she possessed. How able and willing God is, to provide us with means for His work! I took of this £600, for Missions £250, for the Schools £50, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £50, for the circulation of Tracts £50, and for the Orphans £200—Aug. 17. From Somersetshire £10, as a thank-offering for recovery from sickness.—Aug. 28. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Sep. 1. From Scotland £50—Sep. 2. From London £25, with £25 for the Orphans.—Sep. 5. Received the following letter from Sweden. "Dear Brother in the Lord, I have the pleasure of forwarding to you a draft for £5 9s. 7d. Sterling (equal to Rix-dollars 100, Swedish Rix-mynt) being a donation of the late Mr. A. K of O., to be used for your Missions to the heathen, of the safe arrival of which I beg you to inform me. In June last year, my brother G. P. had the pleasure of seeing you. Since 1851 he had given his life to the preaching of the Gospel. Last summer he found an opportunity to accomplish his long cherished desire of seeing something of the work of God in England. He came back greatly refreshed and full of joy in the Lord, and took up his work again, when suddenly, on a Sunday morning, in the midst of his work, he was seized with a fatal attack of liver complaint. On Wednesday evening next (Sep. 18th) he fell asleep in Jesus, in assurance of the rest that remaineth for the people of God.—Being unmarried and contenting himself with very little, he counted himself happy to "labour without hire" the last part of his life. Through the profits of a Hymn Book, issued in partnership with myself, he obtained, however, a little sum of money, which he intended, either for his old age, or, if he should not need it himself, for the promotion of the kingdom of Christ. On his way to England, last year, in a letter from Gothenburg, he expressed to me his wish, that, if he should not return, 5,000 Rix-dollars, Swedish Rix-mynt, should be paid to "Mr. George Müller’s Mission to the heathen." This wish he repeated on his death bed. I should desire to send this sum now, but cannot get it out of my business this year. I hope next year to be able to send the greatest part, if not the whole, to be spent for the object my beloved brother desired.—Some years ago a copy of "the Lord’s Dealings with George Müller" fell into my hands, and I feel thankful to God for reading it, and have issued a compendium of it in Swedish. May the Lord stir up faithful stewards in our country also. Yours in Christian love,* * * *."—I have pleasure in giving this letter to show in what a variety of ways the Lord is able and willing to provide means, if we carry on His work in dependence on Him for what we need. See, how from that comparatively poor country, through a stranger, 5,000 Rix-dollars (about £278 Sterling) are intended to be sent as a legacy for Missions to the heathen. Be encouraged afresh, my brethren in Christ, you who need help for the work of God, to trust in Him with all your heart, and you will not do so in vain—From Ohio, U.S.A., £20 15s. 9d. for Missions among the heathen—Sep. 18. From Hastings £50 with £50 for the Orphans.—Sep. 28. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—From the Orphans of eight departments in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, £9 4s. 9d. for Missions. The dear children had, of their own accord, out of their own little treasure, contributed this for Missions.

Oct. 28, 1868. £50 for the Spanish Mission, from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Nov. 5. Received £54 8s. 8d. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have much pleasure in handing you a cheque for £54 8s. 8d., which I will thank you to dispose of as follows—Missions £25, Orphans £29 8s. 8d.— You are quite aware, that for the past few years I have given you an interest in one particular branch of my business, and that every year your share has been steadily increasing; but this year, I am very sorry to say, there has been a great falling off, arising from severe competition, so that your share I find to be only £29 8s. 8d, instead of over fifty pounds, the amount of last year. Yet, notwithstanding, I find, in taking stock, that I never had a more successful year, save one.—You have during the past few years pleaded with me at the throne of grace for the conversion of my only child. I feel sure you will rejoice with me, when I tell you he took the Lord’s supper with us for the first time last month. It has been my wish for some time past to send you a thank-offering, on so joyful an occasion, and it affords me great pleasure to add to your sum £25 more. With kind regards believe me, yours truly, * * * *."

Dec. 2. From Worcestershire £2 with this letter: "Dear Sir, I forward you £2, per Post Office Order, being a penny in the shilling of my wages since I sent last, to be used at your discretion. I remain, etc. * * * *." Observe what a variety of instruments the Lord is pleased to use, to supply us with means. The wealthy, the middle-class, the labourer, the very poor, all are alike influenced to help on this work, in answer to prayer. While I am writing this, a lady from Germany, who is about to go through the Orphan Houses, called on me. She expressed her great surprise, that I am supplied with means for so great a work, and especially when I told her, that for several years our requirements, have been at the rate of more than One Hundred Pounds a day. My reply to her was, that, though Elijah has been taken to heaven thousands of years since, the God of Elijah still lives. I told her, that I received all simply in answer to prayer. There were lying before me on my table, among many other letters, three, which I held up to her, saying: "this I received last evening from Paris, containing £205; this from Switzerland, containing £1 3s. 10d., and this from the United States, containing £20 Sterling. I added, I have joyfully dedicated my whole life to the Lord, in order to prove to the world and to the church of God at large, what may be accomplished, simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith.—Dec. 3. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Dec. 4. From C. H. £2 "As a thank-offering for safe return off a long voyage."—Dec. 5. From a Scotch donor £200 for Missions among the heathen—Dec. 7. From "Gratitude" in Van Dieman’s Land, five £1 notes.—Dec. 10. From Scotland £50 for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—Dec. 21. From Switzerland £1 7s. 10d.—Dec 22. £50 with the following letter: "Dear Brother in the Lord, I herewith send you £50 for the Lord’s work in your hands. I would suggest that it be laid out as follows, £10 for the School—, Bible—and Tract Fund and Home Missions, £10 for Foreign Missions, the rest for the Orphans; but I leave it to you, it may be otherwise needed. Please enter it from "One who loves Jesus." Hitherto I have sent you one or two small sums, which were the interest of the Lord’s money, this is the principal; and I praise the Lord for thus inclining my heart to give all to Him. My reward is from Him, and I want not the thanks or praise of men. May the Lord continue to bless you in your work for Him, is the earnest prayer of your affectionate younger brother in Jesus, * * * *."—From Cardiff, £45, with £5 for myself.—From Brighton £45 5s. 6d., with l4s. 6d. for books, and £10, for myself, "From a willing giver."—Dec 28. £12 with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Please accept the enclosed £12 for the work in which you are engaged: £8 for furnishing the New Orphan Houses, if required; if not for the use of the Orphans; and £4 for Missions.—I think it right to tell you, that it is now about 7 years, since we were induced, principally through the instrumentality of reading your books, to set aside a certain portion of our income for God’s cause. We were then in very straitened circumstances, and we made up our minds to give a tenth. The very next day our means were slightly increased, and went on doing so. We then gave a fourth. After a long time things seemed again to look dark. I say seemed to look dark; for the event proved, that we were not really any worse off than before; but, by God’s help, we said, we will wait patiently, perhaps God is only trying us. We did not give any less to His cause. And now He has placed us in a position of prosperity that we have never enjoyed before, and are able to give a fourth of our income. It is indeed a blessed thing to trust in the Lord, and we are led to exclaim with the Psalmist, "Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all His benefits." Apologizing for taking up so much of your valuable time, I am, dear Sir, Yours sincerely, * * * *." I have had repeatedly similar donations from these donors.

Dec. 29, 1868. From Ohio, U.S.A., for Missions among the heathen, £37 12s. 9d.—Dec. 30. Received today from London a gold watch and chain, a diamond ring, 3 other gold rings, a gold necklet, 7 gold studs, 3 pairs of gold earrings, 2 gold breast pins, 4 brooches, a gold cross, 2 lockets, 2 bracelets, 2 pairs of links, 2 gold slides, a watch hook, a silver pencil case, and 2 pieces of artificial teeth, set in gold. The articles were taken to be sold for Missions. The letter announcing these articles contained this: "We have been praying the Lord to accept, what His love has made of no value to us; and we pray Him abundantly to bless you and yours and your labour of love for His sake. Be comforted, dear Brother, for ‘He is faithful’ whom we serve. Be patient, for ‘the time is short.’ ‘Occupy till I come.’ ‘Yet a little while.’ ‘Even so, come, Lord Jesus.’ With Christian love, yours affectionately in Christ Jesus, * * * *." Will this dear Christian couple, from whom these articles came, be the poorer, or will they be the less adorned in the sight of the Lord? Verily not. I greatly delight in such donations. If all the disciples of the Lord Jesus acted in this way, what an abundance would thus at once flow into the treasury of the Lord; and if this were done from the love of Christ, what blessing would come to those who were thus enabled to give up their ornaments.—Dec. 31. Received today the following letter, with £100: "Dear Mr. Müller,—It is with pleasure I enclose you a cheque for £100, although I have suffered severe pecuniary losses during the past year. I wish it to be appropriated as follows—£10 for yourself, £60 for the Orphans, and £30 for Missions, etc. May the Lord condescend to receive the offering. With Christian regards, &c., * * * *." Received also £500 from Canada, which, being left at my disposal, I took £200 for Missions, £50 for the Circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £50 for the Tract Fund, and £200 for the support of the Orphans. Thus closed the year 1868 with regard to the Funds for these Objects; we were bountifully supplied with all we needed.

Jan. 1, 1869. From Scotland £50 for Missions, £25 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and £25 for the circulation of Tracts. Received also from a considerable distance £10 for these Objects, with £10 for the Orphans. About this latter donation I make a few remarks. At the early part of the year 1868, a Christian business man wrote to me for advice in his peculiarly difficult business affairs. His letter showed that he had a desire to walk in the ways of the Lord, and to carry on his business to the glory of God; but his circumstances were of the most trying character. I therefore wrote to him to come to Bristol, that I might be able to advise him. Accordingly he undertook the long journey, and I had an interview with him, through which I saw his most trying position in business. Having fully conversed with him, I gave him the following counsel: 1, That he should day by day, expressly for the purpose, retire with his Christian wife, that they might unitedly spread their business difficulties before God in prayer, and do this, if possible, twice a day. 2, That he should look out for answers to his prayers, and expect that God would help him. 3, That he should avoid all business trickeries, such as exposing for sale two or three articles, marked below boat price, for the sake of attracting customers, because of its being unbecoming a disciple of the Lord Jesus to use such artifices; and that, if he did so, he could not reckon on the blessing of God. 4, I advised him further, to set apart, out of his profits, week by week, a certain proportion for the work of God, whether his income was much or little, and use this income faithfully for the Lord. 5, Lastly, I asked him, to let me know, month after month, how the Lord dealt with him.—The reader will feel interested to learn, that from that time the Lord was pleased to prosper the business of this dear Christian brother, so that his returns from the 1st of March, 1868, up to March 1, 1869, were £9,138 13s. 5d., while during the same period the previous year they had been only £6,609 18s. 3d., therefore £2,5287. 15s. 2d. more than the year before. When he sent me the donation above referred to, he also writes, that he had been enabled to put aside during the previous year £123 13s. 3d. for the work of God or the need of the poor.—I have so fully dwelt on this, because Christians in business may be benefited by it.—Jan. 5, 1869. Received £20 15s. 7d., with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Herewith please receive a cheque for £20 15s. 7d., the balance of a fund devoted to God’s work. it is now eight years since I commenced (after reading your book) systematically putting away a portion of my income. I began with a tenth and have gone on to a fifth, and even beyond. I can truly say ‘there has been no lack;’ notwithstanding bad times, they have not been bad with me. Talk about insuring against bad debts! why, here is an office that will never collapse. I advise all my friends to effect policies in it at once. With kind Christian regards, wishing you much joy and comfort in your labour of love, I am, dear Sir, yours truly, * * * *." £10 15s. 7d. of this money was taken for the support of the Orphans, and £10 for the first four Objects of the Institution.—Jan. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Jan. 23. From one of the Midland Counties, £25 for the School Fund, £20 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £150 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, £100 for the Orphans, and £30 for myself. —Jan. 26. From Ohio, U.S.A., £103 17s. for Missions to the Heathen and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.

Feb. 4. Received £50 with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Müller, I beg to enclose you a cheque for £50 in aid of the Lord’s work in your hands, which you are at liberty to dispose of as you think fit. I should like you to keep £10 of it for your own personal expenses. I have to express to you the benefit I have received in reading your works, leading me to realise more deeply my privileges and responsibilities as a Christian, I have seen the hand of the Lord in a marked manner in my business affairs lately. I determined, after serious consideration, to give up a certain portion of my business, that I felt led me into temptation; and also some customs, which, although I could not positively condemn in others, I could not happily pursue myself. Looking at it naturally, I expected my business to be much diminished, perhaps lost; but I had before determined, and had pursued for a short time the practice of devoting any money beyond that necessary for my own wants, received in income from business, to the Lord’s work. Therefore I felt, if it was the Lord’s will, and He intended me to be a steward of His, I should receive the money; and He enabled me thus to leave it in His hands. The result has been, I have had business placed in my hands where least expected. My income last year increased considerably, and I have been enabled to give away several Hundred Pounds, etc." See how God honours those who honour Him! How giving up ways and practices unsuitable for a disciple of the Lord Jesus, did not bring loss but gain, even in this life! But if acting according to the mind of the Lord should at any time bring trial, or even loss as to the things of this life, what is all this in comparison with seeking to please the Lord, and doing those things which are according to His mind.—Feb. 5. Received from a great distance £10 with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I have the pleasure of handing you the enclosed two £5 notes for our dear Lord’s service. I am His property. I also eat His bread, wear His clothes, and breathe His air; and He gives me the enjoyment of very gracious thoughts in reference to Himself, and some little delightful expectations of His very near approach. I wish to be practically thankful, so I have offered the enclosed for His gracious acceptance, signifying thereby that I am not my own, and have nothing that is my own; and, but for His loving kindness in purchasing me—then, instead of this thanksgiving, the least that would have been accepted would have been the payment of all my fearful debt, even to the uttermost farthing. Pray use your discretion in applying the enclosed, and, if needful, take it yourself. I remain, dear Mr. Müller, Yours very thankfully, * * * *." P.S. I may add, that it was by means of your teaching, that the Lord led me some time ago to give a seventh of my income, as a thanksgiving for all I receive, after giving which I hold myself free to give as the Lord shall call, and in one year He called for every penny I had in store. I say all this in confidence and for your comfort, as the Lord has graciously made you a great comfort to me. Bless the Lord, O my soul!" The above £10 was taken for these Objects.—Feb. 8. From Scotland £75. Feb. 15. £5 from "God fearing soldiers in Peshawur, India."—From the neighbourhood of Southampton £38 16s.—Feb. 17. £100 From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven. Feb. 18. From near London £100 for Missions, £100 for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, £290 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.—Feb. 22. From Adelaide, South Australia. £10.

March 1. From Scotland £50—March 17. £100 for the Spanish Mission, from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—March 24. From Scotland £100 for Missions and £50 for the Orphans.—March 31. Received £25, with the following letter from a considerable distance: "My dear Sir, I enclose you cheque for £25 for any portion of your work most in need of it, though I should be glad if you would take £5 of it for yourself. I sold some property about October last by auction, and in prospect of the sale, I was led to devote one half of the proceeds (above the reserve fixed) to the work of the Lord. He was graciously pleased to give me £132 10s. for His work, by this means, and the £25 I now send is, what I thought, a fair proportion of the amount, after considering some other claims more immediately under my own notice.—The Lord was pleased also to give me success in a difficulty respecting my title to another property, since that sale, and He led me to dedicate one tenth of the value of the estate to His work, if it was proved to be mine. I expect the estate will shortly be sold; if so, I shall have about £500 to dispose of for Him. It makes me very happy to carry out these plans, and I am greatly indebted to your work for the purpose being put into my heart. Yours faithfully, * * * *." This gentleman I do not know personally. I not only have given this letter and other similar ones to show in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to supply me with means, but especially to prove to my fellow believers, that, if the work in which we are engaged is indeed the work of God, and we commit our necessities to Him in believing prayer, expecting help, we shall not trust in Him in vain. The hearts of all are in the hands of God, and it is a very little thing to Him, to influence them to help us. Through waiting upon God, and looking to Him alone for help at all times and under all necessities, by His grace my faith has been so increased, that if I could see it clearly to be His will, I should be engaged in any service, I should not be cast down on account of the great amount needed, or the great difficulties to be overcome, resting assured, that God would help me. At the same time, I should most carefully, most prayerfully, most patiently, desire to ascertain, whether, indeed, it were the will of God, that I should be engaged in such a service.

April 3. Anonymously from a Christian Friend, £120 for Missions, and £120 for the support of the Orphans.—April 10. From Devonshire £125 for the Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, £150 for the Orphans and £25 for myself.—Apr, 14. £100 From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Apr. 19. From C. W. £4 4s., instead of insuring his life.—From Scotland £60, with £15 for myself.—Apr. 21. From France £200 for labourers in the Gospel among the heathen and £5 for myself.

May 1. From Scotland for Missions £100—May 17. From India £57 16s., with £30 for the Orphans.—May 22. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—May 25, 1869. From Penang £2 2s.

I have thus referred to some donations, out of hundreds given for these Objects, between May 26, 1868, and May 26, 1869, to show in what a variety of ways, and from what a variety of places and countries, it pleased the Lord to supply us with means, and to such an extent, that during that year we were not only able to accomplish as much as during former years, but to expend about Two Thousand Pounds more on Missionary Objects than during the year before; to circulate a far greater number of copies of the Holy Scriptures than during any former period; and to expend considerably more on the circulation of Tracts, than during the previous year. Yet all this was accomplished, though at the commencement of the year there was but a small balance, comparatively, in hand, and the expenses for the Orphans were about Three Thousand Pounds more, than during the year before. How blessed to have God on our side as a helper, and how sure our success, if we trust in Him!

After the 26th May, 1869, the first four Objects of the Institution were still further considerably enlarged. From this time I had it especially laid on my heart, with my might, to give myself to the establishment of Schools, in which the primary object was, the Spiritual benefit of the Scholars, of course not to the neglect of proper instruction in secular matters. Many Schools were from that time established, and now (in 1874) the number entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, is ten times as great as it was before May 1869. Since then, also, the aiding of Missionary efforts has been very considerably increased, and the number of labourers in the Gospel, at home and abroad, at the end of 1873, was 190. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures, likewise, is now more than double what it was before May, 1869; and the circulation of Tracts has been considerably increased since that time. But as these Objects were so greatly enlarged, the expenses were in proportion considerably increased also, and we needed more and more, by prayer and faith, to draw help out of the inexhaustible treasures of our Heavenly Father. The following will show, how He was pleased to help us continually. I now give some instances of the way in which we were supplied with means.

June 1, 1869. From a Christian grocer, 2s. 8d., being one penny in the pound of his takings during the previous week. Week by week the same donor has ever since repeated his donation. This is a practical illustration on the smallest scale, of regular systematic giving, as the Lord may prosper us. Thus was altogether received about £8 yearly.—June 25. Legacy of the late Mr. H. £45, with £45 for the Orphans.—June 26. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—June 30. From a Christian merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £40 for Missions, £40 for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, and £40 for the support of the Orphans.

July 9. From two Christian manufacturers £60 for Missions, £35 for School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, and £5 for myself.—July 19. From a Christian manufacturer £30 for Missions, £15 for the School—, Bible—and Tract Fund, and £15 for the Orphans.—July 26. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £8—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

August 2. Two months of the new year had now passed away, and the expenses had been far greater than the balance left in hand at the end of the year, being £805 6s. 5d.; but the Lord was pleased, during those two months, so to send in means in answer to our daily prayer, and according to our full confidence in Him, that He would help us, that we were not only able to meet all the needed expenses, but had now even more in hand, than at the beginning of the year. On Aug. 2 there came in from Christian soldiers in India, of the 36th Regiment Foot, £5—Aug. 10. Legacy of the late Miss H. £25, with £25 for the support of the Orphans.—From Clifton £25 towards the support of an Evangelist in Spain.—Aug. 13. From one of the Midland Counties £20 for the Bible Fund, £25 for the School Fund, £150 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, £100 for the Orphans, and £30 for myself.—Aug. 17. From Northumberland £20 for Foreign Missions.—From France 100 francs and 100 francs for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—Aug. 28. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—From Plymouth £10 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain.

Sept. 4, 1869. From a Christian merchant, who contributes as the Lord is pleased to prosper him, £50 for Missions and £50 for the Orphans.—Sep. 6. From Bournemouth £50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, especially the Gospel according to Luke, and £50 for the support of the Orphans. When I received this amount, I had taken steps, to enter to the utmost into every open door for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain—Sep. 9. From Yorkshire £50, with £50 for the Orphans.—Sep. 14. From New Zealand £10—Sep. 20. £25 for Foreign Missions and £5 for the poor, as "A thank-offering to the Lord for a chastisement." May I request the Christian reader to observe this. If, as believers in the Lord Jesus, we see, that our Heavenly Father, on account of wrong steps, or a wrong state of heart, is dealing with us in the way of discipline or correction, we have to be grateful for it; for He is acting thus towards us according to that self same love, which led Him not to spare His only begotten Son, but to deliver Him up for us; and our gratitude to Him is to be expressed in words, and even by deeds. We have to guard against practically despising the chastening of the Lord, though we may not do so in word, and against fainting under chastisement: since all is intended for blessing to us.—Sep. 22. Received £6 with the following letter from an entire stranger: "Dear Sir, I enclose a cheque for £6, £4 to be used as the kind Lord may direct you, and £2 for your own use. It is a thank-offering unto the Lord, for restoring me from a most grievous backsliding state, and also, that He has graciously permitted me to lose all my money, which has been a curse to me, as it was not earned in the fear of the Lord. I thank and praise Him, that He has been so gracious to me, as to take away that "root of evil," that He might bring me a blessing. Oh that I could warn all young Christians to beware of the love of money. Oh, that they could see the years of misery and sin and suffering of mind and body, which I have endured, and the way I have grieved the Lord Jesus, which is more than all! Etc." Will the Christian reader please to read this letter again; it is full of warning.—From Middlesex £50—Sep. 27. From some of the Orphans £7 l5s. 1½d. for Missions.—Sep. 28. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Sep. 30. From Yorkshire £50—I received also One Thousand Pounds today for the Lord’s work in China. About this donation it is especially to be noticed, that for months it had been my earnest desire to do more than ever for Mission Work in China, and I had already taken steps to carry out this desire, when this donation of One Thousand Pounds came to hand. This precious answer to prayer for means should be a particular encouragement to all who are engaged in the Lord’s work, and who may need means for it. It proves afresh, that, if our work is His work, and we honour Him, by waiting upon and looking to Him for means, He will surely, in His own time and way, supply them.

Oct. 1. From the neighbourhood of Chester £20—From a Christian merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £50—Oct. 6. Received One Thousand Pounds for Foreign Missions, Five Hundred Pounds for the Spanish Mission, and Ten Pounds for myself. Behold, dear Christian Reader, how good the Lord is, and how ready to help His servants who trust in Him! I have sought, during this period, to press into every open door, with reference to Foreign Missions; and God has supplied me with means accordingly, and gives now this further especial help in sending £1,000 for this object. In particular also, I have embraced every opportunity with regard to the Mission Field in Spain; and now He sends me £500 for this object, to help in meeting the very heavy expenses, which are to be met in connexion with this Mission. Be encouraged, therefore, you servants of the Lord Jesus, to look to the Lord for means for His service; but 1, Seek really to trust in Him only. 2, Pray for means, and look out for an answer to your prayers. 3, Wait patiently for His help, it will surely come in God’s own time. 4, Avoid working a deliverance of your own, or running before the Lord, by going in debt for the needed supplies for His precious work.—Oct. 13. From London £20 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain.—Oct. 23. Legacy of the late Mrs. C. £400. New 3 per Cent. Stock, sold at £365 9s. 6d.—Oct. 25. £2 as "A thank-offering for an averted catastrophe."—Oct. 30. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Nov. 1. From a Christian merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £80—From New Zealand, £10, with £10 for the Orphans.—Nov. 3. Received for Missions and the Bible Fund the following valuable trinkets: 5 gold rings, 4 gold rings set with diamonds, 2 silver rings, 1 hair ring, gold mounted, a gold bracelet, set with rubies and diamonds, a gold necklet with locket, another gold bracelet, a gold brooch, set with a carbuncle, a pair of gold earrings, set with carbuncles, 3 pearl brooches, a pair of gold earrings, a pair of pearl earrings, 2 pairs of coral earrings, a pair of cornelian earrings, a gold brooch, set with gannets, a gold brooch, set with coral, an eye-glass, gold mounted, a pair of mourning ear-rings, a pair of ivory earrings, a set of silver ornaments, 2 stone bracelets, a stone necklace, and a few other articles.—Nov. 10. Received £3 5s. for Missions, with the following letter: "The last eight weeks I have increased my offering to the Lord to Six Pence out of every Pound I take. Strange to say, I have taken £7 a week more, on an average, over my counter, ever since. But none is mine, it is the Lord’s, laid on the altar, with other possessions and myself, His servant, for Jesus’ sake."—Nov. 11. From London £100 for Missions to the heathen.—Nov. 15. £5 "In thankful acknowledgment of release from the office of Mayor of this Borough."—Nov. 19. From India £15 6s. 7d., being the amount obtained for the surrender of a Life Policy, as the Christian donor saw it to be the will of God, no longer to insure his life.—Nov. 24. Received from a great distance two Turkish Six per Cent. Bonds for Five Hundred Pounds each, the disposal of which being left to me, I took, after they had been sold, two fifths of the amount for Missions, one fifth for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, one fifth for the School and Tract Fund, and one fifth for the support of the Orphans. See how the Lord is pleased to supply His servant, who trusts in Him, with means. As the work has been increased, and the expenses have become greater, so God has been pleased to send me more and more. During no previous year, since March 5, 1834, were the current expenses of the work as great, as during the year from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870; but, at the same time, during no previous year was the income so great. The frequent complaint is, We cannot accomplish what we wish to do, for want of means; our statement is, we wait on God, to direct us, what to do, and having ascertained His will regarding our work for Him, we have always been supplied by Him with means for His work.—Received from Scotland a gold necklet set with diamonds and emeralds, with this statement: "My dear Mr. Müller, I greatly desire to contribute a little to the Lord’s cause in Spain. I have no money; in the meantime I have sent this trinket, being led to see that it is wrong to keep such things by me, when it might be the means in your hands, of sending a few Gospels, or help your Missionary work in that benighted country. Etc." How much (if the love of Christ constrains) may be accomplished, by giving up such needless articles. Will this dear Christian lady be less adorned, because she has given up this necklet? Verily not! Will she have cause to regret it, when with the Lord? Verily not! We have only one brief life on earth. Dear Christian Reader, allow me to say to you, Make good use of this one brief life. This is the sowing time; but throughout eternity we shall reap. Who then will act the part of the wise Christian, live for eternity, and practically lay hold on eternal life?—Nov. 30. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Dec. 1. £100 from a Christian merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him.—Dec. 16. From Brazil £4 for Foreign Missions, with £1 for myself—£1 from St. Thomas, West Indies. Observe how from all parts of the world the Lord is pleased to send the means.—Dec. 31. £80 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Jan. 1, 1870. £6 with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Having had one of your Reports lent to me, and seeing the many different ways people had, of sending you assistance for the different branches of your Institution, I thought I could not do better than begin myself. So I resolved to send at the end of the year one Pound for every house I sold. I now beg to forward you, a Post Office Order for Six Pounds, which I beg you to use according to your own discretion. Yours respectfully, * * * *." The donor is a builder.—Jan. 4. For Missions 10s. 8d., with the following: "This has been saved by little and little from my small trade, since I last wrote to you. Many times, while this has been saved, my house has been without bread; but I would not take it; I looked upon it as the Lord’s money. And though there was no bread in the house, I would not mistrust His goodness to provide. When in such a position, my soul has been much blessed, in waiting for a manifestation of the Lord’s goodness."—May I request the reader to read again this letter. I delight in recording it. If we are faithful to God, it will not be in vain. Many hundreds of times I have been in a similar position with regard to great necessities, either for myself or the Orphans, from the year 1830 to 1848, when I would not take money, which had been laid by for rent, or was due for other purposes, or was the Lord’s in some shape or other, and therefore continued to wait upon God; and He always helped we. But, suppose, I had acted in a different way, and said, I am in great need, may I not take of the money, which has been set apart, and God can help me to refund it shortly; the result would have been that, with every fresh instance of using the money, so set apart, my faith would have been weakened, and at last I should have found myself in the greatest difficulties: whilst, doing as I did, by God’s grace, my faith in Him increased with every fresh deliverance, He was graciously pleased to work for me. It is verily blessed to see God’s hand stretched out on our behalf, when in very great need! The Reader who desires to know more of these matters, will find many such instances recorded in the first, second, third and fourth parts of this Narrative—Jan. 14. From Devonshire £75 for Chinese Missions, £75 for Spanish Missions, £325 for the Orphans, and £25 for my own expenses.—Jan. 25. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Feb. 10. From one of the Midland Counties £120 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, £25 for the School Fund, £150 for Missions, £40 for the Tract Fund, and £30 for myself.—I cannot help remarking here, that, while the Missionary work in China, India, Spain, Italy, etc., had been more than ever laid on my heart, at the beginning of the year, from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870; and especially also the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain; the Lord was pleased to supply me most abundantly with means to carry out my desire regarding these Objects. This donation, together with hundreds more, enabled me to accomplish what I desired.—Feb. 23. From Clifton £25 towards the support of an Evangelist in Spain.—Feb. 26. From New Zealand £10 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Foreign lands, and £10 for the Orphans.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

March 4. From China £3 for Foreign Missions and £3 for the Orphans.—March 7. From Switzerland 1,000 Francs for Foreign Missions.—March 9. £50 from a merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him.—March 19. Received from one of the first Orphans under our care, who has been a believer in the Lord Jesus for about 28 years, 5s. for Missions, 10s. for the Orphans, and 5s. for myself, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, Not from ingratitude is it, I have not written before, but because I knew you had so many letters; but not a particle do I love dear Mrs. Müller less, than those who have written. I think I loved her with you as my parents. True, I never knew my parents, to know what it was to love them; but I do know what it is to love you and her, and from my heart I mourn her loss. I know you miss her daily. I miss her going by the house; for I always watched you go by; but now you are alone. I trust it may please God to spare you, for years to come, to us all, as well as to your own dear child and family for oh! it would be a blank indeed, were you removed from us. I remain yours very respectfully, * * * *." March 23. £5 from Scotland, with these words: "A thank-offering to the Lord, that He has enabled us to pay all our debts."—March 25. I received from T. H. R., today a cheque for £358 16s., with the following communication: "My dear Mr. Müller, I have been thinking about making my will; but before doing that, I have resolved first, to give a portion to the Great Giver of all good, instead of leaving it to my executors, and so saving the duty, and this I shall then be assured is secured and well expended; and then my heirs cannot think, I am making them give what I would not give myself. The amount for which I enclose a cheque is £358 10s. [Then he requests me, under his fictitious initials, to send £100 to two religious institutions, and goes on to say.] £50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain. Beg your acceptance of £5 and £2 10s. for Mrs. C., and the remainder, £201 6s. I leave for your disposal." Of the £201 6s. I took £150 for Foreign Missions, and £51 6s. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund. Observe, esteemed Reader, how the Lord has again remarkably supplied me with £150 for Foreign Missions, and with £50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, and £51 6s. for the other Objects.—March 26. £120 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—March 28. From "Nemo" £39—From an anonymous donor through R. C. Esq., £40, with £40 for the Orphans.—March 30. From a Christian Merchant who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £150.

April 5. "From C. and M." £50 for Foreign Missions, £30 3s. 5d. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, £25 for the Orphans, and £20 for myself.—April 9. From Kent £20 for Missions, with £80 for the Orphans.—April 12. From Sweden £25, as the first instalment of the payment of 5,000 Rix-dollars, Swedish Rix-mynt, left as a legacy for Missions to the Heathen, by the late Mr. G. P. Notice, here again, the remarkable way in which the Lord is pleased, in answer to our daily prayers, to supply us with means.—April 14. From a great distance £500 for Foreign Missions, with £500 for the support of the Orphans. My heart adored and magnified the Lord for this donation. During no previous year, since the Institution was first founded, on March 5, 1834, has the income been as great as during this year; and during no previous year was I enabled to enlarge the work in all the various branches so much, and, therefore, the expenses were greater, far, than ever they had been; but the Lord supplied bountifully all we needed.—April 23. A gold watch, to be sold for these objects. The donor had no money, but, having a silver watch, could spare this for the work of the Lord.—April 29. £100 From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven—April 30. £9 0s. 4d., with this statement "Amount of first day’s takings, after having my shop enlarged."

May 2. From Scotland £40—May 12. A £500 six per cent. Turkish Bond. It was the donor’s kind wish that I should sell it, and take £50 for my own personal expenses.—May 23. From India £87 l6s.—May 24, 1870. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus referred to a few of the donations, given for the first four Objects of the Institution, from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, as specimens, to show the variety of ways, in which the Lord is pleased, in answer to our daily prayer for means, to supply us. The balance which we had, to begin the year with, was nearly twenty times multiplied, so that we were enabled greatly to enlarge these Objects during the year; and during no previous year since March 5, 1834, had there been such an enlargement of these various Objects. This, however, will be more particularly seen, when we come to the Chapter which speaks of the operations of the various Objects of the Institution.

We entered now upon another period of the Institution, from May 20, 1870, to May 26, 1871, during which its operations were still further enlarged, especially in the School Department, which was doubled, in comparison with the previous year; also for Mission work more was expended than during any year since the commencement of the Institution; Bibles, Testaments and Tracts were likewise circulated to a very considerable extent. For all these various Objects above £15,500 was expended; besides £23,290 expended during the year on the Orphan Work. I will again refer to a few instances of the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means for the first four Objects of the Institution.

June 2, 1870. From a Christian gentleman, who had come into the possession of considerable property, £500, as a thank-offering for happily arranging about these matters, of which £300 was taken for the Mission Fund, and £200 for the School—, Bible—and Tract Fund.—June 6. From "Needy" £1 3s. 10d., with £27 7s. 3d. for the Orphans. This kind donor, who calls himself still "Needy," as he did several years since, when he first began to contribute to this Institution, sent a very small amount at first; but he sent month after month, as God prospered him. He still continues to send every month; but his donations are 15 or 20 times as large as they were at first. So the Lord has honoured this systematic giving, as He has prospered the giver even in temporal things—June 23. 17s. 4d., with this statement from a Christian man: "It is one year this month, that I gave up smoking, after smoking 21 years. I was spending 4d. per week on tobacco. When I gave it up, I put aside the money for the cause of Christ. It was the greatest trial to the flesh I ever had. I thought it to be a lust of the flesh for a long time, so in the name of the Lord Jesus I gave it up, and am far better without it."—June 27. Three Ottoman Bonds of £100 each, and 13 Ottoman coupons, of £3 each, for Chinese Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain. The whole produced £251 14s. 6d.—June 30. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in Heaven.

July 7. A diamond ring to be sold for Missions and the Orphans.—July 12. From Sweden £60. being part of a legacy left for Missions to the Heathen. —July 19. From Canada, by order of an English Christian gentleman, £220, with £30 for myself—From a Christian widow, £50, with this letter: "Dear Christian Brother, I am constrained by the love of God to send you £50, to be appropriated as you may think best for the work of the Lord. I had intended leaving this small sum at my death, for the good of the Institution; but it has been laid on my mind to give it at once. ‘Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might,’ is the command. I am a widow with a yearly annuity of £50, and have saved this out of my income," etc.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 15. £19 19s. as the legacy of the late Mrs. W., with £19 19s. for the Orphans.—Aug. 16. £500 for the Spanish Mission, with £200 for the support of the Orphans. The expenses connected with the Spanish Mission are very great, but the Lord is pleased to supply the means for these expenses. Here is an instance: One of His children is stirred up to help, as just stated. If all knew the blessedness of the life of faith, and the joy, the ease, the real success, connected therewith, no one would wish to go any other way; but there must be real trust in God. If we only say, that we trust in God, yet do not really trust Him, we should find it hard to get on, for He would take us by our profession.—Aug. 18. From a widow 15s. 1d., as the proceeds of an apricot tree, and 5s. 6d. the proceeds of a week’s eggs.—Aug. 20. From Ohio £10—Aug. 23. £250 for Chinese Missions. This day I sent off for Foreign Missions £901, and, out of this sum, to China alone £585; but, as I send out, the Lord is pleased to send in again—Received also today, from a poor German Evangelist for Chinese Missions, One Hundred Prussian Thalers, this being his whole little property.—Aug. 24. From a Christian English gentleman of title £50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, and £50 for Foreign Missions.—Aug. 27. Received £50 with the following letter:—"Dear Mr. Müller, Enclosed is a cheque for £50, being £20 for the Orphans, £20 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, and £10 for your own use. On Sep. 21st last year I sent you £6 as a thank-offering for deliverance from a back-sliding state, and that my gracious Heavenly Father had allowed me to lose all my money, which had been a great curse to my soul. He not only permitted me to lose all my own money, but I was also £300 in debt. And now behold the great and abounding love of the Lord toward me, since I have been walking in His ways and trusting in Him for all things spiritual and temporal! I am thankful to say, that my desires for temporal blessings are not now as they used to be, for making money to hoard up, so that I might after a time retire from business; but now I thank my dear Lord, that my only desire, through His Grace given to me, is, that I may have sufficient for family and business, and devote the rest to Him whose it is, and who gives it to me. Truly, I can say, the gold and the silver are His.—He has been indeed very kind, as all my debts are now paid, and I have been enabled to send you £10 this summer and the enclosed £50; and the Lord has likewise given me sufficient for my business at present. Praise the Lord with and for me, for His abounding loving-kindness toward me, during these eleven months. It is indeed blessed to wait upon the Lord and trust in Him, etc." I have given this letter at length, on account of its profitable character.—Aug. 30. From Scotland £100 for Home and Foreign Missions.—From C. and M. £100 for Missions in China, £100 10s. 2d, for Missions in Spain, and £20 for myself.

Sep. 5. A Christian sister having received a present of Fifty Pounds, gave joyfully the whole amount for Missions.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Sept. 15. £5 15s. 6d. as a "Harvest thank-offering from believers at Slapton," for Foreign Missions.—Sept. 16. From Scotland £50, with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Thirty-five years ago I commenced to lay aside for the Master’s use a fixed proportion of my income, and I have great happiness in bearing testimony to the Lord’s goodness to me. I have found, that, as I gave, the more was given to me. To give statedly, and from a sense of duty and obligation, seems to me to be the right way; and not by fitful impulses of feeling.—I enclose a Bank Draft for £50, £45 of which please dispose of as you think fit, the remaining £5 please to keep for your own use. I remain, my dear Sir, yours very truly, * * * *." Sept. 28. From the Orphans in Nos. 1, 3, 4, and 5, for Missions £6 17s. 4½d.—From W. W. A. £16 for the Schools, £16 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £10 for Missions, £10 for the Tract Fund, £16 for the support of the Orphans and £20 for myself.

Oct. 1. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100

Nov. 1. From Sweden a further instalment, of £40 of a legacy, left for Missions to the heathen. —Nov. 2. From a Christian nobleman, a devoted servant of Christ, £50 for Missions in Spain.—Nov. 3. From a Christian noble lady, who gladly gives up all her property, to devote herself to Missionary work, £300 for Missions.—Nov. 4. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 14. £10 from a Christian farmer, as a thank-offering for the sale of his wool.—Nov. 15. From a considerable distance £400 for Foreign Missions. I joyfully send out considerable sums now, for Missions; and, as I seek to scatter the Lord’s bounties, among His dear servants, who labour and toil under many difficulties, so He is pleased to intrust me further with means. The donation just referred to was an especial proof of this.—Nov. 17. Still further from the Christian noble lady above referred to, £120 for Chinese Missions.—From a Manufacturer £400, with £100 for the Orphans.—Nov. 19. From Glasgow £40 for Missions in Spain, China and India, £50 for the Orphans and £10 for myself.—Nov. 29. £20 "from a business firm in New Zealand." From Tobago £3 5s.

Dec. 1. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Dec. 24. From Cheshire £100—Dec. 31. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Thus closes the year 1870, a year during which we received far more for these Objects than during any previous year; this is especially to be noticed on account of the abundance of means raised to relieve the distress occasioned by the war on the Continent. Again and again kind Christian friends, in sending donations, expressed their fear, that I might be suffering for want of funds, on account of the large sums, sent out of the country, to relieve the distress occasioned by the war; to which I replied, that we lacked nothing. The blessedness of faith is most seen under such circumstances. Faith is above circumstances. No war, no fire, no water, no mercantile panic, no loss of friends, no death can touch it. It goes on its own steady course. It triumphs over all difficulties. It works most easily in the greatest difficulties. Those who really confide in God, because they know the power of His arm, and the love of His heart, as shown most in the death and resurrection of His only begotten Son, are helped, whatever their trials and difficulties might be.

As the old year closed in receiving bountifully from the hands of our Heavenly Father, so the new year again commenced; but I can refer only to a few more donations, for these first four Objects of the Institution.

Jan. 2, 1871. From Cardiff £30—From Hastings £45 with £5 for myself.—From Scotland £100—From one of the Midland Counties £100 for Foreign Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—From Ireland a gold chain, to be sold for Missions in Rome.—Jan. 3. From a commercial traveller £10 3s. 9d., with this statement: "Last year I gave you one half-penny on each chest of tea, sold by me. This year I send you one penny, according to what I said I would do, if I was prosperous; and I have much pleasure to say, I have been wonderfully prospered."—Jan 7. "From near London" £50, with £290 for the Orphans and £10 for myself.— Jan. 30. £100 from a military officer of high rank.—Jan. 31. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Feb. 2. From Ramsgate £50—Feb. 3. From Devonshire £100 for Foreign Missions, £75 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Rome, £300 for the Orphans and £25 for myself.—Feb. 15. From Switzerland 100 Francs for Missions.—Feb. 17. From New York £70 for Missions. Notice, esteemed Reader, from what a variety of parts of the globe the donations come. There is scarcely any country, from whence I have not had donations, and generally from individuals who are entire strangers to me; but all come from the Lord, who touches the hearts of His stewards, in answer to our daily, believing and expecting prayers.—Feb. 23. From New Jersey, U.S.A. £10—Feb. 25. From Sweden £72 2s. 6d., being a further part of payment of a legacy left for Missions to the heathen, by a devoted servant of Christ, who about four years since went to his rest.—Feb. 28. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

March 8. From a considerable distance £200 for Foreign Missions, £100 for the School—, Bible—and Tract Fund, £185 for the support of the. Orphans and £15 for myself.—March 16. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £50—March 31. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

April 3. From New Zealand £6—April 4. From Constantinople £1 for the Spanish Missions, £2 for these four Objects, and £6 for the Orphans—April 5. From a considerable distance £185 for Foreign Missions.—April 11. From a military officer at Singapore £10 for Missions, with a silver tankard, a gold necklet and cross, set with pearls and a diamond, a gold bracelet set with diamonds, and a hunting knife for the Orphans—April 20. From the neighbourhood of Leeds a large quantity of valuable jewellery, watches, coins, etc., to be sold for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—April 21. By sale of gold and silver articles £66 10s.—April 29. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

May 8. From Switzerland £8 as "A thank-offering for the unexpected and favourable sale of a house."—May 13. From India £10 "instead of insuring the donor’s life."—May 15. From India £100—May 16, Legacy of the late Miss J. C. £100—From Brazil £4 for Foreign Missions.—May 24. "From the Mission Field" £10 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Rome. —May 20, 1871, £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus referred to some out of the many donations, given for the first four Objects of the Institution between 20 May, 1870, and 26 May, 1871.

During that year I laboured earnestly by prayer, that I might be permitted to extend the operations of these Objects considerably, even as the Orphan Work had been greatly increased. This I had done during the previous period; and in both years a great enlargement took place; but it was never greater than during the year of which I have now been writing. If the Lord should condescend to use His servant further, his aim is, to do this yet more and more, since there are Hundreds of Thousands who might be benefited by Schools, and since the field for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts and for Missionary operations is without limit.

We entered now upon the period from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, during which, for these first four Objects of the Institution alone, our expenses were above Seventeen Thousand Pounds, on account of the very considerable enlargement which had been yet further made in connexion with the School Department, as during this period there were 40 Day Schools, 14 Sunday Schools and 11 Adult Schools, with 4,747 scholars entirely supported; the Missionary Department, and the Bible and Tract Work were also greater than ever; and besides all this, we expended on the Orphan Work alone £25,190 during the year. The total of our expenses, therefore, during this one year was Forty-Two Thousand Two Hundred and Thirty Pounds. Still, as always, we were helped during that year also; and I will now refer to a few of the instances, in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means for the School, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund.

May 27, 1871. On the first day of the new year, I received £300 for Chinese Missions.—June 13. From Hampshire £112 4s. 4d. with £20 for myself.—June 19. From Dublin £25 for Foreign Missions, £25 for Home Missions, £25 for the circulation of the Scriptures, and £25 for the circulation of Tracts—June 20. From a Christian butcher in Bristol 19s., being one penny for each sheep, he had had in his shop, since last he sent.—June 30. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

July 6. From Yorkshire £100 for Foreign Missions with £100 for the Orphans.—From H. J. G. £1 6s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I have sent a Post Office Order for £1 6s., being 3 months’ tobacco and beer money, to be used for Orphan and Mission work."—July 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Aug. 11. From the neighbourhood of Stirling, £100 for Foreign Missions, £80 for the Orphans, and £20 for myself.—Aug. 23. From British Burmah, £9 16s. 10d.

Sept. 3. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven £100—Sept. 12. From Hampshire £125 2s. 10d. with £40 for the Orphans, and £30 for myself.— Sept. 14. Received £3 5s. with the following very instructive letter: "Dear Sir, Some months ago, I laid by my gold chain, feeling it inconsistent, as a Christian, to wear it any longer, purposing, whenever I could dispose of it, to send the money to you for the cause of God. But being in want of money I sold it for half its value, and made use of the money. I ought to have sent the amount to you as soon as I received some money, but did not. I have had various misfortunes since. One instance. Having taken my six children to the sea side, intending to stay some weeks, on my arrival at the place I found my purse of gold was gone; I was compelled to return home the same day. In another journey I lost part of my luggage, and everything has appeared to go contrary. I really believe it is all on account of the above mentioned reason. I state it to my shame. Make what use you think proper of this account. May I be ever more faithful as the Lord’s steward from this time. Please to use this small amount for the cause of God in any way you think best. I am, dear Sir, Yours sincerely, * * * *." Sept. 18. From Yorkshire, £200 with £100 for the Orphans.—Sept. 27. Today I received from the children in most of the departments of the five Orphan Houses £12 9s. 3d. for Missions or the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Rome, with fifteen affectionate letters, one from each of the departments in the five houses. The occasion was, the anniversary of my birth-day, on which this money was sent for the Lord’s work, instead of a present for myself, the children knowing well, how the former would please me. Four departments, however, sent me little presents for myself.—On this day I received also a number of letters from Orphans formerly under our care, containing donations either for these Objects or the support of the Orphans.—Sept. 28. £10 "In lieu of the first fruits of the harvest."—Sept. 20. From Scotland, £100.

Oct. 4. From H. J. G. £1 6s. as "One quarter’s beer and tobacco money."—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Oct 7.—From Scotland a diamond ring and an old guinea piece, for Missions.—Oct. 9. From China £1 15s. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Italy.—From Devonshire £200, with £100 for the Orphans.—Oct. 23. From Dorsetshire £15—From Sweden £80 19s., being the last instalment of 5,000 Rix Dollars, left to me by a servant of the Lord Jesus, some years since for Missions among the heathen. This is one of the Ten Thousand different channels through which God has been pleased to provide this work, during the past 40 years, with pecuniary means. He has never failed us. Many hundreds of donors who once helped us, have passed away; but the Living God has helped us. The circumstances of some, once able to help largely, have so altered, that either they cannot help at all, or a little only; but the Unchangeable God has not failed us. The Almighty God who has a sufficiency for every want has stepped in, and helped us, so that we have been bountifully supplied, though through other instrumentality. Oh, the blessedness of having God as our Friend! Do all my readers know him in Christ? Are they reconciled to God through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ? Have they experienced in their own hearts the cleansing power of the blood of Jesus Christ? Are they by this delivered from the slavish fear of God, have they love to God, and are they able to confide in Him? These are weighty matters. May a servant of the Lord Jesus, who has known the blessedness of these things for more than 69 years, beg the reader, if a stranger to them, not to be satisfied till he knows God in Christ for himself.

Nov. 6. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Nov. 11, From Zurich, Switzerland, £6—Nov. 24. From the wife of a clergyman at a considerable distance I received the following interesting letter: "My dear Friend, I was struck with a remark in your last Report, in which you say, ‘that if every Christian lady would give up her ornaments, an immense sum of money would be realised.’ I think, as long as the Lord has need of money for His people and His cause, a loving child could hardly enjoy ornaments, after having had this put before them. So, I send all I have of any value, and I think our gracious Saviour may accept it, as He did the box of ointment. I pray that God will bless you abundantly in your blessed work. I do wish you could extend your Missions. There seems such a door opened for the Gospel at this time all over the world. Believe me your sincere friend, * * * *." The parcel contained 4 frocks, 3 pinafores, a gold watch, a gold thimble, 4 gold rings, 5 gold brooches, 5 gold lockets, a gold necklet, a silver brooch, a gold seal, 3 eye-glasses, the gold mounting of a hair bracelet, and a pair of jet bracelets. The proceeds were taken for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—I cannot help remarking here once more, if Christians in their dress, in their way of living, in their furniture, in laying aside their ornaments, were more ready to deny themselves, for the Lord’s sake, my full conviction is, that at least ten times as much could be done by them for the work of God, as is done now. During the past year alone, I have obtained several hundred pounds by the sale of jewellery. A Christian gentleman sent me last year a diamond ring, which cost him £88 10s. And many such articles are in the possession of true children of God. How long shall this be? Till the Lord comes again? Verily there will be no joy in our hearts then, at the remembrance that we have articles by the sale of which we might have fed the hungry, or have caused large quantities of Tracts or copies of the Holy Scriptures to be circulated, or aided otherwise in the spread of the Gospel.

Nov. 28. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Dec. 8. From North Devon £18 4s. 2d. for Chinese Missions.—Dec. 13. From North Devon £27 2s. 6d. for Foreign Missions.—Dec. 16. From a Bible Woman, at a distance of several hundred miles, an entire stranger to me, £9., with the following letter: "Beloved Sir, I send you this as a thank-offering unto the Lord, for taking a beloved husband and child in one night to Himself, for giving to me the garments of praise for the spirit of heaviness, and for compassing me about with songs of deliverance; for He will never suffer the righteous to be moved. Please to use the amount in the circulation of the Holy Scriptures abroad. May the good Lord, who is wonderful in counsel, excellent in working, increase you more and more, and comfort you on every side, are the prayers and wishes of a sister in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ. Yours respectfully, * * * *." Dec. 18. From Yorkshire £200 for Foreign Missions.—Dec. 30. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—From Swansea £30.

Jan. 1, 1872. The new year brought new blessings and help from the Lord, as usual. Year by year He helps us in every way. We may be tried and in difficulties; but we are helped by Him. We may have long to wait, and often to call upon Him, before the help comes; but His help does come at last. It may even appear, as if we prayed in vain; but in His own good time He abundantly proves, that He had most assuredly been mindful of us. The first donation, which I received for these objects, at the commencement of this year, was £100 for Missions, £80 for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, with £20 for myself, from one of the Midland Counties.—The next was £120 for Missions, with £5 for myself, from a distance of several hundred miles, with the following Letter: "My dear Sir, Through the Lord’s goodness I am enabled to send you herewith £125; £5 for your own expenses, and £120 in aid of the work under your care. It is now ten years, since I first sent you anything, and about the same time, since I began to give systematically to God’s work, through reading your Narrative. Like many others I can say, that God has made up to me all that I have given, and far more. I am, yours faithfully, * * * *."—This Christian gentleman has sent to me during the last ten years more than £5,000 for the work of the Lord. Of the other donations, received on Jan. 1 for these Objects, I only mention the following—From a builder, residing several hundred miles from Bristol, £10, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I forward you the enclosed Post Office Order, having sold eight houses this year [he gives £1 for each house he sells], and two pounds from other profits, for you to use as you think best, with my best wishes to you and your undertaking. Yours respectfully, * * * *." From a commercial traveller £6 10s. 6d. "being one penny on each chest of tea, sold by him during the past year."—Jan. 25. Today I received the following letter from America, containing a Bank-Order for Five Hundred Dollars, which gives a fresh proof as to the great variety of ways, in which it pleases the Lord to supply the means for this Institution. "Beloved in the Lord, These Five Hundred Dollars I now commit to your care, safe keeping and wise using; they are God’s, not mine. I have no money, house or lands. ‘The earth is the Lord’s and the fulness thereof, the world and they that dwell therein.’ The silver and the gold are His, the cattle upon a thousand hills. Indeed I am not mine own. ‘What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God’s.’ 1 Cor. vi. 19, 20. For months and years I have been asking counsel of the Lord to know in what way I could best dispose of the little He had lent me to His own glory, that on the day of final settlement I might hear, ‘Well done good and faithful servant, etc.’ Matt. xxv, 21. —Learning from your Narrative and Reports, that you, dear brother, entertain the same blessed Scriptural views of stewardship as herein specified, and that all you receive at the hands of donors, goes, not to build up Satan’s Kingdom, but the Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ; I cheerfully and heartily place this small sum of Five Hundred Dollars in your hands, for 1, educating the little folks under your care exclusively Godward; 2, for distributing the Bible among the poorest of the poor in distant lands; 3, to assist faithful Missionaries of the Cross, relying wholly on God for their temporal supplies.—The Lord smile more and more graciously on your labours of love, is the prayer of your-affectionate brother in the Gospel, * * * *." —On the same day received also, from Hampshire, £100 for Foreign Missions, £75 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Italy, £300 for the support of the Orphans, and £25 for myself.—Jan. 29. Received Two Thousand Pounds with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I send you Two Thousand Pounds, the produce of the sale of some property, which has given me much trouble of mind, and the proceeds of which have been devoted to the Lords service.—It is become evident, that He saw it not good for me to hold so much, and therefore allowed its possession to be rather a curse than a blessing. That it may prove a blessing by your appropriation of it, under His guidance, is the prayer of yours truly, * * * *." This letter is full of instruction. 1, The Christian gentleman, who sent this money, is anything but covetous; for he had for about 20 years sent me much for the Lord’s work, and for many years about £200 annually; yet he considered that he held too much. So, other disciples of the Lord Jesus, may hold too much. 2, The writer states further, that, because the Lord saw it not good for him, to hold so much, He allowed its possession to be rather a curse than a blessing. Shall we not all seek to be profited by the experience of this Christian gentleman? Are we not all naturally, to a greater or less degree fond of possessions, and therefore aiming rather after a curse than a blessing? 3, Possessions, small or great, are so far of value, as they are used for the Lord. The night comes when no man can work.—Of this £2,000 I appropriated £1,000 for Missions to the Heathen (having abundant outlets for money in this direction), £500 for the School Fund (having not only very many schools to support in connexion with the Institution, but having recently again established several new schools), and £500 I took for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Italy, where the openings for the circulation of the word of God become more and more extended—Jan. 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

Feb. 2. From Yorkshire £100—From a business firm in New Zealand £24—Feb. 17. Received today the legacy of N. B., Esq., being £200 for these Objects and the Orphan work; I took therefore £160 for these Objects and £40 for the support of the Orphans. This Christian gentleman, whom I have never seen, very kindly left also £200 for myself, duty free. I delight in referring to this, as another exemplification of the Lord’s great kindness to me His unworthy servant, and the readiness of His heart to supply most bountifully all my temporal necessities.—Feb. 26. From Harrogate £100.

March 1. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—March 4. Received 13s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please to accept the sum of 13s., to be used as you please, being one penny of every shilling of my weekly earnings. At first I gave one halfpenny out of every shilling, but the Lord now prospers me so, that I can earn as much in a fortnight as I could in three weeks. I remain yours respectfully, * * * *." March 6. From Hampshire £100, with £27 18s. 10d. for the Orphans, and £25 for myself.

Apr. 5. From Ireland £50 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Rome.—Apr. 11. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Apr. 22. From sale of gold and silver articles £45— Apr. 26. From Ireland £100 for Italian Missions.—Apr. 29. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.

May 16. Received from a Christian physician, £47 2s., with the following letter: "My dear Sir,—I send you a cheque for £47 2s., a tenth of what the Lord has given me, since I wrote to you last. I feel that this tenth is so entirely the Lord’s, that I dare not suggest how I would wish you to expend it. May He direct you, as it pleases Him. Asking an interest in your prayers, which I would esteem a great favour, I am, my dear Sir, yours, with best wishes, * * * *."—May 21. £5 as "A thank-offering for safe delivery in the hour of nature’s trial,"—May 22. Received the following letter, with £50 "My dear Mr. Müller, Two years ago I sent you a small donation. I now send you another, which is part of an allocation I am making of a balance at the credit of a Stewardship Account. For many years I have kept an account in my private books for religious and benevolent donations, taking care that one year with another they did not fall below the tenth, but latterly I have kept a more formal account, God having graciously enlarged my income, and have seen it my duty and privilege to increase, and afterwards to double the proportion, keeping in mind what you have said in your Reports. As a consequence I find at a year’s end a considerable balance over, even after increasing former contributions, and giving to new objects. From that balance I now send the enclosed cheque for £50. It makes one realize more vividly the position of a steward, when called to make such allocations. I cannot but think, that such a labourer as yourself, who throws himself upon the Master, has special claims on the Master’s stewards . . . . I leave you to allocate this sum according to your own judgment, only expressing my wish you should reserve £5 for yourself. Enter it, if you approve, ‘From a Steward’s Balance.’ With kind regards, I am, yours, in the Lord, * * * *."—May 23, 1872. £5 17s. 9d. with the following letter from a shopkeeper: "Dear Sir, It is with pleasure I enclose you this Post-office Order for £5 17s. 9d., which is 2d. on every £1 that we have received for the past year. I am happy to say, that the Lord has been very merciful towards us during the past year. I can say that I give this with free will. I am very glad, that I have advanced from £4 1s. 1d. last year’s donation to the amount enclosed, hoping there will be more next year if the Lord permit us to see another. Yours very truly, * * * *."—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the Love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus referred to some of the donations as specimens, to show how the Lord was pleased to supply us during the year from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872. We were able fully to meet all the expenses, though greater than during any of the previous 38 years, and had a balance of £844 14s. 0½d. left, with which we entered upon the next year, from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, During this year we still further enlarged the School Department, so that 52 Day Schools, 23 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools (83 in all, with 6,620 scholars), were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; the Bible work too was larger than ever; 187 Missionaries were assisted during the year; and Three Millions, Six Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Tracts were circulated during the year. We had, therefore, again to wait upon the Lord for means for all the expenses connected with these operations, and were helped during that year also. I now refer to some of the donations received during the year, as specimens, to show how we were carried through the expenses of the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, with reference to the first four Objects, though they amounted to more than £16,240, besides the expenses for the support of the Orphans, amounting to £25,234

June 6, 1872. Received today £23 from Cornwall for Missions to the heathen. The donor had often sent similar amounts, for the same object. During that year this dear Godly man went to his rest. Thus his sowing time is ended, and now he is reaping. Our time too, esteemed reader, may soon come, when the sowing for ever will be over; therefore, while the privilege is continued to us, let us seek to make good use of the various ways, in which the Lord may permit us to serve Him.—June 8. Received from a considerable distance £200 for Foreign Missions, with £50 for the support of the Orphans.—June 11. £2 4s. 7d. from Cornwall with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a Post Office Order for £2 4s. 7d., being one penny in the pound on my sales for May. Please to use it, as you think best. I was first led to give systematically to God’s cause through reading an account of your work. I thank God that ever I have been led to see it such a privilege to support His cause. Now I feel it a greater pleasure to give than to withhold." The donor has since sent again and again similar amounts.—June 17. From Scotland £220, with £50 for the Orphans.

July 4. £25 from London as "A thank-offering for recovery."—July 6. From Devonshire £150, with £50 for the Orphans.—From Ireland £100 for Missions in China, £100 for Missions in Spain, £200 for Missions in Italy, and £100 for the Orphans, with the following statement: "I well remember some years ago sending you Five Shillings, which at the time was a great sum for me. Since then, by God’s grace, I have sought to act as a steward, and now I can with more freedom send you £500. I am yours in Christ our Head, * * * *." The statement in the letter of this Irish donor calls for much prayerful consideration.—July 9. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—July 11. From India £100—July 12. There was anonymously, today, put into the Letter Box at my house £50, without stating for what it was to be used. The amount was taken for these Objects.—July 17. From a Christian Nobleman £25 for Foreign Missions, and £50 for Missions in Spain.—From London £2 11s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose an order for £2 11s. Please use it for the work in your hands as most needed. I have known you and the work in your hands from nearly the commencement, but have never had the heart to send you anything, until now, when my income is considerably less, than it has been for a number of years, having retired from service. I promised for the Lord’s work 2s. in the pound, for all I earned by waiting. As the work came in faster than I had expected, I increased it to 3s. in the pound; and now send you the amount I have earned in a few weeks £17 14s., for which I feel very thankful to the Lord. I am, Dear Sir, yours in the Lord, * * * *." July 19. From Ireland £55 for Missions in Spain.—From Scotland £215, with £10 for myself.—July 23. Legacy of the late Mr. J. S. of Millbrook £22 10s., with £22 10s. for Missions in Spain and Italy, and £45 for the Orphans.

Aug. 6. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Aug. 9. From Tunbridge Wells £50 for Missions, £20 for the Bible and Tract Fund, £120 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.—Aug. 15. From Australia £100, with £10 for myself.—Aug. 10. From a Guernsey donor £50 for Home Missions, and £50 for the Orphans.—Aug. 24. From Swansea £50, with £50 for the Orphans—From Ireland £25 "From one who has been helped through pecuniary difficulty, and who desires to acknowledge the Lord’s help."—Aug. 26. From Scotland £70 for Home and Foreign Missions, £20 for Missions to the Jews and £10 for myself.—Aug. 28. From Burnham £40 for Missions, and £40 for the Orphans.—Aug. 30. From Constantinople £3 10s., with £1 for Spanish Missions and £8 for the Orphans.

Sept. 3. £100 was left anonymously at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, Park Street, Bristol, for Foreign Missions.—Sept. 14. From Scotland £100 for Foreign Missions, £80 for the Orphans and £20 for myself.—Sept. 17. From Southampton £100, with £144 0s. 10d. for the Orphans and £50 for myself.—Sept. 19. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Sept. 27. On this day I received from the Orphans, in the sixteen different departments of the Five Orphan Houses, £13 15s. 7d. for Missions generally, £1 4s. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Rome, 13s. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures among the heathen, and £1 for Missions in Spain.

Oct. 1. From Scotland £50—Oct. 7. Received a diamond ring, 2 gold thimbles, a vinaigrette, and 2 silver buckles, to be sold for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures.—Oct. 8. £50 from Cumberland. The kind donor of this £50 is an entire stranger to me. Almost all the donors are personally unknown to me. In many instances large donations, of many Hundred Pounds, have come anonymously to hand. But all this we receive as the result of believing, expecting prayer. In childlike simplicity we remind our Heavenly Father, that the work is very great; that our current expenses day by day are very great; that in dependence on Him alone we began the work, and that in this same dependence on Him we have, year by year, enlarged it; and we ask Him, that He graciously would be pleased to supply our need, by putting it into the hearts of His stewards to send us help. And this He does. Though often the daily income is but little, in comparison with the expenses, yet we thank Him even for the little, and ask Him to send us again larger sums. While I am writing this, the income during the last five days has been so small, that it would not cover the fifth part of the expenses of these five days; but I am expecting again much larger sums. It is unspeakably blessed, really to know God, to walk in friendship with Him, to be able to speak to Him about everything, and to roll upon Him all one’s cares and burdens. In this blessed, happy way, I have now been enabled to walk for 44 years, and I cannot describe the joy connected with this life of holy, blessed independence of circumstances, political events, mercantile difficulties, friends, death, &c.; for as long as we are able to lean upon God, we have all we can possibly need. And this blessed holy independence may be enjoyed by all the children of God. It is not only the privilege of a very few favoured ones; but all, without exception, who are reconciled to God, by faith in the Lord Jesus, and who alone trust in Him for salvation, may enjoy this blessing. In order, however, to enjoy this happy fellowship and practical friendship of God and His dear Son, our adorable Lord Jesus Christ, we must walk uprightly. We have to carry out the light which we receive from the Holy Scriptures; we must practise the truth we know. Erring and failing we may be; but we must be honest, upright in not living in sin, in not going on in a course we know to be contrary to the mind of God. Should the latter be the case, we cannot enjoy fellowship with God, nor shall we be able practically to trust Him as our friend, and this will be the greatest hindrance to having our prayers answered, according to that word: "If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me." Psalm lxvi, 18.

Oct. 22. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Nov. 5. From Scotland £200—Nov. 6. In the early part of October I received a letter from a young Christian, a journeyman watchmaker in Germany, informing me that I should shortly receive from him through a cousin of his One Thousand Prussian Thalers, of which he desired one half to be expended for Missions to the heathen, and the other half for the Spanish Mission. As this dear Christian young man was an entire stranger to me, and I knew not whether he had sufficiently weighed the step he was going to take, I wrote to him, asking whether he had fully considered the matter, to which he replied, that it had been long before him, but that since the spring he had had no doubt regarding it. To the point, that this was a considerable sum for him, he replied, that as he was giving it to the Lord, it was not too much, if He would be pleased to accept it for His work and let His blessing rest upon it. To my question, whether he had weighed the point that he might with this money begin business on his own account, he replied, that he had long had the desire to give his whole property to the Lord’s work, (2,400 Prussian Thalers,) but that at present he had only full light regarding 1,000 Thalers, which would leave 1,400 Thalers for commencing business on his own account, though at present he had no desire to go into business, as his monthly pay of 21 Thalers sufficiently provided for him. The whole letter of this dear young man of 25 years of age was of the most calm and satisfactory character. As the matter had been for years before him, and quite decided upon by him for more than six months; and as it was now four weeks since he informed me that he had given orders for the money to be sent, I accepted this money and it was applied according to his desire. We commend this dear young disciple to the prayers of the Christian readers, and ask them to admire the various ways, which the Lord is pleased to use in supplying us with means.—Nov. 15. From Tenby £50 for Missions and £50 for the Orphans.—Nov. 16. From the neighbourhood of Halifax £50Nov. 19. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Dec. 2. From Scotland £150—Dec. 11. From the neighbourhood of Fairford £50—Dec. 17. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Dec. 21. From a Christian gentleman in one of the Midland Counties £450 for Missions, with £50 for myself.—From Reading, for Missions, £20—Day by day we are waiting on the Lord for means for Missions, on account of the vast openings we have for spending money in this way. On this account the last two donations for Missions were particularly refreshing.

Jan. 1, 1873. From a commercial traveller £11 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, it is with much pleasure I send you the enclosed cheque for £11 10s., being a trifle on each chest of tea sold by me in Bristol during this year. By this you will see I have been more prosperous than last year. Please to use this as you think best. Your respectfully, * * * *."—£10 from a builder, residing at a great distance, being £1 for each house he had sold during the past year.—Put into the Letter Box at my house, anonymously, £37 15s. 2d. without stating for what it was intended. It was taken for these Objects.—Received £3 with the following letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir, I have for several years sent you a trifle from another source, but, through old age and infirmity, strength faileth me. Wishing to help the dear Lord’s cause, I can do a little in making bee-hives. I sold this year 30 at 2s. each. I send you £3 to appropriate where most needed. My prayer is, that God may bless you in your work of faith and labour of Love, * * * *." Notice in these four last donations the variety of ways in which God is pleased to supply us with means. The last furnishes, moreover, a striking illustration of the truth of the proverb, "Where there is a will, there is a way." This dear aged Godly man does not say, I have worked formerly, and thus helped on the cause of Christ, but I am now too old. He remembers that he can make bee-hives, and earns thus £3 in the course of a year for the work of the Lord. How lovely to see thus each member in the body of Christ taking its part, the rich and the poor, the learned and illiterate, male and female, young and old! The question for each disciple of the Lord Jesus should be this: How would the Lord Jesus have me to be occupied? How may I best serve Him? What can I do for Him, who gave His life for me? And if this were the case, how different would things be, in numberless ways, to what they are now.—Jan. 2, 1873. From R. W. W. £50 for Missions, with £50 for the Orphans.—Jan. 6. From Ireland £50 for the Spanish Missions.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Jan. 13. Received from Cheltenham £2 with this letter: "Dear Mr. Müller, I enclose Post Office Order for two pounds, to be appropriated as follows, Spanish Missions 5s. 8d., Orphans l4s. 4d. One pound is from a poor saint, with Ecclesiastes ix, 10, who for four years and eight months has laid by a penny a week and desires that it should be used for the circulation of the Scriptures, she having derived much comfort from them, and desires to acknowledge God’s goodness in this way. I remain, etc. * * * *." Will the reader especially consider this donation of one pound, made up by putting aside one penny a week for four years and eight months. Let the poorest of the poor learn from it, how they too, by their pence, may help on the work of God.—Jan. 18. Received again from the donor, referred to under July 17, 1872, £3 5s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed is an order for £3 5s. to be applied to the Lord’s work under your care as most needed, this being 3s. in the pound of all I have earned by attending dinners, etc. In July last I sent you £2 11s. earned in the same way. The employment given me in this way has been more than double what I expected. I send this with much pleasure, and consider it a great honour to be allowed to contribute a trifle to the Lord’s work, etc." Jan. 21. From a considerable distance £100 for Foreign Missions, with £100 for the Orphans.—Jan. 23. £5 as "A tithe offering from a daily governess."—Jan. 24. From Hampshire £175 for the Bible—, Mission— and Tract Fund, with £300 for the Orphans and £25 for myself.—Jan. 31. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Feb. 3. £2 from a soldier’s wife in British Kaffraria.—Feb. 6. £101 18s. 10d. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Müller, The enclosed cheque, value £101 18s. 10d. represents our ‘Ready Money Sales’ on the 1st of January this year, which I beg you to accept and use as you may think proper, etc."—Feb. 7. £2 12s. 6d. from Hull, being £1 14s. 8d. from two children instead of using sugar for one year, and 17s. 10d. from their mother, being the first takings in her little shop each week.—Feb. 26. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Feb. 27. Received from New Zealand a heavy gold snuff box and a gold chain, to be sold for the benefit of Foreign Missions and the Orphans.—Feb. 28. Received £2, with the following letter from a working man: "Honoured Sir, Enclosed I send you a Post-Office Order for £2, for the work of the Lord, to be used by you as most needed. I have no doubt, Sir, it will be interesting to you to know how the Lord has blessed us, since we began to contribute a small sum to His cause. When I first began, my wages were only 14s. per week, out of which I put by 6d. per week. When I left that situation, I took another at 18s. per week; and when I left that one, I took another at 21s. per week, out of which I put by one shilling per week; and now my wages are 23s. 6d. per week, out of which I put by 1s. 6d. per week, etc." Hundreds of similar letters have we received during the last twenty years, in which testimony is borne to the blessings received, both temporally and spiritually, in consequence of systematic giving, according to the means with which the Lord has been pleased to entrust the donors.

March 11. From Hampshire £141 19s. 4d., with £30 for myself.—March 26. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

April 3. £100 from Ireland, for Missions in Italy.—April 7. £50 from Ireland, for Foreign Missions.—April 18. £818 12s. as the legacy of the late Miss A. M. T., a lady whom I never saw, and who last year died on the Continent. The payment of this legacy was a great spiritual refreshment to me, as the income had been very small for several days.

May 13. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Legacy of the late Miss H. of Gravesend, £180 for Missions, with £180 for the Orphans.—From Devonshire £2 16s. 9d., "Being one penny each on 681 apple trees, the number I sold from the time I sent last."—May 23. £40 from Victoria, Australia.—May 26. £5 as the legacy of the late Mr. W. C. of Australia.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus mentioned some of the donations which came in between May 26, 1872, and May 26, 1873, for the first Four Objects of the Institution, in order that the reader may see in what a marked manner, and in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to supply us with means, simply in answer to our believing and expecting supplications. And thus the work has been going on for forty years, though it is becoming more and more enlarged.

Before closing this chapter, it only remains to state, that up to the very last day of the fortieth year of the existence of the Institution, from May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, it pleased the Lord to supply us with means, though the operations during this period were still further enlarged, as several more schools were established, and in other respects the work was extended, as the statistics in the fourth chapter will minutely state. I refer now to a very few donations, received between May 26, 1873, and March 5, 1874.

May 30, 1873. From Ireland for Italian Missions £50—June 3. Legacy of the late Mrs. A. of Syston, £100 for the Bible Fund, £100 for the Tract Fund, £600 for the Orphans, and £100 for myself. This lady I had never seen.—June 9. From Sydney, New South Wales, £44 2s. 3d.

July 9. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—From one of the Midland Counties £450 for Missions, with £50 for myself.—From Scotland £100, with £5 for myself.—July 26. From Ireland, £200 for Spanish Missions, £100 for Italian Missions, £100 for Chinese Missions, and £100 for the Orphans.

Aug. 1. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Aug. 8. From Scotland £100 with £10 for myself.—Aug. 11. From a Clifton donor £50 for Missions in Spain, Italy, and France.—From India £87 16s.—Aug. 13. Received £1,456 l6s. 6d., being the entire of the effects left by an Indian Military Field Officer.—Aug. 27. From Wales £75 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, and £25 for ditto in Rome.—From Somersetshire £80—Aug. 29. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Sep. 1. From a Merchant and Shipowner in Scotland, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £200—From a Manufacturer in Scotland, £100 for Foreign Missions.—Sep. 22. From Ireland £50 for Missions.—Sep. 26. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Sep. 27. From the Orphans in the five houses, £17 5s. 10d. for Missions.

Oct. 16. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Oct. 30. From Tobago £10.

Nov. 6. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 7. From Cambridge £25—From a Merchant and Shipowner, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £100, with £5 for myself—Nov. 11. From Berkshire £50—Nov. 26. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Dec. 3. Received from the United States, one thousand dollars, or £189 12s. 6d. sterling, of which the kind Christian brother wished me to keep £10 for myself.—Dec. 10. From a Merchant, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £100—Dec. 19. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Dec. 31. £100 for Foreign Missions, from the neighbourhood of Manchester.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—£11 from a builder, being £1 for each house sold by him during the year.

Jan. 1, 1874. £100 with £5 for myself, from a Merchant who contributes as the Lord prospers him.—Jan. 13. £40 for Missions in Italy and Spain.—Jan. 22. £100 from Manchester.—Jan. 31. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Feb. 2. From Scotland for Foreign Missions, £150—Feb. 6. £30 in gold, anonymously left at my house, to be used at my discretion.—Feb. 18. £100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

March 4. £150, with £10 for myself, from a Merchant and Shipowner, who contributes as the Lord prospers him.—£100 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven—March 5. £12 4s. came in on the last day of the fortieth year for these objects, in ten different donations.

I have referred to these donations out of the hundreds which came in between May 26, 1873, and March 5, 1874, to show, how the Lord has been pleased to help us with pecuniary supplies to the end of the fortieth year of the Institution, though it has been again still further enlarged since May 26, 1873. Thus the Institution, which had so small a beginning on March 5, 1834, by the help of God has been brought to the end of the fortieth year, though its operations are now so extensive, as the reader will more clearly see from the fourth chapter. I proceed now to the next chapter.