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Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 5.1 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER I.

Enlargement of the Orphan Work, by the building of the New Orphan-Houses No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5, on Ashley Down, near Bristol. Practical remarks, letters from donors and Orphans, &c.

 

In the Fourth Part of this Narrative, Third Edition, from page 206 to 227, I gave minutely the reasons, which led me to seek to build, in dependence upon the Living God, premises large enough to be able to accommodate 700 more Orphans, in addition to the 300 already under our care. I afterwards detailed minutely, how the Lord had been pleased, in answer to prayer, to send one donation after another; and how, on May 26, 1856, I had actually in hand for this object £29,297 18s. 11½d. I now proceed to relate, how, since then, God was pleased further to provide me with means for the Building Fund, but refer only to the more remarkable donations.

June 19, 1856. Received £1700, the disposal of which being left to me, I took for each of the various objects an equal portion, i. e. for the Building Fund £283 6s. 8d., for the support of the Orphans £283 6s. 8d., for the various Day Schools, the Sunday Schools, and Adult Schools of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, £283 6s. 8d., for the gratuitous circulation of the Holy Scriptures among the Poor £283 6s. 8d., for Missions £283 6s. 8d., and for the gratuitous circulation of Gospel Tracts £283 6s. 8d.

July 4. Received £500, the disposal of which was left to me. I therefore took £83 6s. 8d. for the Building Fund, the same amount for the support of the Orphans, and the same amount for the various Schools of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, also £83 6s. 8d, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £83 6s. 8d. for Missions, and £83 6s. 8d. for the gratuitous circulation of Gospel Tracts.

July 5. £245 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, Constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 26. Anonymously 31 old Guinea pieces, with the following letter "Dear Sir, The produce of the inclosed coins to be applied as donations in the following proportions: £10 for Missionary labours, £10 towards your Building Fund, £5 for the Orphans, and what remains divide between Mr. Craik and yourself. A thank-offering for restoration to health."

This is not only an answer to prayer for means, but especially also another answer to my oft repeated prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to incline the hearts of His children to send me their old gold and silver coins for His work, as well as diamonds, jewellery, costly apparel, and other valuable but needless articles.

Jan. 20, 1857 Received £500, the disposal of which was left to me. I divided, therefore, the amount equally between the Building Fund and the five different Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, taking £83 6s. 8d. for each.—£l48 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Feb. 21. Received the following letter:—"Beloved Sir, I enclose you £10 as ‘The fruit from seed sown.’ I wish it appropriated for the support of the Orphans, unless the Building Fund still needs it, in which case half to each. In my deep humiliation last year, I consecrated a certain portion of my year’s income to the Lord’s service, and sent you £10 in anticipation of it, and the result is, that I have nearly £100 to devote to Him during the present year. I have other objects dear to Him in view; but if He so directs me, you will probably hear from me again. I rejoice in being able to sympathize with you in the happiness resulting from trusting in, and working for, the Lord. I am, affectionately yours, * * * * *." The donation was taken half for the Building Fund, and half for the support of the Orphans.

Let us ponder this letter, dear reader. The writer says, that the £10 sent is "The fruit from seed sown." Remember in connection with this: 1, There is such a thing as sowing and reaping in this way, according to 2 Cor. ix. 6. Teaching children, visiting from house to house, for the sake of benefiting persons naturally or spiritually; giving money, bread, clothes, &c., to the poor; using our money in any way for the Lord’s honour and glory, is called, according to this passage, sowing; and, the recompense given by the Lord to Him who sows, in time and eternity, is called reaping. The recompense may be, and generally is, more or less, given even in time; often ten fold, yea, a hundred fold, as the Lord repays even in temporal things, through raising up friends for us, or giving his manifest blessing upon our earthly vocation, &c. But suppose, that, for some particular purposes, the Lord did not allow such reaping to take place here on earth, there will be, most assuredly, the reaping in the world to come. I have moved among children of God above 48 years; I have become acquainted with many thousands of them, and I have known very many, who sowed, and sowed bountifully, and I have not yet met with one single instance in which, even as to this life, the Lord has not acted according to His Word, so that as the sowing was, so was the reaping. This leads me to the second point of the verse: 2, "But this I say, he which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully." These are the words of the Holy Spirit by the Apostle Paul. The figure here used is easily understood by every one. The farmer who sows sparingly, reaps sparingly. The two go together. Thus any Christians, who, according to their time, talents, opportunities, and means, do little for the saints temporally or spiritually; or, for unbelievers, temporally or spiritually, will reap little either in this life or in the life to come. God says so: I believe it. In my inmost soul I believe it. Now let any one seek to sow, on the contrary, bountifully, and such a one will reap bountifully, both now and hereafter, if the sowing be done to the Lord, and not from earthly motives, such as the desire of man’s applause, &c. And now, it may be asked, 3, How much of our money, coming in by the labour of our hands, or by our business, or by our profession, &c., should we give to the Lord, for His work, or His poor saints, or in aiding unconverted destitute persons? No rule can be laid down concerning this. It would be unscriptural to say you must give a tenth, or fifth, or a fourth, or a third, or one half, of all the Lord may be pleased to give you; because, under this dispensation, no rule of this kind is laid down. Yet, while there is no such rule laid down, we have the word of the Lord speaking to us thus: "Ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that ye through His poverty might be rich." 2 Cor. viii, 9.—"Ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s." 1 Cor. vi, 20.—From Peter i, 18, 19; 2 Peter ii, 1; Rev. v, 9; &c., we learn that the precious blood of the Lord Jesus bought us, and redeemed us. Now, if we have been bought by the precious blood of the Lord Jesus, and if we are not, therefore, our own (1 Cor. vi, 19), but belong to Him, with all we have and are; does it not appear most manifest, that our money, as well as every thing else we have, belongs to Him, together with ourselves? What, then, according to this, is the right state of heart for a disciple of the Lord Jesus, concerning his possessions? Is it not obviously this, to present himself with all he has before the Lord, and to say: all this is Thine, for I not merely receive all from Thee, but I myself belong to Thee; command, therefore, what Thou wouldest have me, Thy servant, Thy steward, Thy child, and Thy redeemed one, to do with what I possess. After such a state of heart we should seek; and not only to have it now and then, but habitually; so that not merely the twentieth part of what we may obtain should be His, nor the tenth, nor the fifth, nor a third, nor even one half, but all, if He call for it. But while I say this, yet would I give my counsel further.

If the Christian reader has not grace at present, or has not light, to give himself with all his means to the Lord, after which he should aim, even to be ready, should the Lord call for it, to lay down all at His feet, he should, at least, as far as his love to the Lord leads him, dedicate a portion of his earnings or income to Him, a tenth, a fifth, a fourth, a third, or the half, so that, as the Lord may give to him, he should use the dedicated portion for Him. This plan helps the believer greatly. He will thus more easily be able to give, and to give even much, because that which he gives was dedicated by him to the Lord previously; it is His portion; he will feel it is not his own. In thus giving, say at first the tenth part, he will find how the seed sown produces fruit, how his soul is blessed in thus communicating of God’s bounty, and he will also generally find, that, even in temporal things, he is no loser in thus acting, but, on the contrary, a great gainer, and this will lead such a Christian, after a time, gladly to dedicate the fifth part of all his income to the Lord. In doing so, provided it is done to Him, still more abundant blessing will come to the soul, and still more abundant temporal recompense in return, so that it may lead even to a fourth, a third, or the half of all the Lord may give, to be given back to Him; yea, at last, such a child of God may see it to be his privilege, to call nothing his own, but to hold all as a steward for the Lord. Not that, ordinarily, the Lord calls for all, but rather, ordinarily, such a child of His will obtain more and more even in temporal things. The reason why I propose this plan to my brethren in Christ, is, not to bring their souls into bondage, but to lead them into true liberty. Without some such plan, if there is not grace to hold every thing only for the Lord, there is often very little, yea, scarcely any thing done for Him, by many Christians.

Many children of God have not only no desire that all they have should be the Lord’s if He should call for it; but they have not reached even so far as Jacob had, who did not live under the present dispensation, and who at the first dawning of spiritual light, said to God, "Of all that Thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto Thee." Gen. xxviii, 22. They do not give even the tenth part of all the Lord is pleased to give them back again to Him. They can readily lay out £5000 in the purchase of a house, £200 a year upon the education of each of their two or three sons, keep five servants besides, and live in other respects in proportion with this, and spend, strictly speaking, not £100 directly for the work of God, or for the support of poor saints, or in feeding hungry unconverted persons near them, who cannot earn their bread. What is the consequence? As they live more for themselves, or for their children, than for God, they are not really happy in God, as the real end, for which God has left them here on earth, is lost. But this has not merely to do with the rich or the middle classes of the children of God, but even with the poorer classes. The Christian man with a small salary, or a small business, or the journeyman who only earns his wages, says: I have so little, I cannot spare anything, or, if anything, it can be only the merest trifle. And what is the result? Either all, or almost all, is spent upon himself; or that which is not needed is put by for future days. The consequence is, that such individuals are not happy spiritually, and often also do not prosper temporally, because, as they are not faithful over the little with which God is pleased to intrust them, He cannot intrust them with more, except He do it as to Israel (Psalm cvi, 15) in the way of chastisement, and send leanness into their soul, or to lead them to see the vanity of such things. Often also, both in the case of the poorer classes, the middle classes, and the richer classes, God is obliged to send sickness, heavy losses, loss of business, &c., in order that He may take from His children what they would not gladly, constrained by the love of Christ, lay down at His feet. And now let me in the 4th and last place, tell the reader a little of what I have become acquainted with. A Godly man in London, in the employ of the Government, with 20 shillings per week, and eight in the family, had put by a little money for old age. About 26 years ago, he became acquainted with my Narrative and the Reports. God was pleased to bless them greatly to his soul. He felt that he had scarcely done anything for the work of God. His care about his family; his saying, how shall I provide for my family, had so filled his mind, that he had scarcely ever allowed himself to give away anything but the merest trifle. He now resolved, being greatly blessed in his soul, that he would send me £5 for the Orphans at once, and that he would give back to the Lord for His work one tenth of what He gave him. This was about 26 years since. What was the result? Immediately after, he was informed that his wages were raised two shillings per week, and that for the past sixteen weeks this increase should be paid to him at once. So he immediately received £1 12s. for the £5 which he had given, and this increase of wages since then, (to 1856), has amounted to about £50. From that time, yearly, once or twice, this dear man, whom I have never seen, has sent me something. He had found it difficult before to spare a sixpence; now he had the means to spare half crowns, half sovereigns, yea, sovereigns. About two or three years afterwards, he sent me another £5 for the support of the Orphans. Shortly after he was informed that his wages had been raised another two shillings per week. This has brought him, since then, between £30 and £40 more. No doubt, in other ways also, God has blessed him and prospered him: by keeping away sickness, by making a little go far, by prospering the endeavours of his children to earn something, &c. On May 8th, 1856, I received from this same dear man £10 for the work in which I am engaged: so much had God helped him, and prospered him temporally and spiritually, that, constrained by the love of Christ, this offering was made. In such a way life has its sweetness, even the life of a journeyman, or a day labourer. We feel, then, that we live for others, care about others, serve others. As for myself, I freely own that while I am ready to depart, if this be the will of the Lord; on the other hand, if He would only give me grace to live to Him, I would gladly stay fifty years longer in the world, and have the privilege of serving Him, and thus to sow seed for eternity. I fear that many true Christians do not practically remember, that, while we are saved by grace, altogether by grace, so that in the matter of salvation works are altogether excluded; yet, that so far as the rewards of grace are concerned, in the world to come, there is an intimate connexion between the life of the Christian here, and the enjoyment and the glory in the day of Christ’s appearing.

I give another instance. I knew about 40 years ago a very poor lad. This lad worked at that time at a factory. After some time he was converted, and by his Godly deportment and attention to his business obtained a better place in the factory, till, at last he, together with another Godly young man, became one of the managers of this factory. After some time, the one to whom I refer, entered into a little business on his own account, in which soon the Lord began to prosper him, and has prospered him now for more than 25 years. And what, dear reader, do you suppose is the secret of his success? It is this, that, as God has been pleased to prosper him, this dear man has opened his hand and communicated to the poor, or to the Lord’s work bountifully, out of that which the Lord has given him. This Godly tradesman whom I well knew as a lad without a sixpence in his pocket, has, through liberality, after he had entered upon a little business, been able to give away many hundreds of pounds.

Again, I know such, in the higher and richer classes, both in business, and out of business, more than one or two or three, who, having given thousands of pounds, yea many thousands of pounds to the work of the Lord, have had repayment from the Lord, in tens of thousands of pounds, yea, many tens of thousands of pounds.

The following deeply interesting particulars are recorded in the memoir of Mr. Cobb, a Boston, merchant, which I judge so very valuable in illustrating what I have said above, that I insert them here.

At the age of twenty-three, Mr. Cobb drew up and subscribed the following remarkable document

"By the grace of God I will never be worth more than 50,000 dollars.

"By the grace of God I will give one-fourth of the net profits of my business to charitable and religious uses.

"If I am ever worth 20,000 dollars I will give one-half of my net profits; and if ever I am worth 30,000 dollars, I will give three-fourths; and the whole after 50,000 dollars. So help me God, or give to a more faithful steward, and set me aside."

"To this covenant," says his memoir, "he adhered with conscientious fidelity. He distributed the profits of his business with an increasing ratio, from year to year, till he reached the point which he had fixed as a limit to his property, and then gave to the cause of God all the money which he earned. At one time, finding that his property had increased beyond 50,000 dollars, he at once devoted the surplus 7,500 dollars.

"On his death-bed he said to a friend, in allusion to the resolutions quoted above, ‘by the grace of God—nothing else—by the grace of God I have been enabled, under the influence of these resolutions to give away more than 40,000 dollars.’ How good the Lord has been to me!"

Mr. Cobb was also an active, humble, and devoted Christian, seeking the prosperity of feeble churches; labouring to promote the benevolent institutions of the day; punctual in his attendance at prayer-meetings, and anxious to aid the inquiring sinner; watchful for the eternal interests of those under his charge; mild and amiable in his deportment; and, in the general tenor of his life and character an example of consistent piety.

His last sickness and death were peaceful, yea triumphant. "It is a glorious thing," said he, "to die. I have been active and busy in the world—I have enjoyed as much as anyone—God has prospered me—I have every thing to bind me here—I am happy in my family—I have property enough—but how small and mean does this world appear on a sick bed! Nothing can equal my enjoyment in the near view of heaven. My hope in Christ is worth infinitely more than all other things. The blood of Christ—the blood of Christ—none but Christ! Oh! how thankful I feel that God has provided a way that I, sinful as I am, may look forward with joy to another world, through His dear Son."

I have spent more than 46 years in service for the Lord. During this period, especially during the last 40 years, I have become acquainted with many thousands of believers, many hundreds of whom I have known intimately as well as their private affairs. Moreover, many, very many, have honoured me with desiring my counsel and advice in their private and secret affairs. What have I learnt, among other points, by this? That "there is that scattereth and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty. The liberal soul shall be made fat: and he that watereth shall be watered also himself." Prov. xi, 24, 25. Many instances have I seen in which the children of God scattered, and yet increased; yea, scattered much, and yet abundantly increased; but far more have I seen, in which they withheld more than was meet, but it did tend to poverty. With all the desire to get on, very many were not able to do so, just because they only lived to themselves, they withheld more than was meet, and it tended to make or keep them poor. Bad debts, unexpected and unaccountable loss of custom, heavy family afflictions, &c., took away the money, which they sought to keep for themselves, contrary to the will of God. (I speak here of the children of God, and not of the world. "Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth." The world is judged and condemned at the judgment day. 1 Cor. xi, 32).—Again it is written: "Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the first fruits of all thine increase: so shall thy barns be filled with plenty, and thy presses shall burst out with new Wine." Prov. iii, 9, 10. There is nothing Jewish in these two passages. They are, as to the principles contained in them, deeply important for the believer under the present dispensation. If any man will do the Lord’s will, contained in them, he shall know, by happy experience, that to apply them to the present dispensation is scriptural. The natural mind in many professed disciples of the Lord may put aside such passages; but be not you robbed, esteemed reader, of the blessings connected with acting according to them, which blessings I have myself known for many years, whilst seeking to practice them. The reader who desires further information on this deeply important subject, may obtain some more hints by reading from page 575 to page 604, in the first volume of this Narrative. Ninth Edition. I now return to the income for the Building Fund.

Feb. 21, 1857 £98 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—April 11 From Staffordshire, £100—May 26. £48 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I add the following information:—

a. Up to this day, May 26, 1857, the total income for the Building Fund is £31,817 1s. 11d., so that only about £3,200 more will be required, as far as I am able to judge, to accomplish to the full my purpose respecting the accommodation for 700 more Orphans.

. Up to this day, May 26, 1857, the total income for the Building Fund is £31,817 1s. 11d., so that only about £3,200 more will be required, as far as I am able to judge, to accomplish to the full my purpose respecting the accommodation for 700 more Orphans.

b. The house for 400 Female Orphans, commenced in August, 1855, is now, with God’s blessing, so far advanced, that it is shortly expected to be finished. The new house is intended for 200 Infant Female Orphans from their earliest days, and for 200 Female Orphans from about eight years of age, up to the time they are fit to go to service.

The house for 400 Female Orphans, commenced in August, 1855, is now, with God’s blessing, so far advanced, that it is shortly expected to be finished. The new house is intended for 200 Infant Female Orphans from their earliest days, and for 200 Female Orphans from about eight years of age, up to the time they are fit to go to service.

I now give a few instances out of the many donations, received between May 26, 1857 and May 26, 1858, for the Building Fund.

July 15, 1857. £10 from Bombay.—Sept 18. I had just returned home from the newly-built house for 400 more Orphans, where I had tried the efficiency of the gas apparatus with its 150 burners, when I found a cheque for One Thousand Pounds from a brother in the Lord, who desires to spend the whole of his large income for the Lord, laying up no treasure on earth, and spending very little upon his own necessities. He writes: "Desiring that our heavenly Father will guide me as a steward of His bounty; and, after seeking His direction, I conclude it is good and profitable to invest a little in the Orphan Houses. Will you please to put the inclosed sum towards the Building Fund." I make the following remarks in connexion with this donation:

1, When I felt led to enlarge the Orphan-work, so that a thousand, instead of 300 Orphans, might be provided for, I had no natural prospect whatever, of obtaining the means. But while I had no natural prospects of accomplishing my desire, I had faith in God, and was assured that He would help me through all the difficulties. Accordingly He sent me one donation after the other, and by large and small sums encouraged me yet further and further to look to Him. This donor, at that time, had not the ability, however willing he might have been, to help me to such an extent; but God knew already, that He would give him the means, and make him one of the many helpers to carry out my plans, made after much prayer, concerning this enlargement.

2, The donor sent this donation, as he writes, after prayer, and concludes it is "good and profitable to invest a little in the Orphan Houses." Even as to the way of spending our money, we should not be led by mere feeling, much less be influenced by its becoming known, and our thus getting esteem from our fellow-men; nor should we do things because others do them; but, as the stewards of God, we should contribute the much or the little we have to give, as we are led after prayer, doing always what we do to God, and not to man.

3, The donor writes, he considers it "profitable to invest a little in the Orphan Houses." Do all the readers understand the meaning of this? The donor has not received any interest from me, nor will he have any from me on thus £1000; and yet, I doubt not, this investment will be profitable to him. In such cases I have found that the Lord, even in this life, has taken notice of such deeds, and given ample repayment, often tenfold, twentyfold, yea, in not a few instances, even a hundredfold, according to that word: "Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again."—Luke vi, 38. "He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully."— 2 Cor. ix, 6. But while even as to this life we shall not be losers by acting faithfully as the Lord’s stewards, yet what shall we say when looking at the day of Christ, when even the cup of cold water, given to a disciple in the name of a disciple, shall be rewarded. Were it more habitually before our minds, how brief this present life is in comparison with eternity, and how bright and glorious, and unspeakably precious the blessings are which await the believer in the day of Christ; how gladly should we seek habitually to spend and be spent for Him. Let the believer only realize the vanity of earthly things, and the preciousness of heavenly treasures, and he will seek to live for eternity, and among other things will be delighted to lay up treasure in heaven. It may not be that the money is given to an Orphan-Establishment, nor even to Missionary objects; but in some way or other such a one will consider it an honour and a privilege to be allowed by the Lord to use his means for Him.

This donation helped me another step nearer the full accomplishment of my desires respecting the enlargement of the Orphan-Work.

Nov. 12, 1857. The long looked for, and long prayed for, day had now arrived, when the desire of my heart was granted to me, to be able to open the New Orphan-House No. 2, for 400 additional Orphans. Much had I laboured in prayer and active engagements to accomplish what was to be done, previously; and now things were so far advanced, as that the new house was ready for use; and a few days after we began to receive the children into it. How precious this was to me, will be understood by those, who, having day by day prayed for a blessing for seven years, and often repeatedly on the same day, at last obtain the desire of their heart. Yet this blessing came not unexpectedly to me, but had been looked for, and had, in the full assurance of faith, been expected in God’s own time. In connexion with this I also mention, that, for several years previously, yea, years before a stone had been laid for the building, I had daily asked God, that He would be pleased, by His providential government, and by the working of His Holy Spirit, to fit and qualify helpers for the work: and now, when the house was ready, the helpers also were ready, so that, without difficulty, and without advertising, they were obtained. Thus these thousands of prayers reaped a precious harvest in this particular also. Only continue, dear Christian reader, patiently to wait on God, and, as assuredly as your request is for the Glory of God, for your real good, and you ask in the name of the Lord Jesus, believing that God hears you, the answer will be granted. You may have to pray long, as I had in this case for nearly seven years; but the answer is certain. I now relate further how the Lord was pleased to supply me with means, and how, at last He gave me the amount needed for accomplishing fully the intended enlargement of the Orphan-Work, not for 400 only, but for 700 additional Orphans.

Jan. 19, 1858. Received £3000, which was left to my disposal. I took of it for the Building Fund £600, for the support of the Orphans £600, and for the other objects of the Institution, viz., for Missions, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and for the various Schools £1,800—Yesterday I received a letter, stating that a stranger had offered to pay One Hundred Guineas to the funds of the Institution, if, together with an Orphan girl, who was to be received, I would at the same time, admit her brother, whose turn was not come. This was of course, declined, as the cases of the Orphans are considered in the order in which applications are made, and according to the vacancies which occur for boys and girls, and money never influences me in the least.—Now see, Christian reader, how God recompensed this acting in His fear, irrespective of the loss of the money.—But I must further add, in connection with this, that the lady, who had offered the One Hundred Guineas, and who received this negative reply, an entire stranger to me, very kindly sent me £300 a little while after, though the little boy was not admitted, because his turn was not yet come.

Feb. 16. Received £800, and from another donor £700. Both these donations were left at my disposal, to be used as might appear best to me for the Lord’s work. Of the £800 I took, therefore, for the Building Fund £200, for the support of the Orphans £200, and for the various other objects of the Institution, viz., Missions, the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts, and the various Schools, £400. Of the £700 I took for the Building Fund £200, for the support of the Orphans £200, and for all the other various objects of the Institution £300—Feb. 17. £245 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—As far as I am able to judge, I have now all that is required in the way of pecuniary means for the third house also, so that I am able to accomplish the full enlargement of the Orphan work to One Thousand Orphans.

Pause, esteemed reader! Nearly seven years had I been, day by day, asking the Lord for the needed means, to carry out the desire of my heart, concerning the Thousand Orphans. Not a single day had elapsed since first I began to pray for means, in which I had not been enabled, in the full assurance of faith, that it would be granted, to bring my request before God, and generally I had prayed more than once a day concerning this matter. When I began my request for means, viz., to entreat the Lord to give me Thirty Five Thousand Pounds, I knew well what difficulty there was in the way of my obtaining this sum, looking at it naturally. I am too calm, too calculating a person, too much in the habit of weighing all the difficulties of a case, to be carried away by excitement or imagination. I knew I had no ground naturally to expect this large sum. For months, therefore, I had not prayed at all for means for this enlargement, but had only asked the Lord to show me very clearly whether it was His will that I should go forward; but, having once come fully to this conclusion, on the grounds stated at large in the Fourth part of this Narrative, from page 206 to page 227 of the Third Edition, I was as certain that the Lord would give me all I needed, as if I had had the money already in hand. It might, at that time, have been naturally said to me, and indeed it was said to me, "How will you be likely to obtain this large sum of Thirty Five Thousand Pounds for the Building Fund, and at the same time be able to meet the current expenses of the work already in existence?" The reply of faith was, I know not whence the money is to come, but I know that God, on whom I depend, is able to provide me with all I need, for the current expenses, and also to give me money for the Building Fund. When in November, 1845, contrary to all my former desires, I was led as by an unseen hand, to decide upon leaving the four rented houses, and to build the New Orphan House No. 1 for 300 children, it was considered strange that I should think of enlarging the work from 120 to 300 Orphans, when for years previously I had had almost habitually to wait upon the Lord day by day for daily supplies. Yet so it was, that the Lord gave me all I needed for the Building Fund, although that was no less than £15,055 3s. 2¼d., and I had £776 14s. 3d. more than I required. Moreover, all the current expenses were met in the meantime, and we were able to begin housekeeping at the New Orphan House No. 1 with about Five Hundred Pounds in hand, whilst, before I had thought about building that large house, we had had very rarely as much as £100 in hand, and very often scarcely 100 pence. So this time, whilst the means for the Building Fund were coming in, I had to meet the current expenses, which for the Orphans alone amounted to £26,249 10s. from May 26, 1851 to Feb. 17, 1858, and for the other objects, in the same time, £25,670 9s. 6½d., being altogether £51,919 19s. 6½d.; and when the new house for 400 Orphans was opened on Nov. 12, 1857, I had in hand

£2,292 0s. 11d. for the current expenses of the Orphans. See, esteemed reader, how unbelief is put to shame, and natural reasoning is confounded. Had I, at my own bidding, or for my own honour, or for the gratification of self in some way or other begun this enlargement, I could have expected nothing but to be confounded. Or, good though my intentions had been, had I not been called for the work, I could have expected nothing but to be confounded. Or, had I regarded iniquity in my heart, whilst seeking to carry out this enlargement, I might have prayed much outwardly, but I should not have had my desires granted as to the obtaining of means. I dwell upon these matters for the profit of the reader, especially the young Christian reader, or even older believers whose faith is weak, in order that thus they may be helped on in the divine life.

Up to May 26, 1858, I had received for the intended enlargement of the Orphan Work, to be able to accommodate 1000 Orphans instead of 300, the sum of £35,335 9s. 3d., being actually £335 9s. 3d. more than I had been from the commencement praying for. Let this encourage the reader! I add the following remarks respecting the intended further enlargement of the Orphan work:

For some time previous to May 26th, 1858, I had judged it to be far better to keep the ground belonging to the Orphan Houses free from buildings, and to purchase land for the intended third house. As soon, therefore, as I had obtained in January and February 1858 the large donations referred to, which furnished me with all I yet needed, I took active measures towards purchasing a field near the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. The purchase was made; there arose, however, certain difficulties regarding the matter, which, for many weeks, it was hoped would be removed; but, on June 2nd, 1858, it was finally decided, that it would be undesirable to go on with the completion of the purchase. I could therefore do nothing, in going forward with the New Orphan House No. 3, until I had obtained suitable land.

I refer now to some other donations, as specimens, how the Lord was pleased, over and above the Thirty Five Thousand Pounds, earnestly sought at His hands by prayer and faith, abundantly to supply us with means.

Sep. 27, 1858. £95 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

It has been stated before, that when I had received the means required for the third house, I was looking out for land for it. Regarding this I waited day by day upon God, but for many months it pleased Him to exercise my faith and patience. When, more than once I seemed to have obtained my desire, I again appeared further from it than ever. However, I continued to pray and to exercise faith, being fully assured that the Lord’s time was not yet come, and that, when it was, He would help. And so it proved.

At last, in September 1858, I obtained 11½ acres of land, quite close to the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2, and only separated from them by the road. On these 11½ acres of land a house was built. The price for house and land was £3,631 15s., being more money than I should have seen it right to expend on the site, had it not been of the utmost importance, that the third house should be quite near the other two, to facilitate the superintendance and direction of the establishment. Thus, at last, this prayer also was answered, concerning which I had been waiting upon God for so many months, and concerning which the difficulties as to sight and reason seemed so great, but respecting which my mind was continually at peace; for I was sure, that, as I was doing God’s work, He would, in His own time, help me in this particular also. The longer I go on in this service, the more I find that prayer and faith can overcome every difficulty.

Having now obtained land, and so much, my desire was to make the best use of it, and to build for 400 Orphans, instead of for 300, as I had previously purposed to do. After having had several meetings with the architects, and finding that it was possible to accommodate with comparatively little more expense 450 Orphans, instead of 400, I finally determined on that number, so as to have eventually 1150 Orphans under my care, instead of 1000, as for several years previously had been contemplated. The greatness of the number of destitute children, bereaved of both parents by death;—together with the greatness of the Lord’s blessing, which had during all the many years previously rested upon my service in this way;—and the greatness of the Lord’s help in giving me assistants and helpers in the work as well as means; and, above all, the deep realization that I have but one life to spend for God on earth, and that that one life is but a brief life:—These were the reasons which led me to this further enlargement. To this determination of a still further enlargement, I came solely in dependence upon the Living God for help, though the increase of expense for the Building Fund, on account of the purchase of the land, and accommodation to be built for the additional 150 Orphans, more than had been from the beginning contemplated, would not be less than from £6000 to £7500 more than I had originally expected the total of the premises, which were to be erected, would cost; and though, in addition to this, the yearly additional expenditure for the maintenance of these 150 Orphans, beyond the intended number of 1000, could not be less than £1800 a year. But none of these difficulties discouraged me.

It will now be interesting to the reader to see how the Lord dealt with me, since I came to this decision. I therefore go on to refer to at least a few of the donations, which came in for the Building Fund since October 29, 1858.

Dec. 26. Received information that a glass manufacturer and a glass merchant will kindly supply gratuitously all the glass required for the New Orphan House No. 3, which is expected to contain about 350 large windows.

Jan. 4, 1859. Received £7000, which, being entirely left at my disposal, I took £4000 for the Building Fund, £1000 for the support of the Orphans, £1500 for Missions, £400 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and £100 for the various Schools.—When I decided at the end of October, 1858, to build for 450 Orphans, instead of 300, I needed several thousand pounds more, and was fully assured that God would give me the required means, because in reliance upon Him, and for the honour of His name, I had determined on this enlargement; and now see, esteemed Reader, how the Lord honoured this my faith in Him!—Jan. 6. From Brixton £2, as "A thank-offering to God for an unbroken family at the beginning of the year." From an anonymous donor at Manchester £300, with the very kind promise to send me £900 more, in the course of this year, for the Building Fund.

Feb. 1. Received £1700, the application of which being left entirely to myself, I took for the Building Fund £400, for the support of the Orphans £300, for Home Missions £350, for Foreign Missions £350, for the circulation of Bibles £100, for the circulation of Tracts £100, and for the School Fund £100—Received likewise this day £1000, of which the application was left to myself, and of which I took for the Building Fund £300, for the support of the Orphans £200, for Foreign Missions £200, for Home Missions £100, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £100, for the circulation of Tracts, £50, and for the School Fund £50.

Do you perceive, esteemed Reader, how precious it is to trust in God? Do you see, that, if we ask God for that which is according to His mind, and ask it in the name of the Lord Jesus, and believe that He hears us, we do not wait upon Him in vain? Make but trial of this blessed way for yourself, in your own individual sphere, and under your own individual trials and necessities, and you will find, as we have, times without number, that you do not wait upon God in vain. But you must previously have decided, upon Scriptural ground, that that regarding which you pray, is for the glory of God; you must further ask it at His hands on the ground of the merits and worthiness of the Lord Jesus as a believer in Him for the salvation of your soul; and you must believe that God hears you, and will in His own time and way attend to your request.

Feb. 8, 1859. £245 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

May 26, 1859. Up to this day has been received, towards the enlargement of the Orphan work, the sum of £41,911 15s. 11d. The New Orphan House No. 3 is intended for 450 girls from eight years old and upward, to remain till they are fit to be sent to service. The plans of the building of No. 3 are all completed, and in a few weeks it is expected that the building will be commenced, God willing.

July 11. Received from A. B., anonymously, £400.

Dec. 31. From Lancashire £300

Jan. 1, 1860. From Lancashire £200—Jan. 31. Received £3000, left entirely at my disposal, to be used for the various objects of the Institution. I took, therefore, £500 for the Building Fund, £500 for the support of the Orphans, and £2,000 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund. The previously mentioned large donations from A. B. and from Lancashire, together with this last one, and many smaller donations, not mentioned, received for the Building Fund, furnished me to the full with means for accomplishing the whole of the enlargement, though the amount required was somewhat more, when the estimates for No. 3 came in, than had been anticipated.

May 16. £270 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 22. £200 out of a donation of £2700, left at my disposal, was taken for the Building Fund, the rest for the other objects of the Institution.—May 26, 1860. Up to this day I had received, altogether, for the contemplated enlargement, £45,113 14s. 4½d. The building of the New Orphan House No. 3 Was commenced in July, 1859, and has been steadily going on up to this day.

Apr. 9, 1861. Received anonymously, a gold ring set with five diamonds and two sapphires, a gold necklet with locket, a gold locket brooch, a gold pencil case, a gold cross, anchor and heart, a silver vinaigrette and a pair of silver bracelets.—April 17. £270 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 17. A glass manufacturer and glass merchant kindly gave all the glass required for the 390 large windows of No. 3.—May 26, 1861. Up to this day had been received for the enlargement of the Orphan work, originally intended for 700 more Orphans, but afterwards extended to 850 Orphans, the sum of £46,660 17s. 3d., so that the amount first prayed for, was exceeded by £11,660 17s. 3d. The reader will have, therefore, in this a fresh proof of the blessedness of committing our matters, great and small, temporal and spiritual, into the hands of our Heavenly Father, waiting patiently for the answer to our prayers. We did not obtain the answer to our prayers at once. Thousands of times, many thousands of times our request had to be repeated before our Heavenly Father, and faith and patience were exercised year after year, before the full answer regarding this matter was granted; but at last our prayers were not only answered to the full, but £11,660 17s. 3d. more was received than had been at first asked for.

 

Contemplated further enlargement of the Orphan Work.

The following statement was published in the Twenty-Second Report of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, in 1861, and is reprinted here:

"It is now ten years, when, as by an unseen hand, I was led to that enlargement of the Orphan work, which is now, with the Lord’s blessing, all but completed. The exercise of spirit I passed through, and the reasons which finally led me to that enlargement of the work from 300 to 1000 Orphans, and which, in 1858, was finally still further extended to 1150, may be fully seen in the fourth part of this Narrative, from page 206 to 227 of the Third Edition. I have now to inform the reader, that, as ten years ago, so again during the last months, day by day, my spirit has been exercised about a still further enlargement of the Orphan work, so that there should not only be 1150 destitute children, bereaved of both parents by death, cared for, in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, but 2000; and that still further premises should be built, as two separate establishments, for 850 more Orphans, being a fourth and fifth Orphan House, in addition to the three already built. The reasons which, after daily prayer for guidance, self-examination, and looking steadfastly at all the many difficulties connected with this further enlargement have finally decided me, are the following:

1, The longer I go on in this service, and the more it becomes known, the greater is the number of destitute children, bereaved of both parents by death, who are applied for to be admitted into the Orphan Houses under my direction. Almost daily fresh cases are brought before me, and sometimes 3 or 4 or more at once; and it is not a rare thing, that in each such case there are 3, 4, or even more young children. I am, therefore, willing, to be yet further the servant of the Lord in this particular work, although I am unworthy, most unworthy, that He should condescend thus to use me.

2, But that which at first especially was used by the Lord to direct my mind to this further enlargement, was not only the greatness of the number of applications for Orphans in general, but for boys in particular. For girls we had the prospect of doing something more, when the house for 450 should be opened; but for boys we had no such prospect, nor anything like it, though about 400 were waiting for admission, and hundreds of applications for boys had been declined, as there was no prospect of being able to admit them. The reasons which have led me to care for girls to a greater extent with regard to numbers, than for boys, are these: a, Girls are the weaker sex, and therefore call more particularly for Christian sympathy. b, If neglected, they are still more exposed to the danger of being utterly ruined. c, Girls we have employment for, and can keep them without difficulty till they are 18 or 19 years of age, whilst boys need to be apprenticed when 14 or 15. But I have generally found, that the age from 14 to 18 or 19 is the most important as young persons, with regard to their spiritual state. They are, if cared for, at that age, generally speaking, more in earnest about the things of God, than when younger. This has been my experience during the past 27 years though God has made numberless exceptions during the last three years, while His Holy Spirit has been so mightily at work; and we ourselves have had very many children brought to the knowledge of the Lord, before they were 14 years old.—Because, then, girls are the weaker sex; and are still more exposed than boys to utter ruin if neglected; and we can easily keep them till they are 18 or 19 years of age; I was led more especially to care for them. But now, having to a considerable extent, by the help of God, been enabled to provide for them, I was led to consider whether something more might not be done for boys also, to prevent, if possible, the necessity of refusing the boys of a family, when the girls could be received. I do not mean to say that the whole of the intended enlargement is for boys, yet a part at least, should be appropriated to them. Though, then, my mind has been, and is still led more particularly to care for girls, yet the desire to provide for boys also, to a greater extent than hitherto, was that which, in the first instance, particularly led my mind to this further enlargement.

3, The third reason, which has led me to this enlargement, is, the entirely inadequate accommodation in the Orphan Institutions already in existence in the United Kingdom. If they were multiplied many times, yet would there be an abundance of destitute Orphans to fill them. But even if there were room in them, which is not the case, still, the existing rules of admission by votes, which are in use in most of them, make it difficult, if not impossible, for the poorest and most destitute persons, to avail themselves of them. In referring to the practice of admission by votes, I do not blame any one; for I have reason to believe that many, who use this practice, wish it were otherwise; but I mention it simply as an existing fact. Thousands of votes, sometimes even many thousands, are required, in order that the candidate be successful. But the really poor and destitute have neither time, money, ability nor influence, to set about canvassing for votes; and therefore, with rare exceptions, they derive no benefit from such Institutions. Some time since I had an application for some Orphans, whose mother, a widow, in attempting to obtain votes for one of her fatherless children, was actually so worn out, that one day she came home, over-fatigued by canvassing for votes, sat down and died. I repeat it, I blame no one, yet I would humbly but solemnly entreat presidents, vice-presidents, and committees of such Institutions, to consider in the fear of God, whether it is right to impose such overwhelming work, and such heavy expense on the poor applicants, and whether it is not more Christ-like to bestow the bounty, which is to be bestowed, in a more easy way. I do not know whether it may please God to use this feeble word of suggestion, or not; but this I must say, I do feel myself called upon, to the utmost of my power, to make an easy way for the admission of poor destitute Orphans into an Orphan Establishment; and this, as well as the want of room in the already existing Orphan Institutions, has led me to contemplate this further enlargement by seeking to build for 850 more Orphans, so as to have altogether 2000 under my care.

4, In intimate connexion with this latter point stands the question, What is to become of the Orphans, who are left destitute, if they cannot be received into Orphan Houses, for want of room, or on account of the voting system? There remain the Unions, it may be answered. Yes; but have you considered, esteemed reader, what the moral and spiritual state of the Unions is? Vice abounds in them, on account of the kind of inmates, who, generally speaking, are found there. For this reason, and justly so, many of the respectable, and especially religious, poor, cannot bear the idea that their nephews, or nieces, or grandchildren, who are Orphans, should go to a Union. So they would rather keep them, though themselves most poor. But the result is, generally speaking, they can neither provide for them the necessary food, nor proper education; and the end is often an early grave for want of proper food; or a neglected, uncultivated mind and heart. By the help of God, I will seek, therefore, yet further, to be the Orphan’s friend, and have not only accommodation for 1150, but for 2000.

5. In addition to these reasons, the physical, mental, and spiritual benefit, which many Orphans have derived during a quarter of a century, from being under our care, has weighed especially with me, in seeking, to the utmost of my power, to extend my services still further in this particular.

As to the health of the children, the reader needs to keep in mind, that the very fact of young children being bereaved of both parents by death, except through causality, shows, humanly speaking, that they are the offspring of parents with bad constitutions, and that, therefore, ordinarily, they are themselves unhealthy. Thus we find it, with rare exceptions. And yet, notwithstanding this, so abundantly has God been pleased, especially during the last 20 years, to bless the means which we employ for the invigoration of the constitution of the children, by a healthy locality, thorough cleanliness, perfectly regular habits, plain but nourishing food, exercise, etc., that, a few months after their reception, a marked difference for the better is perceived in their countenances, except they were already sunk too low; and as to the mortality among the children, it is so exceedingly small, especially remembering who these children are, that it is the surprise of all who have considered it. In all this we own the hand of God, without whose blessing all these means would avail nothing; yet we cannot hide it from ourselves, that He is pleased to use these means, and that, for want of them, humanly speaking, one half of the children of the poor die very young, who perhaps would not have died, had they been situated as the children are under our care,

Further, many of the children whom we have received, though thirteen years old, or older, could not even read. Their minds had been utterly uncultivated. In this state, humanly speaking, they would have remained, but for our receiving them. We have had, thus, the joy of educating hundreds, who otherwise might have had no mental cultivation; besides teaching them a great variety of other things which are profitable for this life, in order to make them useful members of society. But further, and most of all, our chief aim concerning the Orphans, from the beginning of the work on Dec. 9, 1835, has been their spiritual welfare. All physical and mental improvement regarding them could never satisfy us. All would be exceedingly little in our estimation, if they were not spiritually benefited. We aim, by the help of God, after the former two points with earnestness; but we labour day by day in spirit for the latter. And this blessing has been granted to us, not concerning 20 or 50 of the Orphans, but concerning hundreds. Yea, so assured am I, that we do not labour in vain concerning this point, judging from the means we use, and the earnestness in prayer God gives us, that I expect but very few of the Orphans to be wanting in heaven. The longer I have gone on in this service, the more abundantly God has blessed the work regarding the Orphans in all these three particulars, as to their bodily and mental improvement, but especially as to their spiritual state; and with reference to the last, within the past three years in particular.

This abundant blessing, then, which God has caused to rest upon our labours among the Orphans, year after year, has greatly encouraged me, among other reasons, to seek yet more to enlarge this work. The longer I live, the more I am enabled to realize, that I have but one life to live on earth, and that this one life is but a brief life, for sowing, in comparison with eternity, for reaping. The consideration of these truths, while they have a practical influence upon my life, in general, also lead me, in particular, to labour for Orphans, poor destitute Orphans, who have no helper and friend, and whose helper and friend, under God, I seek to be yet further and further, unworthy though I am, to be thus highly honoured.

6. In connexion with the foregoing reasons stands also the fact, that the Lord has been pleased to give me gift for this work. I do not take credit to myself for this. There is not the least honour due to me on account of it. The germ was first implanted by the Lord, and He caused it to grow and to increase. The gift which He had been pleased to impart, for such service, was used, at first, while the work was small; for I began with 30 Orphans. Afterwards were added 36 more, and then after a year again 30 more, and finally after the lapse of several years 30 more. Thus, for above 13 years, the number of orphans under my care never exceeded 126; but then it grew to 300, with the opening of the New Orphan House No. 1, and with the opening of No. 2 to 700; and now, with God’s blessing, it will shortly be 1150. Thus, with the enlargement of the work, the gift, which the Lord had been pleased to give me, was further and further developed, as the whole work grew up under my sole and immediate direction.

No president, vice-president, or committee stand in this position. However wise, Godly, and in other respects suitable they may be for their post, except they have been in a similar position to mine, as the sole and immediate director of such establishments, they cannot have gathered the experience that I have gathered for this work. Now, as I said, while there is not the least honour due to me for all this, as God called me for the work, fitted me for it, has sustained me in it, and caused my experience to grow with the work; yet, on the other hand, I feel responsibility laid on me, still further, to the utmost of my power, to make use of this gift and experience, and therefore to enlarge the work, as here proposed.

7, I am further encouraged to enlarge the work, by the help which the Lord has given me regarding assistants. Had I been helped never so much in the way of pecuniary supplies, and had help in this particular been wanting, the work never would have been, what it has been and is now. But as, in every other respect, I have proved the power of prayer and faith in God, so in this particular also. I have waited on God for assistants, and He has given them to me. When, for instance, I had before me the prospect of the enlargement of the Orphan work, in 1851, I began soon after to pray for suitable helpers in the work, and thus prayed day by day, long before a stone was laid in connexion with the New Orphan House No. 2. I continued day by day to pray concerning this object; and when at last this house was opened in 1857, the needed helpers were found without any difficulty. And now again, with regard to No. 3, I have been daily praying for helpers, for more than two years, and doubt not, that,when this house shall be quite ready, I shall again abundantly see the answer to prayer in this particular. But there is one point further especially to be noticed regarding fellow-labourers. When I was led in 1851 to the enlargement of the Orphan work, the chief, and almost only real difficulty I had in my own mind, was the inability of undertaking myself any more work, as my hands were filled to the utmost, having, up to that time, without a secretary or other immediate assistant to myself, except the help of my dear wife in the matter of accounts, &c. carried on the large correspondence of the Institution, and seen myself to the despatch of Tracts and Bibles, &c. Since then, however, the Lord has been pleased to give me three assistants, who entirely relieve me of several branches of the correspondence, see to the issue of Bibles and Tracts, keep the accounts, help in the superintendence of certain matters, &c.; so that, though the Institution is now at least three times as large as it was, when I was led to its enlargement, I go with the same ease and quietness of mind through my engagements as then, though the work certainly requires my attention every day, and all the day, with the exception of the time taken for spiritual exercises. Now, the great help, which the Lord hath given me in this particular, encourages me to the still further enlargement, hoping in God that He will be pleased to give me yet further suitable assistants, and to help me in the discovery of other methods and ways, whereby, notwithstanding the enlargement, I shall be able to accomplish the work.

8, The pecuniary help, which the Lord has given me hitherto, is another voice as from Himself to me, to go forward. To pass by the former enlargements of the work, I will only refer to the last great enlargement, first contemplated by me at the end of 1850. The state of the Institution was then such, that the expenditure for all the various objects thereof amounted to about £6000 a year. To obtain this sum, year by year, simply by prayer and faith; without regular subscribers, without agents for collecting, without asking any one, without any visible prospect whatever, seemed a large sum indeed, looking at it naturally. But, by this contemplated enlargement, when carried out, the expenses would not be only £6000, but £15000 a year. Many were startled by it. And so should I have been, had I simply looked at matters with natural reasoning power; but I looked to the Lord, and to Him alone. I trusted not in circumstances; I trusted not in donors, nor even in donors who gave largely. And now, how have matters been, and how has the Lord dealt with His servant who trusted in Him? Has He said by His dealings with him, thou hast been presumptuous; or, thou hast expected too much from me? Nay, the very reverse. Hear, esteemed reader, how I have fared. During the 17 years which had elapsed since the formation of the Institution, before the contemplation of this great enlargement of the Orphan work, the total of the Income, for the various objects of the Institution, had been Forty Thousand Pounds; but since then, during 10 years only, it has been about One Hundred and Fifty Thousand Pounds. See how unbelief has been put to shame. My full persuasion was, at the time, as expressed in the Report of 1851, and reprinted in the second volume of my Narrative, that, as I had come to the decision regarding this intended enlargement, on the ground that I judged it to be the will of God, for the reasons there given, I was sure God would help me with means; and so it has been. For I never, during the past 27 years, have gone on more easily, regarding means, than since May 1851. Thus, by what God has done hitherto, I am encouraged to go forward, to this still greater enlargement, though without any natural prospect whatever of obtaining the means needed. But my hope is in God, and in Him alone. The premises contemplated for 850 more Orphans, cannot cost with the ground less than Fifty Thousand Pounds, especially as a large field for cultivation by the boys will be required. Now, whence shall I get this £50,000, especially when it is considered, that, in the mean time, the amount needed for the current expenses will be at least £20,000 year by year? And how, natural reason would say, will you be able to keep up the work, provided you were able to accomplish the building, as then the regular current expenses would amount to about £35,000 a year? I feel the force of all this, looking at it naturally. I am not a fanatic or enthusiast, but, as all, who know me, are well aware, a calm, cool, quiet, calculating business man; and therefore I should be utterly overwhelmed, looking at it naturally; but as the whole of this work was commenced, and ever has been gone on with in faith, trusting in the Living God alone for everything, so it is also regarding this intended enlargement. I look to the Lord alone for helpers, land, means, and every thing else needed. I have pondered the difficulties for months, and have looked steadily at every one of them; but faith in God has put every one of them aside.

9, But the following consideration operates with me more powerfully than all the previous eight reasons, which I have given, for the contemplated enlargement. When I began the Orphan Work in 1835, (as may be seen at full length in my Narrative, Vol. I. p. 143—146, 7th edit., where I state the reasons which led me to it,) my chief object was the glory of God, by giving a practical demonstration as to what could be accomplished simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith, in order thus to benefit the Church of God at large, and to lead a careless world to see the reality of the things of God, by showing them, in this work, that the Living God is still, as 4000 years ago, the Living God. This my aim has been abundantly honoured. Multitudes of sinners have been thus converted, multitudes of the children of God in all parts of the world have been benefited by this work, even as I had anticipated. But the larger the work has grown, the greater has been the blessing, bestowed in the very way in which I looked for blessing; for the attention of hundreds of thousands has been drawn to the work; and many tens of thousands have come to see it. All this leads me to desire further and further to labour on in this way, in order to bring yet greater glory to the name of the Lord. That He may be looked at, magnified, admired, trusted in, relied on at all times, is my aim in this service, and so particularly in this intended enlargement. That it may be seen how much one poor man, simply by trusting in God, can bring about by prayer; and that thus other children of God may be led to carry on the work of God in dependence upon Him, and that children of God may be led increasingly to trust in Him in their individual positions and circumstances, therefore I am led to this further enlargement.—Lastly, 10, Much, however, as the nine previous reasons weigh with me, yet they would not decide me, were there not one more. It is this. After having for months pondered the matter; and having looked at it in all its bearings, and with all its difficulties; and then having been finally led, after much prayer, to decide on this enlargement, my mind is at peace. The child who has again and again besought his Heavenly Father, not to allow him to be deluded, nor even to make a mistake, is at peace, perfectly at peace concerning this decision; and has thus the assurance, that the decision come to, after much prayer during weeks and months, is the leading of the Holy Spirit; and therefore purposes to go forward, assuredly believing that he will not be confounded, for he trusts in God. Many and great may be his difficulties; thousands and tens of thousands of Prayers may have to ascend to God, before the full answer may be obtained; much exercise of faith and patience may be required; but, in the end, it will again be seen, that His servant, who trusts in Him, has not been confounded.

Further particulars, God willing, shall be given in due time. I only now say, that these intended New Orphan Houses Nos. 4 and 5 will also be vested in the hands of trustees and enrolled in Chancery, as has been done regarding Nos. 1, 2, and 3.

The Christian reader will now feel interested in learning, how the Lord was pleased to deal with me, in reference to this contemplated enlargement of the Orphan work; and I refer, therefore, to some of the donations which came in towards this object, and shall, periodically, give the totals, which were received. June 6, 1861. Have received the first donation towards the needed Fifty Thousand Pounds, which consists of 5 rupees, 6 annas, 3 senams, 3 Spanish coins, and 3 other silver coins. July 17. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Aug. 1. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 15. In the course of my reading through the Holy Scriptures came this morning the last part of II Chronicles, and the beginning of the book of Ezra, where Cyrus’s decree, concerning the building of the temple, is referred to. In reading this portion, I remembered, how, in the prospect of the building of the New Orphan House No. 1, this passage was a great comfort to me, by showing, how, through the most unlikely persons, God can supply the means. It also again came before me in the course of reading, when No. 2 and 3 were to be built, and means needed, and had the same effect. Now, all 3 houses being built, I thanked God again, for the means which He had kindly given me for these 3 houses, and told Him, at the same time, in prayer, that I expected from His faithful love all the means for the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5 also. While still thus engaged, there came the postman’s knock, and many letters arrived. The first I opened contained an order from Chelmsford for £100, for "The Orphan Institution," the application of which was left to my discretion. I took, therefore, this £100 for the Building Fund, as God’s answer to my prayers.—Sep. 10. From Greenock, £40Sep. 16. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasures in heaven.—Oct. 15. £30 from the same donor.—Nov. 2. £30 from the same donor. Nov. 15. £150 from a donor who sent only a week since £150, with the following letter. "Dear brother in the Lord, as the former £150 was put to the Missionary—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, you will please to put the enclosed £150 towards the Orphan work, as I am more than ever impressed with the blessedness of this work, and its results. I praise the Lord continually for it, and trust you will long be spared, and preserved from all adversaries; for they are many and mighty; and still, in faith in a living Christ, in whom all the promises centre, triumph over all, bearing testimony to the end of your course to the faithfulness of a covenant God. I have been expecting for years the extension of the work, and that 2000 dear children would be provided for. Jehovah far exceed our desires, as He certainly will, and give us to have abundant and large expectations from Him alone! "I am he that liveth and was dead." Yours in Christ * * * *."—Dec. 4. From Scotland 10s., with 10s. for the Orphans, accompanied by the following letter: "Dear Sir, I am glad to say that I am able to continue to give account of prosperity, since I began to give a stated proportion of my income to the work of Christ throughout the earth. It is a few years since I began that plan, of which I now testify that I have found it so profitable, particularly to my soul, and also to the increase of my gains. The Lord is now enabling me to give away as much as I used to earn a few years ago altogether. At that time my income was small, and the work hard; but the Lord opened the way for me to begin business on my own account; and although I have to work hard, yet I am well remunerated, and have been able to give away 24 per cent. of my free income during the last year. I enclose you a Post-office order for 10s., for the benefit of the Orphans, and 10s. for the new building. I would like to have a stone or a few bricks in that house. I remain, yours respectfully, * * * *."

Allow me, esteemed Reader, to draw your attention to this letter. The writer states, 1, that he gives a stated proportion of his income. I again commend this subject to the solemn and prayerful consideration of the reader. A rule, how much each should give, of what the Lord intrusts to him, ought not to be laid down; but it is Scriptural that we should communicate to the poor and to the Lord’s work, as He prospers us. And here, though the highest and most blessed state concerning this matter is, that unreservedly, with all we have and are, we present ourselves before God, as His stewards, being bought by the blood of Christ; yet, to by far the greater part of believers, by reason of their not having as yet attained to this, it will be found most helpful spiritually, to fix, at least, the lowest proportion which they will give of their earnings, the income of their business, profession, situation, or property; lest, through the infirmity of the flesh, and carnal reasoning, and anxious cares, they should be almost entirely deprived of the honour and the privilege, neglect the duty of caring for the poor, and helping on the work of God. They may, however, continually pass the bounds of this lowest proportion which they determined to give, as the love of Christ may constrain them, and as the Lord prospers them. And it is certain, that, if they give to Him and not to man, they will increase in spiritual enjoyment, and they will also increase as to the ability of giving, and thus be led more and more to pass the bounds. This very person, whose letter is before us, has increased more and more as to what he gives now in comparison with what he gave a few years since. And thus I know many Christians, who, from giving 10 per cent. at first, have increased to 15 and 20 per cent., yea, 25 and 33 1/3 per cent., and I know even of 60 and 75 per cent, being given of the whole income; because these Christians long to lay up treasure in heaven, and not on earth. The writer of the letter says, 2, "I am glad to say that I am able to continue to give account of prosperity, since I began to give a stated proportion of my income." Though we should never give, for the sake of being repaid by the Lord; still, this will be the case, if we give from right motives. It is God’s own declaration, that it will be so. This is plainly to be gathered from the following passages: "Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the first-fruits of all thy increase; so shall thy barns be filled with plenty, and thy presses shall burst out with new wine." Prov. iii, 9. 10. "Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure, that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again." Luke vi, 38. "He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord; and that which he hath given will He pay him again." Prov. xix, 17. "He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully." 2 Cor. ix, 6—3. This Scotch donor, a working-man, gives "to the work of Christ throughout the earth." The heart becomes in this way enlarged, and God also gives us the ability to carry out the desires of our heart, if indeed we desire to live as His stewards, and not as owners of what we possess. 4, He says, "It is a few years since I began that plan." He has tried, therefore, the blessedness of it for some years, and he is more and more satisfied with it. I know persons who have for many years, to a very considerable extent, acted according to this plan, and who have found it do good to them, both spiritually and temporally. 5, The writer says that he has found this plan profitable to himself spiritually as well as temporally. It is the former I would here especially urge upon the believing reader for consideration. It will surely be thus. If we give statedly, as God prospers us, we act according to His mind; and, whilst doing so, we are blessed in the deed. Every instance of obedience, from right motives, strengthens us spiritually, whilst every act of disobedience weakens us spiritually. 6, He says, "The Lord is now enabling me to give away as much as I earned a few years ago altogether." Think of the enjoyment, to be intrusted by the Lord with more and more, if we act as faithful stewards for Him, so that a person not rich, a common man in the eyes of many, it may be, can give away to the needy and to the work of God as much as the rich, it may be much more; yea, that thus an ordinary man, because he is a faithful steward to the Lord, may after a time be intrusted by God with very large sums. 7, Lastly, he says that "he has been able to give away 24 per cent. of his free income during the past year." Consider this. A hard working man to be able to give away £1 4s. out of every £5, and £24 out of every £100. If this principle were carried out, and universally acted on, in the Church of God, how different it would be as to the amount of means with which the children of God would find themselves intrusted by Him. I have again made these few remarks on this important subject, as I have had very many letters during the last twenty-eight years, expressive of the blessing which believers have derived from acting according to my advice, with reference to this matter, to which they had been led through my publications. The reader who desires to read more on the subject, is referred to page 575 to 604 of the first volume of my Narrative, ninth edition.

Dec. 9. 1861. It is now about six months since my intention of enlarging the Orphan work still further, so as to be able to accommodate 2000 orphans, instead of 1160, became known. Since then I have done nothing, except seeking, day by day, to follow up the printed statement with prayer. The result is, that I have received £941 6s. 6d. already, towards the £50,000 which will be needed. When it is considered that no personal appeals have been made to any one, and that I have received about £7000 besides, during the six months, towards the current expenses of the work, simply as the result of prayer to God, it is no small sum. Still, after this rate, it would take about twenty-five years before all that is needed for the Building Fund would come in. However, I am not discouraged. I believe in God. After much prayer, self examination, and looking at all the difficulties in the way, I was led, as fully stated before, to determine on this further enlargement; and I am sure, that when God’s own time has come, He will send me larger sums, yea all that is needed, and that in the meantime, I have to consider this delay and trial of faith and patience to be for my good, and the good of the Church of God, who afterwards may be benefited by these His dealings with me.

Dec. 28. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Jan. 11, 1862. I had again had my usual long season for prayer this evening for all the various objects of the Institution, and a variety of subjects in connexion with them, as also for individuals for whom I daily pray, and, amidst other things, also asked the Lord again for means for the Building Fund, when, about half an hour afterwards, I found at my house a crossed cheque for £2,000, with the following lines: "I enclose cheque, value £2,000, which accept with my best love and the expression of my heartfelt thankfulness to God for the privilege of being fellow-helper in the work of caring for orphans. I would like it to be applied towards the building you propose (d.v.) erecting. I shall consider as though I had £1000 in each building; but you are at liberty to use the whole for the first, if you wish. Inasmuch as it is done to the Lord, I know it is well spent."

Do you see, esteemed reader, how blessed it is to wait upon God? We may have to pray, and to pray long, before the answer comes; but we do not wait upon the Lord in vain. Our faith and patience may be tried, greatly tried; but in the end all will be well, and faith will be recompensed. Above seven months I had now, day by day, requested the Lord to send me means for this object, but all this time only £1064 as yet had come in. Now the Lord gives me by one donation nearly twice as much as had come in during more than seven months previously. Be encouraged by this, my fellow-believer. The great point is, that we ask only for that which it would be for the glory of God to give to us; for that, and that alone, can be for our real good. But it is not enough, that the thing for which we ask God be for His honour and glory, but we must secondly ask it in the name of the Lord Jesus, viz., expect it only on the ground of His merits and worthiness. Thirdly, we should believe that God is able and willing to give us what we ask Him for. Fourthly, we should continue in prayer till the blessing is granted; without fixing to God a time when, or the circumstances, under which He should give the answer. Patience should be in exercise, in connexion with our prayer. Fifthly, we should, at the same time, look out for and expect an answer till it comes. If we pray in this way, we shall not only have answers, thousands of answers to our prayers; but our own souls will be greatly refreshed and invigorated in connexion with these answers.

One word more in connexion with this donation of £2,000 Do you think, dear reader, that I was greatly excited when I received it, or greatly surprised? Not in the least. I look out for answers to prayer, I expect them, daily and hourly expect them; and therefore, when God is pleased to grant them, the answer does not surprise me. Seek, dear reader, to ponder that word of our adorable Lord Jesus: "What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them." Mark xi. 24. In attending to this consists real power in prayer.

Jan. 14. Received £2,000, left at my disposal, of which £800 was placed to the Building Fund, and £1200 to the School—, Bible—, Missionary—, and Tract Fund.

Jan. 27. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Jan. 28. Received £2500, the disposal of which being left to me, I took £1000 for the Building Fund—, and £1500 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund.—Feb. 8. £290 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

March 12, 1862. It was in November, 1850, that my mind became exercised about enlarging the Orphan work from 300 Orphans to 1000, and subsequently to 1150; and it was in June, 1851, that this my purpose became known, having kept it secret for more than seven months, whilst day by day praying about it. From the end of November, 1850, to this day, March 12, 1862, not one single day has been allowed to pass, without this contemplated enlargement being brought before God in prayer, and generally more than once a day. But only now, this day, the New Orphan House No. 3 was so far advanced, that it could be opened. Observe then, first, esteemed Reader, how long it may be, before a full answer to our prayers, even to thousands and tens of thousands of prayers, is granted; yea, though those prayers may be believing prayers, earnest prayers, and offered up in the name of the Lord Jesus, and though we may only for the sake of the honour of our Lord desire the answer: for I did, by the grace of God, without the least doubt and wavering look for more than eleven years for the full answer; I earnestly importuned the Lord; I looked for the answer only on the ground of the worthiness of the Lord Jesus, judging myself entirely unworthy of an answer; and I sought only in this matter the glory of God. If then, you also, dear Reader, have to wait long, yea even twice or thrice as long as I have had to wait in this matter, be not discouraged, provided your petitions are of that character that you are warranted, by the word of God, to look for an answer. I myself have been bringing certain requests before God now for seventeen years and six months, and never a day has passed without praying concerning them, all this time; yet the full answer is not come, up to the present; but I look for it, I confidently expect it. In connexion with the opening of the New Orphan House No. 3 observe, Secondly, the large amount of money in hand, with which we were allowed to begin housekeeping there. Before the New Orphan House No. 1 was thought of, and the Orphans were living in four rented houses in Wilson Street, Bristol, we were almost daily, for a period of five years, exposed to great trials of faith, with reference to means for meeting the expenses for the Orphans. Yet, though we were almost habitually very poor, the Lord helped, always helped. At last I was led to see plainly, that it was the mind of God that I should leave the rented houses, and build a large house, not only large enough for the 120 Orphans then under my care, but for 300. Looking at it naturally, and judging simply from the trial of faith through which we had passed in previous years, it might have been said, and was said by unbelief: How strange, that you should seek to extend the work from 120 to 300 Orphans, when you have had so many difficulties in meeting the expenses for 120; and how strange, that you should expect to obtain all the Thousands of Pounds needed for this large house. Faith, however, replied: God, who plainly points it out to be His will that I should build (for the reasons fully given in the Report of 1846, and in the second volume of my Narrative), will supply the means. And thus it was. He gave me all the means needed for the building and fitting up and furnishing The New Orphan House No. 1, though the expenses were more than £15,000, and I had several hundred pounds balance left of the Building Fund, and was, moreover, able to begin housekeeping in the new building with above £600 in hand for current expenses. This abundance, however, did not always continue; for in this new large house also we became again poor with our 300 Orphans to be provided for. Still, scarcely was the house quite filled, after we had only occupied it for about 18 months, when my mind was led to a greater enlargement than before, even to build for 700 more Orphans, so as to have a thousand. Years pass, at last a house for 400 more is opened in November, 1857, and I am enabled to begin housekeeping in the New Orphan House No, 2 with £2,292 0s. 11d. in hand, though in the mean time nearly £50,000 had been disbursed for current expenses. Now, at last, the New Orphan House No. 3 is opened; 700 Orphans had been supported for some years, and the other objects had been year by year greatly enlarged; still, faith further triumphs, and the third house is opened with £10,309 1s. 10d. in hand for the current expenses for the Orphans. Do you not perceive, esteemed Reader, how precious the principles are on which we act? I dwell upon this, in order that you also may lean upon God, and trust in Him for everything, should you not do so already. After having walked in this precious road of trusting in God in all temporal and spiritual necessities for myself, my family, and the service in which I am engaged, for thirty-two years; and after having most abundantly for thirty-two years proved the efficiency of this way of obtaining help from God, I commend it most heartily to my fellow-believers.

But there remains, thirdly, another point in connexion with the opening of the new house to be noticed. As in the case of No. 2, so also in the case of the New Orphan House No. 3, I had daily prayed for the needed helpers and assistants for the various departments. Before a stone was laid, I began to pray for this; and, as the building progressed, I continued day by day to bring this matter before God, feeling assured, that, as in every thing else, so in this particular also, He would graciously be pleased to appear on our behalf and help us, as the whole work is intended for His honour and glory. At last the time was near when the house could be opened, and the time therefore near when the applications, which had been made in writing during more than two years previously, should be considered, for the filling up of the various posts. It now, however, was found that, whilst there had been about 50 applications made for the various situations, some places could not be filled up, because either the individuals, who had applied for them, were married, or were, on examination, found unsuitable. This was no small trial of faith; for day by day, for years, had I asked God to help me in this particular, even as He had done in the case of the New Orphan House No. 2; I had also expected help, confidently expected help: and yet now, when help seemed needed, it was wanting. What was now to be done, dear Reader? Would it have been right to charge God with unfaithfulness? Would it have been right to distrust Him? Would it have been right to say, it is useless to pray? By no means. This, on the contrary, I did; I thanked God for all the help He had given me in connexion with the whole of the enlargement; I thanked Him for enabling me to overcome so many and such great difficulties; I thanked Him for the helpers He had given me for No. 2; I thanked Him, also, for the helpers He had given me already for No. 3; and, instead of distrusting God, I looked upon this delay of the full answer to prayer, only as a trial of faith, and therefore resolved, that, instead of praying once a day with my dear wife about this matter, as we had been doing day by day for years, we should now meet daily three times, to bring this before God. I also brought the matter before the whole staff of my helpers in the work, requesting their prayers. Thus I have now continued for about four months longer in prayer, day by day calling upon God 3 times on account of this need, and the result has been, that one helper after the other has been given, without the help coming too late, or the work getting into confusion; or the reception of the children being hindered; and I am fully assured, that the few who are yet needed will also be found, when they are really required.

I notice, lastly, in connexion with the opening of the New Orphan House No. 3, that its completion was several months later than had been expected, not on account of any thing over which I had control; but there was a difficulty in the summer of 1861 on the part of one of the contractors in obtaining a sufficient number of men, and thus the work was protracted beyond what might have been at first expected. To this were added other difficulties, connected with another contractor, over which like wise I had no control, and in which I recognized the hand of God, and therefore felt that it became me to seek to glorify Him by patient submission, being assured, that, as the work was His and not mine, and as He cared far more for the good of the Orphans who were waiting to be admitted than I did, He would allow me, in His own time, the joy and privilege of opening the new house for the reception of these destitute children. And thus it was, after faith and patience had been abundantly exercised.

I now return to the account:—

March 26, 1862. £60 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—April 8. £3 3s. "from a dying bed," sent with the following letter: "My dear Sir, My dear wife felt a very strong desire to send something more than the few stamps she sent you, and the Lord has met her wish in a remarkable manner. She has been disowned by several of her rich relatives, because of her attachment to the cross of her Lord. An uncle, who at one time promised large things, turned against her. He is recently deceased, and left her £3 3s. This has just come to hand. She sends it to you. Please to use it for the new Orphan Houses. This comes, as far as we can judge, with almost her last breath, and that breath is prayer for you and the work of God in your hands.—In much sorrow, I am, dear Mr. Müller, faithfully and devotedly yours in Jesus, * * * * ."

April 19. From London £25, with £5 for myself, with the following statement: "This £30 is a thank-offering to the God and Father of all mercies for a wonderful answer to the prayer of faith, which I have been daily, and almost hourly, laying before the Throne of Grace, since the middle of December last, that the ever Living God would be pleased, if according to His will, for the glory of His name, and for my good to extricate me from a loss, arising from a mistake; and yesterday an answer by the removal of the burthen, was graciously vouchsafed. The reading of your Reports, and the carrying out of your recommendations, by the grace of God, have enabled me to do this."

May 13. £60 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 26, 1862. The total amount received for this contemplated enlargement of the Orphan work, from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, is £6598 11s. 5½d. In connexion with the contemplated New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5, I make the following remarks.

1, During the past year also very many applications have been made for the admission of orphans; yea, several hundreds have been applied for, and the applications have been more numerous than ever. Indeed there has been a steady increase of applications ever since the Orphan work first commenced. The more it has become known, the greater the number of applications. It is an exception if a day now passes, on which no fresh application is made for the admission of destitute children, bereaved of both parents. The numerous applications for admission of destitute Orphans point out more and more the importance of the enlargement of this work, which, by God’s continued help, I purpose to effect. And therefore I continue in prayer regarding this object.

2, I do not mean to wait till I have the whole £50,000 which will be needed for the contemplated enlargement, but to take steps towards the erection of No. 4, if God will, when there shall be about £25,000 in hand. Towards this £25,000 has come in during the past year £6598 11s. 5½d.; and I hope further to have available, out of the balance of £4471 16s. 1d. left in hand from the former Building Fund for No. 2 and No. 3, about £2500, as only about £2200 more will be required for additional fittings and furniture, and the payment of the balance due to some of the contractors, whose accounts could not be wound up in time for the Report; so that, when it shall have pleased the Lord to give me about £16,000 more, by His help steps may be taken for the erection of No. 4.

3, Observe, esteemed Reader, that the Lord not only has given me the means needed for the erection of No. 2 and No. 3, but after these two Orphan Houses for 850 children have been built, and almost all the fitting up and furnishing has been completed, I have the prospect of a balance in hand of about £2500. Is not this a precious way? Will you not yourself try it, fellow believer, if you need means for the work of God, or means for any thing, which you can honestly bring before God in prayer?

The following statement will show the Reader, how the Lord was pleased further to send in means for this enlargement of the Orphan Work.

July 12, 1862. £60 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 16. From Herefordshire 2s. 6d., with the following letter:—"Dear Sir, Having read your Report, I see the Lord has put it into your heart to enlarge your Work. I beg you to accept my mite toward the contemplated building. It is a part of the produce from the sale of celery plants, raised in my garden. May the Lord bless and prosper your undertaking, and spare you many years for His work. To Him be all the glory. From a poor working man, your obedient, * * * *."—See, esteemed reader, in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to help me. I receive donations of £5, £10, £20, £50, £100, £500, £1000, and I have received even £2,000, £3000, £4000, £5000, £7000, and £8100, in one donation; and here a poor working man gives 2s. 6d. Sometimes poor widows have laid aside their farthings or halfpence weekly, and have sent them to me when amounting to a shilling or more. But all these donations, whether farthings and halfpence, or hundreds and thousands of pounds, are the result of prayer to God, and the exercise of faith; for the hearts of all, rich and poor, are in the hands of our Heavenly Father, and He is pleased to listen to the supplications of His children, who call upon Him in believing prayer. And thus, without appealing personally to any one, but simply following up the Reports by prayer, the Lord has been pleased to give me altogether the sum of £250,000 from the beginning of the work up to this day, August 15, 1862. See how easily the donations are obtained; for we do not write letters to request them, nor call on persons, and thus expend much time on this part of the work. See how they are obtained without much expenditure of money; for all we do is, to print and circulate the Report of the work, which is followed up by prayer; and even these Reports are sold for the benefit of the Orphans, and bring in the greater part of what they cost, so that the total expenditure, in connexion with the obtaining of the money, is not even one per cent. See how successful a way this is for obtaining means; for the Lord has enabled me more and more to enlarge the work, and He has not obliged me to give up certain parts of it for want of funds, though the expenses of the various departments of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad are now so great. See what a happy way it is, both with regard to man and God; for we never meet with a cold reception from our fellow men, as we never apply to them for anything; and, so far as it regards God, it brings Him very near to us experimentally, when, in answer to prayer to Him only, we receive the means. The reason why I dwell on this, is not to find fault with other modes; but to encourage my fellow believers, fully, unreservedly, and habitually, to depend upon God, and upon Him alone, for everything. This is the privilege, yea, the duty of the child of God. Thereby would God be glorified and our hearts become increasingly acquainted with Him. I relate here, for the encouragement of my fellow believers, two answers to prayer, which, in addition to numberless others, we had in connexion with the work during the past year.

In the early part of the summer, 1862, it was found that we had several boys ready to be apprenticed; but there were no applications made by masters for apprentices. As all our boys are invariably sent out as in-door apprentices, this was no small difficulty; for we not only look for Christian masters, but consider their business, and examine into their position, to see whether they are suitable; and the master must also be willing to receive the apprentice into his own family. Under these circumstances, we again gave ourselves to prayer, as we had done for more than twenty years before, concerning this thing, instead of advertising, which, in all probability, would only bring before us masters who desire apprentices for the sake of the premium. We remembered how good the Lord had been to us, in having helped us hundreds of times before, in this very matter. Some weeks passed, but the difficulty remained. We continued, however, in prayer, and then one application was made, and then another; and since we first began to pray about this matter, last summer, we have been able to send out altogether 18 boys up to May 26, 1863; the difficulty was thus again entirely overcome by prayer, as every one of the boys, whom it was desirable to send out, has been sent out.

The other instance is this. One of the drains at the New Orphan Houses was stopped up. It runs about eleven feet deep under ground. A place was opened, but in vain. A second and third place were opened, but in vain. The difficulty was very great; for the drain not only ran under the foundations of one of the houses, but it appeared also needful to lay open the ground for nearly one hundred feet long and eleven feet deep, which not only would have been connected with very heavy expense, but would also have been most undesirable for many reasons. Under these trying and difficult circumstances, our hope, however, was in God, and to him we betook ourselves, calling daily on Him at least three times for help. One more place was now opened, and the Lord, in His pity and compassion, ordered it so that the opening was made at the very spot where the obstruction existed; and in a few hours more all the difficulties were over, with comparatively little expense. Be then, dear Christian reader, encouraged to roll all your burdens and cares upon God, in believing prayer, and you will not look to Him in vain. I have now tried this blessed way for very many years, and have never been confounded. We proceed with the income for the Building Fund.

Sep. 3, 1862. From Upper Norwood £300—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £36—Each donation was received by me with deep interest, whether the £300 mentioned under Sep. 3rd, or smaller donations, which have not been mentioned; because each of these donations came to me in answer to daily believing prayer, and as a further proof that God is willing, in His own time and way, to give me the full amount needed. Moreover, I labour on cheerfully in prayer, looking at the three Orphan Houses, now in operation, with 1060 Orphans in them, which have been paid for in full, also all the furniture contained in them, and all the machinery and fittings; and yet a considerable balance was left, though the total expense was nearly Sixty Thousand Pounds. Further, I gladly labour on in prayer, and am refreshed by every donation for the Building Fund, on account of having the sweet privilege before me, of being permitted to do yet more for poor destitute children, bereaved of both parents; for though I have received, during the last five years and a half, no less than 1021, and within the last 14 months alone 441, applications continue to be made. Almost daily fresh cases come before me, of a distressing character, so that I long to be able to provide more accommodation for Orphans, and especially for boys, as we have not been able to hold out any hope for even the twentieth part of the boys, who, within the last three years, have been applied for. And lastly, I am encouraged to go on in prayer for this object, because I seek God’s honour in this service, and for Him do I purpose to build the intended houses, No. 4 and No. 5; and therefore, though I know not when He will give me the money yet needed, and whom He will honour in employing as the instruments, whether many or few, or only one; yet I am assured that in the end He will give all, as in the case of the three houses now in operation. Oct. 11, 1862. From Scotland £20—Oct. 25. £20 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 6. From India, from a staff-officer, £6.

Jan. 10, 1863. From a physician in Scotland, £10, with the following lines: "I came to the resolution last year to return to the Lord the half of all I could save of my income, and I shall be able to give more than ever I have given before."—Jan. 15. From Hong Kong, £25—Jan. 28. Received also £1,200, which, being left entirely at my disposal, I took £400 for the Building Fund and £800 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund. Thus I have £400 towards the object for which I am daily labouring in prayer, viz. to build accommodation for 850 more Orphans.

Feb. 2. From Moulmein, Burmah, 50 rupees for the Building Fund and 50 rupees for the Orphans; also, from the same place, 50 rupees besides, for the Orphans.—Feb. 4. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Feb. 10. Received £1000 which, being left at my disposal, I took £400 for the Building Fund and £600 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund. I have thus £400 additional for the Building Fund, which is no small joy. The Christian reader will not wonder at my joy, when I give the following extract from a letter, received on this very day, while I am writing this for the press, containing an application for the admission of two very young infants bereaved of both parents: "I have heard much lately of the great benefit derived from your Asylum for Orphans, and am anxious to know whether such a case as the following would be thought worthy of your charitable consideration About six weeks ago, two little babes were given birth to by a mother, whose husband was at the time lying ill with his arm broken. The birth took place at a time when the mother was distracted by the death of a daughter, who, simply saying she had a headache, had lain down to rest on her bed, and never rose from it again. The birth of the twin children, sorrow at the sudden death of her daughter, and anxiety for her husband so possessed her, that, from the moment of her delivery to the time of her death she was unconscious. Meantime the husband’s arm mortified, amputation was tried in vain, and he had gone to the grave before his wife. Thus these poor little children are orphans; and, if I were not afraid of wearying you, I could tell you of the deaths, within these six weeks, of a grandfather and grandmother, a brother and two other sisters, stripping them, in their hour of greatest need, of their nearest friends. There are four other little children and no one to provide for them except two elder sisters, both of whom are servants, living on their wages. Therefore, in spite of an intense repugnance to send these little Orphans to the workhouse, that has become their home. I scarcely know a case in which such a home has been so little deserved, or in which charity could find fitter scope, &c."—I have just now received four very young children, one of whom is less than eleven months old. With these facts before me, none of my readers who feel as Christians, and enter in any degree into the distress which surrounds them, will be surprised that I labour with earnest longing in prayer, to be allowed of God the joy and honour and precious privilege of caring for more Orphans still and that, when I receive additional means for the Building Fund, I am so greatly delighted.—Feb. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £145, with £145 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—, and Tract Fund.—March 27, £40 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 4. From one of the Orphans, formerly under our care, and now in business on his own account, £3 towards the building of the new Orphan House No. 4, with the following letter: "My dear Sir,—It affords me much pleasure to send you the enclosed cheque as a thank-offering for an amount of success I did not expect. And I would take this opportunity of again thanking you for the great kindness bestowed upon me during the six years I was under your care, and for the fatherly interest you have ever taken in me since that time, which is nearly sixteen years. Please to accept these expressions of my gratitude, and believe me yours very respectfully, * * * *."—May 22. £32 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 26, 1863. In connection with the contemplated New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5, I state the following: I do not purpose to wait till I have the whole £50,000, needed for the contemplated enlargement, but to take steps towards the erection of No. 4, if God will, when there shall be about £25,000 in hand. Towards this £25,000 has come in during the past two years altogether £9773 10s. 6¼d. There was left, after all the expenses in connection with the building, fitting up, and furnishing of the New Orphan Houses, No. 2 and No. 3, had been met, a balance of £2904 7s. 5d., which was carried to the present Building Fund account, and made the total of £12,677 17s. 11¼d. in hand on this day, towards the extension of the Orphan Work. The reader has to keep in mind, that, in addition to the £9773 10s. 6¼d., received during the two years, from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1863, towards the contemplated enlargement of the Orphan Work, there was also received for the current expenses of the various Objects, already in operation, the sum of Thirty Two Thousand Six Hundred and Five Pounds.

In the following pages I now relate, how the Lord was pleased to supply us further with means for the Building Fund, without however doing more, than singling out a few donations, and periodically referring to the total in hand, just as I have done, with reference to the last two years.

July 31, 1863. Two months and five days of this period have already passed away, and during this time only £161 11s. 4d. has been received towards the Building Fund. After this rate, it would be a very long time before I should be able to take active measures towards the contemplated enlargement of the Orphan work. But I am not discouraged. Fresh applications for the admission of orphans continue to be made. A considerable number of boys we have not been able even to register, because we have no prospect of being able to provide for them, while they are of an age suitable for reception. Many female Infant Orphans also, though registered, will have to wait a considerable time, before their turn for admission comes. All this, however, leads me the more earnestly to labour in prayer, that it would please the Lord to allow me the joy and precious privilege of providing further accommodation for the admission of destitute children, bereaved of both parents by death; and I am fully assured, that God will condescend to use me in this service still further, and that, when His time is come, He will also send larger sums for the Building Fund.—I go on now to state how the Lord was pleased to send in the means after July 31, 1863.

Aug. 1. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in Heaven.—Aug. 3. From Birmingham £100—Aug. 12. From a shipowner, who, instead of insuring his vessels, gives the amount, which be would have to pay, to the work of God, £50, with £150 for Missions, and £10 for myself.—Aug. 14. £90 with the following letter:—"Dear Sir: Enclosed you will find a cheque for Ninety Pounds for the Building Fund, from a friend of mine, who is giving a seventh of his property to the support of the cause of Christ—Yours in the Lord, * * * *."—Aug. 26. £50 from the north of England.—Aug. 31. The total income during this month was £581 1s. 3d. But in answer to daily prayer the Lord helped further.

Sept. 3. From Birmingham £100—From Essex £100, with £100 for the support of the Orphans, and the following letter: "Beloved Brother in Christ,—I have to fulfil what has long been on my mind, but I lacked opportunity. A dear sister of mine, both in the flesh and in the Lord, died nearly 11 years since, leaving me, by her will, 10 acres of pasture land; but I was to pay to surviving relatives £200, an annuity to a faithful servant, and £200 to you, for the benefit of the Orphan Establishment. At this time I had no funds to fall back upon; but, by a hard struggle, I managed to pay the money which could be lawfully demanded of me, and have kept up the annuity to this time. When the will came into the hands of the Proctor, he immediately decided that the £200 to the Institution would be null and void, owing to the Mortmain Act. This suited me well at the time, for reasons already stated, having exhausted what little money I had, in paying other lawful demands; but I thought, probably there would come a day when I might manage to pay the other. Up to this year, however, I have never had £200 I could call my own; but in May last an aged relative died, leaving me the residue of her property, after paying more than 20 legacies. Having nearly paid them all, I have felt at liberty today, to send you the £200, which my dear sister intended you to have, more than 10 years since, and it will be some relief or comfort to my mind to know, you have received it safely. I think it might be taken £100 for the Orphans, and £100 for the Building-Fund, unless you like to divide it differently, * * * *." I have given as much of this letter, as more immediately refers to the subject, because many persons are not aware, that no houses, nor lands, nor income from houses or lands, nor anything that is considered real estate can be left lawfully to Charitable Institutions, and that, if this is done, all is null and void. [Since 1874, when this was written, an alteration in the law has been made; and now, even real estate, may be left to Charitable Institutions.] I have, therefore, and because I am often asked for a proper form for a bequest, placed at the end of the Reports, a form for a bequest, drawn up by an experienced legal practitioner. And I have also given this letter on account of the grace manifested by the Christian donor, who, without being in the least bound to do so, pays the £200 the first moment he can, that thus he might carry out the intention of that Godly sister of his, who more than ten years since entered into her rest.

I give also here the form for legacies to be left to the Institution, as the reader may not possess a copy of any of the Reports.

Form of a Legacy for the Orphan work:—"I give to George Müller of Bristol, or such other person or persons as shall, when this legacy shall become payable, be the director or directors of the New Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, Bristol, the sum of _______ to be paid out of such part of my personal estate as shall be legally applicable thereto; and to be applied by the said George Müller, or such other director or directors for the Purpose of such New Orphan Houses, and his or their receipt shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors."

Form of a Legacy for the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution:—"I give to George Müller of Bristol, or such other person or persons as shall, when this legacy shall become payable, be the director or directors of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad (of which the said George Müller is now the director), the sum of _________ to be paid out of such part of my personal estate as shall be legally applicable thereto; and to be applied by the said George Müller or such other director or directors, for the following four objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, viz.—assisting Schools, circulating the Holy Scriptures, aiding Missionary efforts, and circulating religious publications, or for any of those objects; and the receipt of the said George Müller, or such other director or directors, shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors."

Sept. 30. Another month has passed away, and the Building Fund is somewhat further increased, though much is needed yet, before I can feel warranted to take active steps, towards the contemplated enlargement. Nevertheless every donation, even the smallest, brings me nearer this time. I therefore feel grateful to the Lord for every donation, even the smallest, and take it as an encouragement from Him, to continue in prayer, and to expect, in His own time, which is always the best, the full amount. Meanwhile the constant applications for the admission of orphans, speaks loudly as to the need of more accommodation for these destitute children. During this month of September, among many others, 3 Orphans were applied for, both of whose parents were dead, the eldest not three years old, the second 14 months, and the youngest 3 days old.

I notice here, when the New Orphan House No. 2 was being built, and No. 3 was in contemplation, I often was asked, Do you think that you will have Orphans enough to fill these houses? Since No. 2 was opened on Nov. 12, 1857, to May 26, 1864, we received altogether 1202 Orphans; and only from March 12, 1862, to May 26, 1864, we received 727. It is now (May 26, 1864) several months since the New Orphan House No. 3 was entirely filled, and we had 1160 Orphans under our care, i. e. not a single vacancy left. The more you labour in caring for poor destitute children, bereaved of both parents by death, the more you will see, that there are still many thousands remaining who need to be cared for. We have now (May 26, 1864) on our books 990 waiting for admission, of whom 473 are boys; though, as stated, 1202 have been received since Nov. 12, 1857, and 727 since March 12, 1862. But this number, in all probability, would be 4 times as great, had we not been obliged to decline registering so many hundreds of boys, because we had no prospect of being able to provide for them, whilst they were of an age suited for such an Institution. I now return to the Income for the Building Fund.

Oct. 3, 1863. £35 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—From Birmingham £100—Nov. 3. From Birmingham £100—Nov. 13. From Honduras £1.

Do you notice, esteemed Reader, the variety of places, yea the variety of countries, from whence the donations are received? The last donation referred to came from a very poor servant of Christ in Honduras, where he lives for the purpose of winning souls from among the very poor people, by whom he is surrounded. I never saw him. I never had heard of him. God in a remarkable way directed my Narrative into his hands in that far-off land, made it a blessing to him, and led him, out of his great poverty, to send me £1 a year, or more, for several years past. There is scarcely a country, from whence I have not received donations; yet all come unsolicited, often anonymously, and in by far the greater number of cases from entire strangers, who are led by God, in answer to our prayers, to help on this work which was commenced, and is carried on, only in dependence on the Living God, in whose hands are the hearts of all men. Did all know the blessedness of this way, and the power there is in prayer and faith, they would, for themselves, gladly pursue this course, and act habitually on these principles; for the doing so brings abundant blessing to the soul, as well as procures the needed help in answer to prayer. No one, however, can act on these principles, and know the power of them in his own experience, except he be reconciled to God, by faith in the Lord Jesus, and have thus the guilt removed from his conscience; and, if this has been done, it is necessary to continue to walk in uprightness of heart; for if we regard iniquity in our hearts, the Lord will not hear us. Psalm lxvi, 18.

Nov. 18, 1863. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Dec. 2. From Birmingham £100—Dec. 31. £30 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Thus I saw the close of another year, with reference to this part of the work. The full answer to my daily prayers was far from being realized; yet there was abundant encouragement granted by the Lord, to continue in prayer. But suppose, even, that far less had come in, than was received, still, after having come to the conclusion, upon Scriptural ground, and after much prayer and self-examination, as stated at full length before, I ought to have gone on without wavering, in the exercise of faith and patience concerning this object; and thus, all the children of God, when once satisfied, that any thing, which they bring before God in prayer, is according to His will, ought to continue in believing, expecting, persevering prayer, until the blessing is granted. Thus am I myself now [viz., in 1864] waiting upon God for certain blessings, for which I have daily besought Him for 19 years and 6 months, without one day’s intermission. Still the full answer is not yet given concerning the conversion of certain individuals, though, in the mean time, I have received many thousands of answers to prayer. I have also prayed daily, without intermission, for the conversion of other individuals about ten years, for others six or seven years, for others four, three and two years, for others about eighteen months; and still the answer is not yet granted, concerning these persons: whilst, in the mean time, many thousands of my prayers have been answered, and, also souls converted, for whom I had been praying. I lay particular stress upon this, for the benefit of a certain class of readers, who may suppose, that I need only to ask God, and receive at once; or that I might pray concerning any thing, and the answer would surely come. One can only expect to obtain answers to prayers which are according to the mind of God; and even then, patience and faith may be exercised for many years, even as mine are exercised, in the matter to which I have referred; and yet am I daily continuing in prayer, and expecting the answer, and so certainly expecting the answer, that I have often thanked God that He will surely give it, though now for 19 years and 6 months faith and patience have thus been exercised. Be encouraged, dear Christian reader, with fresh earnestness to give yourself to prayer, if you can only be sure that you ask for things, which are for the glory of God.—I now go on to relate, how the Lord was pleased to help further, in sending in means for the Building Fund.

Jan. 2, 1864. £100 from Birmingham—Jan. 26. From Weston-super-Mare £50—Jan. 28. From Clevedon £14 10s. as "The Proceeds of a Christmas Tree."—Jan. 30. Above eight months have passed away since May 26, 1863, and though generally daily donations have been received towards the Building Fund, yet the total amount, received during these eight months, amounts only to £2,018. Were I to reason, naturally, under such circumstances, I should be greatly discouraged; for it would take about seventeen years, after this rate, before the whole £50,000 which is required for the Building Fund, would be obtained. That, which comforts me, is the consideration that God can give in a short time not only larger sums, but even by one donation the whole amount which is required. I therefore, without the least discouragement, continue my supplications, being assured, that the Lord will, in His own time and way, give me the whole amount needed, and that, as the applications for the admission of orphans, for whom we have no room, continue to be made, He will surely enable me to provide more accommodation for destitute Orphans, so that 2,000 may be cared for, instead of 1,150.

Feb. 2, £100 from Birmingham.—Feb. 10. Received £2700, of which, as the application of the donation was kindly left to me, I took £1350 for the Building Fund and £1350 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract-Fund.—Feb. 22. From Greenock £150 with £50 for the School, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract-Fund, £20 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.

In the previous part of the Narrative reference has been repeatedly made, as in connexion with the last donation, to presents which were kindly sent by the donors for my own use. These instances I have gladly recorded, as they came in connexion with the donations referred to, because they afforded mean opportunity of speaking well of the kindness and faithfulness of the Lord, in supplying my own personal or family need. It is now about Sixty Four years, since I have had any regular income what ever. In the year 1830, I saw it to be the Lord’s will to give up my regular income in connexion with the ministry of the Word, and to trust in Him alone for the supply of all my temporal necessities. I have been enabled to continue in this path, and have not been allowed to regret the step which I then took. Thus it is also in my position as director of the various Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. I have no salary in this position; but the Lord abundantly supplies my need; yea, though there are many expenses connected with this very position, He abundantly meets all my wants, and gives me far more than I need. If I had earnestly sought to obtain a lucrative place, either as preacher of the Gospel, or in some other way, I should not have had nearly as much, I have reason to believe, as, unsought, unasked for (so far as it regards man), I receive day by day out of the loving hand of my Heavenly Father. When I look at His kindness to me in saving my guilty soul, I am overwhelmed with the boundlessness of His love and grace towards me in Christ Jesus; and when I look at His kindness to me, even as it regards temporal things, I know not where to begin, nor where to end, in speaking well of His name. I do desire to magnify Him, and therefore I declare in this public way His great goodness to me in thus so abundantly supplying my temporal necessities; and I do so also, if it may please God, by this means, to encourage the hearts of His children, more and more unreservedly to trust in Him. It is now about Sixty Four years since I have asked help for myself from any human being; but God has been indeed my helper. And now the very work, respecting which I had every reason to believe, when I commenced it, that it would be connected with great expenses to myself, as well as be the means, looking at it naturally, of decreasing my own income, God has (though unsought for on my part) used as the instrument to bring along with it many supplies for myself also; thus not only abundantly meeting my increased expenses, but giving me far more than I need for myself. How great is His goodness! Dear Christian Reader, be encouraged by this! Do but trust in God with all your heart, and you will find that you will not be confounded. Only let it be trust in God, not in man, not in circumstances, not in any of your own exertions, but real trust in God, and you will be helped in your various necessities. But I cannot send this forth, without again cautioning any who may read it against doing the same by way of imitation. Let any one trust in God, as I by His grace did, and have Scriptural warrant for doing so; and the Lord will surely honour this confidence in Himself; but, as assuredly as any one professes to trust in God, his profession of faith will be tested, and greatly tested, even as mine was; and then it will be soon seen, whether the trust in God is real or not. When I took this step, in November, 1830, I determined, really, truly, solely, habitually, by God’s help, to look to Him, and under no circumstances, either directly or indirectly, to make known my present position, however needy, to my fellow-men, in order that the hand of God might be seen, when He helped. In this way I have continued ever since; and, by the help of God, purpose to continue to the end of my course. Now, because many, who have professed to look to the Lord alone for their temporal supplies, have failed in this, and have made their wants known to their fellow-men, to induce them to help them, they have thus failed in obtaining the wholesome food for their faith, and their faith has become weaker instead of stronger. But, further, no one, I judge, can be truly happy in such a path, except he be content, to the end of his course, to remain only a steward for God; so that, if he be intrusted by Him with more than he needs, he be willing to give it back to God, who gave it to him. Let these two points be carried out, in a humble prayerful state of heart, and happy and blessed will that servant of God be. All I have known who have acted thus have, without a single exception, done well; but those, who merely said that they trusted in God, without doing it, and who therefore did not act as stated above, sooner or later broke down. God looks for reality. Faith may be weak at first, but it must be real.

Feb. 24. Received £2,200, which being kindly left at my disposal, I took £1,100 for the Building Fund, and £1,100 for the Schoo1—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.—Feb. 26. "From a Presbyterian Missionary, sent from Cape Town," anonymously, £5—From Cirencester £10, with £10 for Missions,—From Chatham £10, with £5 for myself.—From Wiltshire £5, with £10 for the Orphans, and £5 for myself, "As a tribute of affection to a father’s memory."—From a Christian Merchant £20, with £50 for the Orphans, £10 for Missions, £10 for the Bible Fund, £5 for the Tract Fund, and £5 for myself, with the following interesting communication:—

"You will notice, dear brother, that I am sending you much more than hitherto. I some time ago made the resolution to increase my contribution for the Lord’s work, on a per-centage, increasing with increased receipts, following the examples named in your Reports; and the Lord so blessed me last year that I have had to ascend four steps in the scale I had laid down at a time when I little thought I should ever use the higher amounts. I merely notice this for your comfort, as you may like to know it as the result of reading your Reports." In connexion with this letter, which I request the Reader to peruse once more, I make the following remarks:—

Many of the children of God lose in a great measure, the privilege, and also the blessing to their own souls, of communicating to the Lord’s work, and to the necessities of the poor, for want of a regular habit of giving. They may not be covetous, they may not be loving again this present evil world, and yet they scarcely in any degree act as stewards for the Lord, but as if they were already owners, because they only give from feeling, or particular circumstances; and thus it comes that life is gone, before they are aware of it, without good use having been made of that one brief life here on earth, in using their means for the Lord, as they might have done. But this one brief life is now for ever gone. This sowing time will never return. The harvest is now before them with that word of the Lord, "He which soweth sparingly, shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully, shall reap also bountifully." How, then, the Christian says, shall I act, in order that I may best use my means for the Lord? My reply is this: 1, Seek to keep before you, that the Lord Jesus has redeemed us, and that, therefore, we are not our own, because we are bought with a price, even the precious blood of the Lord Jesus. All, then, we have and are, belongs to Him, is at His disposal; and we have to look at our possessions as a faithful steward would, who is intrusted with goods or money by a rich proprietor. 2. The habitually using our means, the regularly communicating as the Lord prospers us, is next to be attended to. As much as it is practicable, we should seek to do this weekly, according to that word, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him." 1 Cor. xvi, 2. If, through particular circumstances, this is impossible, then the first time we are able to ascertain how our business stands, how much our profession has brought us in, &c., we should settle before God, how much, accordingly, we can spare for the work of God, or for the poor. 3, With regard to the amount to be given, no rule can be laid down for others, because the whole ought to be done, not in a legal spirit, but from the constraint of love and gratitude to the blessed One who died for our sins, and to God the Father who spared not His only begotten Son, but delivered Him up for us. But take heed, esteemed Christian reader, that you do not lose the blessing, because it is not said you must give the tenth part, or the fifth part, or the third part, or half or three-fourths of what God gives to you. The writer would set before himself nothing less than to stand habitually, with all he has, and with all the Lord is pleased to intrust him, as God’s steward before Him, and to say, Lord, thine is all I have; use it as Thou pleasest. On this principle he has, by God’s grace, been enabled to act for Sixty-Four years; and the unspeakable happiness and blessedness resulting from thus acting, he is unable to describe. If, however, the reader says, I cannot do this; the reply is, then do what you can, and have grace for. Give the tenth part, or the fifth part, or the third part, or the half, of what God gives you, even as you have now light and grace on the subject; only fix even the smallest amount you purpose to give of your income, and give this regularly; and as God is pleased to increase your light and grace, and is pleased to prosper you more, so give more. If you neglect an habitual giving, a regular giving, a giving from principle and upon Scriptural ground, and leave it only to feeling and impulse, or particular arousing circumstances, you will certainly be a loser. The smallest amount which is fixed to be given, may be continually gone beyond; but it is well you should fix this lowest amount, lest you should do nothing at all, or scarcely anything.

These hints are affectionately commended to the children of God, by one who, through the ordering of God has met with numberless instances in which was verified the word of God, which says, "There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty. The liberal soul shall be made fat; and he that watereth shall be watered also himself," Proverbs xi, 24, 25. "Give, and it shall he given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure that you mete withal it shall be measured to you again." Luke vi, 38.

Feb. 29. From a dear Orphan, who on Feb. 26th died of consumption, as a believer, 5s. 3d., which she gave to her Christian nurse, with these words : "Please to give this to Mr. Müller for the Building Fund, with my kind and grateful love, and thank him and Mrs. Müller for all the kindness shown to me." With such cases before me, yea, with the hundreds of orphans before me, who have not only been benefited bodily, mentally, and morally, but also spiritually, the Christian reader will not be surprised, that I labour with my might in prayer, that the Lord would allow me yet further the honour and privilege of providing accommodation for the reception of destitute children; and I have not the least doubt that, as He was pleased to allow me to build the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, and to fill them with 1,150 Orphans, though years had to pass away before all was completed, and the full answer given to the many thousands of prayers offered; so God will help me to the full in the building of No. 4 and No. 5 also, and thus provide accommodation for 850 more Orphans. I therefore continue in believing prayer. I have not been allowed to have a shadow of doubt as to whether God can or will give me the means; but day by day, in the full assurance of faith, I renew my requests before God; and generally day by day the amount of the Building Fund is to a greater or less degree increased. I then give thanks, and ask for more; and as the days come I look out for answers to my prayers. The reader will remember that I stated, before entering upon the income during the month of February, 1864, that during the previous 8 months and 5 days only £2018 altogether had come in for the Building Fund; but, during the month of February alone, came in £2,815 Thus the Lord showed, that when He is pleased to work, it is not necessary that a very long period should elapse, but that by a few donations, yea by one, if He pleased, He could give me the whole amount yet needed. I therefore went on, day by day, renewing my requests, with thanksgiving for what He had given me already; and I now go on to relate, what further it pleased Him to send me, in answer to prayer.

March 1. From Birmingham £100—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £148—March 15. From a shipowner £50, instead of insuring his vessels.— March 16. £120 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

April 2. From Birmingham £100—May 3. From Birmingham £100—May 13. Today an application was made for the admission of 5 Orphans. The father was drowned; the mother had just died in consumption. Both corpses were laid on the same bed. The eldest child is 5 years and 7 months old, the second 4 years and 2 months, the third 2 years and 9 months, the fourth 1 year and 7 months, and the youngest 7 weeks old. Many such whole families have we received during the past 28 years; and delighted I am to be able to receive them, in order that the brothers and sisters of the same family may not be separated from each other. At present, however, we can only register these children, till their turn comes, or the Lord allows me to provide further accommodation for Orphans. But the reader will not be surprised that, with such cases, constantly coming before me, I feel deeply interested about being able to provide more accommodation, by building two other houses, for which I am now almost daily receiving donations out of the hands of God, through the instrumentality of His children. Nor have I the least doubt that, in His own time, I shall have all I need. The abundant blessing, also, which hitherto has rested on this work, encourages me greatly further to enlarge it.

May 18. From New Zealand £40, with £50 for Missions, and £10 for myself.—May 23. From Greenock £15, with £20 for Missions.—May 24. From Torquay £40—May 26. £120 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—I have thus, out of the hundreds of donations, which came in between May 26, 1863, and May 26, 1864, referred to a few. On May 26, 1864, there was in hand for the Building Fund £19,321 7s. 1½d. towards the £50,000 required. In the 25th Report, published in 1864, I added the following:—I do not mean to wait till I have the whole £50,000 needed for the contemplated enlargement, but to take steps towards the erection of No. 4, if God will, when there shall be about £25,000 in hand, that is, when I shall have about £5,700 more than I have now. The following will show to the reader, how the Lord was pleased to help us further, in answer to prayer.

June 2. £100 from Birmingham.—From Holland 12½ florins.—June 2. From Barcelona, in Spain, £5—June 24. From Ootacamund, East Indies, £20—July 5. From Birmingham £100—Aug. 3. From Birmingham £100—Aug. 5. From Hong Kong, China, £30—Aug. 19. From Greenock £100—Aug. 23. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Aug. 23. From London £50—Sept. 2. From Birmingham £100—From J. C. £50—Sept. 13. Received 5s. from one of the Orphans, formerly under our care, with the following letter: "Dear and Respected Sir,—May I be permitted the privilege of sending you but a short note, knowing how precious every moment is to you. I feel that to attempt to express my heart-felt gratitude to you for all your parental care is more than pen can write, and it is only when I reach Home that I shall be able sufficiently to praise my Heavenly Father for having placed me in the dear Orphan House, where I learnt to love Jesus at an early age. Now I can say from the depth of my heart, that I would not part with my Saviour for all that the world could give; and seeing that the Lord has been pleased to remove my dearest earthly treasure, I trust that it may be the means of leading me into closer communion with Himself and making me more devoted to His Name and glory. May I have the privilege of asking you to put the inclosed 5s. to the building of No. 4; for I should be happy, if I could be the means of raising but one stone towards another Home for poor Orphans; and my humble prayer is that you may have the joy of seeing yet very many brought to Jesus. I am, Dear and Respected Sir, Yours very gratefully and respectfully, * * * *." The writer was some years since sent to service, having been 12 years and 5 months under our care, and 5 years a believer, before she left us.—Sep. 16. From the North of England £100—Sep. 17. "From the estate of the late Miss C. H., through her brother T. H. Esq.," £1,000. T. H., Esq., desires to spend the property of his departed sister, as he considers she would approve of, were she still living, and therefore sends this £1,000 for the Building Fund.—Day by day I am waiting upon the Lord for means to be able to take active steps in this part of the work, and I need not say, therefore, how seasonable and precious this donation was. But I confidently expect, in the Lord’s time and way, the whole amount yet needed.—Sept. 27. Received £1 5s. from the House Girls of No. 2, (viz., the elder girls who are more immediately trained for situations, after having left the School Room), with the following letter: "Beloved and honoured Sir,—May we once more be allowed the privilege of expressing our love and gratitude to you, on this another anniversary of your birthday, which, we sincerely hope, will prove a very happy one; and that you may be spared to see many more still happier, is our earnest desire,—It would give us great pleasure to present you with some trifling article for your own particular use; but, as we are quite at a loss what to select, we think, perhaps, it will give you equal pleasure, if we ask your acceptance of this small sum towards the Building Fund.—May we be allowed to embrace this opportunity of thanking you for our pleasant holidays this summer, which we greatly enjoyed. And now, with respectful love to dear Mrs. and Miss Müller, and hoping you will accept the same yourself, We remain, beloved and honoured Sir, Yours gratefully and affectionately, The House Girls of No. II."—On the same day I received £1 10s. from the House Girls of No. I, with the following letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir,—Once again may we be allowed the happy privilege and pleasure of wishing you many happy returns of your birthday, and may we ask your acceptance of this trifle, which we should like to put to the Building Fund, with our gratitude and love to you. We feel that we can never repay, or be sufficiently grateful, for all the unceasing care and kindness, which you so constantly manifest towards us; but we hope, that, if spared to leave the Orphan House, we shall seek to give pleasure and satisfaction, knowing that you are pleased to hear of our welfare after we have left. We hope and trust, that your health is much benefited, by the blessing of God, and that your valuable life may long be spared, and your untiring efforts crowned with great success. We remain, Dear Sir, Yours gratefully and respectfully, The House Girls of No. I."—I received also from the Orphan Boys £1 0s. 3d. with the following letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir,—We, the Orphan Boys, are very glad to have another opportunity of congratulating you on the return of another anniversary of your birthday, and beg you to accept a small sum of money towards the Building Fund of the New Orphan House No. 4, where we hope many destitute Orphans, like ourselves, may find shelter, and a happy home, which we have found. We also hope that your valuable life will be spared for many years to come, to be the Orphans’ friend and benefactor, and we hope, the blessing of God will rest upon your labours. We desire to thank you for the years of care you have bestowed upon us, and we hope that our future years will prove, that it has not been in vain. It pleased the Lord in the year 1859 to pour out His Holy Spirit upon us, and He brought some of us to love the Saviour, the fruits of which remain among us to this day. Please to accept our kind regards, and please remember us to dear Mrs. Müller, Miss Müller, and Miss Groves. We remain, Dear Sir, Yours very gratefully and affectionately, The Orphan Boys."—Lastly, from the House Girls of No. III £1 1s. was received, with the following letter: "Dear and respected Sir,—Again at this the return of your birthday, we feel it a great pleasure to be permitted to write a few lines to thank you for all your unceasing kindness for so many years. We hope that the change you have so recently taken has been beneficial to the recruiting of your health and strength, and also of those who accompanied you. We sincerely hope, that you may enjoy good health for many years to come, and that you may long be spared to be the Orphans’ friend and protector. Dear Sir, we could not think of anything that would be useful to you, and knowing the great desire of your heart to raise another house, will you allow us to place the enclosed sum at your disposal for that purpose. We remain, Dear Sir, Yours gratefully, The House Girls of No. 3."—In addition to these letters, I had also letters from the elder girls and Infant boys and girls of No. 1; from the elder girls and the Infants of No. 2; and from the elder girls in the two departments of No. 3. But though these letters are of the same tone and character and value, they are not given here because they came together with little presents, which these dear children sent to me for myself, while the former came with donations for the Building Fund. The letters which have been given may show to the reader the kind of position in which I stand with regard to the Orphans whilst they are yet under our care; and the letters which either have been given or will be given, the writers of which are Orphans, formerly under our care, will show, how we stand towards them after they have left us.

I received also for the Building Fund on Sept. 27th 10s. 6d. from one of the Orphans, who had been about sixteen years under our care, and several years a believer before she left. In March 1854 she was sent out, and has continued to walk in the fear of the Lord ever since.

Oct. 3. £100 from Birmingham.—Oct. 12. £40 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Oct. 14. £100 from a ship owner, instead of insuring his vessels, with £100 for missions.—Nov. 2. £100 from Birmingham, Nov. 3. From Cambridge £25 10s.—From Clifton £31 10s.—Received also Five Thousand Pounds for the Building Fund, from a donor who desires neither his name nor residence to be known.

Do you rejoice with me, dear reader, in the receipt of this last donation? Does the greatness of the amount surprise you? Do you think it strange and marvellous, that I should receive such a large sum in one donation? Well, the donation indeed filled my heart with inexpressible delight, because it was the fruit of thousands of prayers, and it brought me a decided step nearer the time, when all prayers will be fully answered with regard to the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5, as they have been fully answered regarding No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3; but while my heart was filled with joy and gratitude, I remained calm, perfectly calm, without the least excitement. Nor was I in the least surprised at the greatness of the donation, for I look out for answers to my prayers, and I expect much from that bountiful heart, which spared not the Lord Jesus. If £10,000, yea £20,000, had been given to me at once, it would not have surprised me, nor was it marvellous in my eyes, to receive so much at once; for God has power as ever to give largely; and He has still some of His children on earth who are so happy in Himself and who so lay hold on eternal life, that they can afford to give up a good portion of the possessions of this life, and, if called upon to do so, even all they possess in this world, in order to do good.

It has been stated that I did not intend to wait before taking active steps, until I had the whole Fifty Thousand Pounds needed for the two houses, intended to be built; but that when I had one half of that amount, I purposed to take steps for the building of one of the houses. I had now, through all that had come in since May 26, 1864, including this last mentioned donation, above Twenty Seven Thousand Pounds in hand. I had patiently waited God’s time. I had determined to do nothing, until I had the full half of the sum needed for the two houses. But now, having above Two Thousand Pounds beyond the half, I felt, after again seeking counsel from God, quite happy, in taking steps for the purchase of land.

My eyes had been for years directed to a beautiful piece of land, only separated by the turnpike-road from the ground on which the New Orphan House No. 3 is erected. The land is about 18 acres, with a small house and outhouses built on one end thereof. Hundreds of times had I prayed, within the last years, that God for Jesus’ sake would count me worthy, to be allowed to erect on this ground two more Orphan Houses; and hundreds of times I had with a prayerful eye looked on this land, yea, as it were, bedewed it with my prayers. I might have bought it years ago; but that would have been going before the Lord. I had money enough in hand to have paid for it years ago; but I desired patiently, submissively, to wait God’s own time, and for Him to mark it clearly and distinctly that His time was come, and that I took the step according to His will for whatever I might apparently accomplish, if the work were mine, and not the Lord’s, I could expect no blessing. But now the Lord’s mind was clearly and distinctly made manifest. I had enough money in hand to pay for the land and to build one house, and therefore I went forward, after having still asked the Lord for guidance and being assured that it was His will I should take active steps. The first thing I did was, to see the agent who acted for the owner of the land, and to ask him, whether the land was for sale. He replied that it was, but that it was let till March 25th, 1867. He said that he would write for the price. Here a great difficulty at once presented itself, that the land was let for two years and four months longer, whilst it appeared desirable that I should be able to take possession of it in about six months, viz., as soon as the conveyance could be made out, and the plans be ready for the New Orphan House No. 4, and arrangements be made with contractors. But I was not discouraged by this difficulty; for I expected, through prayer, to make happy and satisfactory arrangements with the tenant, being willing to give him a fair compensation for leaving before his time had expired. But, before I had time to see about this, two other great difficulties presented themselves: the one was, that the owner asked £7,000 for the land, which I judged to be considerably more than its value; and the other, that I heard that the Bristol Water-Works’ Company intended to make an additional reservoir for their water, on this very land, and to get an Act of Parliament passed to that effect.

Pause here for a few moments, esteemed reader. You have seen, how the Lord brought me so far, with regard to pecuniary means, that I felt now warranted to go forward; and I may further add, that I was brought to this point as the result of thousands of times praying regarding this object; and that there were, also, many hundreds of children waiting for admission; and yet, after the Lord Himself so manifestly had appeared on our behalf, by the donation of £5,000, He allows this apparent death-blow to come upon the whole. But thus I have found it hundreds of times since I have known the Lord. The difficulties, which He is pleased to allow to arise, are only allowed, under such circumstances, for the exercise of our faith and patience; and more prayer, more patience, and the exercise of faith, will remove the difficulties. Now, as I knew the Lord, these difficulties were no insurmountable difficulties to me, for I put my trust in Him, according to that word: "The Lord also will be a refuge for the oppressed, a refuge in times of trouble. And they that know thy name will put their trust in thee: for thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek thee." Psalm ix, 9, 10. I gave myself, therefore, earnestly to prayer concerning all these three especial difficulties which had arisen regarding the land. I prayed several times daily about the matter, and used the following means. 1, I saw the Acting Committee of the Directors of the Bristol Water-Works’ Company regarding their intended reservoir on the land, which I was about to purchase, and stated to them, what I had seen in print concerning their intentions. They courteously stated to me, that only a small portion of the hand would be required, not enough to interfere with my purpose; and that, if it could be avoided, even this small portion should not be taken. 2, This being settled, I now saw the tenant, after many prayers; for I desired, as a Christian, that if this land were bought, it should be done under amicable circumstances with regard to him. At the first interview, I stated my intentions to him, at the same time expressing my desire that the matter should be settled pleasantly with regard to himself. He said that he would consider the matter, and desired a few days for that purpose. After a week I saw him again, and he then kindly stated, that, as the land was wanted for such an object, he would not stand in the way; but that, as he had laid out a good deal on the house and land, he expected a compensation for leaving it, before his time was up. As I, of course, was quite willing to give a fair and reasonable compensation, I considered this a very precious answer to prayer. 3, I now entered upon the third difficulty, the price of the land. I knew well how much the land was worth to the Orphan Institution; but its value to the Institution was not the market value. I gave myself; therefore, day by day, to prayer, that the Lord would constrain the owner to accept a considerably lower sum than he had asked; I also pointed out to him why it was not worth as much as he asked. At last he consented to take £5,500 instead of £7,000, and I accepted the offer; for I knew that by the level character of the land we should save a considerable sum for the two houses, and that by the new sewer, which only a few months before had been completed, running along under the turnpike road near the field, we should be considerably benefited. In addition to these two points I had to take into the account, that we can have gas from Bristol, as in the three houses already in operation. And lastly, the most important point of all, the nearness of this piece of land to the other three houses, so that all could easily be under the same direction and superintendence. In fact, no other piece of land, near or far off, would present so much advantage to us, as this spot, which the Lord thus so very kindly had given to us. All being now settled, I proceeded to have the land conveyed to the same trustees who stood trustees for the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3.—I have thus minutely dwelt on these various matters for the encouragement of the reader, that he may not be discouraged by difficulties, however great and many and varied, but give himself to prayer, trusting in the Lord for help, yea, expecting help, which, in His own time and way, He will surely grant. I now refer further to some of the donations, which the Lord was pleased to send me since Nov. 3, 1864, when I received that donation of £5,000. Nov. 23. From London, £100—Nov. 26. "From an officer of the Indian army," £10, with £10 for the Orphans, £10 for Missions out of India, £5 for Home Missions, £10 for the Schools, £10 for the Bible Fund, £5 for the Tract Fund, and £10 for myself. This man of God joyfully lays down, year after year, at the feet of the Lord, all that he is intrusted with by Him.

Dec. 2. Received 14s. 6d. with the following statement: "I duly received your Report, for which I am much obliged. Since reading that there were 990 Orphans Waiting for admission, and No. 4 not begun, I have laid by one penny on every article sold in my Outfitting department, and this order is already the result. I had intended waiting till March next, till I had been here a year and taken stock; but the 990 Orphans, left without any, perhaps, of the many blessings they might receive under your care, prompted this small effort, and I have surely received more than a hundredfold in blessings in so doing."—From Birmingham £100.

Jan. 3, 1865. £100 from Birmingham—Jan. 17. From Devonshire £64—Jan. 27. From China £7 15s. 2d.—From Weston-super-Mare £50.—Feb. 3. £100 from Birmingham.—March 8. From Birmingham £100—March 9. This day the conveyance of the land, which I had purchased for No. 4 and No. 5, was signed and the money paid. Week after week had passed, and many weeks, before all was completed, and a great many things had to be settled in order to prove the title, in every way, good; but all these many hinderances were satisfactorily overcome; and now, in answer to many prayers, I carried off the deeds. But, as I have found hundreds of times in my experience during the last 35 years, since I have in more childlike simplicity sought to trust in God for everything, so it was at this time also, viz., the Lord had no sooner answered prayer, and according to my trust in Him helped me, than He allowed circumstances to occur, in which faith should be further exercised, and more prayer still called for. When I was on the point of leaving Bristol for Warrington for the signature of the deeds and for obtaining them, I received information, that a donor, who for 20 months, month after month, had sent me £100 for the Building Fund, £28 8s. for the printing of Tracts, and £28 8s. for the support of the Orphans had died, and, as one of the very last things he did, he kindly had sent me again this donation, which I received on the 8th. The same donor had also, previous to these last twenty months, sent me for 19 months, month by month, £28 8s. for the printing of Tracts, and £28 8s. for the support of the Orphans. And previous again to that he had kindly sent me various donations, amounting to several hundred pounds besides, so that altogether about £5,000 or nearly so, must have been sent to me by him. This dear Christian donor was now suddenly removed. And what, you ask, dear reader, was the effect produced upon my mind? The news found me in peace, the news was read in peace, and the news did not for a moment rob me of my peace. I thanked God, for having continued this dear donor to me so long; I thanked God that He had taken this, His dear servant to himself in peace. I was no more disturbed in mind, and no more made anxious by the removal of this donor, who had contributed after the rate of about £1,900 a year, during the last 20 months, than if some one had been removed who had only given a few shillings or a few pounds yearly. Should any one ascribe this to ingratitude, such would be entirely mistaken. I felt the kindness of the dear departed Christian gentleman much. I had for a very long time prayed daily for him and for each member of his dear family; and I have also continued to pray for the bereaved widow and each of the children since; and, as long as life is continued to me, I shall remember the kindness of the dear departed one; but yet I was without the least particle of anxiety. God remained to me. God who had moved the heart of His servant to help me, remained to me; this was my comfort; this kept me from even the smallest degree of anxiety. Many times I have been similarly situated. One donor after another, who contributed much, has been removed; many such have been removed; but God, my never-failing Friend and Helper, has remained to me. One died who had given me Thousands of Pounds; but God remained, and the work went on. Another died who had given me Thousands of Pounds, but God remained, and the work went on, and was enlarged still more. Another died who had given me Thousands of Pounds; but the work went on, and was enlarged far more still. And thus, whatever changes have befallen me as to donors, by death, by their alteration of circumstances, by their alteration of heart towards God, He, the Living God, has more and more helped me, and done so more and more manifestly. The reason why I have so particularly dwelt upon this point, is, to show the blessedness of really knowing God, trusting in Him and in Him alone, being satisfied with Him and with Him alone; this, and this alone gives real, true, Scriptural independence. I would desire to be thankful for Two Pence, and even to express this thankfulness; but a donation of Twenty Thousand Pounds, or even Fifty Thousand Pounds at once would not, by the help of God, lead me to trust in the donor, even in any degree, but alone in God. And thus trusting alone in God, when the Irish famine prevailed from 1846 to 1847, we went on more easily than in any previous year; because we trusted in God, and were helped, though so many charitable contributions were sent to Ireland. The same was the case at the time of the Crimean war, and at the time of the Lancashire distress in the cotton districts, on account of the American war. And thus it has been when one after the other of our donors, and not a few who had considerably contributed, were removed; because God, who has the hearts of all men in His hands, touched the hearts of others, making them to see the honour and preciousness of the privilege, of contributing to His work; and so it has come, that we have been always helped, and more and more, instead of less and less, because we were only trusting in God and not in donors, though thankful to each of them for their kindness in helping us. In this spirit, by the grace of God, we mean to go on to the end of our course, for the sake of honouring God, and for the sake of proving to the Church and to the world, what may be accomplished simply by prayer and faith; and it were better, that we should soon be removed hence, than depart from this path, which has been happily, satisfyingly, and successfully pursued since 1834, and, we humbly trust, for the spiritual good of not a few of our fellow disciples.

May 26th, 1865, I make the following remarks in connexion with the Building Fund.

1, The total income for this object alone, during the past year, was £11,033 17s. 3½d., so that, with the £19,321 7s. 4d. in hand on May 26, 1864, there would have been on May 26, 1865, £30,355 4s. 5d.; but, of this sum, £130 8s. was expended in connecting the drains of the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 with the main sewer, recently constructed, and in making a small additional drain; £5500 was paid for the purchase of the land for the intended New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5; and £88 19s. the conveyance of the land to trustees and enrolment of the deeds in Chancery cost: so that, on May 26, 1865, the amount in hand was £24,635 17s. 5d.

2, As soon as the conveyance was actually made, the land paid for, and the deeds were in my possession, which took place on March 9, 1865, I proceeded to the plans for No. 4, when it was found, that serious disadvantages and a considerable additional cost would be connected with building only one house at a time, instead of the two at one time, or, at least, commencing them together with as little interval as possible. The points that came before us were these. The land is about 1,500 feet long and about 500 feet wide. In building the two houses it would be necessary, in order to suit our purposes, to build them both the long side of the field, so that both of them would occupy about 1,100 feet. Now, in doing so, if that house were built first which would be furthest from the turnpike road, and afterwards the one near the turnpike road, we should have to make a new road, going round the one nearest the road, whilst being built, as it would be impracticable to pass through the ground filled with material, full of dirt and clay, and where about a hundred workmen would be occupied. But this would involve the additional expense of a long temporary road, which would have to be removed again, and the land to be made good again for cultivation, all of which would be connected with considerable expense, time, loss of good arable land for two or three years, besides the expenses connected with fencing off the land. But if the house nearest the road were built first, then, while that house would be ready to be opened, the road must be round that house and land belonging to it, in order to have access to the building spot for the further one. Moreover, in either case, the presence of a hundred workmen, near a newly opened public Institution, would be most undesirable, if it possibly could be avoided. And lastly, if the two houses were built at different times, the double amount of salary for a clerk of the works would have to be paid, whilst one clerk of the works could well superintend the two houses. But by this one item, if the two houses were built at the same time, we should save at least £300, and by having from the commencement only that one road, which we mean finally to use, and keeping the land, which is not needed for the building itself, undisturbed, we should not only save several hundred pounds more, but also save the expenses connected with fencing off, making good the land again, and also avoid the dirt, dust, and disorder, necessarily near a large building which is being erected, besides not having the many workmen close to the one new house, just opened. After, therefore, looking again and again at these various points, greatly as I longed that the building should commence soon, it appeared to me desirable, yet patiently to wait the Lord’s time for some more money, whereby I should be enabled to begin both houses at the same time. From what has been stated about the income, the reader will have seen, that out of the Fifty Thousand Pounds needed for the two houses, above Thirty Thousand Pounds have come in, so that only about Ten Thousand Pounds more are needed, to meet all the expenses connected with the building of the two houses; for the remaining Ten Thousand Pounds for fittings and furniture would only be needed when the houses are built or nearly so. Now as the Lord has been pleased to send me during the past year above Eleven Thousand Pounds for the Building Fund, and as by commencing the two houses at the same time the whole would be completed considerably earlier, than if one house at a time were built, I am by this, in addition to all the other reasons given, led to a more decided conviction, that it is better to wait till God shall have in His great kindness, and in pity and compassion to the many hundreds of orphans now waiting for admission, sent me Ten Thousand Pounds more. He can do this in a very short time if He please. In the meantime I continue to wait on Him, and delighted, shall I be to begin actual operations on that very land, so admirably in every way suited, which the Lord has so very kindly given, especially as again, from Jan. 1, 1865, to May 26, 1865, the admission of 276 Orphans has been applied for, and generally daily fresh applications are being made. From Jan. 1, 1864, to May 26, 1865, viz. in 17 months, altogether 915 Orphans have been applied for to be admitted.

The following pages will now show to the reader, how the Lord was pleased further to help us; but out of the many donations, received for the Building Fund, only a few can be singled out.

July 12, 1865, From Devonshire £75—From New Zealand £7—July 17. From Hong Kong, China, £50—July 25. From the neighbourhood of London £100, with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I believe that it is through the Lord’s actings upon me, that I enclose you a cheque on the Bank of England, Western Branch, for £100. I hope that your affairs are going on well. Yours in the Lord * * * *." This Christian gentleman, whom I have never seen, and who is engaged in a very large business in London, had sent me several times before a similar sum. A day or two, before I received this last kind donation, I had asked the Lord, that He would be pleased to influence the heart of this donor to help me again, which I had never done before regarding him; and thus I had the double answer to prayer in that not only money came in, but money from him. The reader will now see the meaning in the donor’s letter, when he wrote "I believe that it is through the Lord’s actings upon me that I enclose you a cheque, &c" Verily it was the Lord who acted upon this gentleman, to send me this sum. Perhaps the reader may think, that in acknowledging the receipt of the donation, I wrote to the donor what I have here stated. I did not. My reason for not doing so was, lest he should have thought I was in especial need, and might have been thus influenced to send more. In truly knowing the Lord, in really relying upon Him and upon Him alone, there is no need of giving hints directly or indirectly, whereby individuals may be induced further to help. I might have written to the donor (as was indeed the case), I need a considerable sum day by day for the current expenses of the various Objects of the Institution, and also might have with truth told him, at that time, that I yet needed about Twenty Thousand Pounds, to enable me to meet all the expenses connected with the contemplated enlargement of the Orphan work. But my practice is, never to allude to any of these things in my correspondence with donors. When the Report is published, everyone can see, who has a desire to see, how matters stand; and thus I leave things in the hands of God to speak for us to the hearts of His stewards. And this He does. Verily we do not wait upon God in vain!

On the day I received this £100 from London (July 25th), I received also, anonymously, for the Building Fund £30—July 26. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Aug. 1. A few days since I received the following letter, from one of the Missionaries among the heathen, whom I have sought for a number of years to assist with pecuniary supplies as well as by prayer, in his service for the Lord. "My dear Brother in Jesus, I just write a line to inform you, that I have written to my father by this mail, requesting him to send you Five Hundred Pounds, being a portion of a legacy left me by an uncle, who departed to be, I hope, with Jesus. Please use it as our dear Lord directs. I feel unworthy of the privilege of contributing to the glorious work in your hands. If you think it right so to do, please do not let it be known who gave it. The other portion of the legacy I have ordered to be sent out here, as there are different objects, for which I feel it is greatly required. May the Lord enable me to act as His steward! etc." Today I received, accordingly, from the father of this Missionary, £500, of which I took £250 for the Building Fund and £250 for Missions. Admire, dear Christian Reader, the hand of God together with me. Here is a missionary, labouring for years under many difficulties, trials, privations, and hardships, in order to preach the unsearchable riches of Christ to poor benighted idolators, himself having been repeatedly reduced to the last piece of money. Now all at once he is put into the possession of many Hundreds of Pounds, and, instead of spending it on himself, or keeping it laid up in the Bank or otherwise on interest, the love of Christ constrains him to spend it, and gladly too, for the Lord. I love to dwell on such cases; for though there is much to sorrow over, in these days, in connexion with the Church of God, yet there is the bright side too, and there are many things yet to be found among the children of God, to gladden the hearts of those who love the Lord. It has been my own happy lot, during the last thirty-seven years, to become acquainted with hundreds of individuals, who were not inferior to apostolic Christians. And why may not all believers act in the spirit of apostolic Christians, seeing that the same blessed Spirit who dwelt in them, dwells in all who believe in the Lord Jesus; and that we have the whole revealed will of God in our possession in the Holy Scriptures; and, like apostolic believers, are looking for the return of the Lord Jesus, with whom we shall share the glory? Verily, did we more abundantly enter into what God has done for us, and will do for us, what manner of persons should we be! Let us then encourage one another to live more fully, more habitually, yea altogether for God, while the honour is continued to us, to be here on earth as His witnesses!

On the day I received the above £500 from a Missionary, I received £5 from another Missionary, also habitually assisted out of the funds with which the Lord is pleased to intrust me, and who has been labouring for years in Demerara.—Aug. 2. From one of the former Orphans, who had had a small legacy left to her, £5—Aug. 5. From Ireland £100—From one of the Orphans, for several years in service, 2s. 6d. with the following letter: "Dear and Respected Sir, Will you please to accept of this small trifle for the Building Fund. I can never feel too grateful for the many blessings I enjoyed during the eleven years I was under your care. The Lord has in many ways proved Himself to be the Father of the fatherless, since I left the Orphan House. He has indeed cared for me. I desire ever to feel most grateful to this kind Friend, who not only has been so kind to me in temporal things, but has in mercy done good to my soul, in bringing me out of nature’s darkness into His marvellous light. It was in the dear Orphan House I was brought first to see and feel what a guilty sinner I was. There I found forgiveness through the blood of Jesus, and now I desire to love Him much who has done so much for me. May the Lord reward you for your work of faith and labour of love. I hope dear Mrs. Müller, Miss Müller, and Miss Groves are quite well. May I ask to be respectfully remembered to them. Again thanking you for all your kindness, I remain, dear Sir, yours most gratefully and respectfully * * * *."—Aug. 9. From Coventry £4, instead of insuring the donor’s life, and 10s. instead of entering four children in a burial club.—From a former Orphan, then in dying circumstances at her sister’s house, 1s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have just been reading to sister Ruth the last Report you so kindly sent me, and she, with deep gratitude and joy, begs me to send her mite towards the new Orphan House about to be built, with many prayers for you and those connected with the work, fondly remembering the happy time spent in No. 2, under your kind fatherly care; and the happy day she found Jesus to be her Saviour; and the last prayer at the time of parting: all is recalled with tears of joy. Also she wishes me to say, all is peace, with the prospect of death before her. She fears no evil. Christ is very precious to her soul, and she hopes to meet you and all loved teachers in heaven, through the blood of Jesus, A friend had given Ruth this 1s. to buy some wine; but she begged me to send it to Mr. Müller. I remain, dear Sir, your humble and grateful servant, * * * *." The dear Orphan, referred to in this letter, has since peacefully fallen asleep in Jesus. Her illness was consumption.

Sept. 1. From a baronet in the neighbourhood of Bristol £50—Sept. 4. Today I have received one of the most remarkable donations that I ever received for the work in my hands. I am staying with my family at Ilfracombe for change of air. After the large packet of letters, which day by day comes to hand from Bristol, had been replied to, I took a walk with my family near the sea on the Capstone. In returning home, two gentlemen, entire strangers, came up to me, one of whom said, "Please excuse me, are you not Mr. Müller?" Having replied to him in the affirmative, he said, "I have to give to you some money for the Orphans." I then requested him to step aside, and to seat himself with me on one of the benches close by, that I might learn particulars. He now told me the following, which I give as nearly verbatim as I can. "I live in the neighbourhood of M. I am a business man, and, what would be called, a hardworking business man. Sometime since one of your Reports fell into my hands, but, I honestly confess it, I could not believe that you did obtain your funds simply in answer to prayer; I questioned the truth of it. However, the thing came up into my mind again and again. While I was thus considering whether God was really with you, and whether you really obtained simply by faith and in answer to prayer these large sums of money, I heard of a certain property to be sold, which I thought I should like to buy, if it were disposed of reasonably. I looked it over, and had it valued by a competent business man, who told me that it was worth so much. I then said to myself, in a kind of sceptical way, I will now see whether God is with Mr. Müller or not. If I get this property for so much (fixing a low price on it), I will give Mr. Müller One Hundred Pounds. I then instructed a person to bid for me at the auction, where this property was sold, at a distant place; but so great was my curiosity to see, whether God really would appear for you in this matter, that by the next train I set off to the place where the auction was, that I might obtain as early as possible information, how the matter would end; and I found, to my great surprise, that I had actually obtained this valuable property, at the exact low price which I had fixed. I was astonished. But I began now to reflect more on the principles on which you act, and I wondered, that, as a Christian, I or any one else could call in question what you say about answers to prayer; and the more I consider the matter, and the more I read your Report, the more I see how right and proper it is, to come to God for all we need, and to trust in Him for everything. The conveyance having been made, and all being now settled about the sale, I felt it right to fulfil my promise; so my friend, whom you saw just now with me, and I set out on a tour into Devonshire, and then, on our way home, called the day before yesterday (Saturday) at your house; but found you were from home. We stopped yesterday (Sunday) in Bristol, and having there learnt your address, we came on here to Ilfracombe today, for I wished to know you personally." After I had heard all this, I stated to this dear stranger, that I was not at all surprised at God’s working thus for me, since day by day I sought His help, and thus, in answer to prayer, obtained from the most unlikely persons, and entire strangers, donations for the work. "So for instance, I said, as you told me that you come from the neighbourhood of M—, I had a letter from a lawyer at M—, not long since, asking me to send him a proper form for a legacy to be left to the Orphans, as one of his clients (whose name he did not mention) wished to leave a legacy of £1000 for the Orphans. Now, as far as I know, I am not personally acquainted with a single person at M—, nor do I know the name of the individual who purposes to leave this £1000." "About this legacy," replied the stranger at my side, "I can tell you something. After I had got this property, and saw how wrong I had been in looking in such a sceptical way on your work, as if there were no reality in prayer, I decided on helping you further. I thought to myself, though I am a man in health, and of middle age, yet it might be well to make my will, and to leave you £1000 for the Orphans." Thus I found out, to my surprise, that this stranger himself was the individual on whose account a lawyer at M— had written to me. We now separated, the stranger stating he would in an hour call at my lodgings and give me a cheque for the £100. He did so, and wished £70 to be appropriated to the Building Fund, £20 for the support of the Orphans, and £10 for my own personal expenses.

Sept. 9. From the neighbourhood of London £200, with £20 for the School and Missionary Fund, £20 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.—Sept. 16. From the Isle of Man £5 as a "Thank-offering, Birthday gift."—Sept. 20, From the North of England £100—Sept. 23. From Glasgow £50—Sept. 27. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Oct. 20. From Sunderland £18 as the value of a diamond ring.—Oct. 31. From Monmouthshire £1, with the following most uncommon letter: "My dear Sir,—I have much pleasure in forwarding you a Post Office Order for £1, as a thank-offering to God for a severe loss of income, which He will, I hope, sanctify to me. Please apply it, as you think fit. Believe me, my dear Sir, yours very faithfully, * * * *." All Christians do not look on trials, afflictions, losses, pain, sickness, bereavement, as on dispensations intended by God for their good; and yet they are invariably intended for our good. We should seek habitually to recognise the hand of God in all His dealings with us, and believe that all are intended for our real profit, according to Rom. viii, 28. If we do so, we can give to God even a thank-offering for a severe loss; for it is intended for our good. Moreover, the loss might have been greater still, in most instances; and therefore, if for no other reason, it becomes us, to give a thank-offering that it was not greater. The loss of £100 might have been £1000; or that of £1000, £10,000; or that of £10,000, £100,000. The sickness of one child might have gone through the whole family; or the death of one friend might have been the death of all our friends; and so on. Were we thus to look at the dealings of God with us, seeking to recognise him habitually, and taking them all as intended for our blessing; and, in addition to this, were we to remember how much heavier our trials might be, we should be more truly grateful for our lot.

Nov. 4. From a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £50, with £50 for Missions.—Nov. 7. From Palamcottah, India, £10—From Northamptonshire £1, as "A thank-offering to Almighty God for permitting my only child to attain the age of 5 years, without having one serious illness."—From Yatton £1, as "A thank-offering for preserving our cattle from this fearful disease." Nov. 14. From a poor widow in London, who suddenly died, 1s., and a penny stamp, with the following letter, which was after her death found in her drawer, with this money, being the only money she possessed. "Kind Sir, With pleasure I take up my pen, to return you my sincere thanks for the copy of the Report, which you so kindly sent. I find it very interesting. I have sent the enclosed trifle towards the Building Fund, and regret exceedingly, not having it in my power to send a larger sum; but I feel quite assured that my Divine Master, as well as yourself, will not despise the day of small things. He knows, how I have been straitened in my circumstances in consequence of so much illness. I remain, Sir, your obedient humble servant, * * * *." There are donors, who have contributed to this object Thousands of Pounds, and here is this poor widow, who gives her all, which she possesses in money. Observe, dear Reader, the variety of ways, which God uses, to supply us with means.—Nov. 15. From Yorkshire £22 10s., with £22 10s. for Foreign Missions.—Nov. 17. £20, "In memory of a dear departed Friend E. P."—From Australia £22—Nov. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £40—Dec. 11. From Wales £22 10s., with £22 10s. for Missions and £5 for myself, with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have very great pleasure in bearing my testimony to the truth of your remarks on the subject of devoting a certain portion of income or profits to the Lord’s work. About eleven years ago I was led to give a 10th, and later on an 8th, and then a 6th; and I have not had any cause to regret this course; on the contrary, I have proved the truth of God’s word, ‘There is that scattereth and yet increaseth, &c.’ Enclosed I hand you cheque for £50, £5 of which please accept for your own use; the balance to be devoted as you may deem most desirable. With kind regards, yours sincerely, * * * *." The £45 was portioned out as above.—Dec. 15. From Worcestershire £35 10s.—Dec. 26. From the North of England £45 19s. 6d., with £5 for myself.—Dec. 27. From London £25—Dec. 30. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £45.

Jan. 1, 1866. From a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £50, with £100 for Missions, £50 for Bible—, Tract— and School Fund—Jan 4. From one of the former Orphans, who seven years since was sent out to service, 5s., with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, May I once again take the liberty of writing to thank you and all my dear friends for the kindness which I, for so many years, experienced in the Orphan House. It is ever with feelings of gratitude I recall the care and love bestowed on me and all my dear companions in that truly favoured home; and I trust that my endeavours to do my duty to those who are placed over me, may prove that the lessons learnt there are not thrown away.—Will you please to accept the enclosed five shillings in stamps for the Building Fund. Will you please give my grateful love to dear Mrs. Müller and Miss Groves, and earnestly wishing your health and life may long be spared to be the Orphans’ Friend, I remain, dear and honoured Sir, your grateful and obedient Orphan, * * * *." The writer of the above letter was received in a most deplorable destitute state, and through poverty greatly neglected, who, after being 9 years and 5 months under our care, was sent seven years since to service, and has given us comfort ever since. I refer to this case as the precious fruit of our service, and to show how the labouring in faith, not looking at the natural appearance, is rewarded. For I remember well the day, when, more than 16 years since, I received this poor girl, in her utter destitution, and how, judging from the way in which she had been living, I expected nothing but difficulty; but I received her in faith, looking to the Lord for help and wisdom, and had scarcely any difficulty regarding her.—Jan. 6. From Ramsgate £25, with £25 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund—From a servant of the Lord Jesus £1 5s. and 2 artificial teeth set in gold, with the following statement in his letter: "I beg to acknowledge with thanks the last Report, received a few months back, and to testify again the benefit I have personally derived from reading its contents, and from following the principles which it is meant to illustrate. Though my expenses at home are now heavier than they were, I have managed to increase the proportion of my income which I devote to God, and find that I am better spiritually for sparing a seventh of the whole, than I used to be in giving a tenth. I begin to feel something of the superior blessedness which our Lord attributes so truly to giving over receiving."—From London £50—Jan. 10. From Scotland £25—From Edinburgh £15—Jan. 13. From Devonshire £84 16s.

In giving thus to the readers one instance after the other, how it pleased the Lord, to supply me with means, I am unable to convey to them my feelings in receiving one donation after the other as the result of waiting upon God. Day by day, and generally twice a day at least, prayer regarding the obtaining the full amount of means needed for building two other Orphan Houses for 850 more Orphans, is brought before God; and when, therefore, a donation comes in, whether large or small, it brings me somewhat nearer the point of having the whole amount. I thank God for the donation, but ask for more, ask for the whole yet needed; and I firmly believe it will be obtained in His own time. From Jan. 1, 1865, to Dec. 31, 1865, therefore during one single year only, Six Hundred and Eleven Orphans were applied for to be admitted, in addition to all the Hundreds we had on the list before Jan. 1, 1865: the Christian and feeling Reader will therefore not wonder, that I should be in earnest to obtain more accommodation for destitute Orphans. On this account I labour on in prayer, till my prayers shall have been turned into praises, as was the case regarding the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3.—Jan. 15. From Demerara £1—Jan. 16. From "A friend on the Irawaddy" £10—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Jan. 17. From Devonshire, £100—Jan. 18. From London £50, with £50 for the Orphans.—Jan. 19. From Australia £4—Jan. 25. From B. S. £5—Jan. 26. From Bath £100.

Feb. 2. From Tunbridge Wells £20—Feb. 3. From S. L. £5Feb. 8. From Clifton £25—From Natal £2—Feb. 13. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £148—Feb. 24. From Somersetshire £50—Feb. 28. "From C. P. and sister" £20 for Missions, and £10 for myself.—From Weston-super-Mare £50, with £10 for myself.

March 5. From Hong Kong £80—March 8. From India £30—March 28, £100 from a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels.—April 2. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

May 5. From T. H. Esq., £1,000 "as a tribute to the memory of a departed sister." This gentleman sent me also in Sep. 1864, £1,000, as, having come by the death of his sister into the possession of her property, he wishes to spend it in such a way as she would approve of, if alive—May 8. From Yorkshire, "In memory of May 24th," £25—May 10. From Pennsylvania, U. S., £5—May 15. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—May 17. From Leicestershire £200, with £184 6s. 6d. for Missions—May 18.—From an officer of the Indian Army £10, with £20 for Missions, £10 for the Bible Fund, £10 for the School Fund, £10 for the Orphans, and £10 for myself.—From a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £100, with £100 for Missions.—May 26. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £76.

I give the following information in connexion with the Building Fund:—

1, The total income for this object alone, during the past year, from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, was £9,366 4s. 7d., so that, with the £24,635 17s. 5d. in hand on May 26, 1865, the sum was increased by May 26, 1866, to £34,002 2s. 0d.

2, By the end of March, 1866, all the plans for the two houses were ready, and in April we received tenders from contractors for the two houses, No. 4 and No. 5.

3, According to the estimate I had made about these two houses, judging from the expenses connected with the building of the New Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3, we should have had enough money, for meeting the amount of the contract for No. 4 and No. 5; but when the tenders came in, it was found, that the amount was about £8,000 more than my calculation made in the spring, 1861; this arose from the fact, that, since then, almost all the building material has risen in price, particularly slates, and that the wages of the workmen are one-fourth higher than they were when the New Orphan Houses No. 2 and 3 were built. The amount of the tenders for both houses, including the Cooking and Heating Apparatus and Drying Stove, amounted to £41,147; but I had not this amount in hand, needing about £8,000 more. Now, what was to be done under these circumstances? My decision was made instantly. My heart longed to build two more houses to the honour of the Lord, for the benefit of poor children, bereaved of both parents by death; I had brought before the Lord many thousands of prayers during the past five years; there were many hundreds of orphans waiting for admission, and their number daily increasing (for during the past year alone 611 were applied for to be admitted); but I could not contract debt: I would not sign contracts, which I had not money in hand to meet. Should it be said: But your work is so manifestly the Lord’s work, it is surely according to His mind, that destitute children, who have lost by death both parents, should be cared for, so that you need not be afraid to build, though you have not yet all the money in hand, for God will surely help you: my reply is this. Just because it is the Lord’s work, and manifestly His, therefore I can wait, patiently wait His time. When His time is come, He will give to the last shilling all I need; but if I commence before His time, which I should do, were I to begin that for which I have not the means; it would be like saying: "God has not money enough to pay for His own work;" and, instead of acting in faith, I should act presumptuously. I therefore did this. Having ample means to meet the contract for No. 4 (for separate tenders were given in for the two houses), I accepted it, and a written agreement was made between the contractor and myself, that on Jan. 1, 1867, or at any time previously, I may accept his tender for No. 5 also, but I shall not be bound to do so. If it shall, therefore, please the Lord, by the 1st of Jan. 1867, to give me about £7,000 more, than I have now in hand, the contract for No. 5 will be signed; but I cannot go in debt. For this amount I look and wait on God, and doubt not that He will help further, as He has always done. If it please the Lord to exercise my faith and patience, yet, I will, by His grace, continue to call upon Him, being fully assured, that in the end I shall have enough. In stating that about £7,000 more would be needed, before I could sign the contract for No. 5, no reference is made to the fitting up and furnishing the two houses, which will cost about £10,000 more; but this latter sum will not actually be needed, before entering into an agreement for building No. 5.

4, The contract for the building of No. 4 was signed on May 3, 1866, and on May 7th, the operations on the ground commenced, and have been steadily going on up to this day, May 26, 1866.

5, It is necessary here to state, that, if even all the money had been in hand on May 3, 1866, to contract at once for both houses, yet only one could have been gone on with; for they will be so large, that no contractor in Bristol has sufficient scaffolding to begin the two houses at once, but there must necessarily intervene between the commencement of the one and the other eight or nine months. This difficulty could only have been overcome, had there been sufficient money in hand, by having two different contractors, which was for many reasons very undesirable, or by employing one of the great London contractors, but in the latter case the two houses would have cost about £7,000 more than they now will cost.

In the following pages will now be given, out of the many donations, which the Lord was pleased further to send in for the Building Fund, a very few specimens. July 17, 1866. From London £105—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £80—July 21. From Devonshire £190 2s. 11d.—July 30. From a Bristol donor £200, with £100 for Missions, £100 for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £100 for the circulation of Tracts, and £10 for my own expenses.—Sep. 5. £150 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Sept. 7. £30, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have lately been reading the last Report of your valuable Institution, and am much impressed with the donations and letters therein contained, especially with two of them. One is that of an old Orphan, now in service, who had been enabled to lay by some of her wages, but sent the money to you in preference to its lying useless. Another is that of a poor afflicted widow who had saved some money and acted in a similar way. Being impressed by their example, and by the Divine precept, Matt. vi. 19, I have taken from the Post Office Savings’ Bank the savings of four years work, and lay it at your disposal, trusting that you will devote part of it to the Missions, and the rest as you may think best. Hoping that you will receive it safely, that it may be blessed by God to the increase of the Redeemer’s kingdom, and that your own labours may be abundantly rewarded, I am, Your sincere donor, * * * *." I took half of this amount for Missions and the other half for the Building Fund. It has been my happy lot, during the last thirty-eight years especially, to become acquainted with a great number of Christians, who desired in all childlike simplicity, to take the Lord at His Word, and to carry it out practically, in order that thus they might obtain the blessing, which ever is coupled with obedience to the written Word. The writer of the above letter is an instance of this kind, whom I commend especially to the prayers of Christian readers, that God would give her a full recompense for her obedience, both temporally and spiritually, even in this life; and that she never may be allowed, even for one moment, to regret what she has done for the Lord.—Sept. 19. From Birmingham £200—Sept. 21. "From S. Kent," as "First dividend from a Bank, which stopped payment, some time since," £100 with £53 16s. 3d. for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, and £10 for myself.— From Blackheath £100—Sept. 27. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the Love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Oct. 8. From a Shipowner £100, with £100 for Missions, instead of insuring his ships.—Oct. 12. Today the senior partner of a large firm kindly promised to give himself all the glass that would be required for the 350 large windows of No. 4, and, in the name of his firm, he promised, that the firm jointly would give all the glass which would be required for the 350 large windows of No. 5.—Nov. 17. £120 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 28. From Colonel — £10 "To help in accepting the tender for No. 5." It then wanted 33 days to the time when the matter finally was to be settled about the tender of the contract for No. 5. As yet I had not all in hand for this purpose, though expecting to receive it through the gracious hand of my Heavenly Father, for whose honour and glory I desired to build this Fifth Orphan House. I therefore continued patiently, believingly and expectingly to make my supplication to Him, and, accordingly, He was pleased, day by day, to send in further supplies, as He had done from the time I had signed the contract for No. 4.—Nov. 29. From a soldier, a private in India, £1—A poor labourer in Staffordshire having a desire to help in the work of God in my hands, sent me half the amount of money he obtained by the sale of the honey of one bee-hive; and, by being prospered this year more than in any previous year, he was able to send me 15s.

Dec. 4. From Bengal £30—Dec. 7. From the neighbourhood of Chippenham Ten old guinea pieces. There are yet many of these in existence, and many Christians have sent me some from time to time, so that I have received many hundreds, and during no period more than during the past year!—Dec. 8. From Devonshire, 15 tea spoons, 3 table spoons, a gravy spoon, 3 salt spoons, a table fork, a pair of sugar tongs (all of silver), 3 pairs of spectacles, a compass, an eye glass, a silver top of a pepper box, a gold brooch, 4 pieces of artificial teeth, and a pincushion.—Dec. 10. From Lincolnshire £8, as the "profit of three lectures."—Dec. 12. £20 from Dorchester.—Dec. 14. From Australia £20—From A. C. S., Scotland, £100—Dec. 22. From Wishaw, £1 saved by giving up smoking.—Dec. 26. From the House Girls of the New Orphan House No. 1, Ten Shillings.—From a former Christian Orphan, now clerk in a lawyer’s office, 10s.—Dec. 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—From W. C. H. Esq. £25.

This was the last day of the year, and the next day was the one to which the accepting of the tender for the contract of the New Orphan House No. 5 had been postponed. On the 26th of May, 1866, I needed about £7000 more, than I had in hand, to be able to accept the contract for No. 5 without going in debt; but by the 31st of Dec. 1866, the Lord had so graciously helped, that a little more than £7000 had come in, so that a day before the first of January, 1867, I was able to accept and sign the contract for No. 5, the contracts for both houses being £41,147. I had now the desire of my heart regarding this point also, and the precious recompense from the Lord, of having received all the money from Him for this object, without going in debt. Thousands of times I had asked the Lord for the means needed for building these two houses, and now I had, to the full, received the answer. On the 15th of Jan. 1867, operations commenced in connexion with building No. 5.

In addition to the hundreds of orphans previously applied for, there were from Jan. 1, 1866, to Dec. 31, 1866, altogether 617 Orphans, whose admission had been applied for, from which the reader may easily judge, how great the delight of my soul was, when I considered myself warranted to sign the contract for No. 5 also, and thus had before me the delightful prospect of being permitted, to care for many hundreds more of destitute Orphans.

I refer now only to a few more specimens of the way in which it pleased the Lord further to supply me with means for the Building Fund.

Jan. 1, 1867. From Surrey £50—From Scotland £100—From Devonshire £25—From the neighbourhood of Market Drayton £5 as "A little thank-offering to a gracious God for His preserving care of cattle in the midst of disease and death."—Jan. 9. From one of the believing Orphans, who was many years since sent out to service, £1, with £1 for Missions.—Jan. 16. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £60—Jan. 24. From Somersetshire £300—Jan. 26. From Devonshire £148 16s.—Notice, dear Reader, that, after the contract for No. 5 also had been signed, as there was yet about Ten Thousand Pounds more needed for fitting up and furnishing the two houses, the Lord was pleased to encourage His servant regarding that amount also, by sending in means towards these expenses soon afterwards.

Feb. 13. Received £27, with the following letter. "My dear Sir, May I trouble you with a short history in reference to a sad affliction, which has taken place in my family in the past year.—In the month of June last my daughter was taken ill of fever, which was so severe that all hope was given up of her recovery. The two medical men who were attending her, wished to have further advice, and called in Dr. —. My fear on that day was indescribable. I felt so reduced and powerless by reason of the heavy load of trouble on me in reference to my dear child, when these words came powerfully to my mind, ‘She shall not die, but live to declare the glory of God.’ I was compelled to say in return, ‘What can I render to the Lord for such mercy and goodness?’ —The response was, ‘Give £20 to the dear Orphans.’—I had such a sight of the great work, which you had undertaken and carried on so wonderfully under the blessing of God for so many years, that, when these dear children are left entirely destitute of earthly parents, the Lord has provided for them in such a manner, and using you as the instrument in His hands! What a privilege to be able and willing to give a trifle towards such a work!—When my daughter began to be a little better, my wife was taken ill of the same complaint, and was laid aside for about six weeks. I am happy to say, they are now fully recovered, and have the pleasure of enclosing my promised vow unto the Lord for £20, together with my usual gift of £7, making together £27, £5 of which is for the new Buildings and £2 for yourself. That your life may be spared many years to come, still further to prosecute the good work you have so long been enabled to carry on, is the desire of Yours very sincerely, * * * *."—Feb. 22. From Somersetshire £25, and £75 for the Bible—, Missionary—and Tract-Fund.—Feb. 28. From Somersetshire £50—From one of the former Orphans, a Christian, now in Pennsylvania, U.S., £1, with a grateful letter.

March 4. From Devonshire £50—March 13. From Devonshire £100.

Apr. 2. From Pennsylvania, U.S., £14 6s.—Apr. 4. From New Zealand £2—Apr. 10. From Scotland £105 9s. 2d.—Apr. 13. From Bengal 100 Rupees.—Apr. 15. From Demerara £5 and £2—Apr. 22. From Liverpool £20, with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I enclose you Bank Draft for £20, say £10 for the Building Fund, £5 for the support of orphans, and £5 for your own personal expenses. Not having smoked for twelve months, this is the amount I would have spent otherwise in cigars. Wishing you every success, Truly yours, * * * *." This donation not only shows in what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to supply me with means for His work, but also, how much money may be saved by giving up needless and injurious habits.

May 3. From a Yorkshire donor £25—May 6. From the neighbourhood of Bath £500. The kind donor of this sum had several times before sent me £50, and even £100; but now he kindly sent £500. As the work increases, and the outgoings become greater and greater, so the Lord is pleased, not only, in answer to our daily prayers, to raise up new donors, but also to influence the hearts of those, who have given before, to give more than ever. This £500 particularly refreshes my spirit, as it will be a considerable help towards the expenses connected with the fitting up and furnishing the two new houses.—May 9. From a Somersetshire donor £100, with £100 for the Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund—May 11. £10 for the Building Fund, with £10 for the Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, as "A thank-offering to the Father of all mercies, for innumerable mercies, spiritual and temporal, to the father and mother of a large family."—May 13. From Berlin £20—From Madras £40, with £47 16s. for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.—May 14. From Yorkshire £25—May 22. From Scotland £50—May 25. £50 from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus given some out of the many donations, which the Lord was pleased to send, in answer to daily prayer, for the Building Fund, up to May 26, 1867.

I now make a few remarks in connexion with the Building Fund and the two Orphan Houses in course of erection.

1, The total income for the Building Fund from May 1866, to May 26, 1867, amounted to £11,203 16s. 8½d. Having thus received about £4,000 more than was required for the contract of No. 5, only about £6,000 more is required for the fittings and furnishing of the two houses No. 4 and No. 5.

2, As both houses are exactly the size of the New Orphan House No. 3, in which we have healthful accommodation for 450 children, I hope that we shall be enabled to accommodate 900 more Orphans in the two houses, now in course of erection; so that our total number would then be 2,050, instead of 2,000, as first contemplated.

3, No. 4 is erected and roofed in, and a beginning has been made to plaster the inside. No. 5 was commenced, as stated before, on Jan. 15, 1867.

4, On May 26, 1867, we had all the means in hand, actually required for the erection of the two new houses, and also, as far as could be calculated, about £4,000 towards the fittings, furniture, and other expenses not included in the contracts, so that only about £6,000 more was required. We had, therefore, through patient believing prayer and the exercise of faith, received about Fifty-Two Thousand Pounds towards the Fifty-Eight Thousand Pounds which would be needed altogether. I now give a few instances in the following pages, to show the Reader, how the Lord was pleased to help us further.

May 31, 1867. Received the following letter from a donor in Kent, entirely unknown to me, even by name, who had sent me about 3 months before £300. "Dear Sir, I find I have still £200 left of the legacy I mentioned to you, some time back. As every penny of that legacy is "Corban," I cannot touch it, and should like to send it to you, if you will excuse being troubled again by me. My heart’s wish would be, that you would accept it for yourself and family; but it is not for me to press so delicate a point, therefore you are free. Doubtless there are calls for help on all sides of you. Would I could make this thousands. Accept my Pseudonym,* * * *." Of this £200 I took £100 towards fitting up and furnishing the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5, and £100 for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.—June 8. From Scotland £20, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, enclosed is Twenty Pounds, which I send to you as a thank-offering to the Lord, to be disposed of by you as you may deem most proper. Last year I sent you Ten Pounds, this year I feel satisfied it is my duty to send you Twenty, being persuaded there is a withholding more than is meet, which tendeth to poverty." Etc. I took £10 for the Building Fund, and £10 for the first four objects of the Institution.—June 21. From Lance-field, Australia, £1—From Ballarat, Australia, £2— From the East Indies £25—June 27. From Dunedin, New Zealand, £5.

July 13. From Devonshire £144 19s. 11d.—July 19. From Scotland £50—July 24. From the neighbourhood of Bath, £500, from a gentleman who had in May also sent me £500. I have never seen this kind donor, as is the case with perhaps 19 out of 20 of the donors; but the Lord spoke to him, thus to help me to accomplish this enlargement of the Orphan Work.—July 26, From Penang £5.

Aug. 13. From a clergyman in Oxfordshire £45, with £5 for myself.—Aug. 14. From Gloucester £25—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Aug. 15. £7 13s. instead of insuring 306 acres against hailstorms.—Aug. 17. Anonymously from Glasgow £100—Aug. 23. From London £50.

Sept. 27. From some of the Orphans in the three houses, towards fitting up and furnishing the new houses, £4 13s. 4d.—Sept. 28. From Scotland £100, with £100 for Missions, £42 10s. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, and £42 10s. for the Orphans.

Oct. 7. From Scotland £50, with £100 for Missions, and £50 for the Orphans.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50—Oct. 8. From Somersetshire £10, as "A Thank-offering for having well secured our harvest."—Oct. 12. From a Hong Kong donor £50—From Sunderland £10, as "A widow’s remembrance of her husband."

Nov. 1. From Demerara £3—Nov. 7. Received £53 19s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, It affords me much pleasure to send you a cheque for £53 19s., the Lord’s share in the profits of my business. In July 1858, when I sent you my first cheque for £4 6s. 4d., I little expected it would ever reach its present amount. I trust you will apply it to that department of your work that most stands in need; and should Five pounds be acceptable to yourself, I hope you will take it. I remain, etc.,* * * *." I took of the £53 19s. for the fitting up and for furnishing No. 4 and No. 5, £26, and £27 19s. for the first four objects of the Institution. As the Lord was pleased to prosper this Christian in business, in 1858 and since, so he contributed to the Lord’s work; and the result was, that the Lord intrusted him with more, made him a steward over more; so that, as he says, his ability to send me help increased from £4 6s. 4d. to £53 19s. All believers, who know the enjoyment of giving, will know also how this enjoyment may be increased more and more by a ready heart, to be the Lord’s steward.—Nov. 9. From C. 4s. 6d. "As a thank-offering for having caught the train several times, when being on important business and having very little time."—From Devonshire £5 "Instead of going a wedding trip."—Nov. 14. From an Orphan, now in service, 2s. 6d., with the following letter: "Beloved and respected Sir, May I be allowed the privilege and great pleasure of writing a few words to thank you for the Report you so very kindly sent. Oh! dear sir, I think I can never be thankful enough and praise my Heavenly Father for placing me under your kind fatherly care. Oh! how sweet and how precious to think that it was there in the dear, dear Orphan House, that I found joy and peace in believing. May I ask you to receive this trifle towards the Building Fund, or whatever you think best. I long to see the happy home of my childhood once more. Please to remember me most respectfully to beloved Mrs. Müller, Miss Müller and Miss Groves. Trusting yourself and family are well, and that you may be spared many years to be the Orphan’s friend, I am, yours most respectfully and gratefully, * * * *."—The writer of this letter having been 10 years and 10 months under our care, was eight years since sent out to service, after she had been for 14 months a believer, whilst under our care.—Nov. 19. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100—Nov. 29. Received £10 from a distance of about 300 miles, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, A few weeks ago I had the privilege of reading one of your Reports, and, allow me to say, that, while doing so, I had my soul much blessed. Just at that period I was the subject of much depression from financial causes. Trade was very dull, with little or no prospect of its being better for some time to come. But, thank God! I was enabled to look through the clouds and darkness that surrounded me. Faith lent its realising light; and the clouds dispersed; the shadows fled. I promised the Lord, if He would open my way and grant me deliverance, I would send a donation of Ten Pounds to the Institution He has made you the honoured instrument of raising and sustaining for so many years. All praise be to His blessed name! deliverance came, and I forward you a Post Office Order for £10 Please accept it from one who desires to render a portion of his income to the cause of God. Use it as you think well. Etc."—The donor is entirely unknown to me. This is one of the thousand different ways, in which the Lord, in answer to my daily prayers, is pleased to influence the minds of persons to help me.

Dec. 2. From Clifton £200, with £100 for Missions, £50 for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, and £50 for the Orphans.—Dec. 31. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.

From Jan. 1, 1867, to this day, Dec. 31, 1867, the admission of 595 Orphans had been applied for. And thus, year after year, very large numbers of destitute Orphans have been applied for. How great, therefore, the importance of being able soon to open the two new houses, and to be able to admit 900 more.

Jan. 1, 1868. Received from a Shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels, £50, with £100 for Missions, and £29 7s. 2d., for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund.

Feb. 1. Only about £20 had been received this morning; a large sum to some, but very little to us, the expenses of the various objects of the Institution being now so great. After family prayer I united, as usual, with my dear wife in prayer, and we thanked the Lord for what He had been pleased to send us, at the same time asking Him to send much more, if it might be, even this very day. About twenty minutes after this, I received a letter containing £50, in which the kind Christian donor writes: "As you soon will receive more Orphans, I send you this sum for them." In the afternoon there came in further £3 11s. 6d., and in the evening £10 and £5 from Sunderland, and from Scotland £66 6s. for the Building Fund; besides a few other small donations. Thus the day, which began with about £20, closed with a total income of £141 0s. 6d. But the most remarkable point is this: The £66 6s. from Scotland supplies me, as far as can be known now, with all the means necessary for fitting up and furnishing the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5. Six years and eight months I have been, day by day, and generally several times daily, asking the Lord to give me the needed means for this enlargement of the Orphan work, which, according to the calculations made in the spring of 1861, appeared to he about Fifty Thousand Pounds, but which, at a later period, in consequence of the rise of wages and material for building since 1861, was found to be about Fifty Eight Thousand Pounds. The total of this amount I had now received. I praise and magnify the Lord for putting this enlargement of the work into my heart, and for giving me courage and faith for it; and, above all, for sustaining my faith regarding it day by day without wavering. When the last portion of the money was received, I was no more assured concerning the whole, than I was at the time I had not received one single donation towards this large sum. I was at the beginning, after once having ascertained His mind, through most patient and heart-searching waiting upon God, as fully assured that He would bring it about, as if the two houses,with their hundreds of orphans occupying them, had been already before me. I make a few remarks here for the sake of younger believers, in connexion with this subject: 1, Be slow to take new steps in the Lord’s service, or in your business, or in your families. Weigh everything well; weigh all in the light of the Holy Scriptures, and in the fear of God. 2, Seek to have no will of your own, in order to ascertain the mind of God, regarding any steps you propose to take, so that you can honestly say, you are willing to do the will of God, if He will only please to instruct you. 3, But when you have found out, what the will of God is, seek for His help, and seek it earnestly, perseveringly, patiently, believingly, and expectingly: and you will surely, in His own time and way, obtain it.

Some individuals, who are unacquainted with me, may suppose that I entered too hastily upon this enlargement, without counting the cost. If so, they are mistaken. I was ready to go forward, if God would have me to go forward; and I was not only content, but well pleased to stand still, and enlarge the work no further, if this had been the mind of the Lord: I had no will of my own. I further weighed well all the difficulties. I truly counted the cost. The work I had in hand, before this last Orphan enlargement, would require year by year about Twenty Thousand Pounds, and I had reason to believe, that, when the enlargement was carried out, it would require above Thirty Thousand Pounds annually, besides the sum for building the two new houses. But with all this calmly, fully, and patiently looking at all the difficulties, not only with regard to the needed money, but the numberless other matters to be taken in to the account; I, at last, became assured, that the Lord would have me to go forward, as the reader may remember from the previous part of the Narrative, where I have given the reasons, which led me to this conclusion. Now, when once this decision had been made, upon Scriptural ground, and after much prayer, I was of good cheer. The difficulties cast me not down; for I expected help from God. I set myself earnestly to prayer, and help came by little and little; yet it came. Money was sent. The land was obtained, and with no little difficulty. The plans were made. The houses were begun. But day by day I went on praying, looking for the full answer. And thus, step by step, the Lord has helped me further.

Feb. 19. From Devonshire £50. Apr. 3. From a gentleman at Liverpool £10, with £5 for the Orphans, and £5 for myself, "saved in one year, by not smoking cigars."—Apr. 9. From the neighbourhood of Southampton £1, as "A thank-offering for the Lord’s goodness in restoring the donor’s horses to health."—May 23. All the glass, needed for the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5, was given gratuitously. The glass for No. 4 was kindly given by the senior partner of a large firm, and the glass for No. 5 by the same firm conjointly. The promise to do so had been given nearly two years since: but now I learnt from the clerk of the works, that all the glass had been actually supplied. The greatness of the gift will be seen, by its being remembered that there are above 700 large windows in these two houses.—May 26, 1868. When the last year commenced on May 27, 1867, I needed yet about £6000 to meet all the expenses connected with fitting up and furnishing the two new houses; but the Lord was pleased to give me, altogether, for this object, £6633 17s. 5¼d. during the year. I have, therefore, reason to believe, that the amount required is in hand.

When the Report for 1868 was written, I stated, that, as far as I could see, I had all the money in hand, required for the building, fittings and furnishing of the two new houses. Since then, however, I have received some further donations; and as I could not possibly know what unexpected expenses might occur, I received all those donations (which expressly were given) to meet the expenses connected with this enlargement. The Lord by this has again acted as in former times; for in the case of the New Orphan House No. 1, when all the expenses had been met in full, I had a balance of more than Six Hundred Pounds in hand; and when all the expenses for building, fitting up, and furnishing No. 2 and No. 3 had been defrayed, there was about Two Thousand Nine Hundred Pounds left. Thus the Lord showed, that He could not only provide the large sums needed for these 3 Orphan Houses, but that He could also give more than was enough, and all simply in answer to prayer, though about Sixty Thousand Pounds had been required. In like manner I expect, that, when all the expenses connected with the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5 shall have been defrayed, there will be again a balance left. This is just like the ways of God. When He orders something to be done for the glory of His name, He is both able and willing to find the needed individuals for the work and the means required. Thus, when the Tabernacle in the Wilderness was to be erected, He not only fitted men for the work, but He also touched the hearts of the Israelites to bring the necessary materials and gold, silver, and precious stones; and all these things were not only brought, but in such abundance, that a proclamation had to be made in the camp, that no more articles should be brought, because there were more than enough. And again, when God for the praise of His name would have the Temple to be built by Solomon, He provided such an amount of gold, silver, precious stones, brass, iron, etc., for it, that all the palaces or temples which have been built since, have been most insignificant in comparison with that Temple. The reason why I dwell on this is, that it may lead the Christian reader, first of all, to see well to it, that the work in which he desires to be engaged is God’s work; secondly, that He is the person to be engaged in this work; thirdly, that God’s time is come, when he should do this work; and then to be assured, that, if he seeks God’s help in his own appointed way, He will not fail him. We have ever found it thus, and expect to find it thus, on the ground of the promises of God, to the end of our course.

I refer now to a very few donations, received for the Building Fund, since May 26, 1868.

Sep. 17. Received from the neighbourhood of London the following letter, with a cheque for £47 10s. "Dear Sir,—More than two years ago, mainly owing to thoughts suggested by reading the annual Reports of the Orphan Houses you have been enabled to establish, I commenced setting aside a tenth of my income and business earnings, for the purpose of relieving human want and destitution.—I am sincerely thankful that I have been led to this practice, at the same time I am grieved to find, I am not by any means so careful and diligent in the application and distribution of the money thus entrusted to me, as I ought to be.—My wife and I have lately been considering that we have three children entrusted to us, and with them there has hitherto been given to us abundantly the means of bringing them up according to our position in life; therefore we think it will be well to provide (from the means above named) for three other children in the Orphan Houses, and this we purpose to do year by year, as our Lord permits, and as our family may increase. If you have no objection, please to receive the enclosed cheque for £47 10s., viz., £37 10s. for three children at your own moderate estimate of £12 10s. each, £5 for the Building Fund and £5 for your own family—all for the present year 1868.—Asking you to excuse haste in writing, and humbly praying that our Lord will continue to bless and prosper your work, I am, Yours sincerely, * * * *."

Nov. 2. From Gloucestershire 702 children’s knives and forks, 24 carvers and forks, 36 table knives and forks and 36 dessert knives and forks, to supply the cutlery for the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5.

Jan. 29, 1869. From Nelson, New Zealand, £2—Feb. 11. From C. & M. P. £100, with £81 8s. 3d. for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, and £20 for myself.—Apr. 20. From Liverpool £10, with £5 for the support of the Orphans and £5 for myself, saved in one year by not smoking cigars.

May 26, 1869. The New Orphan House No. 4, was opened on Nov. 5, 1868. Since then we have received into No. 4, or to fill up some vacancies in No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, 420 Orphans. In order to accomplish this, and to dispatch all the work, connected with the other three houses for 1,150 Orphans, the amount of labour, which has fallen on my principal assistants, and especially on my dear wife and her sister, Miss Groves, has been so very great, that I have been obliged to delay the opening of the New Orphan House No. 5, until No. 4 shall have been filled. It is difficult for those who are not acquainted with the practical working of such an Institution, to enter into the great amount of labour connected therewith; but were they to see the many thousands of articles of house-linen, and the many thousands of articles of clothing required for only one such Orphan House for 450 children, they would easily understand why we have not yet been able to open No. 5. I only further add, that as we are very particular in investigating the cases of the Orphans, for whose admission application has been made, the filling of only one such house with Orphans, entails several thousand letters. The fitting up and furnishing of No. 5 has been steadily gone on with for about 6 months; with the help of God it will soon be completed, and that house also will be opened ere long; for it is the joy and delight of my heart to do to the utmost what can be done to receive yet many more destitute Orphans.

May 26, 1870. On Jan. 6, 1870, the long looked for, and the long prayed for day, arrived, when the last house also, the New Orphan House No. 5, could be opened. The immense work connected with sending out Orphans from the other four houses, filling up again the vacancies thus made, and going on with all the other parts of the work, had made it impracticable to open this house sooner. Since the opening of No. 5 there have been received into it 153 Orphans. Receptions into this house since January 6th have been hindered by the measles and scarlet fever with which it pleased the Lord to visit some of the Orphans; for, though those diseases were through God’s kindness in a mild form, yet we could not move a number of Infant Girls, intended to be moved into No. 5, until these diseases were gone. In addition to this, it pleased God, to remove from my side my beloved wife, who for 34 years had been a most valuable helper to me in the Orphan Work, from its earliest beginning, in November 1835. This event, on account of her position in the work, in addition to the measles and the scarlet fever, has retarded the filling up of No. 5. What Mrs. Müller was to the Orphan Work, and how greatly I need the help of God, to have her place supplied, in some degree, by other helpers, the reader may learn from the account I gave of her work in her funeral sermon. "Funeral Sermon of the late Mrs. George Müller, by her bereaved husband. J. Nisbet & Co., London: Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, 34, Park Street, Bristol. Price Two Pence."

March 5, l874. Both houses, No. 4 and No. 5, have now been for years in operation, No. 4 since Nov. 1868 and No. 5 since the beginning of the year 1870, and above 1,200 Orphans have been already received into them, and month after month more are received, as the Orphans are sent out from them as apprentices or servants. Moreover, all the expenses in connexion with their being built, fitted up and furnished were met to the full, as the demands arose, and, after all had been paid, there was left a balance of several thousand pounds, which is being used for keeping the houses in repair. See, esteemed Reader, how abundantly God answered our prayers, and how plain it is, that we were not mistaken, after we had patiently and prayerfully sought to ascertain His will. Be encouraged, therefore, yet further and further to confide in the Living God.

We proceed now to the next Chapter.