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Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 5.4 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER IV.

 

In this chapter will be found the statistics of the Institution, from May 26, 1850, to March 5, 1874, as to the number of the attendants, year after year, in the Day Schools, Sunday Schools and Adult Schools; also how much was expended year by year on the schools, and the results of our labours, in the way of spiritual blessings, in so far as they are known. Further, it will be stated how many copies of the Holy Scriptures were circulated year by year, at what cost, and the spiritual results of these operations, if any have come before us. Further, how many Missionaries at Home and Abroad were assisted, year after year; how much was expended on this part of the work; and what were the spiritual results of these Operations. Further, it will be stated, how many religious Tracts and Books were circulated, year by year; at what cost; and what has been the spiritual result of these labours, in so far as it is known. Lastly, how many Orphans were received and dismissed, year by year; how many each year were under our care; at what cost; and what were the spiritual results of this part of the work. In addition to these various points, statements of a miscellaneous character will be added, which may be of interest to the reader.

From May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution four Day Schools, with 181 children in them, and six other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 175 children, was entirely supported by the Institution, and six others were assisted. One Adult School, with 72 scholars, was entirely supported, and two others were assisted. The total amount of means, expended on all these schools, during the year, was £385 14s. 8½d. If the reader will observe how the Lord was pleased afterwards to increase the School Department, he will see, that it has been multiplied since then more than ten times. —During that year we circulated 2,077 Bibles, 1,222 New Testaments, 151 copies of the Psalms, and 316 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds, spent on this Object, was £521 7s. 1½d.

I will now give a few instances in which the circulation of the Holy Scriptures was blessed, in order that believers thereby may be encouraged, prayerfully and diligently to continue to circulate them, and, at the same time, look out for blessing upon their labour. A brother in the Lord from Devonshire wrote to me in December 1856: "I thank you, my dear Sir, for your kind offer in reference to a supply of Bibles, etc. I hope to avail myself of it, when in need. I have just received an account of conversion through giving one of your Bibles. A sailor, who had been at sea in the Royal Navy many years, returned to this his native place, six months ago, and, because of his good behaviour, he was drafted into the Preventive Service, and stationed in the neighbourhood of W—. While he was in this neighbourhood I sent for him. He came to my house, I spoke to him about his soul, and the precious blood of Christ. He kneeled down while I commended him to God. I then presented him with a copy of God’s truth, supplied to me by you, with the request that he would read a portion every day, which he promised me to do. He has sent several most beautiful letters, stating, that, in reading that Bible, which is his constant companion, God gave him not only to feel he was a sinner, but that the blood of Jesus Christ, His Son, cleanseth from all sin. And further, that, being justified by faith, he has peace with God, through our Lord Jesus Christ. His wife is also deeply concerned. They have been found out and visited by a sub-officer, who reads and prays with them very frequently. This same brother, in a letter of March 4, 1857, refers again to this circumstance, and states that the wife was also converted through reading that Bible that was given to that sailor.

A brother in the Lord wrote to me that he had it in his heart to visit from house to house, in a large manufacturing town in Yorkshire, and, if possible, to supply each house with a tract, and to seek out persons who were destitute of copies of the Holy Scriptures. I supplied him, therefore, with 10,000 Gospel Tracts and 30 Bibles, and subsequently with 127 more Bibles, and finally with 10,000 more Tracts and 74 Bibles. I now give two letters from this brother in the Lord, to show both the spirit in which the work is done, and the way in which it is done, and likewise that such kind of service is not in vain. * * * * "Feb. 28, 1857. My dear Brother, In answer to your question, I mean, all the last sent Bibles are gone, the 127; and since they have been given, I have given away amongst the poor 15 copies of the New Testament, which the Lord gave me the means of obtaining. I have had some assistance from other saints, amongst us in scattering the precious seed. The weather has been very favourable for the work. ‘Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might.’ ‘I must’ (says Jesus) ‘work the works of Him that sent me, while it is day; the night cometh when no man can work.’ This has been the feeling that has moved my heart, in the circulation of these Bibles, without losing any time. I have come home at night so wearied, that I have had to stop by the way, and lean against something to rest myself; but the sympathy of Him, who sat on the well, wearied with His journey, was sweet. I remain, dear brother, yours affectionately in Him * * * *." "* * * * April 24, 1857. My dear Brother in Christ, All the Bibles are not yet distributed. This has arisen from the fact of finding so many openings for testifying of Jesus to poor sinners, in the course of visiting from house to house, where I found the Lord had made an impression by His truth on the minds of any, I have been led to repeat the visits, setting forth Jesus as the way to God. This has prevented me getting over so much ground rapidly; yet this, I am persuaded, has been of God. In the course of one week two poor men were brought to receive the Lord Jesus, by the Lord enabling me to set before them the Gospel of the Grace of God. Ignorant almost as heathens, when God opened their eyes to see the work of Jesus, how they gloried in the blood of Christ! One of them reminds me much of the Tract called ‘Poor Richard.’ Both were afflicted. One, who yesterday fell asleep in Jesus, how he was lying on his bed, crying in delight, ‘Oh the blood of Christ, the blood of Christ; I depend on none but Jesus.’ When I first visited him, he knew not even the theory of the way of salvation, and had no Bible. I gave him one you sent, which he read as long as he was able, and the Tracts were used to strengthen his faith. Another case, where I testified of Jesus and directed it all to the husband, I found afterwards that the wife was brought to receive Jesus as well as her husband. Another case where I meant the Gospel for the husband, because he was poorly, I found the wife seemed to have received it while the husband remained in darkness. Meeting cases of this kind, I have thought it good to attend to them, and have had much joy in seeing God opening blind eyes, and poor sinners casting themselves on the work of Jesus. ‘There is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth’; and we too share the joy, etc."

In a similar way have many servants of Christ, by going from cottage to cottage, from court to court, from ship to ship, etc., sought in many parts of the world, for many years, to help me in circulating the Holy Scriptures, making it their particular business to find out the very poorest of persons who desired to possess a copy, but were not able to pay for it. With this is also combined the endeavour to discover cases in which, very poor and aged persons, had not a Bible printed in large type, in order to furnish them with a copy.

From May 20, 1850, to May 26, 1857, we expended on Missionary Operations, £3,177 17s. 11½d. By this sum seventy-four labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

During this year, intelligence was received, that very many in Canada, British Guiana, India, China, the United States, Sardinia, Switzerland, Belgium, France, etc., had been brought to the knowledge of the Lord through the instrumentality of the missionaries, who were assisted by the funds of the Institution; but it would take up too much space here, to give again the letters, which were printed in the Report for 1857. This only would I say, that there is good reason to believe, that these dear servants of Christ had been used in the conversion of hundreds of precious souls, and that thus our prayers had been answered.

From May 20, 1850 to May 26, 1857, there were more than One Million and Three Hundred Thousand Tracts and books (exactly 1,313,301) circulated; and on this Object was expended £975 18s. 7½d. During that year there was not, as for many years previously, a single open door set before us, where we could profitably have circulated the Holy Scriptures, or given away Tracts, but the Lord was also pleased to enable us to enter those doors. These opportunities had during the previous years increased more and more, but the Lord was also pleased, along with them, to give increased means.

As we had been enabled, day by day, to seek the blessing of the Lord upon this part of the work likewise, so He was pleased, during the year from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, also, to grant His blessing to rest upon it. I will now relate some of the instances in which the Tracts were blessed.

A brother from Sunderland writes thus: "I have to tell you of a case of true conversion, which I have just found out, by one of your Tracts delivered among the mob at the Sunday bands. We have not laboured in vain, and I expect to hear of more. We intend to go on Sunday and Tuesday, and to have a large distribution on the race-course here. May they be blessed! The Tract in question is headed " The Substitute."

A brother labouring in Devonshire writes to me thus, on May 15th, 1857: "You will be pleased to hear of a case of blessing through the Tracts. Yesterday fortnight I determined, notwithstanding the distance, to visit T., a secluded village. I had once been there before and carried two packets of Tracts. The Misses F. told me that the Tract "Peace with God," had been blessed to an old woman of 82 years of age. The words which gave her liberty were, "if you cannot say it, God can," referring to the text. She is full of joy, and having been a servant to Sir —’s family, residing in their almshouses, bears a precious testimony to these Tracts, the whole of which she reads with avidity, much to the annoyance of some people who cannot understand, why she could not get much joy out of other things.

A brother residing at Hull writes on May the 24th, 1857, thus: "This week we heard of one poor soul, a German, who died in the infirmary here a few days ago, who seemed to have received real blessing through one of your German Tracts. It is rarely we know what is the fruit of their distribution; but this poor fellow was a dying man, when he came into the hospital, and, being a foreigner, remained there till he died."

The following information was sent from Somersetshire: "In returning you my most sincere thanks for the liberal supply of Tracts, I am happy to say, that, without a single exception, they have been most thankfully received by the people. I also feel great pleasure in informing you, that God, in a very gracious manner, has caused the reading of one of them, viz.: "Christ between the two thieves," to be blessed to the salvation of a poor old man, of whom there is every reason to think that he is a child of grace. Many other instances there are in which the "Serpent of Brass," "Naaman the Syrian," and others have been of great benefit to many individuals, in some producing conviction of sin, in others strengthening their faith in Christ. A further supply of Tracts from you would be most thankfully received."

The following instance may show, in what a variety of ways these Tracts are circulated. A brother in Scotland writes thus on May the 15th, 1857, "Yesterday I received by railway the Tracts, as mentioned in your last. I am most thankful for them. They are a great boon, and I trust they will turn out to be a great blessing to many souls. At our steeple-chase I sent off and dispersed among the returning crowds no fewer than 7,000. This was 2,500 more than I had done at any previous period. I had more helpers in their distribution. We had with us 9,250 Tracts."

In like manner have the Tracts been distributed at agricultural shows, fairs, and races; also in various places the passengers of the Sunday excursion trains have been met by Christian men, who have offered to each of them a Tract. Likewise in certain places the passengers of the government trains have been frequently supplied. In other places all the passengers of emigrant vessels have each a Tract given to them. All this has been done in addition to visiting from house to house, from court to court, from vessel to vessel. Also, frequently, the assembled persons who had the Gospel preached to them in the open air have had a Tract given to them afterwards. On these labours we seek the Lord’s blessing, and we fully expect His blessing. Day after day, and year after year, our heart has been drawn out in prayer to God upon this part of the work, and, therefore, we take this as an earnest that God will own and bless it; yea, we expect to meet thousands of souls in the day of Christ, who were brought to know Him and to believe in Him, through these Tracts and Books, of whose conversion we hear nothing on earth. Nearly a million of Tracts and little Books were, during the year from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, given away gratuitously. We do not, however, depend upon the number of copies which are circulated, but upon the blessing of the Lord; yet, at the same time, we would seek to labour on, embracing every opportunity, just as if everything depended upon the number we circulated.

How greatly this part of the work was already in 1857 increased will be seen, if it be remembered, that during the first period of its existence, we circulated 19,609 within 18 months, and in this period we circulated 1,313,301 within one year. The Lord be praised for His help in every part of the work, and for His kindness in this particular also!

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, there were 299 Orphans in the New Orphan House No. 1. During the year, there were admitted into it 30 Orphans, making 329 in all. Of these 329, one died during the year, the dear girl who died in the faith, whose letters have been given in this Narrative. Only one died! I desire to dwell upon this with gratitude to the Lord. God helping us, we desire to trace His hand in everything; at the same time, the longer I am engaged in the Orphan work, and see the effects which are produced by regular habits, cleanliness, nourishing food, proper clothing, good ventilation, a healthy locality, etc., the more I am convinced, that at least one-half of the children among the poor who die, die for want of proper attention. I do not state this to find fault with them; I rather mention it in the way of pity and commiseration, and, if it may be, to draw the attention of the public to the fact. If anywhere the mortality among children should be great, humanly speaking, it should be so among us, because we generally receive the children very young, and also, because the very fact of these children, while so young, having been bereaved of both parents by death, shows that their parents, generally speaking, were of a very sickly constitution. Indeed the greater part of the Orphans whom we have received, lost one or both parents through consumption. And yet, though such is the case, we have seen again and again, how children who came to us in a most diseased state, have, by the blessing of God, through proper attention, been brought out of that state, and are now very healthy. But again and again we receive children whose countenances at once show that they have not had sufficient food, or were in other respects greatly neglected.—Three of the Orphans were received back again by near relatives, who, by that time, were able to provide for them. 14 boys were fitted out and apprenticed at the expense of the Institution. 12 girls were sent to service, each having been provided with an outfit, at the expense of the Establishment. Several of those who left the Orphan House, we had the joy of sending out as believers. These 30 vacancies, thus occasioned, left on May 20, 1857, only 299 Orphans under our care, being one less than our number. The total expense for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, during the year, ending May 26, 1857, was £5,076 0s. 5d.; and the total expense for the support of the Orphans, was £3,893 6s. 2½d.

The Lord was pleased greatly to bless, during that year, our labours among the Orphans.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858. During this year there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution four Day Schools, with 206 children in them. In addition to these four Day Schools, seven others were assisted. One Sunday School with 157 children was entirely supported, and eleven others were assisted. One Adult School with 95 scholars was entirely supported. From March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, there were 6,440 children in the Day Schools, 3,068 in the Sunday School, and 2,807 persons in the Adult School, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; besides the Tens of Thousands in the Schools which were assisted, of which no Report is asked, as to numbers. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 12,315 souls were brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these various Schools, up to May 26, 1858. The amount of means spent on the Schools during the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, was £381 15s. 0¼d.; and from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, £8,320 8s. 4¼d.

During this year there were circulated 2,521 Bibles, 1,153 New Testaments, 107 copies of the Psalms, and 182 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There were circulated, from the commencement of the Institution, up to May 26, 1858, altogether 20,722 Bibles, 12,655 New Testaments, 565 copies of the Psalms, and 1,442 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during this year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £445 14s. 10½d. The total amount spent from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, is £4,853 2s. 1d.

For the encouragement of believers who seek to serve the Lord in circulating the Scriptures, I relate the following case, communicated to me in October, 1857, by a brother in the Lord, who helps me in the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts, and who labours in the West of England.

"A young woman has lately returned to this neighbourhood, in an advanced state of consumption, from P—, where she had been in service. She was very thoughtless about her soul. Though she was well able to read, I found out she had no Bible. I commended her to God in prayer, and marked the 51st Psalm and the 3rd chapter of the Gospel by John, and gave her a Bible. She says that, in reading these two passages, God gave her the peace which passeth understanding. She is at present giving the most decided evidence of conversion to God."

During the year, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, was expended on Missionary operations £3,531 12s. 4d., whereby 82 labourers in the Gospel, to a greater or less degree, were assisted.

Though the Orphan work required during this year by far more means, than during any previous year, since it had been in existence; yet the Lord enabled me to enter into every door which He was pleased to open before me as it regards the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and to expend several hundred pounds more upon Missionary objects, than during any previous year. But while I was glad to be able to assist 82 Servants of Christ, in various parts of the world, I am especially rejoiced and thankful, that it pleased the Lord to own their labours greatly, so that during no former year I had more cheering accounts than during this year.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, is £25,325 19s. 10d.

From May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, we circulated more than One Million and Three Hundred and Thirty-four Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 1,334,791), at an expense of £785 6s. 4½d. The sum total, which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1858, amounts to £5,421 1s. 7¼d. The total number of Tracts and Books, circulated during that time, was above Seven Millions and Forty-five Thousand.

I will now relate some of the instances in which the Tracts were blessed, in the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858.

A brother in the Lord, labouring in Somersetshire, writes: "A woman between 80 and 90 years of age, (through the tract called ‘The Substitute’), who was altogether ignorant of her real state, has been led, I trust, to cast her soul upon Jesus, for the forgiveness of sins."

A brother in Sunderland writes: "We should be glad of another supply of tracts at your convenience; and Bibles of any kind would at all times be acceptable. There has just been a decided case of usefulness by one of the tracts, ‘The Brazen Serpent.’ I doubt not, many more are blessed." The same brother again writes: "I have the pleasure of adding that we have manifest fruit from the distribution of tracts. I have just heard of two cases, one an ungodly pilot, to whom Mr. L. gave a tract on Sunday morning; another case in which Mr. R. gave one, entitled ‘The Compassion of God,’ which was blessed to the woman’s soul, who is now proposed for communion with us."

A brother in Devonshire writes, July 7, 1857: "I thank you for the 6,000 tracts. I have found a special blessing to accompany Bunyan’s ‘Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ.’ I will relate to you what occurred on Wednesday last. Several weeks before an inquirer, to whom I had given a copy of this tract, and finding it a blessing to her, sent it to a dying friend of hers in London, and wished from me another copy for herself. On Saturday morning I called on a sister in the Lord, leaving for this inquirer the desired tract. I was about leaving, when a stranger to me entered, to whom I gave another tract, and spoke a little to her of the Lord, but she was quite silent. I afterwards learned that this second inquirer was reading Bunyan’s tract with great interest, the copy I had left for the first; and, on Wednesday last, again calling at the house, as the sister living there was relating to me the account, she said, ‘There she comes.’ Instead of the former timidity she at once confessed Christ in a manner one could not doubt to be genuine. She told me that, when I had seen her, she was anxious, but did not think herself fit to receive the promises; but that Bunyan’s tract had been blessed to her, particularly the hymn at the end ‘If you tarry till you are better, you will never come at all!’ I was filled with joy at seeing what the Lord had wrought in her soul." The same brother writes a day later: "I afterwards learnt that the person in London, to whom ‘Come and Welcome’ had been sent, departed last week, as it is hoped, to be with Jesus."

About a million of Tracts and little Books were, during the year, given away gratuitously.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, there were 299 Orphans in the New Orphan House, No. 1.

During the year there were admitted into it, and into the new house for 400, altogether 219 Orphans; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1858, 518 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 518 there died 4. Only four! For this we desire to feel grateful, especially when we consider that by far the greater part of these Orphans are the offspring of very diseased parents. A short time since, when examining the certificates, sent on behalf of the children for whose admission application had been made, I found that, in five successive cases, both parents of all the children, i.e. all the ten parents, had died in consumption. To speak within bounds, at least two-thirds, if not three-fourths of the parents, whose children are now under our care, died in consumption. On this account the very small mortality among the children is a matter of thankfulness to God. Two out of these four Orphans gave us great comfort in their removal, as they bore full and distinct testimony as to their trust in the Lord Jesus for the salvation of their souls. Two of the Infants were sent back to their relatives, who were able to care for them; also 1 boy of such an age as that he might be apprenticed, and 1 girl of an age to earn her own bread, whom the near relatives desired to have, feeling it their duty to provide for her. Besides this, 3 of the elder girls were at the expense of the Institution fitted out, and placed in service; and 8 boys were at the expense of the Institution fitted out and apprenticed; so that there were only 499 Orphans actually in the two houses on May 26, 1858.

May 26, 1858. During the past twenty-two years the Spirit of God has been again and again working among the Orphans who were under our care, so that very many of them were brought to the knowledge of the Lord; but we never had so great a work, and, at the same time, one so satisfactory, within so short a time, as during the past year. I will enter somewhat into details, for the benefit of the reader. There are 140 elder girls in the New Orphan House No. 1. Of these there were at the beginning of the last period ten who were considered to be believers. Some of my readers may remember, that certain letters are printed, written by an Orphan, Caroline Bailey, who died on May 26, 1857. The death of this beloved girl, who had known the Lord several months before she fell asleep, seems to have been used by the Lord as a means of answering in a goodly measure our daily prayers for the conversion of the Orphans. It pleased God at the beginning of the last period, mightily to work among the Orphans, so that all at once, within a few days, without any apparent cause, except it be the peaceful end of the beloved Caroline Bailey, more than 50 of the 140 girls were brought to be under concern about their souls, and some with deep conviction of sin accompanying it, so that they were exceedingly distressed. And how is it now? my readers may ask; for young persons are often, apparently, much concerned about the things of God, but these impressions pass away. True, dear reader, I have seen this myself, having had to do with many thousands of children and young persons. Had, therefore, this work among the Orphans begun within the last few days, or even weeks, I should have passed it over in silence; but more than a year has now elapsed since it commenced, and it will, therefore, give joy to the Godly reader to hear, that, in addition to those ten, who were previously believers, and of whom one has been sent to service, there are 23 Orphan girls, respecting whom, for several months, there has been no doubt as to their being believers; two besides, died in the faith, within the year; and there are 38 more who are awakened and under concern about their souls, but respecting whom we cannot speak as yet so decidedly. All this regards only one branch of the Orphan Establishment, the 140 elder girls of the House No. 1. In addition to this, I am glad, also, to be able to state that among the other girls in the New House No. 2, and among the boys also, some are interested about the things of God; yea, our labours begin already to be blessed to the hearts of some of the newly received Orphans.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, amounted to £5,513 5s. 7½d., and we also spent, for the building, fitting up, and furnishing of the New Orphan House No. 2, £17,419 1s. 7½d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859.

During this year we had still only Four Day Schools connected with the Institution, entirely supported by its funds; for at that time it pleased the Lord to lay still more and more upon my heart the care for destitute Orphans in particular; but, after five large Orphan Houses had been built, with an accommodation for 2,050 Orphans in them, it pleased the Lord, just in the same way, to bestow upon me the great honour and privilege to care for the instruction of children in Scriptural Day Schools, as the Reader has seen already, and will further see. In the four Day Schools, there were, from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, 242 children. In addition to the entire support of these four Day Schools, there were seven such Schools assisted. In the one Sunday School entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were 143 children; and nine other Sunday Schools were assisted. There was only one Adult School connected then with the Institution, in which there were 14 adults. During this year came before us several instances in which the instruction, received in our Schools, had been blessed after the pupils had long left the Schools. A young man died a consistent Christian in Barbadoes, who many years before was under our care; another became decided for the Lord, though far away at Philadelphia; another in Cornwall; another, who gave us great sorrow for a long time, and who lived near London, became a believer, the instruction, formerly received being blessed at last, though only after many years. The amount expended on the Schools, during this year, is £439 8s.—During this year we circulated 2,347 Bibles, 1,311 New Testaments, 91 copies of the Psalms, and 186 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. On this object was expended £430 7s. 7½d. During this year we expended on Missionary operations £4,149 17s. 5d., whereby 91 labourers in the Gospel were assisted.

The Orphan work required during the year, from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, for current expenses, far more than ever before; but, notwithstanding, I was enabled to respond in full to every application which was made for Bibles and Tracts; and, in the way of Missionary operations, there was expended £618 5s. 1d. more than during any previous year. While, however, it is to me a cause of thankfulness, that the Lord allowed me to increase this part of the Institution more and more, and to make it increasingly, as its name indicates, an Institution for Abroad as well as for Home; yet that, which still more calls for thanksgiving, is the fact, that I received from the greater part of the brethren, whom I sought to assist, the most encouraging letters, regarding their labours. Many hundreds of souls were again, during that year also, brought to the knowledge of our adorable Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these His servants. I received several hundred letters from them during the year, very many of which are of such deep interest, and so full of cause for praise and thanksgiving, that they would in themselves form a valuable volume; but I cannot give any extracts from them, on account of the size of this Narrative.

During this year, from May 28, 1858 to May 26, 1859, was spent on the circulation of Tracts £992 19s. 6½d. There were circulated above One Million Eight Hundred and Eighty Five Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 1,885,401). I will now refer to a few instances in which the Tracts were blessed.

A brother, labouring in Devonshire, who has often been supplied with large quantities of tracts, writes on March 7, 1859: "Will you kindly send me some Tracts. I have heard of several cases in which they have been useful."

Another brother, labouring in Cornwall, writes on January 16, 1859: "You will be interested to hear, that a brother in the Lord, once resident here, but now residing at B. A., some time since, on finding a comrade, a carpenter of the same mine of which he is the engineer, not at home, left a tract fixed to the door handle. A few days after, the friend named L. K. said, "O—, do you know some one left a tract on my door the other day, and it was a word exactly in the right minute;’ and then declared that it had led him to see the need of a Saviour. This occurred a few months since; but yesterday I walked over, and O— told me the title of the tract, which before he had not known. It is a leaf tract, having the last verse of the 6th chapter of Romans for a heading: ‘The wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.’ The new convert is quite alive to the truth, and much interested in reading anything that may aid his progress."

Another brother, labouring in London, writes on Dec. 1, 1858: "I awaited this post, that I might enclose the accompanying letters, which you will be pleased to read, the fruit of giving a tract in the streets of London, so many hundreds of which I have been enabled to circulate through the liberal supplies you have sent me. I may also add, that this poor sister’s happiest moments are now spent in reading one of the Bibles you last sent me. I hope and believe that we shall hereafter see many who have been similarly blessed through the Gospel Tracts. I met this poor woman in the summer, and through the goodness of the Lord was enabled to take care of her until her illness, a few weeks since, when I got her into the infirmary of St. Pancras Workhouse."

I read the letters of the convert with much interest. She was just on the point of becoming a Roman Catholic, when the tract was put into her hand, which was used of God to lead her to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus.

A brother of the Lord in Exeter, who for many years past has been supplied with large quantities of tracts, writes on Dec. 1, 1858: "I am happy to say that the Circus, which was opened in this city, has been closed, and that the company is gone, who, according to reports, and the substantial character of the building, intended to continue in Exeter through the winter months. Great efforts were unitedly established by Christians here, to neutralize the objects of the Company, and to persuade persons not to go to their performances. These were by the posting of large bills, and the printing and distribution of tracts, which were given away in the neighbourhood in large quantities, and even at the very doors of the Circus, greatly to the mortification of the company, one of whom took up the subject in the public papers. It is a glorious defeat of Satan’s plans, and for which we offer God the praise. Some hundreds of your last supply to us were circulated there, and one of them put into the hands of the clown (the writer of the paper to which I referred), who promised to read it carefully in his own room after the close of that evening’s performance, which he was then about to engage in.

On Oct. 25, 1858, a brother writes from Sunderland: "Our usual half yearly fair has just passed over, when, with several beloved brethren, I helped to distribute a large quantity of tracts. The brethren came to my house, when we asked a blessing upon our intended work, and then went forth, expecting blessing to follow. Already one person has come forward, awakened about his soul, with the tract which awakened him, and I hope many more may be saved from the wrath to come."

Another brother writes from Sunderland on March 7, 1859: "Another of your tracts has been a blessing to a man and to a woman."

A Christian lady writes on Nov. 22, 1858: "‘The aged Swiss Peasant’ was read last week to a deeply attentive audience of the very poor. A striking sense of solemnity prevailed during the reading. An aged man present was observed to be much affected; his neighbour thought him ill, and wished to remove him home; but he said he would like to stay and hear the ladies. He spread out his withered hands to the company, and entreated them to accept the offer of salvation, saying that he had been a great sinner, but that he believed God would have mercy upon him. The scene was very touching, and many wept; for he was known to be a great sinner. Fervent prayer was afterwards offered on his behalf, and for all present, under a sense that ability was given thus to plead, that, at the eleventh hour, this aged one might be snatched as a brand from the burning. On attempting to rise from his seat, it was found that he had no power to use one leg, and he was carried at once to bed. It was thought he was slightly paralyzed. He recovered the use of his limbs the next day, and subsequently told the lady who read the narrative, that, while she was reading, he felt so much, that it overpowered him. He said, that during the night he found such a heavy burden on his conscience, that he could have no rest till he had taken it to the Saviour. He was so far restored as to be able to attend the Cottage reading again on the Lord’s day (yesterday), when the tract ‘Poor Richard’ was read, and again ability was granted earnestly to plead for each one present."

A brother at Hull writes, April 25, 1859: "I am again without tracts, except a few German ones. All which you sent have been circulated; and, amongst other results, we have to thank God for three poor girls of the town, who, I trust, are rescued from their miserable ways. Two of them seem really converted to God; the other, though not converted, seems most anxious to live a better life. Oh! for divine wisdom and love to know how to serve such. Oh! for Christ’s life manifested in us in everything."

A brother, who labours in Wiltshire, wrote to me, on Aug. 4, 1858, at full length, respecting the conversion of a very great sinner, a young woman of 22 years old, who, by means of one of the tracts sent to him, had been brought to the peace and joy of the gospel, through faith in the Lord Jesus, and who afterwards fell asleep in much peace.

A brother at Exeter, whom I have been permitted to supply with many thousands of tracts, writes on August 27, 1858: "I desire to lay before you a little statement of the way in which the tracts you so kindly sent me have been disposed of. Before leaving my house for this work, I fall on my knees before the Lord, and ask His blessing to accompany me in my labour, that sinners may be made willing to receive the word of life, which is able to make them wise unto salvation through faith which is in Jesus Christ. I then go from house to house, and from room to room, in the dark streets, lanes, alleys, and courts, of this city; also I attend the fairs, markets, revels, wakes, and places of public amusement; also the fashionable walks of the pleasure seekers; also the railway platforms; so that wherever crowds of persons are found together, these I have distributed among them the word of life. I found two persons this week, to whom the Lord has blessed the labours of His unworthy servant. One has since found peace, the other is under deep conviction, yea, great distress of soul. And now, dear sir, what has been the cause of this consecration of my time and self to the Lord? it is through reading your Report for 1857. In going through that report, I was much like one that could not afford a penny a week for the Lord. I besought the Lord to give me more faith, and He heard and answered my prayer; so that, while at one time I could not afford any time or money for the Lord or His work, now, through His grace, I am enabled to give two days in the week, and sometimes more, to this work, besides paying a man to do my work in my absence; yet I have no Jack."

The same brother writes on May 10, 1859: "Will you permit me to give you a little account of the great Tract distribution of Easter week. Several Christians here held a united prayer meeting, to ask the Lord’s blessing on the distribution of tracts and preaching of the gospel; and twelve brethren, from various branches of the Church of Christ, went together to the fair, where about 10,000 persons were present, when in three days we distributed more than 20,000 Tracts. This work has not been without its happy result. The fields here are white to harvest. I should feel very thankful if you will send me more Tracts for the Lord’s work."

On May the 16th, 1859, the same brother writes: "I desire to acknowledge the receipt of 10,000 Tracts you so very kindly sent me for the Lord’s work here. May He abundantly bless their distribution to many poor sinners. Since I wrote to you last, I have heard of 27 persons to whom the Tracts were blessed which were distributed during the Easter week in this city."

Day after day, and year after year, my heart has been drawn out in prayer to God for this part of the work, and, therefore, we take this as an earnest that God will own and bless it; yea, I expect to meet thousands of souls in the day of Christ, who were brought to know Him and to believe in Him, through these tracts and books, though I should hear nothing of their conversion at present. Above Twelve Hundred Thousand Tracts and little Books were, during the year, given away gratuitously. We do not, however, depend upon the number of copies which are circulated, but upon the blessing of the Lord; yet, at the same time, we would seek to labour on, embracing every opportunity, just as if everything depended upon the number we circulate.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, there were 499 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 212 Orphans; so that there would have been on May 26, 1859, 711 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 711, seven died. Only seven! This I desire especially to notice, with gratitude to the Lord—One of the girls was taken by her relatives to Australia, as they were going to emigrate, and wished to provide for this child.—Another girl and a boy, who had been 8 years and 3 months under our care, and who were now ready to be sent out, were received back again by a relative, now able to provide further for them.—Fifteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, and were also each of them provided with an outfit.—Thirteen girls were sent out to service, each of them having been provided with an outfit.—To one of the Orphans, who had been 14 years and 6 months under our care, and who for more than 11 years out of that time had been a believer, I gave a situation in the New Orphan House No. 1; so that on May 26, 1859, there were only 672 Orphans in the two houses.

May 26, 1859. Though, during this year, we had not so great and so sudden a work of the Spirit of God going on among the Orphans, as during the previous year, when, within a few days, above 50 out of one department of 140 girls were suddenly brought under deep concern about their souls; yet, the blessing of the Lord was not withheld even spiritually. There are already many caring about the things of God among the 424 Orphans who were received within the last eighteen months, and who ask it, as a privilege, to be allowed, in the summer, to take their Bibles with them to bed, so that, should they awake early in the morning, before the bell is rung, they may be able to read them. Out of the 13 girls, who were sent to service, 9 had been believers for some time before they left the Establishment.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, amounted to £6,974 17s. 0½d.; and there was expended besides, of the Building Fund, £3,983 17s. 2½d. for the Orphan work.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860.

During this year there were four Day-schools entirely supported by the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, with 339 children in them. In addition to the entire support of these four Day-schools, eight other Day-schools were assisted. One Sunday-school was entirely supported, with 160 children in it; and seven others were assisted. One Adult school, with 48 scholars in it, was entirely supported. During no previous year had we so many instances brought before us, in which our former instructions were blessed, as this year; and as, on many accounts, it was the most remarkable of all the previous years of the existence of the Institution, so in this particular also; for instance upon instance was brought before us, in which young men and young women, once under our instruction, were, by the power of the Holy Spirit, enabled now at the last, to stand manifestly on the Lord’s side, through faith in our Lord Jesus. But this is not all. We had, during the past year, as far as we were able to judge, more manifest blessing in the way of conversion among the children in the schools, than during any former year since the Institution had been in existence. In the schools in Bristol there were 37 of the children converted. We thanked God for it, and were yet further encouraged by this blessing to go on in our labours.

There was expended on the Schools £515 4s. 4d. From May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, we circulated 1,699 Bibles, 1,134 New Testaments, 63 Psalms, and 248 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended, on this object, during the year, £398 3s. 7d.

As an encouragement to my fellow-believers, I relate the following instance of blessing, through the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, in answer to our daily prayers, with which we follow the copies of the Word of God which are sent out. The facts were communicated to me in a letter, dated London, Oct. 30, 1859, by a Godly man, whom I have supplied with Bibles and Tracts, for gratuitous circulation. "I have been hesitating to write to you, knowing your hands are full of important and blessed work, and thinking it would be an addition to your already many engagements. But now I have it pressing on my heart, especially because I have to relate an interesting case, in which the Lord has begun to work in a family through one of the Bibles kindly sent by you to me this year. On Oct. 2 (1859), I found the family, poor and in need of a Bible. This was taken, and given at the door, with a few words spoken to the conscience of Mr. S. He took the Bible upstairs to read. The first words which met his eyes were these: ‘The wicked walk on every side.’ These words pierced his heart like an arrow from God, and made him feel his guilt and danger. Five days after, the Lord took his youngest child, an only son; four or five days after this, he himself was brought home ill. He is weeping under a sense of guilt, but has not found peace yet. Through the introduction of that Bible, the Lord seems to be working in two or three families in the same house. I trust it may prove like seed, sown into good ground. The 10,000 Tracts you also sent me, have been scattered in almost all parts of the East of London, etc."

From May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, was expended of the funds of the Institution £5,019 6s. 1d. on missionary objects, whereby 101 servants of Christ were aided to a greater or less degree.

During this year the current expenses for the support of the Orphans were greater than ever; the outgoings for the circulation of Tracts also, together with the expenses for the Schools, were greater than ever; and yet, in addition, I was enabled to expend on missionary operations £869 8s. 8d. more than during the previous year, though this part of the work had been increasing year by year, for more than twenty years. Thus the Institution, as its name indicates, practically became more and more the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. But while I desire to be truly grateful, for having been enabled to accomplish so much, simply in answer to prayer for means, in aiding a hundred servants of Christ to a greater or less degree, that, which especially calls for gratitude, is the fact, that, during this year, by far more souls, as far as it is known, were brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these labourers in the Gospel, than during any previous year. Many hundreds were converted through them. I received about 600 letters from these brethren, and at least one half of that number recorded instances in which their labours had been blessed; but I must refrain here from giving any of them.

I now enter on the Tract work. We expended on this Object, during that year, £1,650 11s. 4d., and there were more than Two Millions Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand Tracts and Books circulated (exactly 2,562,001). About two millions of these Tracts were given away gratuitously.

I had heard from a believer at Belfast, to whom I had sent large supplies of tracts for gratuitous circulation, and who by means of other believers had spread them abroad in the North of Ireland, that many persons had been converted through these tracts, and I requested him to let me know some of the particulars. His reply is given in a letter dated April 28, 1860, as follows: "I have been asking the Lord what to write to you, and I send you Isaiah xxxii. 20, being disappointed in receiving the particulars from the persons who spoke to me of the Lord’s blessing on the tracts. They say He has blessed them, greatly blessed them, and they are delighted with the conciseness yet fulness of each; but the individual cases of conversion cannot be recapitulated."

A clergyman in the North of Ireland, to whom I had repeatedly before sent tracts, and now again 10,000 for gratuitous circulation, writes thus on Aug. 5, 1859 "An absence of a few days prevented me acknowledging earlier the arrival of the tracts. For so large and helpful a supply, it is impossible that I can return you any adequate thanks. They are just such as are needed, and are most eagerly read. One, the "Blood for a Token," was blessed some time ago to a young girl of about twelve; and no doubt each has its history, and in many cases has been, I trust, a savour of life unto life."

The next is an extract from a letter written by a brother who labours greatly in the circulation of Tracts in the North of Devon, and who writes thus on Oct. 17, 1859: "I can relate to you another instance in which the Lord has blessed the tract, Bunyan’s ‘Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ.’ A middle-aged woman, living very near to this house, had been observed to be very regular lately in attending the chapel, and to pay great attention to the Word spoken. I was asked to visit her, and learned that she had in secret been mourning for sin for two or three months, having been impressed by the tract, ‘Come and Welcome,’ which, she tells me, I gave her on the main road, though the circumstance has escaped my memory. However, it was the Lord’s ordering, and it is His work. I pointed her to Christ, and she is now rejoicing in Him, as I trust."

A brother in Norfolk writes thus on December 17, 1859: "My dear wife tells me that one of the little tracts, ‘It is the Blood that maketh Atonement,’ was made a blessing to a young man who died a little while since. We cannot tell how much good has been done, but I can tell of this."

A brother in the Lord labouring in the Gospel among sailors in the county of Durham, writes on Oct. 7, 1859: "During the last three months, three hopeful cases came to my notice among Prussian seamen. One of them found peace while I preached Jesus to him on board a Prussian ship. Your German tracts had been the means of impressing his mind greatly, so as to lead him to care for his soul and see his need of a Saviour."

The same brother writes on Jan. 18, 1860: "Your tracts sent to me to distribute have found their way into all parts of the world, and many instances came to my notice during the past year in which they had been blessed to the souls of sinners. Some were sent in letters to German soldiers serving in the East Indies, and have been blessed to their souls."

From Derbyshire I had, on Feb. 2, 1860, the following communication: "I have visited some fresh places since I last wrote, and have given thousands of tracts. I called yesterday at a house at A., where a woman says that the tracts I have given her helped her more than everything she has ever had. She also told me of a man, a relative, who visited her last summer, and read some of the tracts I had left her, and they were the means of his conversion."

From Exeter I had the following intelligence, in a letter dated March 22, 1860: "I have just heard of a tract, which I gave to a young lady, having been greatly blessed to her, in setting her mind at liberty as before the Lord. It was one of the tracts you sent me, and I am hopeful that in more cases around this place there will be fruit from this department of labour."

From another brother in Exeter, who also has often been supplied with tracts, I had the following communication on March 28, 1860, concerning tracts, which I had sent him, and of which he had given some to a brother of his for circulation: "On a former occasion I stated, that I had occasionally, during my affliction, forwarded some tracts to a brother of mine, a sincere servant of Christ, and who feels it his joy to labour in every way he can for the good of poor sinners. His residence is in D., and I frequently have the gratification of hearing from him of the heart-cheering and blessed results of his endeavours. A few days ago I received a letter, in which, alluding to the work and the distribution of the tracts, he says: ‘I have so much to say about them, that I hardly know where to begin. I gave a tract to a young man, which was the means of bringing him to Jesus. He is now a member of a church. We, including two or three pious young men, left tracts, some little while since, and a Bible, at a very low house at the back of N. C., where we had been several times. Now, there is a prayer-meeting held there three evenings every week, and much good is being done there.’"

A third brother in Exeter, who has often had large supplies of tracts, writes thus on April 4, 1860: "I desire thankfully to acknowledge the receipt of 9,900 tracts and 200 little books for children. I have lately found one soul brought to Jesus through a tract given her. She is very happy in the Lord. Many have received much blessing from the tracts; some have had comfort in sorrow, others have had their doubts removed, their faith strengthened, and their hopes confirmed. Our labour is not in vain in the Lord."

And again this same brother writes on May 15, 1860. "I desire to lay before you the way in which those 10,000 tracts you sent me last have been disposed of. Six thousand of them were distributed at the Easter fair here, the remaining 4,000 have been distributed on Lord’s days in the streets of this City and neighbourhood, at open air preachings, railway stations, etc. I must also lay before you some interesting account of the Lord’s blessing on the tracts. At the fair this year a young woman came in from the country to spend her time at the fair; she was met with a tract which was given her, and she read it. The Lord fastened conviction of sin on her conscience, she left the fair, came to a prayer-meeting with the tract in her hand, in deep distress of soul, and after some time found peace through faith in the precious blood of Jesus. I have had cause for special praise to the Lord this year in the case of many youths, who were last year at the fair, tearing up all the tracts they could get at; but this year the Lord has met with them, and those lads have been a great help to me in this work, by standing in the streets leading to the fair, distributing tracts, and speaking and warning those who were going there. The Lord has raised up many helpers here in this work, so that the Word of Life is circulated far and wide. He is also continuing to bless the tracts in an especial way to the young converts; for your tracts are eagerly sought after for instruction, and I feel much pleasure in going in and out among these young disciples. There is still much blessing here in this city. I should be glad to receive some tracts, as I am quite out of gospel tracts. Those little books you sent me were much prized by the children who have been converted. If you can spare some more I should be glad."

In August, 1859, a brother in the Lord and two sisters went out from our midst for missionary service, to labour in Penang, Straits of Malacca. We had especially asked the Lord, among other things, that He would be pleased to bless the labours of this little missionary party, whilst yet on board, and thus give them an earnest concerning their future service. I had also supplied them with tracts and bibles for the sailors. This prayer was answered. The wife of the missionary writes from Singapore, Jan. 19, 1860, thus with reference to their voyage, and blessing on one of the tracts: "I think I mentioned we had a meeting every night for reading the Word, the captain and officers not on duty being present, and with joy I have to tell you that the Lord has blessed the Word to the conversion of two, the chief officer and the carpenter, one a Welshman and the other a Scotchman, who for some months walked so as to give us real joy. I believe the chief officer was in a thoroughly self-righteous state, and the tract ‘Alonzo or the Vain Endeavour’ was used by the Lord in showing him his real state; and both he and the carpenter have again and again spoken of God’s goodness in bringing them on board the Ballarat. Three of the sailors were also impressed, and we hope that the Word spoken and the prayers treasured up for them will at last give us to rejoice over them."

I refer now briefly to the Orphan work.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, there were 672 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 70 Orphans; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1860, 742 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 742 three died. Only three! I notice this especially, with gratitude to the Lord. All three died as believers. One of the children was returned to her relatives, because they would not submit to the regulations of the Establishment. Three others were, after sufficient trial, returned to their relatives, because their state of health rendered them unfit to be inmates of an Institution in which the girls are trained for domestic service, and the boys for being apprenticed to a trade. Two boys were returned to their relatives to be apprenticed by them. One boy was expelled from the Institution, having been long borne with, and found too injurious to the other children. One girl, when old enough to be sent out to service, was returned to her grandmother, because we could not recommend her, though for nine years we had tried every means to fit her for service. Fourteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, 6 of whom were sent out as believers; and 16 girls were sent to service, having, as well as the apprentices, been supplied with a suitable outfit by the Institution. Of these 16 girls, 8 left us as believers, and some of the other eight were in a hopeful state. One of the girls, who had been for 2 years and 8 months a consistent believer, was sent to London, to be trained for a teacher, at the expense of her uncle. Thus it came, that, on May 26, 1860, there were just 700 Orphans under our care, our full number in the two houses, i.e. in No. 1—300, and in No. 2—400.

May 26, 1860. Day after day, and year after year, by the help of God, we labour in prayer for the spiritual benefit of the Orphans under our care. These our supplications, which have been for 24 years brought before the Lord concerning them, have been abundantly answered, in former years, in the conversion of hundreds from among them. We have, also, had repeated seasons in which, within a short time, or even all at once, many of the Orphans were converted. Such a season we had about 3 years since, when, within a few days, about 60 were brought to believe in the Lord Jesus; and such seasons we have had again twice during the past year. The first was in July, 1859, when the Spirit of God wrought so mightily in one school of 120 girls, as that very many, yea more than one-half, were brought under deep concern about the salvation of their souls. This work, moreover, was not a mere momentary excitement; but, after more than eleven months have elapsed, there are 31 concerning whom there is full confidence as to their conversion, and 32 concerning whom there is likewise a goodly measure of confidence, though not to the same amount, as regarding the 31. There are therefore 63 out of the 120 Orphans in that one school who are considered to have been converted in July, 1859. This blessed and mighty work of the Holy Spirit cannot be traced to any particular cause. It was, however, a most precious answer to prayer. As such we look upon it, and are encouraged by it to further waiting upon God.—The second season of the mighty working of the Holy Spirit among the Orphans, during the past year, was at the end of January and the beginning of February, 1860. The particulars of it are of the deepest interest; but I must content myself by stating, that this great work of the Spirit of God in January and February, 1860, began among the younger class of the children under our care, little girls of about 6, 7, 8 and 9 years old; then extended to the older girls; and then to the boys, so that within about ten days above 200 of the Orphans were stirred up to be anxious about their souls, and in many instances found peace immediately, through faith in our Lord Jesus. They at once requested to be allowed to hold prayer-meetings among themselves, and have had these meetings ever since. Many of them also manifested a concern about the salvation of their companions and relatives, and spoke or wrote to them, about the way to be saved.—Should the believing reader desire to know, how it has been with these children since the end of January and the beginning of February, our reply is, we have in most cases, cause for thankfulness. The present state of the 700 Orphans, spiritually, is, that there are 118 under our care, regarding whose conversion we have full confidence, 89 regarding whom we have also confidence, though not to that full degree, as concerning the 118; and 53 whom we consider in a hopeful state. To these 260 are to be added the 14 who were sent out as believers, and the three who died in the faith during the past year. It is to be remembered, that very many of the children in the Orphan Houses are quite young, as we have received them from 4 months old and upward.—During no year have we had greater cause for thanksgiving on account of the spiritual blessing among the children, than during the last; and yet we look for further and greater blessing still.

There was expended for the support of the Orphans, from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, £7,699 13s. 11½d., and £2,428 5s. 6½d. was expended in connexion with the building of the Orphan Houses.

I enter now upon the year from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861. The total of the expenses during this year, for the various objects of the Institution, amounted to £24,700 16s. 4d. So greatly was already, by this time, that work enlarged, which had so small and insignificant a beginning on March 5, 1834; but prayer, and trust in the Living God, had enlarged it thus, and went on enlarging it, further and further, till it came to what it is now in the year 1874.

From May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, there were four Day Schools, with 302 children, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and eleven besides were assisted. One Sunday School, with 177 children, was entirely supported, and thirteen others were assisted. One adult School, with 34 scholars, was entirely supported.

From March, 1834, to May 26th, 1861, there were 7,178 children in the Day-Schools. In the Adult-Schools there were 3,019 persons. The number of Sunday-School children amounts to 3,294. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 13,491 souls were brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these various Schools: besides the many thousands in the Schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, British Guiana, the West Indies, the East Indies, &c.; which were to a greater or less degree assisted. During the year from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, we had again repeatedly instances brought before us, in which our former instructions had been blessed, and, among others, there was the case of one who is now himself a preacher of the Gospel. In addition to these instances of blessing on our former labours, we had also the joy of receiving 8 from among the Sunday Scholars into Church Fellowship; and in the Day-Schools, though we had not so many conversions as during the previous year, yet there were at least a few. There was expended on the Schools, during this year, £484 9s. 0½d. During this year we expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £569 10s. 6d., and there were circulated 2,756 Bibles, 3,144 Testaments, 87 copies of the Psalms, and 292 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

As an encouragement for circulating the Holy Scriptures, and, at the same time, to show the great importance of providing the poor with copies of a large type, I relate the following circumstance, communicated to me by a servant of Christ labouring in Devonshire, whom I have for years supplied with Tracts and copies of the Scriptures. "An old man died a few days ago, to whom about 3 years ago I gave one of the large Bibles you sent me. I have a good hope he died in the Lord; but I was much encouraged to hope the gift of God’s word was not in vain, from the knowledge he seemed to possess of the Word, and how, when I would quote or read parts of it, he would anticipate the words, as I read or spoke. He suffered excruciating pains; but the word of God was precious, and Christ alone was his hope. I felt the more interested in his value of the word of God, as he told me he had been desiring a large Bible for 17 years previous to the time I gave him one."

The following touching little narrative was sent to me by a missionary in Nova Scotia, whom I have for years supplied with Bibles, Testaments, Tracts, and little books, which he seeks to circulate in the most destitute parts of that spiritually needy district, in which he more especially labours.

"Between the settlements of Cape North, and Bay St. Lawrence, there is a public road, recently cut through a dense forest, and entered by a deep gorge, causing an abrupt break in a chain of mountains, commencing at the extreme point of Cape North, and running about 70 miles along the western side of the island, the mountains varying in height from 1,000 to 1,300 feet. On entering the gorge, and ascending by a circuitous road half way up the Sugar Loaf Mountain, so named from its shape, you emerge upon a mountain valley, and thus proceed a few miles, when you again descend into the Bay St. Lawrence settlement. Along this road there are scattered a few miserable huts, the habitations of very poor and generally a very degraded people. Having upon one occasion ascended to the valley, I sat down to rest, when suddenly, by the sound of an axe, I was attracted to a spot, where stood a little boy felling a tree. I called the boy to me, and asked him to take a seat beside me. He obeyed, evidently surprised. I said to him, my little boy, you appear to be working very hard for your years, are you obliged to do so? ‘Yes, sir,’ he said, ‘Father is away fishing, and there is no one at home to get fire wood but me.’ Can you read, my child? ‘A little, sir; I go to the Doctor’s when I can, and he teaches me to read.’ (The Doctor occupied a little hut about half a mile from where we sat, down in a deep glen, where he was clearing the forest, planting potatoes, and growing oats, in order to provide for his family). Can your parents read? ‘No, sir.’ Would you like to read to me? giving him a little tract book. ‘I will try, sir.’ He did his best, and appeared greatly pleased at my interest in his welfare. Would you like to read in the Word of God, and to receive a New Testament. ‘Oh! yes, sir; indeed I should,’ his eyes sparkling with joy. ‘And I’ll go to the Doctor’s every time I can, and learn as fast as I can.’ After conversing about the love of the Saviour, and commending him by prayer to God, I proceeded on my journey. But from this point the poor child’s sorrows began. His parents were Roman Catholics and intemperate. When they found the child in possession of a Testament, they were angry, and said they would burn it. The boy wept, and besought them not to do so. He was beaten. At length they told him, to take the book and sell it for four pence, and bring them rum with the money, or they would destroy it. This the poor boy did, to pacify them. The Doctor, when relating to me the circumstance, said—"When the child came to me, he trembled, fearful that he should not get the money. He said, ‘Oh! Mr. Christy, only buy the book for me, and I will come and chop firewood for you whenever I can. Oh! I cannot spare the book, &c.’" Said the man, ‘I had but sixpence in the house, but I could not but give the money. The boy now comes every night to read in his Testament, he appears deeply interested, and is learning to read very correctly.’ We expect D.V. to hear from this little boy again, and hope to find him, through grace, sitting at the Master’s feet, learning of Him, and perhaps, yet to become a shining light in the midst of darkness and delusion."

During this year there was expended on Missionary operations the sum of £5,273 7s. 6d., whereby 107 servants of the Lord Jesus were assisted. There came to hand during this year, about 700 letters from these brethren, but as space does not allow me to insert any of them in this volume, I feel it necessary to state, that during that year it pleased the Lord to bring many hundreds of souls to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of those brethren, who were helped out of the Missionary fund of this Institution.

There was expended on the circulation of religious Tracts, from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, £1,264 8s. 3½d., and there were circulated above Two Millions and Four Hundred Thousand (exactly 2,408,659) Tracts and Books. Above Two Millions of the Tracts were given away gratuitously.

I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these Tracts were sent.

A brother in the Lord, who labours in the Gospel in Devonshire, and whom I have repeatedly supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes with reference to one of them on Feb. 14, 1861:—"The Lord is still carrying on His work among us. A poor man that was a swearer and a drunkard, who spent the Lord’s day in reading the newspaper, was one Lord’s day morning passing by a brother’s door, and he offered him some tracts to read instead of the newspaper; and the Spirit was pleased to impress upon his mind the words, ‘Why will ye die?’ and he came under the sound of the Gospel, and found peace in believing. It is very precious to see him taking those, that were his companions in the ale-house, under the sound of the Gospel."

The same brother writes thus on May 25, 1861, about the same individual:—"When I last wrote to you, I mentioned that a person was converted by means of a tract given to him. Since then he has opened his house for meetings, and it has been so filled, that I have not had room to stand. I have seen seven or eight in deep distress about their souls at once; and I do not think that there has been one meeting without some fresh case of blessing, either of conviction of sin, or of those convinced brought into liberty." This shows what abundant blessing may result from the circulation of tracts, not only to the individuals to whom they are given, but to great numbers besides.

On April 17, 1861, I had the following lines regarding one of the tracts, from a Christian person, whom I had repeatedly supplied with tracts:—" You will rejoice to hear that the Railway Tract ‘Progress’ has been, we trust, blessed to the conversion of a poor man."

A labourer in the Gospel in Herefordshire, who has often been supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes concerning them:—"A woman came this week to our house, and told my wife that she had borrowed a tract, she had left at a neighbour’s house. It’s title ‘Grace.’ She was specially struck with the words, ‘waiteth to be gracious,’ and thought, ‘Why should he wait any longer for me? I found that all through my life I have been limiting the power of His grace.’ Another woman, that has been a ‘sinner,’ found peace through the little book, ‘The Passover.’ She has been coming to our house for the last five months under deep concern. Mr. C., of London, was preaching in this town about three weeks since, and, at the close of his address, I spoke for a short time on the words—"When I see the blood I will pass over,’ and ‘The blood shall be a token to you.’ When this poor woman got home, she remembered I had given her a little book upon the subject, and thought she would read it; and, while so doing, felt the joy of a finished salvation. She told me, since she found this joy, that many times she had left her bed and prayed to the Lord, and that, before, she had often fasted whole days together, hoping to get peace."

A brother in Wiltshire, who has for many years been supplied with tracts, writes on Jan. 17, 1861: "I can inform you of the happy departure of J. S., the first person in this hamlet, whose mind was opened to see and feel himself a poor lost sinner, through reading the tracts you supplied us with; and who was led to embrace the Saviour as his great High Priest, and, resting on His atoning blood, found pardon and peace some years ago. I was privileged to be the last person he spoke to on earth. I asked him how he found himself in the near prospect of eternity. He replied with great firmness, ‘I am on the Rock Christ Jesus; I am trusting to the blood, and I have no doubt, no fear.’ These were his last words. After uttering them he gently breathed his last."

A brother in the Lord at Sunderland, who, together with other Christians, has circulated many tens of thousands of tracts, which I have sent him, writes on Nov. 7, 1860: "I take the opportunity of telling you, that your tracts have been lately very much blessed to souls, by the grace of God. The missionary at S. has found many cases of special blessing. G. G. has also found them very useful, especially the German tracts. One Swedish Captain was so fond of your German tracts, that he said he intended to have some of them translated into his own mother tongue. Brother L. has had a remarkable case of usefulness in the Union. A very hardened prostitute, who hated the truth, and even wept with rage when it was presented to her, has been completely broken down by reading ‘The Converted Negress,’ and is now saved from the wrath to come. She has an awfully bad leg, the fruit of her life of sin, and is daily expecting to have it cut off, else she must die. She is a trophy of divine grace indeed."

The following extract from a letter, dated Sunderland, Oct. 10, 1860, refers to the case just related, and gives some further particulars: "I thank you for so large a supply of tracts; many have expressed themselves as benefited by them. One instance of real good has during the last month come to light. A woman, whom I had often spoken to about her past sinful life, and who was one of the most hardened women I had ever met with, I gave one of your tracts to, entitled ‘The Converted Negress.’ The reading of this so affected her, she told me, that it was the first and only thing that had ever done her good. She could not sleep all night, and felt for the first time how merciful God had been to her, that He did not cut her off in her sins."

A godly man in Gloucestershire, whom I have supplied for many years with tracts for gratuitous circulation, in applying for more, writes thus on April 13, 1861: "May I once more beg of you to forward to me a large parcel of tracts for the young men of the Royal North Gloucestershire Militia, who are to be here for a month. After many years acquaintance with your Evangelical Tracts, I can say for myself, they have often cheered me when downcast during my sojourn here of 12 years. Some hundreds here have borne similar testimony. With regard to the young men of the R. N. G. Militia, many of them appreciated the tracts, and I know that many of them traced their conversion to their agency. May I hope you will send me a large supply for them and others."

A godly man in Glamorganshire, in applying for a further supply of tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on July 1, 1860: "I have to day finished giving away the tracts you last sent me, hoping they may be blessed to many souls. They have been accompanied with many prayers, and many have professed to have been profited by them. I have this day visited in the infirmary a poor woman who is fast sinking. She dates her conversion from reading the tract entitled "Truth and Grace." The last time before this, that I visited her, her almost first words were, "I am waiting till the Lord shall call for me." Her mind seems to be calm and peaceful, stayed on the Lord. I should be glad to receive some more tracts."

The following case was recently communicated to me, concerning one of the tracts, which a Christian farmer had bought at the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Institution: "An aged man had the tract, ‘Thy kingdom come,’ given to him. The result was, that he was awakened to a sense of his condition as a lost sinner, and was soon led to Christ as his only refuge, whereby he obtained peace, through believing; and is now waiting, with joyful anticipation, for the coming of that kingdom, for which he had so often, in words, prayed, but never knew its power in his own soul, until he received the said tract."

The following communication was contained in a letter, dated March 22, 1861, and written by a believer in Devonshire, whom I have for years supplied with large quantities of tracts for gratuitous circulation: "Since I wrote to you for the last parcel of tracts, I have had cause of joy in previous seed sown, which is bringing forth fruit, to the glory of God. A dear Christian sister had a relative in the Isle of Wight, to whom she enclosed a tract, entitled ‘The Passover,’ in a letter. The Lord blessed it to the salvation of his soul. This will encourage and give you joy, also that your labour is not in vain in the Lord."

Some months since a Christian in business, in Gloucestershire, who employs a number of men, requested me to send him a quantity of tracts, especially with the view of having them read by his workmen, instead of unprofitable or bad publications. I gladly complied with his request, and shortly afterwards received the following joyful communication, that five of his workmen had been converted through these tracts. The letter is dated Feb. 1, 1861, in which he writes thus: "The Lord Jesus has been pleased to give us unmistakeable proof of blessing attending the reading of the tracts you sent me, in my workshop, in the conversion of five of my work people. We have had a noonday prayer meeting among them for a month past, and such was the spirit given us on last Saturday, that we continued in prayer from 12 o’clock till 5, except while we paused to take a little refreshment. Our souls were drawn out especially for one to be set at liberty. The new converts prayed like those who are taught of the Spirit. The Bible is read at least six different times in the workshop, and we have commenced reading among the cottagers at night around us, and are encouraged to go forward."

Christian Reader, labour on for the Lord, and your labour will not be in vain. Circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts with the greatest diligence; speak also for the Lord, as if everything depended on your exertions; yet trust not in the least in your exertions, but in the Lord, who alone can cause your efforts to be made effectual, to the benefit of your fellow-men or fellow-believers. Remember also, that God delights to bestow blessing, but, generally, as the result of earnest, believing prayer.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, there were 700 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 46; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1861, 746 under our care, had there been no changes; but of these 746 ten died. This is the largest number up to that time, that ever died of the Orphans under our care, in one year. Generally there were not half so many. During the previous year only three out of 742 were removed by death. Still, even ten is a small proportion, considering that by far the greater part of the parents, of the children under our care, died in consumption, which is known by the certificates. Most of those ten who died were very delicate, when they were placed under our care. Yet, as it is, we had joy in the end of almost all of them. Eight out of the ten died as believers, concerning whom we have a good hope; one was an infant; and there was only one concerning whom we had no hope.—Two boys and two girls, of such an age as that the boys might have been apprenticed, and the girls sent into service, we were obliged to return to their relatives, as we could not recommend them to any master or mistress, on account of their moral state. This is one of the painful experiences with which we now and then meet, and which in every work for God will be met with; yet we have cause for thankfulness, that cases of this kind are comparatively so rare. We have, moreover, under such circumstances, also repeatedly found, that, after all, our efforts had been blessed, the seed which was sown springing up to the glory of God and our comfort, when the individuals were no longer under our care.—Four of the children were given up to their relatives or friends, after having been a considerable time under our care, as these relatives were able and desirous now to provide for them,—One of the children, who was only taken on trial, on account of imbecility of mind, was, after 16 months fruitless endeavour to benefit her, given up again to her relatives, on account of the entire want of mental capabilities—Four of the Orphans were given up to their relatives, on account of their state of health, as there was no prospect of their being benefited by remaining in the Institution; and as, especially in two cases, their native air seemed the only thing likely to benefit their health. We had, however, the joy of seeing two out of these four brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, and they had been consistent believers for a considerable time, before they left our care.—One of the girls was sent out to be trained as a teacher. She had been a believer for eleven months, before she left.—Eight of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed, at the expense of the Institution, and were also provided with an outfit. Out of these eight, four had been believers some time, before they left.—Fifteen girls were sent out into service, having been each, at the expense of the Institution, provided with an outfit. Out of these 15, twelve had been believers for a considerable time, before they were sent out. We had therefore, on May 26, 1861, only 699 Orphans in the two houses, viz., 299 in No. 1, and 400 in No. 2.

May 26, 1861. The previous part of this Narrative, has given to the Christian reader proof upon proof, how greatly the Lord has condescended to bless our labours, spiritually, among the Orphans. This blessing continues. During this year there were not such instances of the working of the Holy Spirit, as during the two previous ones, when great numbers of the Orphans, all at once, were led to care about their salvation, yet we had not a few instances regarding individual children. The chief cause for thankfulness we have, with regard to the present spiritual state of the Orphans, is, that by far the greater part of those, who professed faith in our Lord Jesus during the two previous years, when the Spirit of God wrought mightily among them, have not been allowed to go back, but have continued on the Lord’s side. Out of the 700 Orphans under our care, there are 127, concerning whose conversion we have full confidence, and 65 regarding whom there is also a goodly measure of confidence, though not to the same extent. There are 32 besides, who profess to be believers and to have been converted, regarding whom, however, the teachers, as yet, are not satisfied. To these 224 are to be added the eight who died during the past year as believers, and the 19 who were as believers sent out.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans, during the year, were £8,022 7s. 10d.; and there was expended in connexion with the building of the New Orphan House No. 3, £9,060 8s. 2d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862. This period was especially marked by furnishing a full answer to the prayers which day by day had been brought before God for more than eleven years, from November, 1850, with reference to the enlargement of the Orphan Work. It was also marked by the expenditure of £26,029 16s. 7½d. during the year, for the various objects of the Institution. And it was finally marked by the Lord’s most manifest help, in every way, in connexion with the work; and by the continuation of spiritual blessing, resting on the various objects of the Institution.

During this year we had four Day Schools connected with the Institution, with 320 children, which were entirely supported by its funds. In addition to these four Day Schools, which were entirely supported, ten other Day Schools were assisted. There was one Sunday School with 164 children entirely supported by the Institution, and 12 others were assisted. One adult school, with 55 scholars, was entirely supported. There was expended on the School work, £498 5s.

From May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there were circulated 3,017 Bibles, 1,732 New Testaments, 42 copies of the Psalms, and 66 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended on this Object £498 14s. 4d.

On Missionary Objects we expended from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, £5,527 5s. 2d., whereby 116 servants of Christ were assisted. During this year there were received above 800 letters from these 116 Missionaries, full of deep interest, and showing that their labours had been blessed, during that year, in the conversion of many hundred souls. Gladly, would I reprint here the extracts from their letters, which were published in the Report of 1862; but space forbids me so to do. As, however, the Reports published since 1846 may yet be had, they can, at a trifling cost, be obtained by applying to Mr. Sarsfield, Manager of the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, No. 78, Park Street, Bristol, should any of the readers desire to see these Missionary letters.

From May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there was expended on the circulation of Tracts £1339 7s. 1d., and for this amount there were circulated more than Two Millions and Seven Hundred Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 2,711,501). During this year more than Two Millions One Hundred and Fifteen Thousand were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother, who labours in the Gospel in Ireland, wrote on Sept. 9, 1861: "I am sure you will be anxious to know what I have done with the large parcel of tracts you kindly sent me. I have given samples of them to several of the Lord’s dear saints, who are in the habit of distributing tracts in schools and prayer-meetings, asking them to pray over them before they gave any of them away. The Revival of 1859 having raised up many, devoted young men, who preach in their respective neighbourhoods, but who are in a great measure ignorant of the simple Gospel, I have made it a special point to put a number of your tracts into their hands; and, with God’s blessing, my object in doing so has been gained, which was, that they might be led to state more simply the doctrine of the Cross, without adding ordinances or duties of any kind to the work completed by Jesus. I know for certain they have been greatly blessed in this respect. But while I know they have been blessed in building up and comforting great numbers of weak believers, I do not know of any that I could certainly say were converted by them. One old sinner I hope was blessed by them, but I am not quite sure. I went to see him on his death-bed, and, after conversation and prayer, I left him a few tracts. I saw his friends about four weeks after the time I left the tracts, who told me he often wanted to see me, and that he had been greatly comforted by the tracts, which he often caused to be read, after he was unable to read them himself. The rest I have distributed in public meetings and by the way-side as I travel, or by any other means I have of getting them into the hands of sinners, and I have still a number of them on hand."

The same brother writes on April 26, 1862: "On Monday last a man came to our meeting who is deeply concerned about his soul. He has been a professor many years, but now feels he needs a Saviour. He told my wife it was reading one of the tracts you sent me that led him to see his need of salvation. The name of the tract was ‘How does a man become a soldier?’ I am to preach at his house on Thursday week, D.V."

A brother, labouring in Yorkshire, who has been supplied with many tens of thousands of tracts, for gratuitous circulation, writes on Nov. 11, 1861: "The enclosed tract (‘The Dying Peasant Lad’), which I had from you, was the means of much blessing to a man about three weeks ago; and he walked five miles the next day to meet me where I was expected to preach the Gospel, that he might tell me how happy he felt. He had been unhappy about his sins for some weeks before."

A godly man at Manchester, who has been repeatedly supplied with large quantities of tracts, for gratuitous circulation, writes concerning them: "For the last four months the Corn Exchange has been opened for the preaching of the Word, and a congregation of 1200 people come regularly to hear words whereby they may be saved. During these meetings I have taken the opportunity of circulating these tracts, which were thankfully received and read while waiting for the time to begin the service. A Roman Catholic came up to me one day last week, and while in conversation with him he pulled a tract out of his breast pocket (‘The Incorruptible Seed), remarking that this was the tract that made him decide for Christ, and that he needed no Saviour but Jesus."

A brother, labouring in Surrey, writes on Jan. 17, 1862, with reference to tracts, which I had sent him for circulation: "A poor woman, whom the Lord had brought to Himself at W—, was first led to think of her soul through a tract (‘The Two Cabmen’) I left at her house with her little children, she being from home. The few words spoken to these lambs were used of the Lord to her blessing in this way: ‘She felt’ (so she told me) ‘the kindness of anyone so speaking to her children.’ I believe I mentioned her case before. She appears to grow in grace, and the work seems real."

A godly man in Cheshire, whom I have repeatedly supplied with tracts, writes on May 5, 1862: "One woman has been brought to God by reading one of your tracts."

An evangelist, labouring in Somersetshire, writes on May 27, 1862: "The little books and tracts are nearly all given away; if convenient, I shall be thankful to receive a fresh supply. I know of one case of deep impression in a man I could not get access to till just before he left Y—. The tract ‘A Just God and a Saviour’ had evidently affected him. As it was one lent from house to house, he requested me to procure him a copy to keep, and detained the one he had till I supplied him. He offered to give anything for it. He returned to his native place and died in a few days."

The following interesting communication was sent to me by a brother labouring in Devonshire, on Sept. 9, 1861, and shows, that, above five years since, God was pleased to bless a tract, which I had sent him, though recently only the circumstance had come to light. Thousands of instances of blessing may never come to our knowledge until the Lord comes. We have, therefore, patiently, prayerfully, and in faith to go on with our service, being assured, that, if we faint not, in due season we shall reap. "I have no doubt that you will be glad to learn the following incident: Five years since, when in Cornwall, I gave a tract to a very low dissipated woman, who received it mockingly, and at once put it into her pocket. When she got to her house, she took it out of her pocket, to help light her fire. It was a tract of two pages. She read the following text, heading the first page: ‘The wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom. vi. 23.’ God the Holy Ghost flashed the light of conviction upon that poor dark depraved heart. The tract fell from her hand, dropping on her knees. Her cry went up to God. For hours she continued in an agony of soul. When she bethought herself again of the tract, snatching it from the floor, the first word on the other page now caught her eye, and that word was ‘Mercy.’ God used it instrumentally in leading her to the cross of His Son, then and there. After maintaining a beautiful consistency of Christian walk and testimony, she recently fell asleep in Jesus. Let my last end be like hers! With the Bibles, Testaments and tracts that you have so liberally supplied me with, I have regularly supplied several ships that sail from S—. A nice young Christian seaman always takes a large supply with him, to give away to the sailors in foreign ports, for which his vessel is bound. Some months since, while speaking to a young man at Georgetown in Demerara (that young man was also from this neighbourhood, but not converted), he says: ‘It was as if a voice said to me, give that young man some tracts. And on learning that the crew numbered forty, I gave him a large packet, which he promised faithfully to distribute amongst his shipmates. The next day that vessel sailed for Liverpool; but she had not sailed many days before 29 out of the 40 had fallen victims to yellow fever. The first that died was S. P—, the young man to whom I gave the tracts.’ Surely this was a remarkable providence. When at home, those young men lived within four miles of each other; yet meeting thousands of miles away, the one to speak faithfully to the other of Jesus, and to supply the Gospel through the tracts only a few hours before so many were taken. I shall be glad of some Bibles, tracts, &c., when you can send them, as I am now getting very low."

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there were 699 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3, altogether 159 children, so that the total number on May 26, 1862, would have been 858, had there been no changes; but of these 858, seven died. Only seven! Six out of the 7 who died were believers, and the seventh was an infant. One of the girls was delivered up to her relatives, by their wish, as they were now able and willing to provide for her. Two of the boys, who were ready to be apprenticed, were not apprenticed by the Institution, as they could not be recommended; but were delivered up to their relatives to be apprenticed by them. One of the boys, ready to be apprenticed, and who could have been recommended, was not apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, because his relatives were able and willing to do it. Twelve boys were provided with an outfit and apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, 6 of whom had been believers for some time before they left. Twenty-four girls were provided with an outfit by the Institution, and sent out to service, eleven of whom had been believers for some time before they left us. Deducting these 47 from 858, there were only 811 Orphans actually under our care on May 26, 1862.

We enter now upon the year, from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863.

In reading these particulars with reference to these various years, we pass on rapidly from one year to the other; but, as to our actual experience, each year was marked by many thousands of petitions, thousands of difficulties, if not heavy trials, of one kind or another; but, at the same time, with thousands of joys in one way or other. It will be difficult for the reader to place himself in our position, except he himself has been occupied in similar work, and has acted on the same principles on which we act. Nevertheless, I will go on, finishing the history of this Institution to the end of its fortieth year, as I trust that, after all, many of my readers will be convinced of the power of prayer, and the blessedness of simple trust in the living God, in carrying on his blessed work.

During the year, from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, there were four Day Schools, with 321 children, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. In addition to these four Day Schools, 6 others were assisted. One Sunday School, with 160 children, was entirely supported, and thirteen others were assisted. One Adult School, with 48 Scholars, was entirely supported, and two others were assisted. The amount expended, on these Schools, was £536 19s. 10½d.

During this year 2,227 Bibles, 1,183 New Testaments, 54 copies of the Psalms, and 125 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were circulated. The amount spent, on this object, was £400 1s. 1d.

During this year was expended, of the funds of the Institution, the sum of £4,929 3s. 10½d. on Missionary operations, and by this sum One Hundred and Sixteen labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted. I received again, as usual, many hundreds of letters from those servants of Christ; but as space does not allow me to reprint here, what was given of them in the Report published 1863, I only say, that a considerable portion of these letters speaks of blessing, which the Lord was pleased to bestow on their labours during this year.

There were circulated between May 26, 1862, and May 26, 1863, Three Millions and Thirty-nine Thousand Tracts and Books, at an expense of £1,263 6s. 2½d. Two Millions Four Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand of this number were given away gratuitously. Hundreds of believers were engaged in spreading them abroad, not merely in many parts of England, Scotland, and Ireland, but in various other parts of the world. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

An Evangelist, who labours in Scotland, and moves about from place to place, writes on Oct. 3rd, 1862: "Many thanks for the bountiful supply of Tracts which came to Tain. Several tracts have been blessed this season in Ross-shire, e. g. ‘Mercy,’ at Dingwall, and ‘Two things which God hath joined together,’ at Ullapool."

A brother, who labours in the County of Durham, and who is habitually supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Aug. 29, 1862: "Your Tracts, I believe, will prove a blessing to many. A man came to me a few days ago, saying he was in distress. I asked him if his circumstances were bad; ‘No,’ said be, ‘I have plenty of work, but you have often given me a tract in the street; and the reading of one of them has made me very uneasy, as it speaks of a change of heart, which I am convinced I have not.’ He seemed to be in earnest. This is one of the many instances of the effects of tract distribution which have come to my knowledge."

The same brother writes on Oct. 17th, 1862: "I have visited regularly for two months a man who is laid up with a broken leg. When I first saw him, I reminded him of the goodness of God in sparing his life in the time of danger. I said to him pointedly, ‘What would have become of your soul, if you had died then?’ He was affected to tears, and replied, with a full heart, ‘I should have been lost.’ I have repeatedly visited him since. Two days ago I asked him how it was with his soul; he said, ‘I am happy now.’ I said, ‘What makes you happy?’ He replied, ‘Christ.’ I asked him when he first became happy; and he told me it was while reading the Tract, ‘Poor Richard.’ I gave him another tract, and told him to look to Jesus alone for salvation."

A brother in Yorkshire, who has been frequently supplied with large parcels of tracts gratuitously, writes on Sep. 1st, 1862: "The tracts you kindly sent me arrived quite safely, and we have begun distributing them. One of the distributors, who has taken out hundreds into the country, says that he can trace in 7 or 8 instances that the tracts he has left at different houses have been distinctly blessed to souls."

A godly man in Cheshire, whom I have often supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Aug. 1st, 1862: "I have great pleasure to inform you that several cases have come under my notice of good being done by your tracts. I gave a tract to a man, who became so uneasy after reading it, that he could not rest. He was pointed to ‘the Lamb of God who taketh away the sin of the world.’ He is now walking in the ways of the Lord. A second case is that of a woman, who was so affected by a tract which I gave her, that she cried for mercy. She is now on the Lord’s side. In a third case I left two tracts with a family. The father was such a wicked man that his wife could scarcely live with him, but he is now quite another man. His wife told me this week that she should have to thank God that he ever sent me with those two tracts; she added, ‘he is now asking God to save him from all his sins, and he says the Lord will save him."

A Christian tract distributor in Staffordshire writes on Oct. 11, 1862: "I am most happy to inform you that the tracts you sent me have been the means, through the Spirit of God, of doing much good. I have one instance before me of a poor old woman who was often in doubt and fear about her interest in Christ. One Sunday afternoon I found her in a desponding state of mind. I prayed with her, and read the tract entitled ‘I do depend upon the blood,’ when, to my joy, light began to dawn upon her soul, and from that time I have reason to believe she has rejoiced in a crucified Saviour. Other instances might be mentioned of the good which the tracts have done, through God’s blessing."

A missionary among sailors, labouring in Suffolk, who has been gratuitously supplied with tracts, writes on Sep. 15, 1862: "I am pleased to inform you that the tracts were well received, and that one case of conversion has come to my notice. It resulted from the reading of a tract that I gave after an open-air meeting."

A brother in Somersetshire, who has been for many years supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Nov. 18, 1862: "You will be pleased to hear that a dear sister in the Lord, who lives at O., and to whom I gave a packet of your tracts, told me a few days ago that two instances of true conversion through them have come to her knowledge. One was rather remarkable. She was taking some of them from house to house; but when she came to a gentleman’s boarding school, she said to herself, ‘I fear to leave a tract here;’ she heard a loud laugh from an usher; but she determined to persevere, and the tract was given to a young lady, who had recently gone there to keep house for her brother. She read it; was convinced of sin; obtained peace; and is now a happy believer. The tract was entitled ‘The Heart made Captive.’ Your tracts have been conveyed into many a dark district around, and I am sure the Lord will bless them."

A brother labouring in Devonshire, who has been habitually supplied with tracts for many years, writes on July 9th, 1862, concerning the blessing on one of them: "I think I mentioned a woman near W., who had been converted by a tract, the title of which I did not then know. I have recently been there, and, on visiting this woman, handed her the tract entitled ‘The Gospel or Glad Tidings,’ when she immediately exclaimed, ‘That is the tract,’ and turned to the last page, where are the words, ‘God is no respecter of persons,’ etc., which had led to her conversion."

The letters that have been received show, also, the variety of opportunities which are embraced by distributors for the abundant and wide scattering of the "good seed" contained in the tracts. Large quantities have been circulated amongst the attendants at open air preachings, the passengers on board emigrant ships, and by railway trains, the frequenters of fairs, races, steeplechases, and the spectators at executions. As an illustration of the way in which the last-named sad occurrences were turned to profitable account, I give the following letter from a brother who labours in Cornwall. It is dated Aug. 19, 1862: "I embrace the first opportunity to thank you for the 9,500 tracts received on Saturday evening. Brothers B., R., T. , and myself left here at 2 o’clock yesterday (Monday) morning, and got to Bodmin about half-past 6, so that we had a nice long morning for work before the execution took place. Two of us took one part of the town, to meet the people as they came in, and two of us the other part. As we gave the tracts into the hands of the people, we quoted a few words of Scripture, or put a pointed question, such as, ‘Saved, or not saved?’ ‘Do you pray?’ ‘Prayer won’t save you; Jesus saves;’ ‘The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord;’ Jesus says, ‘Come unto me,’ etc. About 10 o’clock, brother B. and I went into a field near the prison, where the people had assembled in thousands to see the poor man hanged. Here we had nice opportunities for preaching to large crowds, who listened most attentively; and, as I was able to speak of having, a short time ago, preached in the open air in the village where the murder took place, and where the murderer lived, and of well remembering seeing the man, now about to be hung, leaning against the hedge, while I was preaching, without his jacket, in his shirt sleeves and working clothes on a Lord’s day morning, the people were the more interested and attentive, and seemed deeply impressed. We each preached two or three times, then walked through the large field, where, as the people were seated in rows, we warned and exhorted as we walked with the tracts which B. brought with him. We gave away nearly 15,000 altogether, I should think. We purposely left the place whilst the execution took place, and returned when it was over. The Lord was very manifestly with us, and we prayed that much blessing may be given. It was very interesting to see such an immense number of people reading the tracts, and, apparently, so interested."

Christian Reader, labour on for the Lord, and your labour will not be in vain. Circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts with the greatest diligence; speak also for the Lord, as if everything depended on your exertions; yet trust not in the least in your exertions, but in the Lord, who alone can cause your efforts to be made effectual, to the benefit of your fellow-men or fellow-believers. Remember also, that God delights to bestow blessing, but, generally, as the result of earnest, believing prayer.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, there were 811 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 323 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1863, would have been 1,134, had there been no changes; but of these 1,134, eight died during the year. Only eight! One of these eight was a young infant; 4 died as decided believers, one was in a very hopeful state; and of the other two we have some hope in their end. Three of the girls were expelled from the Institution, as the last means that we could use, in seeking to benefit them, after they had been long borne with. Four girls were sent back to their relatives, on account of their being in such a state of health of body or mind, as rendered them unsuitable inmates for the Orphan Houses; yet there was nothing in their conduct, morally, to make it needful to send them away. One boy, having come to such an age, as to be ready to be apprenticed, was delivered up to his relatives, and not apprenticed by the Institution, as he could not be recommended. Another boy was sent out ready to be apprenticed, but was not apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, but by the relatives, as they were able to do so. Eight girls were delivered up into the hands of their relatives, who desired to have them, as they were by that time able to provide for them. Eighteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, eleven of whom were sent out as believers. Thirty-one girls were sent out to service, having had situations and an outfit provided for them by the Institution; nineteen out of these were sent out as believers, and most of them had been converted for some time. Deducting these 74 from 1,134, there were only 1,060 Orphans actually under our care on May 26, 1863, viz. 299 in No. 1, 397 in No. 2, and 364 in No. 3. The amount expended on the support of the Orphans was £11,194 4s. 7½d., besides £1,867 8s. 8d. of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864. During this year there were 6 Day-Schools, with 516 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and nine others wore assisted. One Sunday-School, with 146 children, was entirely supported, and five others were assisted. Two Adult-Schools, with 76 Scholars in them, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various schools, amounted to £587 12s. 2d.

During this year were circulated 1,682 Bibles, 1,828 New Testaments, 49 copies of the Psalms, and 107 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, was £406 0s. 2½d.

During this year was spent on Missionary Objects the sum of £5,600 7s. 9d., whereby One Hundred and Twenty labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were assisted. Though, for the reason before stated, I cannot give extracts from the many hundred letters received during the year, from these 120 labourers in the Gospel, yet I cannot leave this part of the operations of the Institution, without adding to the praise of God, that there is the fullest reason to believe that, during this year, many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these brethren, who laboured at home and abroad, and whom I sought to assist.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864, the sum of £1,394 2s. 5d.; and there were circulated within the year 2,704,348 Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1864, is 22,357,137

Nearly Two Millions (exactly 1,923,835) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother in Devonshire, whom I have for many years supplied gratuitously with copies of the Holy Scriptures and tracts, for circulation among the poor, writes on July 22, 1863:—"The tracts, I am happy to say, have been made a blessing in various instances coming to our knowledge. Two recent cases are a great joy to us. One a Unitarian: leaving ‘Over Luggage’ at his house, seeing it he took it up, saying to his wife, ‘What have you got here?’ The title attracted his curiosity, he read the paper, and, by the blessing of the Holy Spirit, it has resulted in his unquestionable conversion. Unto the remark of a friend lately to him ‘Then you feel yourself a Sinner?’ his answer was, ‘The greatest Sinner out of hell!’ The other case is the conversion to God of a very bad man, through the tract, ‘Your Dying Hour.’ He behaved very cruelly to his poor wife prior to this, but is now truly ‘A new creature in Christ Jesus,’ and has joined the Wesleyans. To God be all the glory; ‘for of Him and through Him and to Him are all things, to whom be glory for ever and ever.’"

The same brother writes on Feb. 2, 1864:—"Our Christian friend, the packman, of whom I have before spoken in my letters, is desirous to have more tracts to distribute in the country (obscure places) at a distance from here. We have received many times most gratifying intelligence of the usefulness of the tracts in the parts he visits. I some time since referred to one instance in the true conversion to God of a very bad man, to whom the tract ‘Your Dying Hour’ was made a blessing. He is now a ‘New creature in Christ Jesus,’ and devoted to the service of God. Another case I may mention which I think gratifying. A woman of some little property in the village, was deeply impressed by the circumstance of our friend labouring to do good in his journeys, and his having given a Bible (one of yours) to a poor family. She reflected on her own hitherto indifference to spiritual things, and that it was in her power to do some good after the example of this poor man. ‘What! (said she) shall he try to be a blessing to others and give them Bibles, who is so dependant, and I, who have money, let them perish for want of the Word of God?’ She resolved to set to work, and went away and purchased 62 Bibles, which she at once distributed among her poor neighbours, having sent a man to inquire who needed them. And who can tell the extent of this act? What it may further lead unto? And by the Spirit’s blessing shall prove at the end! All resulting from the one gift of a Bible (of yours) and the distribution of the tracts in that quarter."

Another Christian in Devonshire, whom I have often supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes "I do not think I ever told you of one to whom I took tracts a long while ago; the reading of them was made a blessing to her soul. In visiting her from time to time I find real progress."

A believer at Penzance, whom I have also supplied with tracts for circulation, writes on Oct. 23, 1863:—"I am thankful to say, the tracts which I have received from time to time, have been blessed to souls, one especially, viz., the tract ‘Come, Sinner,’ on one side, and ‘Glad Tidings’ on the other. About two months since I was out of town and distributed some tracts. The next week I had to visit that place again, and on the quay a man came and asked me if I knew him. He told me I gave him last week a tract, and am thankful to say I found by reading it, that there is salvation for me. I thought there was no salvation for such a sinner as I am. I have been a wicked man, and I gave myself up to the wicked one, but, thank God, you gave me this precious tract, here it is, thank God there is salvation for me,"

A brother in Devonshire writes on April 18, 1864:—"Your last gift of tracts was large, but with the exception of one packet, they have been with fervent prayer distributed and sent on their mission; and I am thankful to be able to say, that I know of one case where, under God, they were made instrumental in the conversion of a poor sinner, an old man, and of many others where men and women have, through reading them, been brought under deep concern for their souls, and to seek the Lord."

Another brother in Devonshire writes on April 29, 1864:—"One manifest case of blessing seems to have taken place, through the tracts distributed, the particulars of which are contained in a letter written by the person to her father, brother and sister, which I here enclose."

The letter was sent, giving the details of the conversion of this person, and the blessing granted on the tract "Why will you die"; but, as it was written to near relatives, I thought it best not to give the particulars.

A Christian gentleman in London writes on March 9, 1864:—"I yesterday received a note from a female in the neighbourhood of Exeter, to whom I had forwarded a packet of your tracts. She avers that they have been manifestly blessed in two cases within her own knowledge."

From the commencement of the Institution up to May 26, 1864, above Thirty-Four Thousand Bibles, about Twenty-Three Thousand Testaments, and above Twenty-Two Millions of Tracts and Books were circulated, in connexion with this Institution; but while, on the one hand, we would labour, as if everything depended on our exertions, on the other hand, we would not in the least degree depend upon the number of copies of the Holy Scriptures or Tracts which we circulate, but only on the blessing of God. This blessing, by God’s grace, we seek daily, and, therefore, we expect fruit, abundant fruit, to result from our labours, though this fruit should only in a small degree be witnessed by us in this world.

If any of the Christian readers are in the habit of circulating Tracts, and yet have never seen fruit, may I suggest to them the following hints for their prayerful consideration. 1, Seek for such a state of heart, through prayer and meditation on the Holy Scriptures, as that you are willing to let God have all the honour, if any good is accomplished by your service. If you desire for yourself the honour, yea, though it were in part only, you oblige the Lord, so to speak, to put you as yet aside as a vessel not meet for the Master’s use. One of the greatest qualifications for usefulness in the service of the Lord is a heart, truly desirous of getting honour for Him. 2, Precede all your labours with earnest, diligent prayer; go to them in a prayerful spirit; and follow them by prayer. Do not rest on the number of Tracts you have given. A million of Tracts may not be the means of converting one single soul; and yet how great, beyond calculation, may be the blessing which results from one single Tract. Thus it is also with regard to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and the ministry of the Word itself. Expect, then, everything from the blessing of the Lord, and nothing at all from your own exertions. 3, And yet, at the same time, labour, press into every open door, be instant in season and out of season, as if everything depended upon your labours. This is one of the great secrets in connexion with successful service for the Lord; to work as if everything depended upon our diligence, and yet not to rest in the least upon our exertions, but upon the blessing of the Lord. 4, This blessing of the Lord, however, should not merely be sought in prayer; but it should also be expected, looked for, continually looked for: and the result will be, that we shall surely have it. 5, But suppose, that, for the trial of our faith, this blessing were for a long time withheld from our sight; or suppose even that we should have to fall asleep, before we see much good resulting from our labours; yet will our labours, if carried on in such a way and spirit as has been stated, be at last abundantly owned, and we shall have a rich harvest in the day of Christ.

Now dear Christian reader, if you have not seen much blessing resulting from your labours, or perhaps none at all, consider prayerfully these hints, which are affectionately given by one who has now for more than forty-eight years in some measure sought to serve the Lord, and who has found the blessedness, of what he has suggested, in some measure in his own experience.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864, there were 1,060 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 181 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1864, would have been 1,241, had there been no changes; but of these 1,241, seventeen died during the past year, 3 as infants and, of the other 14, ten were believers. We own with especial gratitude to God the smallness of the number of deaths, since for more than two years all around us infectious fevers and the small-pox have been so prevalent. Almost all the 17 children died of consumption in one form or other, at which we are not surprised, as about three-fourths of the children in the Orphan Houses lost one or both parents in consumption. Five girls were returned to their relatives, as they had epileptic fits (of which no information had been given by the relatives before admission) or other diseases, on account of which they were unsuitable inmates for such an Institution as the New Orphan Houses; 10 children were given up to relatives, by their desire, as they by that time were able and willing in future to provide for them, the temporal circumstances of some having become better; 16 boys were sent out to be apprenticed; 2 girls were sent out to be apprenticed to dressmaking, the one being unsuitable for service, and the other having a sister a dressmaker who desired her to be with her; and 41 girls were sent out to service. Of the boys who were sent out, 8 were converted, and of the girls 14. Thus 91 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,241, which left just 1,150 on May 26, 1864, in the 3 houses, the number for which the New Orphan Houses were fitted up, namely 300 in No. 1, 400 in No. 2, and 450 in No. 3. The expenses for the support of the Orphans amounted to £11,948 10s. 4d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865.

In looking back upon the Thirty One years, during which this Institution had been in operation, I had, as will be seen, by the Grace of God, kept to the original principles, on which, for His honour, it was established on March 5, 1834. For 1, during the whole of this time I had avoided going in debt; and never had a period been brought to a close, but I had some money in hand. Great as my trials of faith might have been, I never contracted debt; for I judged, that, if God’s time was come for any enlargement, He would also give the means, and that, until He supplied them, I had quietly to wait His time, and not to act before His time was fully come. And further, that, being engaged in the work, which I had Scriptural warrant to believe He had given me to be engaged in, I needed not to be afraid of being supplied with what I might need, but that, if I would quietly wait His time, patiently wait, continue in prayer and believing expectation, His help would come. And thus it had been thousands of times during the Thirty-one years. 2, Another principle, with which I set out, regarding the formation of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, was, that the Living God, and He alone, should be the Patron of the Institution; that I would trust in Him, and in Him alone; lean upon Him, and upon Him alone. To this, by God’s grace, I had been enabled to cleave for the Thirty-one years. And now I have to say, to the honour of His name, that He has helped me more and more, and that it is a blessed thing indeed to have Him as our Patron; for I have the fullest reason to believe, that I have been enabled to accomplish ten times, if not a hundred times more, than if I had sought after the patronage of the great and wealthy in the land. 3, The line of demarcation between believers and unbelievers, with regard to active engagements in connexion with the Institution, as teachers, or otherwise, with which we set out at the first, has been adhered to ever since.—By the help of God, we intend in future also to act according to these original principles.

When one year and nine months later, in December, 1835, the Orphan work was added to the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, my especial object was, as has been stated at large in this Narrative, vol. I, page 143-146 of the Seventh edition, to show how much could be accomplished through the instrumentality of prayer and faith. I had, indeed, the bodily, mental, and spiritual benefit of poor children, bereaved of both parents, at heart; I would, with all diligence, as God should help me, labour for this; yet, the primary object was the glory of God, in seeking to set before my weaker brethren in the faith, as their servant and fellow member in the body of Christ, the encouragement connected with this work, for the strengthening of their faith. And now, going on in this part of the work, in the thirty-ninth year, what have I to say? Nothing less than this, that the Lord has never left us nor forsaken us. Great have been our trials of faith, year after year, without exception; but God has helped continually. With regard to pecuniary means, we were at one time, for about five years, almost daily, in the trial of faith; but we were, also, continually helped. And as the work enlarged, instead of needing hundreds of pounds, as at the first, we now needed tens of thousands, yea hundreds of thousands; yet the Lord helped as before. But not merely with regard to pecuniary means, but in every other way, we were continually helped, through prayer and faith. When teachers and other assistants were required, we gave ourselves to prayer, and were helped. When suitable Christian servants were needed, we looked to the Lord, and were helped. When the health of the children tried us, or the health of the teachers or other assistants, we still looked to the Lord, and were supported, and in His own time helped and delivered out of the trial. When situations were needed for boys ready to be apprenticed, or girls to be sent to service, we looked to the Lord for suitable openings; and, in hundreds of instances of this kind, we received precious answers to prayer, though sometimes we had often and long to call upon the Lord for the needed help. And thus in hundreds of other difficulties, necessities, and wants, we have invariably found that prayer and faith, our universal remedy, was sufficient. Whatever the difficulty might be, whatever the need, however great the perplexity of the position; we trusted in God, and were sustained and at last delivered.

I relate here, for the encouragement of the reader, a few instances, in which the help of God, in answer to our prayers, was very manifest, and which occurred during the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, about which I am now more particularly writing.

It may be remembered by the reader, how great the scarcity of water was in the summer of 1864 in almost all parts of England. Long before we felt any want in the Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, many thousands of the inhabitants of Bristol, as well as elsewhere, had been tried by the lack of rain. At last, however, all our fifteen large cisterns in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 were empty, and almost all our nine wells in these 3 houses, most of which are deep, failed also; yea, even one with a good spring, which never had been out before, was also pumped dry. Now, dear Reader, place yourself into our position. For all the various purposes in these three houses, we use from 2,000 to 3,000 gallons of water daily. Under these circumstances, we were daily waiting upon God, that He would be pleased to give rain to supply our cisterns and wells, or that He would otherwise help us. Now see how he kindly interposed. About one-third of a mile from the Orphan Houses resides a farmer, who had three wells, filled with water, which he had never known to fail, and he very kindly sent word to say, that he would gladly supply the Orphan Houses with water, as long as he had any. This was thankfully accepted, as a precious answer to prayer, and we had the water hauled, about 1,000 or 1,500 gallons daily, the remainder of what we required being supplied by what our wells yielded, by being pumped every four or six hours. Thus we went on, day by day, and were helped over a most difficult time, whilst the distress in Bristol increased more and more. At last, however, these wells, which never had failed before, and out of which, day by day, for about six weeks, we had drawn so much, without the least apparent diminution at first, were nearly emptied, so that the kind farmer was under the necessity, though reluctantly, of letting me know that he should need the little water which remained for himself and his tenants. We thanked God for having helped us for about six weeks in the way mentioned, and asked Him for further help, though we knew not how that help was to come, the scarcity of water being now all around greater than ever. Our hope, however, was in God, being fully assured that this time also we should prove His faithfulness. On the very day on which the information was received, that that day would be the last day we could be supplied with water from those wells, another kind farmer, about a mile and a half from the Orphan Houses, sent word to me, that we could have as much water as we liked from a brook which ran through his fields. This offer was thankfully accepted. We made a dam in the brook, which soon made the water to rise four feet high, and thus we had an abundance of water, till God was pleased to send rain. The only difference in the latter case was, that we needed three carts instead of one or two, and several men more, than before. Thus, by prayer, we were helped through the great drought of the summer 1864.

I relate another precious deliverance, in answer to prayer. During the three years previous to May 26, 1865, scarlet fever, typhus fever, and small-pox were to a greater or less degree prevalent in Bristol and the neighbourhood. We gave ourselves to prayer, that, if it might be, the Lord would mercifully preserve us from these diseases in the Orphan Houses; and, if they must come, we might be sustained and helped. So far as it regards scarlet fever and typhus fever, we had not one single case during the whole time. With regard to the small-pox, too, we were preserved for many months, yea nearly two years it had been more or less raging in the neighbourhood; but at last it pleased the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, to allow it to enter among us. We now were indeed dependant upon the Lord, that this disease might not infect hundreds of children, yea the teachers, matrons, nurses and servants of the Institution; for though it was only as yet in the smallest house, still there were 320 persons in it, and 50, 100, 150, or even more might be laid down at once. Nothing remained, therefore, but our universal remedy, prayer and faith, that the Lord would have mercy upon us, and cause us not to be tried above our measure. In all childlike simplicity we told Him how we were situated, how great the difficulty and trial would be, if a great number of children were at once ill in the small-pox. All necessary precautions were, of course, at once used, in separating the diseased children entirely from the rest, and cutting off, as far as was at all practicable, the intercourse with the infirmary rooms; for a different course would not have been faith but presumption, as we had the ability for so doing; but who does not know, how powerless after all such precautions are in themselves. Our only trust, I confess it frankly to the honour of the Lord, was in His pity and compassion, in His tender, fatherly heart; for He knew our case. The result was, that, though week by week, and month after month, for about seven months, we had the disease at the New Orphan House No. 1, yet there were only 5, 6, 8, or 10 ill in the house at one time, and all the cases light, yea, very light for the most part. No. 1, however, was not the only house; but after some time the New Orphan Houses No. 2 and No. 3 were also afflicted with this disease. In No.2 the cases were only eleven altogether, and very light, though there are 400 children in that house, one half of whom are young infants. We felt this an especial mercy, and a particular answer to prayer, that the cases there were so few. In No. 3 we had case after case, sometimes 4 or 5 children in one day were taken ill. At one time all the available beds in the Infirmary rooms were filled, having 15 down at one time in this disease, besides other sick children. In this our great extremity we entreated the Lord, that, if it might be, He would not allow fresh cases to occur, as we could not, without great difficulty, keep anymore children separate from the rest. He had mercy on us. Not a single other case occurred, until the number in the Infirmary rooms was considerably diminished, and there were only altogether a few more fresh cases after this. At last, in Dec. 1864, the disease disappeared entirely, having been 9 months constantly among the 1,200 inmates of the three Orphan Houses. Almost all the cases were light, most of them very light, and not one child died. Only one of the teachers out of all the grown up persons had the disease, and that very lightly. Thus we proved the Lord, as the prayer-hearing God in this matter also.

On Jan. 14, 1865, there were tremendous gales in Bristol and the neighbourhood. When I arrived at the Orphan Houses, about eleven o’clock in the morning, I found our roofs greatly injured, and laid open in at least twenty places, and about twenty large panes of glass broken; in two cases also the woodwork of the windows, the wind having blown the slates against them. This being Saturday, and the Orphan Houses a good distance from the place of the glazier and slater whom we generally employ, and all his men out and engaged, when he received our order to send men, nothing could be done that day, and of course nothing on the coming day, it being the Lord’s day. Under these circumstances we besought the Lord, that, if it might be, He would mercifully be pleased to keep off the rain and remove the gales. If there had been any heavy rain, the houses would have been much damaged; and, if the wind had blown as in the morning, many hundreds more of the slates might have been blown off. Now see as to the wind. In the afternoon of Saturday it was comparatively calm; but in the evening it began again to blow much, at the very time while I had with my dear wife my usual time for prayer. But, having six or seven times called upon the Lord, it grew calm, not a single slate more was blown off as far as I could learn. And as to the rain, only a few drops fell on Saturday, none on the Lord’s day, and on Monday we had a number of men on the roofs, and others to mend the windows and make good the broken wood-work. On Monday and Tuesday rain and wind were stayed. The sky was full of clouds, but only a few drops fell; nothing to hurt the houses or hinder the work. By mid-day of Wednesday the roofs were so far repaired as that all the worst places were made good, except one. But now it began to rain, and rather heavily. The slaters had to leave the roof and come into the house; and the appearance was, that still much damage might be done. We saw the state of things, and my dear wife and I fell again and again on our knees, and, after three or four times praying, the rain was stayed, the men could go on with their work, and that very afternoon the worst of all the places was repaired, and it was found that the rain had done no damage, for the opening was on the south side, whilst the rain came from the north. By the end of the week all the other slighter injuries were also repaired; and thus we had, in the face of great damage and difficulty, most precious deliverances in answer to prayer.

The reason why I relate these circumstances so minutely, and why similar instances will still further be given, is to shew, that, if we trust in God, and betake ourselves to Him in believing prayer, we are helped, and our hearts are kept in peace. If the reader has had typhus fever, scarlet fever, the smallpox, or other infectious diseases in the house, he will know how the natural tendency is, to be very anxious under such circumstances, and, in this great anxiety, often to anticipate the very worst as to the infection, and to be in danger of acting unscripturally; whilst, on the other hand, if the ordinary proper precautions are used, we cast our burden upon God, and say, it is my Heavenly Father who sends this disease; He, who is full of pity and compassion, will not lay more upon me than He will enable me to bear, therefore I will trust in His love and wisdom and power; and then the soul will be calm and quiet, yea very peaceful. This is to be aimed after, not only for our own good, but because it tends to the glory of God, and is a testimony to the unconverted as to the reality of the things of God, and tends to the strengthening of the faith of our fellow believers.

At the end of the year, from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, the Lord allowed us to have our faith again exercised in the way of an infectious disease. The scarlet fever, from which we had been so long preserved, made its appearance among the children; but only four cases occurred, and they were of so light a character, that I should scarcely have mentioned the circumstance, except I had before said, we had had no case of fever in the houses. Of course we knew not how it might be the Lord’s will to act in this matter; yet our minds were again kept in peace, and we again proved the compassionate heart of our Heavenly Father, who laid no more on us than He enabled us to bear.

In the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, there were six Day Schools, with 485 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; and eleven other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 140 children, was entirely supported, and five others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 29 scholars, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. The amount, which was expended on these various schools during the year, is £650 7s. 8d.

There were circulated 2,323 Bibles, 4,106 New Testaments, 104 copies of the Psalms, and 293 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £404 14s. 10d.

From May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865. there was expended on missionary operations, £5,669 9s., 5½d., whereby 122 labourers in the word and doctrine were assisted. I give a very few extracts from some of the many hundreds of letters received from the missionaries during the year as specimens.

A brother, labouring in Demerara, writes on Nov. 22, 1864:—"Through the loving kindness of our gracious God and Father, we continue in this work here, unworthy as we are; and He does use us a little, I trust, for His name, both in helping on His people and gathering some of the ‘other sheep.’ He brings them by us, blessed be His holy name, into the fold! You will be pleased to hear that I baptized twelve brothers and sisters last Sunday week the 13th inst. Africans and Creoles. I often think that there is very little thankfulness in me when ones and twos, and nines and tens, are brought to the Lord. I have often found myself looking at the hundreds and thousands of unconverted, instead of the brand plucked from the burning; still I would bless the Lord from my heart for the smallest manifestation of His grace, while I mourn over, labour and pray for, the thousands of unconverted around us."

The same brother writes on May 6, 1865:—"Through our Heavenly Father’s loving care, I am kept in good health, and enabled to work in the vineyard, daily. The field is large, and therefore more labourers are needed; but one who loves the Master, and loves His work, cannot be discouraged: one loves to think that it is not here that we see, or are meant to see, the full fruit of our labours. We must sow now the seed; we shall see the harvest gathered in hereafter; and sure it is, that it is not in vain that Christ’s servants have laboured. I baptized six here last month, one brother and five sisters: they were Creoles and Africans, all with black faces; but as cleansed by the blood of Jesus, He can say of them ‘thou art all fair, my love, there is no spot in thee.’"

Another brother, also labouring in Demerara, writes on Feb. 3, 1865:—"You will be glad to hear that many of the Chinese have been brought to the knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus. Last Friday I baptised 26 persons, 21 were Chinese, and, it being their New Year, a great many were assembled at the Old Colony House, as they are allowed a few days holiday at this time; some came a great distance to the meeting."

A brother labouring at Ningpo, China, writes on Nov. 5, 1864:—"Accept again, dear brother, my sincerest thanks for your kindness. I shall be glad to use your bounty for the object mentioned. I am not only thankful for your kind remembrance in this way, but I am glad to think that I am remembered also in your prayers. I am sure I must be prayed for by some one; for my work, not withstanding all my littleness of faith and unfitness in other respects, seems to prosper. Two months ago I had the pleasure of baptizing at one time sixteen persons, twelve in connection with the congregation left in my care by our dear brother J., and four in connection with my own. Since then six more candidates have been accepted in connection with the former, and there are several applicants connected with the latter. Mrs. L’s orphan school is also prospering. The house that has been building during the past year, is now nearly ready for occupation. It will afford very good accommodation for fifty girls and an assistant, if Mrs. L. should ever have one. Her present number of girls, however, is only twenty-three. They will doubtless increase, and as fast as we shall be prepared for them. The mission generally at Ningpo, I believe, is prospering. And numerous stations and churches are springing up in the region round about. There are difficulties and discouragements connected with it. But it is the Lord’s work and it will prosper."

A brother labouring at Penang, writes on Aug. 8, 1864:—"We have cause for much praise and thanksgiving to our loving Father in Heaven for bringing some to put their trust in Jesus, and rely on Him alone for the salvation of their souls. A few weeks ago, I was invited by one of the brethren to go to his house as some young persons desired to hear the Gospel. The wife of this brother is also a believer; they have both been in fellowship a few years. I went to the house about five o’clock in the evening, and found two young women, his wife, and two strangers from India, one of whom was a believer, and married, the other has entered the school. These two young women had never heard the Gospel, and their native language being Malay, was an advantage to them; both were Mohammedans. I told them, before we commenced, I would kneel down and ask God’s blessing upon the Word, and that He would be pleased to open their hearts to understand the truth. We all kneeled down and I prayed; afterwards I read to them several portions of the Word and simply preached to them Jesus. I set before them, as the Lord enabled me, His sacrifice, the sacrifice of Himself for sin. They quite understood the meaning of a sacrifice, and whilst relating to them the wondrous story, their eyes were fixed upon me the whole of the time. I went once or twice in the week for a few weeks, setting Jesus before them as the only way of salvation, and through whom alone men could be pardoned and saved. They both received the Gospel and believed in Jesus. One of them was baptized on the 24th ultimo. Her name is Lydia. The other is near her confinement; she also will, God willing, be baptized on her recovery. On the 28th ult., four Chinamen were also baptized, after giving evidence of their faith in Christ; they were four clear cases of conversion. Last Thursday evening two more Chinamen were examined; they desire to be baptized, both cases were satisfactory. Since Lydia was received into fellowship, her step-father has been very angry, and on her leaving the chapel yesterday week he came and made an attack upon her, as she was returning home. She escaped from him; and brother G. and I went to see him, but he was not in his house. In the evening we went again and found him at home. I then expostulated with him and told him not to persecute his step-daughter, as that religion was not of God that persecuted. I exhorted him to come to Jesus and trust in Him, though he might have to suffer shame and reproach. He promised he would not molest her again, and if she wished to go that way she might do so. The Lord’s dear people who pray for us may see from this, that their prayers are not in vain."

The same brother writes on Nov. 22, 1864:—"The latter end of last month brother G., a Chinese brother and myself, took a tour for three days on the Mainland. We left the Mission about nine o’clock in the morning and took a small boat. In this boat we sailed about five miles and arrived at the opposite shore. We then proceeded on foot for about two miles, until we came to a house where reside a country born man and his wife. He is a manufacturer of cocoanut oil, and employs a great many hands. This couple live very much alone and are well disposed to the Gospel. I should think the wife to be a believer. At twelve o’clock we had a meal with them, called tiffin, rice and curry, and some coffee. After reading a portion of the Word, we went on our journey, they kindly lending us a conveyance drawn by a bullock, as it was very hot in the day. We arrived at a village called Ager Tawer. Here we stayed and commenced at once to preach the glad tidings; a crowd of Malays gathered around. Brother G. went further into the village and preached to the Chinese. The population consisted principally of Chinese and Malays. We continued preaching for about three hours. One man, evidently with an air of self-reliance, asked how many had become Christians there. I replied, I did not know one; but I further said, when you have to stand before Jesus Christ, who will be your Judge, for every one will have to be judged by Him, you then cannot say you never heard these glad tidings. During the afternoon a large number of people came into the village. I asked what it meant; they told me it was a funeral of a young man who had died from fever. They went into the Mosque, but would not allow me to enter. I preached to them under the wall, and, after they had done, many of them came to the front of the Mosque and sat down; some listened and others cavilled. After we had done preaching, we went into the house of the Punghulu, the chief man of the village, something like an inspector of police in England. This man was very kind to us: he prepared us rice and fowls for dinner. We spoke to him, and preached Jesus. In speaking of the death of Jesus (the Mohammedans deny the death of Christ, and he being a Mohammedan, denied it too), the Lord enabled me to speak so forcibly, proving the death of Christ, that he got up from his seat and went out. He was an intelligent Malay. In this place we lodged for the night; we lay down on the floor, each of us having a pillow and a mat, but no covering; hence the mosquitoes were very troublesome. However we slept, the Lord watching over us in this place, surrounded by hundreds who were enemies to Christ. In the morning we awoke early and travelled on foot three miles further till we came to another village. During the walk we meditated on the Word and had our souls fed. The name of the village is Penaga. We had some refreshment here, and a season of prayer; we then went out and preached to those in the village, who listened to the wondrous story of the Cross. We found one of the chief men in this village who had been in the Mission School during Mr. B.’s time. He was a Mohammedan, he said, but not a rigid one. After publishing the Gospel, we left about three o’clock in the afternoon, and arrived in the dusk of the evening at the house of the oil manufacturer, who kindly lodged us for the night. He allowed his workmen to leave off work sooner, in order that they might get ready to come and hear the Gospel. They all came together, men and women, about ten. I preached Jesus to them in Malay, and set before them God’s way of salvation. About nine o’clock we retired to rest very fatigued, and slept soundly. We took our leave in the morning and arrived at the Mission safe and well."

The same brother writes on Jan. 6, 1865:—"The Chinese young woman of whom I wrote, was baptized on the 1st of last month. Her name is San Yong. And a brother was baptized on the 18th of the same month, Sieu A Loy. The Word by the Holy Spirit still takes effect. We have an open door in the town, and many listen to the glad tidings. Dear brother G. and I were in the province on the Mainland, and had good opportunities; many heard."

Another brother, also labouring at Penang, writes on 7th July, 1864:—"Brother C. and I continue to have, weekly, good meetings on board ships. We have been printing large placards with Scripture texts, which are exhibited outside the chapel gates for the passers by; in no other way can we reach the Europeans on shore. We have reason to believe they have already been touching some; for it has been said, Why not put them in the native languages for the heathen? This island is in a fearfully dead state. Yet the Chinese listen very attentively to the Word preached,—and power belongeth unto God. The Lord is our portion; and He graciously lets us see from time to time His working among the few believers in church fellowship here."

The same brother writes on Oct. 7, 1864:—"There has been an addition of six Chinese brethren here since the 28th July last."

A Christian captain, who saw the missionary operations at Penang, in writing to me a description of it, on Nov. 15, 1864, gives this statement:—"With the exception of the missionaries, the church consists of native Christians, Chinese (principally), Malays and Klings, numbering 67 adults with 30 communicants in the schools. There are 45 boys, boarders, 20 girls, boarders, 20 day-scholars, and 5 native teachers; 55 men and 12 women have been baptized. The women are not so seriously inclined as the men; the generality of them think they have no aim or object in life except to get married and have children. One Chinaman in particular appears very serious; he walks a distance of ten miles to meeting every Sunday morning. The others are all very attentive during worship, and the singing is very good; the words in their own tongue are set to psalm tunes."

A brother labouring in the Madras Presidency, East Indies, writes on May 11, 1864, received the end of June, 1864:—"The Lord is greatly encouraging our hearts now, to see that, here and there, the Word is taking effect, and in several places I hear of persons professing themselves Christians, who simply believe that Jesus died for them on the cross as their substitute, and that they can only be saved by Him. Two cases have come to my notice of persons in two different villages about twenty miles west of this, and there are some cases of peculiar interest."

The wife of the same brother writes on 27th June, 1864:—"One of the oldest converts in Palcole fell asleep in Jesus last week, leaving precious testimony of his faith to the last."

Her husband writes again on Jan. 11, 1865:—"On the 1st, New Year’s Day, three natives were baptized; one had formerly been a Hindoo, but had turned Mohammedan; he came out from among the latter in 1857, during the time of the mutiny. He is now a humble follower of Jesus. The other two, a young man and a young woman, were both formerly in our humble school at Palcole. On Lord’s Day last my dear wife and I went over to Palcole, for the day, and during the night were joined by brother H—, and by J. B., when we all proceeded to Martair, 16 miles from this, arriving at day break, where a man and his wife were to be baptized, which baptism took place at 9 am., in the Canal. Many of the Palcole Christians came over, and we had a good day. The Gospel was preached several times during the morning. This man is a very sincere man, and though he has not much knowledge, yet he is, and will be, a light in these dark regions: and he has great confidence that God his Father will not allow them to remain alone there, but will give others to join them. Already he sees some signs of willingness to listen to the truth among his neighbours. His wife is a gentle humble woman. There are many round about as desiring baptism, and we hear of many in distant places who are anxious to hear the Word. Allasahib (a native Christian), a few weeks since visited some of the villages from whence many formerly came to hear the Word. At one of these, one of the men was on his death bed. He embraced A. most affectionately, and said, ‘I am going to Jesus who died for me,’ and the next day fell asleep, we trust in Jesus. Several cases of this kind have from time to time come to our knowledge, and I have no doubt they often occur."

Another brother, also labouring among the heathen in the Madras Presidency, East Indies, writes on the 7th June, 1864:—"I have been enabled to preach the Gospel to a good number in these parts lately; and as I turned a deaf ear to their foolish, and at times blasphemous arguments, had more attentive audiences than usual. The other day I visited a festival where six sheep were offered up to a goddess who is supposed to delight in blood. I spoke to a crowd of people before and after the slaughtering of the sheep, and some listened with marked interest, and asked what they should do. Oh! how I do long to see sinners feel themselves (through the power of the Holy Ghost, by the Word) to be sinners."

The same missionary writes on Feb. 19th, 1865 "When your letter arrived, I was absent from home, at a village about 20 miles distant from this, with brother B. Our chief reason for going there, was to see a couple of men whom I had met at the festival which I was about to visit, when I last wrote, and who then appeared anxious about their souls. We found one of them, and had opportunities for reading and speaking in the evenings and during the night to him and about 20 others belonging to his sect. He and two or three others are, no doubt, anxious about their state; but I do not think they as yet read their title clear; they seem quite ill at ease, not knowing what to do. As I mentioned in my last, we (my wife, children and myself) went to the festival at Antrivady and met large numbers of people, to many of whom I was enabled to preach the everlasting Gospel. There was scarcely an hour of the day in which we were without hearers, for the five which we spent there. The remembrance of that time, and the readiness with which many appeared to listen to the good news, will, I feel, be ever fresh to my mind. Do pray regarding the incorruptible seed which we scattered at Antrivady. On the first day when speaking to some hundreds who were on their way to the sea side, one, a high caste man, who had listened very attentively for some time, came out from the crowd and said something to this effect: ‘Well, I have come so far, but I will go no further; I shall not bathe in the sea, but go home at once; we are on the wrong track.’ He then walked to the tent door, sat there for a short time, then, amidst the jeers of some, started for his home, which was some miles distant. Since that, I have been permitted to visit two other festivals, one in company with brother B., and the other alone. At both many poor dark souls heard of Jesus, and some bought books and tracts. As you may suppose, we met with oppositions. At Antrivady some bought tracts and afterwards tore them up before my face; I could do nothing but pity them. Two men were crushed under the idol’s car. Whilst all appeared awe stricken at the accident, I took the opportunity of preaching Christ; may the Lord bless His own word. Brother B. baptized five native females, and one young man the other day; others are desiring baptism. May the Lord work mightily by His Holy Spirit.

A brother, labouring in connexion with the last two missionaries, writes on Jan. 6, 1865:—"Regarding the school, I cannot with certainty say much as to the manifest results of the daily declarations of the precious Gospel of our Saviour, amongst the poor boys, though, we cannot but have great hopes of the secret working of the Spirit, in the hearts of some of them. The manifest attention paid by them to the preached word, and the very evident interest taken in its precious truths, as well as their disregard of all their idolatrous practices and ceremonies, lead us to form hopes, that the seed sown has not altogether proved to have fallen by the way side. Oh! may the Lord grant His word to grow up and bear fruit. The bonds with which the Satanic system of caste binds these poor youths, are indeed very strong, and it needs the mighty influence of the ‘constraining love of Christ,’ to cause them to break through the meshes of this net of the enemy of souls, even when the light of the Gospel has, in a measure, shone into the heart, and revealed the preciousness of Jesus; as I believe it has in one or two cases. In other respects the Lord’s work here has met with blessed results. Even our little English gatherings together have been blessed to the souls of two or three; while to the native brethren, there have been several additions by baptism. It was a most delightful sight, to witness on new year’s day the whole of the native Christians, amounting to about 50, gathering together, and a most precious privilege it was to meet with them in communion, after the admission of three more converts who had that day professed to put on Christ. Several more we hope to receive shortly into the visible church, and at the same time we have great cause for thankfulness regarding the interesting state, in general, of the natives in neighbouring parts, who seem anxious to hear, and quite prepared to receive the Gospel tidings. Our dear brethren B. and H. find in this an especial cause of joy, as it shows that their labours in the Lord have not been in vain."

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834 to May 25, 1865, is £61,494 17s. 0d.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, the sum of £1,068 12s, 0½d.; and there were circulated within the year 2,659,016 Tracts and Books. The sum total which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1865, amounts to £14,394 8s. 7d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1865, is above Twenty Five Millions (exactly 25,016,153).

Above One Million and Six Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,615,725) of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously.

I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A Christian brother in Worcestershire wrote to me, "I have received a parcel of Tracts from Bristol, for which I thank you. You will, I am sure, feel refreshed when I tell you, I know of some blessed cases of conversion, resulting from Tracts I have received from you previously."

A Christian brother in Devonshire, who has been for many years regularly supplied with Tracts for gratuitous circulation, wrote on Oct. 31, 1864: "Some time ago I gave the Tract, ‘Almost and Altogether,’ to a farmer, who was standing where I was preaching the Gospel in a village. It was blessed to his conversion, and shortly after his wife and daughter and two servants were converted."

A brother in Sunderland writes, on Dec. 8, 1864: "Sometime since I was called to visit a sick man. He had been formerly most careless. After I had spoken to him, and read to him from the Word, I took one of your Tracts, entitled ‘Poor Mat cannot Pay, Jesus has Paid.’ When I had done reading, he said: ‘Oh! that is I. My name is Mat. Jesus has paid; I cannot pay.’ I did not know before his name was Mat; but he found peace, and died most happy in Jesus. His last words almost were: ‘Mat cannot pay. Jesus has paid.’ This same Tract proved a blessing to another, a friend of his I visited, who thought that I had got the history of him printed on this Tract. Bursting out weeping, he said, ‘This is my poor friend Mat, who could not pay.’ I said, ‘But Jesus paid for him, and in this hope he departed to be with Jesus.’"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No, 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 124 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1865, would have been 1,274, had there been no changes; but of these 1,274, fourteen died during the past year. Only 14! Out of these 14, 11 gave us comfort in their death, as they died as believers in the Lord Jesus, 2 out of the 14 were infants, and the state of one only was not satisfactory. Two of the girls we were obliged to expel from the Institution. We had long borne with them, and at last resorted to this painful mode, as the last thing we could do for them, to arouse them out of their state. Fourteen of the Orphans were taken back by their relatives, partly because their circumstances had altered, and they were now able themselves to provide for them; or, partly, because they were now of such an age, as they would be of use to their relatives. Ten of the Orphans we were obliged to return to their relatives, as they either were mentally or physically in such a state of weakness or disease, that they were not suitable for the New Orphan Houses. Twelve of the boys were apprenticed, eight of whom had been for some time believers, before they left. And, lastly, 72 girls were sent out for service, seven of whom had been for some time believers. This makes the dismissals during the year 124, the same number as the receptions; so that on May 26, 1865, there were just 1,150 Orphans under our care, our full number for which the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, have been fitted up, namely, 300 in No. 1, 400 in No. 2, and 450 in No. 3. The amount of means, spent for the support of the 1,274 Orphans under care, during the year, was £11,839 12s. 2d., and £5,588 19s. was spent of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866.

For the encouragement of the Christian reader, and especially for the benefit of younger believers, I would refer to some precious answers to prayer which we had during that year.

As during the previous year, so in June, 1865, we had again before us the prospect of much difficulty and considerable additional expense, in connexion with the Orphan Houses, for want of water, particularly want of soft water in the cisterns, as during the spring of 1865 there had fallen very little rain, and as the season appeared to remain as dry as during the previous summer. This, in an establishment where from 2,000 to 3,000 gallons of water are daily consumed, the reader will see to be no small difficulty. But we betook ourselves to God in prayer, we earnestly sought His help, and we sought it not in vain; for though we had many times to call upon Him in May and June, yet in the beginning of July, 1865, abundant showers began to fall, and the Lord was pleased to give unto us such help as it regards water, that we never passed a period of eleven months so easily as from the beginning of July, 1865, to May 26, 1866; for we had generally in our cisterns enough soft water to last us two months, though there should have been no rain at all. I gratefully record this mercy, though such a common one, to the praise of the Lord.

During this year we had repeatedly to wait upon God for helpers, situations having become vacant through sickness or otherwise. In these cases we might advertise for candidates; but, though we should not consider it wrong to do so, we prefer simply to wait upon God, asking Him to direct the right persons to us; for He knows our need; the work is His and not ours; and He knows who are fit for the work. In all simplicity we ask Him, under such circumstances, that He would be pleased to make known our need, and incline suitable persons to apply for the situations; and during this year we were thus again and again helped in answer to our prayers. In one instance, when we needed a laundress, we began to pray on July 15, 1865, and brought this matter before God day by day, and generally two or three times a day; but no answer seemed to come. In the beginning of October, it appeared as if the answer were given; but all proved a disappointment. Instead of being discouraged by this, and thinking it useless to continue in prayer, we began afresh, and with more earnestness than ever to call upon the Lord; and on October 26th, after we had thus daily waited upon God for three months and eleven days regarding this matter, our prayers were answered.

During this year it pleased the Lord to exercise our faith greatly with reference to Scarlet-Fever and the Hooping-Cough. In Sept. 1865, the Scarlet-Fever broke out at the New Orphan House No. 2, in which house there are 200 Infant Girls and 200 Elder Girls. It appeared among the Infants. The cases increased more and more. But we betook ourselves to God in prayer. Day by day we called upon Him regarding this trial, and generally two or three times a day. At last, when the infirmary rooms were filled, and also some other rooms that could be spared for the occasion, to keep the sick children from the rest; and when now we had no other rooms to spare, at least not without great inconvenience; it pleased the Lord to answer our prayers, and in mercy to stay the disease. There were in all 36 children ill in the scarlet fever at No. 2, but not one died of the disease. The same malady broke out also at No. 3. But the Lord dealt there very gently with us; only 3 children were ill in the fever, and all recovered.—At the end of the year 1865 the hooping-cough appeared among the 450 girls of the New Orphan House No. 3. This disease was very general in Bristol, and many children died in consequence. Parents and others, who have an affectionate heart, and who feel for the suffering of children, can easily suppose, how our hearts were affected, when we heard these dear children labouring under this trying malady. But, while we thought it right, to take all the necessary precautions with regard to the spread of the disease, and to use the needed remedies; yet our chief and universal remedy, prayer and faith was again resorted to. We trusted in God, and betook ourselves to Him, and we were not confounded. When it is considered that we had 1,150 Orphans in the 3 houses, and that the hooping-cough was so general in Bristol and the neighbourhood, and in many instances so fatal, the hand of God, in answer to constant daily prayer for several months, regarding this disease, is marked enough, in that we had only in all the 3 houses 17 cases of hooping-cough, and that only one child died in consequence of the hooping-cough, this dear little girl having constitutionally very weak lungs and a tendency to consumption, which followed the hooping-cough.

But of all the many answers to prayer, which we had during that year, the choicest was, that it pleased the Lord to work greatly by His Spirit among the girls, especially in two schools at the Orphan Houses, as He had been pleased to do in the previous year among the boys. Without any apparent means, humanly speaking, all at once, God stirred up more than one hundred girls to be greatly in earnest about their souls. We are not surprised at His thus working, for we look for it, and daily pray for it, and generally several times daily; yet when the answers come, they are very refreshing to the inner man, and they greatly quicken the divine life, and lead to further and yet greater trust in God.

As it regards pecuniary supplies, I again found, during this year also, as during former years, what resources we have in God. Though the expenses for the support of the Orphans were greater than during any previous year since the commencement of the work, on account of the high price of animal food, and increase of the price of butter, milk, oatmeal, rice, etc.; yet the Lord supplied us abundantly. The total of the income for all the various objects of the work, from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, was £26,852 12s. 5d.

There were during this year 6 Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, with 450 children in them; and eight Day Schools, besides, were assisted. One Sunday School, with 150 children, was entirely supported, and four were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 40 scholars, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, is £663 7s. 8½d.

There were circulated 2,123 Bibles, 2,249 New Testaments, 62 Psalms, and 376 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £423 3s. 4d.

During this year was expended on Missionary Objects £4,235 13s. 2d., whereby 125 labourers in the Gospel were assisted. Gladly as I would give extracts from the many hundred letters which I received from the 125 servants of Christ, the size of this book forbids my doing so. I only have to say, that many hundreds of precious souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, during the year, through their instrumentality; and especially, also, the labours of evangelists at Home were blessed.

There was laid out on the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, the sum of £756 19s. 0½d.; and there were circulated within that year nearly Two Millions (exactly 1,927,360) of Tracts and Books.

Nearly One Million and Seven Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,695,415) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A sister in the Lord in Cornwall, whom I have often supplied with tracts, writes on Aug. 5, 1865:—"A sister in the Lord has told me of blessing to three, through reading your Gospel Tracts. One of the three died in peace last year. I think it was ‘The Serpent of Brass,’ that was used for blessing to this one. I was with my friend at the first interview with the other old man. When we met with him he was in quite a self-righteous state; he seemed willing to receive tracts, which my sister took him from time to time. She was led to do this, knowing how much time he had, having only to keep a stop gate, where he stayed from 8 o’clock in the morning till 6 o’clock in the evening. My sister visited the wife of this old man, and found her in an awakened state. They are now, from what my friend says, enjoying peace, through the atonement of Jesus, and she said it was from the tracts that were lent to them."

A brother in the Lord in Devonshire, who has been for many years supplied with large quantities of Tracts, Bibles and Testaments for gratuitous circulation, writes on Aug. 12, 1865:—"I am happy to say we have repeated proofs of the usefulness of the tracts. It will be a great joy to your heart to know, as it is to me to say, that ‘The Substitute’ has recently been blessed unto the conversion of a poor woman in the country. I bless God for this instance of His grace:—perhaps we know but little in this world, and in many cases nothing, of the good effected by their distribution."

The same brother writes on Feb. 28, 1866:—"I am happy to assure you that the tracts are in most cases not only willingly, but thankfully, received; and occasionally we are rejoiced to know of sanctified effects following. One dear woman, who, then in good health, was converted by means of one of your tracts, not long afterwards died, very happy, with the same tract in her hand, clasped to her bosom—so precious was it to her as the instrument of leading her to Jesus and of her soul’s salvation. Such blessings on the work are both encouragements to perseverance, and rewards of grace of unspeakable joy unto our hearts."

A Bristol Christian Tract Distributor, who has also been repeatedly supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Oct. 5, 1865:—"Dear Sir,—Some good while since you were kindly pleased to supply me with some tracts and leaflets for gratuitous distribution, and, as my number is nearly exhausted, I again venture to solicit a renewal of your assistance. Dear Sir, I feel very desirous of giving some account of the manner in which I dispose of the trust you commit to my charge. As our city is well supplied by various distributors, I have taken other ground within a radius of 5 miles from our city, from Dundry to Shirehampton, and from Frenchay and Hambrook to Pensford; and the classes among whom I labour are such as the following:—Soldiers, sailors, water-men or wherrymen, bargemen or canal men, cabmen at all the cab stands, omnibus men, railway navvies, gypsies, colliers, city and county police, field strollers, turnpike road gamblers, wayside cottagers, milkmen, farmers’ servants and all others, as circumstances allow. I am thankful I am not without good hope that your tracts have been the means of doing much good. I always leave home praying for the leadings of the Holy Spirit, that I may put the right tract into the right hands; and that the same good Spirit may work on the heart, to bring glory to God and extend the kingdom of our most blessed Redeemer. Last Lord’s-day I spent the afternoon among the soldiers in our barracks, giving them such tracts as I thought most likely to induce them to read. I find that among most of the classes before described, tracts of a narrative, or anecdote character, are most acceptable. Dear Sir, should you again help me in my work, a supply of the above kind will be thankfully received by your distributor."

A London Tract distributor wrote some months since:—"Dear Sir and Brother in Christ,—Might I venture to ask you for another supply of Gospel Tracts for free distribution, and likewise ask an interest in your prayers? For encouragement, I may say that several persons have been brought to the Lord Jesus through the other grant. I remain your affectionate, although unworthy brother in Christ," &c. The following is a letter from Buckinghamshire, dated May 17, 1866:—"In writing you again for a few tracts, I might refer you to some and not a few cases in which they have been blessed of the Lord; but one I must tell you. I think I told you in my last of one of my visits to P. and staying the evening to speak unto the people. I was there again last week, and found that I gave to an old man of 92 years of age, ‘Your Dying Hour.’ It was blessed to his awakening, and caused him great uneasiness. His granddaughter, with whom the old man lives, was listening to the Word in the evening, and I am happy to say that now in both a change is effected, which is as conspicuous as it is joyful."

A brother, labouring in the Gospel in Cornwall, writes on June 1, 1866:—"The Lord continues to bless the circulation of tracts. A few days since I heard that a young man in consumption, at a village some distance off, to whom I gave that tract, entitled ‘Pardon through the Blood of Christ,’ was led to the Lord by it, and has since died."

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 123 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1866, would have been 1,273, had there been no changes; but of these 1,273, eleven died during the year. Only 11! Out of these 11, five died as decided believers, 1 as a young infant, regarding 1 we had some hope, and the state of 4 was uncertain.—Five girls were expelled from the Orphan Houses, their ages varying from 16 years and 9 months to 18 years. We had long borne with them, and at last, in mercy to the other Orphans, this painful remedy was resorted to, as the last means of seeking to do them good. We had no prospect of ever being able to recommend them, for situations, though they were all able to earn their living.—Eight Orphans, out of the 1,273, were returned to their relatives, because, after long trial, we found that two of them were so weak in intellect, that we never could have recommended them as servants or apprentices, and six of them had spinal or scrofulous or other incurable diseases, so that they never would be fit, humanly speaking, to take situations, yet were now of an age to leave the Institution.—Five children were given up to their relatives, who, by that time, were able to provide for them, and were desirous of doing so.—Fifteen boys were sent out to be apprenticed, of whom eleven had been believers for a longer or shorter time before they left.—Eighty girls were sent out to service, of whom twelve had been for a longer or shorter time believers, before they were sent out. These 124 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,273, so that on May 26, 1866, we had 1,149 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 399; and in No. 3, 450.

I have already stated in the previous pages, that it pleased the Lord, to give to us, as the choicest answer to prayer, during the year, that He had been pleased at the beginning of this year 1866 to stir up all at once above One Hundred Orphans to care about their souls. From the moment I heard of this blessed work of the Spirit of God among these dear children, my prayer was daily, that God would be pleased to deepen it, that He would extend it through each department of the three houses, and that He would not allow Satan to mar it. The like petitions, I doubt not, my dear fellow-labourers brought before God. And now rejoice with us, dear Christian Reader, in what I am going to relate to you further. Towards the end of the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, one of the Orphans, Emma Bunn, more than seventeen years old, was taken ill. As we soon learnt that her case was hopeless consumption, and her soul unprepared for eternity, we were the more earnestly concerned about her salvation. But though she had been fourteen years under our care, and therefore from very early days, she was unconcerned about the things of God, yea to a very high degree indifferent. She grew weaker and weaker, but remained as careless as ever. She was often spoken to; the Scriptures were in small portions read to her; prayer was offered to the Lord on her behalf continually, both in her hearing, and otherwise; but all, apparently, of no use. Her case became more and more discouraging. On May 26 she was yet again visited by my dear wife and several of my helpers; but her case was as hopeless as ever, though the appearance was, that she would live only a few days longer. On the following day, however, it pleased God to reveal the Lord Jesus to her heart. She was able to put her trust in Him for the salvation of her soul, and thus obtained peace. This dear girl, who had been so entirely careless about the things of God, was now unspeakably happy in the Lord, which was coupled with great self-loathing and confession of sin. She expressed in the fullest way one could have wished, how sorry she was, for having so long neglected the salvation of her soul, how she had disliked to be spoken to about the Gospel, and how even, on one occasion, when one of my helpers, was again coming to her bedside, to speak to her, she feigned to be asleep, when she heard him coming, to escape being spoken to. When now this dear girl was convinced of sin, and made so unspeakably happy through faith in the Lord Jesus, she manifested the deepest concern about the salvation of her young friends and companions in the New Orphan House No. 3, and sent several messages to them from her dying bed, intreating them to seek the Lord. On Sunday, May 27, 1866, she found peace in the Lord, and on Tuesday morning, May 29, she fell peacefully asleep in Jesus. Her thoughtlessness and carelessness regarding the things of God had been well known among the Orphans, and her conversion and her messages were now used by the Lord as the instrument of the most extensive and glorious work of the Spirit of God that we ever had had among the children, during the whole time that the Orphan Work has been in existence. 350 Orphans in the New Orphan House No. 3 alone were led to seek the Lord, and the greater part of them found peace for their souls, through faith in the Lord Jesus, shortly after. These dear children, formerly almost all careless and indifferent, and most of them much like what Emma Bunn had been, afterwards had their prayer-meetings among themselves, as often as they could, and, in other ways, gave joy to our hearts. I have so minutely dwelt on these facts for the following reasons:—

a. Many individuals are discouraged, because they see their children or other relatives remaining indifferent about the truth, and they are ready to consider that it is useless to pray any longer for the conversion of these their relatives, or to set the truth any further before them. Let such remember Emma Bunn. Her case was indeed, humanly speaking, of the most hopeless character; and yet our prayers were at last most fully answered; and any special efforts, which had been made to impress her heart, were most abundantly recompensed. Similar instances we have had again and again among the Orphans.

. Many individuals are discouraged, because they see their children or other relatives remaining indifferent about the truth, and they are ready to consider that it is useless to pray any longer for the conversion of these their relatives, or to set the truth any further before them. Let such remember Emma Bunn. Her case was indeed, humanly speaking, of the most hopeless character; and yet our prayers were at last most fully answered; and any special efforts, which had been made to impress her heart, were most abundantly recompensed. Similar instances we have had again and again among the Orphans.

b. In the case of Emma Bunn we saw the benefit of storing the memory with the truth, and the benefit of Biblical instruction; for, when she was once brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, it was most manifest how the Spirit of God was pleased to use all this, and how rapid her progress during the little while she continued to live, after her conversion.

. In the case of Emma Bunn we saw the benefit of storing the memory with the truth, and the benefit of Biblical instruction; for, when she was once brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, it was most manifest how the Spirit of God was pleased to use all this, and how rapid her progress during the little while she continued to live, after her conversion.

c. Some children of God almost think, as if there could be no reality in the conversion of young persons, and especially of a number of young persons, all at once; and yet we have had instance upon instance that children of the age of nine or ten years old have been converted and remained steadfast in the ways of God for many years; and we have also seen, how at least the greater part of the children, who in large numbers were stirred up to care about their souls, continued to do so. Let us, then, expect great things from God, and we shall have them.

Some children of God almost think, as if there could be no reality in the conversion of young persons, and especially of a number of young persons, all at once; and yet we have had instance upon instance that children of the age of nine or ten years old have been converted and remained steadfast in the ways of God for many years; and we have also seen, how at least the greater part of the children, who in large numbers were stirred up to care about their souls, continued to do so. Let us, then, expect great things from God, and we shall have them.

During the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, was expended on the support of the 1,273 Orphans, who were under our care, £12,520 3s. 8d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867.

The Institution, having been formed on March 5th, 1834, had now been above thirty-two years in operation. Its beginning was most small, but it had since been almost year by year enlarged, and that to such an extent, as that the expenditure in connexion therewith, during the year of which I now write, amounted to £34,849 0s. 6d. To large houses of business, or even to some private wealthy individuals, this sum may not appear a very large one; but it is to be kept before the Reader, that the means to meet such an expenditure are obtained simply by asking God to work in the hearts of His stewards to help us; for in no case is an appeal made to any individual for help. From this we abstain, not that we consider it sinful in it self to apply to individual believers for help in the cause of Christ; but, because one of the especial reasons for the formation of this Institution, and especially of that of the Orphan Work, was, that it might be seen to the glory of God, how much can be accomplished simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith; in order that thus there might be, in this work, a witness to the faithfulness of God for the believer, and that the unbeliever might see, in it, the reality of the things of God, and thus be led to seek Him while He is to be found.

I notice a few out of the many especial blessings, mercies, and answers to prayer, granted to us during this year, for the encouragement of the Christian readers.

When the cholera appeared in England, during the summer of 1866, and when there were even some cases in Bristol, it had been, from the commencement, our special prayer, that, if it might be, the Lord would mercifully shield the Orphan Houses against this fearful disease. And so He did. Not a single instance occurred. We had, however, many applications for the admission of children, who had lost both parents by cholera, and in one single letter 23 such children were applied for.

During this year the hooping-cough again broke out among the Orphans. We asked the Lord, that, if it might be, He would graciously prevent the spreading of this trying malady; and He did deal very pitifully with us; only eight children, out of all the hundreds under our care, took the disease.

During the summer and autumn of 1866 we had also the measles at all the three Orphan Houses. After they had made their appearance, our especial prayer was, 1, That there might not be too many children ill at one time in this disease, so that our accommodation in the Infirmary rooms or otherwise might be sufficient. This prayer was answered to the full; for though we had at the New Orphan House No. I not less than 83 cases, in No. II altogether 111, and in No. III altogether 68; yet God so graciously was pleased to listen to our supplications, as that when our spare rooms were filled with the invalids, He so long stayed the spreading of the measles till a sufficient number were restored, so as to make room for others, who were taken ill. 2, Further we prayed, that the children, who were taken ill in the measles, might be safely brought through and not die. Thus it was. We had the full answer to our prayers; for though 262 children altogether had the measles, not one of them died. 3, Lastly we prayed, that no evil physical consequences might follow this disease, as is so often the case; this was also granted. All the 262 children not only recovered, but did well afterwards. I gratefully record this signal mercy and blessing of God, and this full and precious answer to prayer, to the honour of His name.

During the whole year, we were mercifully preserved from trying infectious fevers. I gratefully mention this particular mercy of God, to the praise of His name.

There never was a year, since this work had been in existence, that our current expenses were so great as during this year, which was occasioned by the high price of provisions, &c.; added to this, the three Orphan Houses were taxed, with all the ordinary city taxes, which, for more than 30 years before, while the Orphan Work was in operation, had not been the case. But while, on the one hand, our outgoings were greater than ever they had been, since the 5th of March, 1834, our income too was greater than during any previous year, since the Institution had been in existence; whereby God not only again showed how able He is to meet the increase of expenses in connexion with His work, but He was, as it were, likewise saying to me, I will also provide means, when the two new houses, now in course of erection, shall have been filled with destitute Orphans.

I record it as a marked blessing from God, that we had no difficulty during this year, nor for a number of years previously, in placing out the Orphans, when ready to leave the Institution; but had far more applications for apprentices and servants than we were able to supply.

I cannot pass over noticing especially the small number of deaths we had during this year among the Orphans. Only eleven died, out of 1,304, who were under our care from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867. When it is considered, that by far the greater part of these Orphans lost one or both parents in consumption, and that, therefore, almost all inherit from their parents a weak constitution; we have especial cause for thankfulness in the small number of deaths. We indeed see, on the one hand, the importance of cleanliness, regular habits, wholesome food, and suitable clothing with regard to these children; and we are, moreover, fully convinced, that for want of these requisites, so many tens of thousands of the children of the poor go to an early grave; yet, on the other hand, we do own the gracious blessing of God upon these means, which are used for the preservation of the health and life of these children.

The greatest of all the blessings, however, which it pleased the Lord to bestow upon us in connexion with this Institution, in answer to daily prayer, was the mighty awakening among the Orphans, which occurred at the end of the previous year and the beginning of this. This was the greatest spiritual blessing we ever had had among the Orphans, at one time, till then.

From May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there were six Day Schools, with 425 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and nine other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 150 children, was entirely supported, and eight others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 32 scholars, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. The amount of means, which was expended, in connexion with the various Schools, is £686 19s. 11d.

There were circulated 3,193 Bibles, 4,572 New Testaments, 61 copies of the Psalms, and 6,702 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £530 4s. 2d. From May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there was expended on Missionary operations of the funds of the Institution, £5,010 18s. 2d., whereby 125 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, were assisted. There rested upon the labours of these brethren again abundant blessing during this year, and many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord; but I am unable to give extracts from about One Thousand letters, received from these brethren, for want of space. As, however, the Reports may yet be obtained, the Christian reader who feels interested in the matter, may send for the Report from 1866 to 1867, in which 20 large pages are occupied with these extracts.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, the sum of £731 1s. 11d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Eighteen Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,824,604) Tracts and Books.

More than One Million and Four Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,403,432) of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother in the Lord, whom I have often supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on July 2,1866:—"The Tracts which I last received have been carefully distributed, and I have reason to believe, by communications made to me, that much blessing has resulted through these silent messengers. A poor woman told me, three weeks ago, that she found peace through reading one of the Tracts which I left at her cottage.

Another, residing in Wiltshire, writes on Aug. 14, 1866:—"I was rejoiced to find, that a Tract entitled ‘I do depend upon the Blood’ was blessed to the salvation of a poor profligate woman. She was one who had drunk deeply of the cup of this world’s pleasure, but at last, in the decline of her life, her only theme was, ‘The blood of the Lamb.’"

The next extract is from a letter received from London, dated Feb. 22, 1867:—"You kindly sent us during the past year 18,000 Tracts. I have much pleasure in informing you, that two distinct cases of conversion have come under our notice by their distribution. One of the Tracts was lying on a table at a factory, and while the men were having their breakfast, one of them read it and was deeply convinced of sin. Before the day closed, he found peace through believing in Jesus by no other means than the application of the words of the Tract by the Spirit to his soul. He is now earnestly engaged with us in scattering far and near these heralds of mercy, praying that the Lord would again choose the weak things of the world to confound the things that are mighty. The other case is that of a young woman who was very worldly; she was aroused to a sense of sin by reading a Tract, and is now trusting in the Lord. She has since been the means of bringing her sister to a knowledge of the truth. We have distributed about 60,000 during the past year; they have been distributed during open air services, at lodging houses where services are conducted, in the hospital, in every house in the neighbourhood, and by the way side. The Lord has, in mercy, set His seal to each of these efforts, and though He has not yet given us our heart’s desire, still we go out, trusting to Him, who hath said, ‘They who go forth weeping bearing precious seed shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing their sheaves with them.’ We are in need of Tracts, and if the Lord should incline you to send us more, they will be gratefully received and prayerfully distributed."

The following is an extract from a letter, dated Aug. 1, 1866, written by a believer in Wales, whom I have often supplied with parcels of Tracts for gratuitous circulation.—"We are still distributing many Tracts round the hills, and, praise the Lord! we have reason to believe much good is being done by them. I neatly folded, and prayed for the divine blessing on a number, that my dear sister N. took to the Pontypool fair last month. She gave one to a poor man, he unfolded it, and having read the title, ‘Behold He cometh,’ he said with tears in his eyes, ‘I hope I shall be ready to meet Him.’ Brother N. has been very much blessed in giving Tracts at a village about two miles from where we live, where backsliders have been reclaimed, believers strengthened, and a prayer meeting begun: to God be all the praise and glory. And, dear brother, I must tell you about a poor man who had a stroke about a year ago. Sister N. called to see him, and left him a Tract. The next time she called, he said, that Tract had showed him the way of salvation, and he repeated nearly all the Tract to her, and said that he now saw that Jesus had paid his debt, and that he that believeth hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation, but is passed from death unto life. He got a little better and managed to reach our house a few months ago; he was quite clear on these truths, and trusting in what Christ had done for him; but he said he wanted to feel fit for heaven, he did not always feel happy. We had a nice time in prayer together, and we gave him a Tract we thought the Lord would bless to him. I was glad to see him again this week, he said he had seen from the Tract he had last, that Christ was his righteousness in which he was to appear before God, and that what he had to do, was, to trust in Christ, to look to Him, and not trouble about his feelings: he said, ‘Payment, God will not twice demand, first at my bleeding Surety’s hand, and then again at mine,’ He said, when I am persecuted, these words keep me up: ‘Love your enemies, and pray for them that despitefully use you,’ and I tell it all to the Lord in my simple way. Praise the Lord for this victory gained! My dear brother, we should be very glad of another grant of Tracts, if you could please to send us some. Many thanks for past favours."

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there were 1,149 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 1,154 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1867, would have been 1,303, had there been no changes; but of these 1,303, eleven died during the year. Eight of these eleven fell asleep in Jesus as believers, one was an infant, and the two others gave us no satisfaction as to their spiritual state. Three out of the 1,303 were expelled during the year, on account of violence of temper, insubordination, and habitual bad behaviour. They were all three girls, able to earn their bread as servants. Fifteen Orphans were during the year removed by relatives, who, by that time, were both able and willing to provide for them in future; out of these fifteen, six left us as believers in the Lord Jesus. Nine boys were apprenticed, of whom eight left our care as believers. One hundred and fifteen girls were sent out, fit for service, of whom sixty were believers. These one hundred and fifty-three are therefore to be deducted from the 1,303, so that on May 26, 1867, we had 1,150 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 400; and in No. 3, 450.

I notice further the following points respecting the Orphan work:

1. From what I have just stated as to those who died as believers, or were apprenticed or sent out to service as believers; and from the letters received from Orphans, which have been given in this Narrative, the reader must have seen how greatly the Lord is pleased to bless the Orphan work spiritually. To this, however, is to be added, that there were then a considerable number of converted Orphans under our care, and that hundreds left us in previous years as believers, or fell asleep as true Christians whilst in the Orphan Houses. For all this we thank the Lord, and in it we gratefully own His hand; but we expect far greater spiritual blessing still, as it regards the Orphans.

2. The greatest of all the spiritual blessings, however, resulting from this work, I judge to be this, that the Reports which have been issued in connexion therewith, have not only been instrumental in the conversion of many sinners, by leading them to see the reality of the things of God, but have, also, in the cases of many thousands of Christians, as their letters have testified to me, during the past 36 years, been a great spiritual help to them, in comforting them, leading them more fully to cast their burdens upon the Lord, increasing their faith, showing to them practically and experimentally that the Living God is still the Living God, and in other respects benefiting their souls. This point was the great and chief end of the establishment of the Orphan Work, that thus God might be glorified. This end has been answered beyond the largest expectations which I had in the year 1835. But now, my faith having been greatly increased, by the grace of God, since then, which I thankfully own to His praise, my expectations are far greater in this respect, than they were in the year 1835, and I expect far greater blessing, therefore, in this particular for the time to come, although I am in myself unworthy of being thus used by the Lord, even in the very least degree.

There was expended from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, for the support of the 1,303 Orphans under our care, the sum of £13,456 17s. 4d.; and in connexion with the building of the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5 £14,407 6s. 2d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868.

In looking back upon this year, my soul does magnify the Lord, for all the help He was pleased to give to me. Difficulties, greater than ever I had them for the previous thirty-three years, were overcome during that year, by prayer and faith; work, which is increasing with every year more and more, was not allowed to overwhelm me; and expenses greater than during any previous year, amounting altogether from May 27, 1867, to May 26, 1868, to £41,310 16s. 8½d. were met, without my ever being unable to satisfy to the full at once all demands, though sometimes amounting to more than £3,000 at a time. We were then going on in the Thirty-Fourth year of this Institution, proving day by day, that the Living God of the Bible is still the Living God. Elijah has long since been taken up into heaven, but the God of Elijah lives; and all, who truly depend upon Him, will find Him ever ready to help them.

By the grace of God we hold fast the principles on which, in March, 1834, the Scriptural Knowledge Institution was formed, of which I would here only refer to the following. 1, God Himself was from the beginning sought to be the Patron of this Institution; and He alone is our Patron still. We are grateful for any kindness manifested towards this Institution, even the least, whether in the way of donations or otherwise; but we are with every succeeding year more and more convinced, that, if we would really prosper, God must not theoretically only, but practically be honoured above every one, even the most exalted or rich persons; and He must be confided in, and not any human being. And how have we succeeded, you may ask, esteemed Reader, with the Living God alone as our Patron? All who know the small and most insignificant beginning of the Institution bear us witness, that we have not in vain set up our banners in the name of our God, and confided in His power and willingness to help us. Four Hundred Thousand Pounds Sterling the Lord was pleased to send into our treasury, in answer to prayer, since we began to confide in Him alone, on March the 5th, 1834, up to May 26th, 1868. 2, We decided, in particular also, from the beginning, never to go beyond the means which we had actually in hand, whilst enlarging the field of labour. To this we have habitually adhered; which has kept us from going before the Lord. Sometimes we have had to wait on God a long time, before the means were obtained, which it appeared to us desirable to have; but they have always been sent to us in the end. We judged it to be for the glory of God, patiently to wait His time, and not to make haste in doing His work, by contracting debt. This happy way, this peaceful way, this prosperous way, this Scriptural way, I affectionately commend to all my brethren in Christ, especially to my younger brethren, who seek to work for God; for I have proved its blessedness for about Forty Four Years.

The Reader may ask, And what was done with the Four Hundred Thousand Pounds Sterling, which were given for the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad up to May 26, 1868? The answer is, that above Sixteen Thousand Five Hundred children or grown up persons were taught in the various Schools, entirely supported by the Institution; more than Forty-Four Thousand and Five Hundred Copies of the Bible, and above Forty Thousand and Six Hundred New Testaments, and above Twenty Thousand other smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures, in various languages, were circulated from the formation of the Institution up to May 26, 1868; and about Thirty-one Millions of Tracts and Books, likewise in several languages, were circulated. There were, likewise, from the commencement, Missionaries assisted by the funds of the Institution, and of late years more than One Hundred and Twenty in number. On this Object alone Seventy six Thousand One Hundred and Thirty-seven Pounds were expended from the beginning, up to May 26, 1868. Also 2,412 Orphans were under our care, and five large houses, at an expense of above One Hundred and Ten Thousand Pounds were erected, for the accommodation of 2,050 Orphans. With regard to the spiritual results, eternity alone can unfold them; yet even in so far as we have already seen fruit, we have abundant cause for praise and thanksgiving.

From May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, six Day-Schools, with 415 children in them, and seventeen other Day-Schools were assisted. One Sunday-School with 194 children was entirely supported, and eighteen others were assisted. Two Adult-Schools, with 40 Scholars in them, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various schools, was £787 0s. 0½d.

From May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were circulated, 2,501 Bibles, 6,771 New Testaments, 129 copies of the Psalms, and 10,409 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the Funds of the Institution, spent on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £557 1s. 2d.

During no previous year, since the formation of this Institution, were so many copies of the Holy Scriptures circulated as during this year; and during no previous year did we circulate so many copies of the Holy Scriptures in foreign languages, as during this year. The latter was chiefly owing to the fact, that two of the Missionaries who are assisted by the funds of this Institution, were almost the whole time, while the Paris Exhibition lasted, during the Summer of 1867, labouring among foreigners in Paris, preaching to them, and especially circulating the Holy Scriptures among them. One of these brethren speaks 8 modern languages, and the other three, and through their instrumentality alone were circulated during the year, chiefly at the Paris Exhibition, 163 French Bibles and 1,600 French Testaments, 212 Spanish Bibles and 461 Spanish Testaments, 24 Italian Bibles and 182 Italian Testaments, 44 Portuguese Testaments, 32 Russian Testaments, 3 Polish Testaments, 11 German Bibles and 602 German Testaments, 2 Modern Greek Testaments, 1 Hebrew Testament, 2 English Bibles, 1 English Testament, 8,200 Portions of the New Testament in French, and 340 Portions of the New Testament in 12 other languages.

I received many letters from those two brethren, who laboured at the Paris Exhibition, of which I will now give a few extracts.

Brother L— writes from Paris on June 25th, 1867:—"I take a little corner of the building, which brother H— asked me to take, as just there a great number of the aristocracy of all nations visit; and here I sit down and pray the Lord to send me some whom He may have prepared to receive a little portion of His truth. Last week I had four distinguished visitors—the Russian Duchess —, who asked many questions as to the circulation, &c., and wished in parting, ‘Russia might soon be filled with Bibles.’ The next day the Russian Princess — came and asked me to give her a copy in Russian; and the next day the Grand Duke of — with his Duchess, asked me to give him a German portion. He noticed some little Spanish gilt-edged Testaments I had by my side and asked me what they were for. I told him. He said, ‘And do they take them?’ I gave him an account of the Spanish work which interested him; and, when parting, he said, ‘I hope you may send many thousand copies into Spain, for they indeed need them.’ I did not know any of these visitors until the officers, who were standing a distance off, told me; and of this I was the more glad. Another class of persons in whom I am much interested, are the invalids who come to the Exhibition. As they pass in their wheel chairs, many aged and many consumptive, whom kind friends are doing their best to satisfy with the world’s toys, my heart is specially drawn to them; and I am often pleased to see them regard very earnestly, the text on the portico—’Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved,’ &c. The gendarmes, now they understand they are not to interfere with this work of distributing the Scriptures, are always most anxious for copies, and each band of soldiers numbering 500, who come in turn to see the sight, receive copies every morning on their entry. I have a very happy opportunity of saying a word to the priests, many of whom come, some hoping by their wisdom to confound me, but to whom I read such Scriptures as,—‘By one offering,’ ‘it is finished,’ and other such portions to lead their minds to the only way of peace. Others stay to ask me what is the object of giving away such portions, and I read such portions as show that the word of God was generally in the possession of the ‘common people’—as the Bereans, the Eunuch, and the favourite word in John v., ‘Search the Scriptures;’ also in Rev. i., ‘Blessed are they who read,’ &c. Two young priests were with me the other night for a long time, and they admitted that I had what many men had not; and one said he was sure that ‘It is finished,’ was the only ground of peace, but thought I ought to pray to God to enlighten me on the ground of doctrines. They shook hands very friendly, and I told them I should pray to God for them, to make them satisfied with, ‘It is finished.’ Every day I meet with such. Among my Spanish friends I continue to find favour, and have every day some fresh case of the desire to know more of the pure and unadulterated Word; as they continually say, ‘They know the religion of Christ must be different to what is seen in Spain.’ One day a Portuguese gentleman, to whom I spoke, said ‘I have read many books of men, but now God’s word is my only book, and I rejoice in the work.’ I gave a copy the other day to a Professor of the Royal School of Industry in Madrid, and he recommended one of his students to go with me to get a copy. I have two young men in the Spanish department, who are very interested in the work, and frequently bring their countrymen that they may have copies. This is just an outline of my daily work, although I cannot describe the many feelings that occupy me in this work."

Again this brother writes August 1, 1867. "The whole of the Spanish Commission are interested, and always tell their countrymen. One of them said to me, ‘I was brought up as a priest, and when you spoke to me about the Bible, I thought, what business has he to speak about such things to me; but now I am interested in what you say, and read constantly the New Testament.’ He and another hold me by the hand as a brother, and ask all kinds of questions."

The same brother writes on Aug. 3, 1867:—"We have had a band of Spanish soldiers here who came to take part in the international festival. The greater part of these carry back Bibles and Testaments. It was a most interesting sight to see the interest they took in the Word given and preached. A brother in the Lord was greatly moved as he saw a company of 7 fine soldiers gathered round me listening to the truth as it is in Jesus: the emotions of their faces and the expression ‘La Verdad,’ (Truth) ‘Mira pues’ (Look at that now). Often one would say to another, ‘How our eyes have been bandaged,’ and said another, ‘I have been reading the New Testament, which you gave me, the last four days. I never read such a beautiful book in my life.’ A month ago a son who is in the Spanish Commission brought his father, to have a Bible. The old man was wonderfully interested. He writes to his son, ‘When I arrived in Madrid, they took from me all my books; I begged hard for my Bible, but they would take it. Get one of the soldiers (naming him) to bring me another.’ Many others continually bring their friends to receive copies. I have daily congregations who listen with peculiar delight as I dwell on the one theme ‘Consumatum est.’ (‘It is finished.’) Every now and then I get some from Barcelona who know one and another there, whom we are yet interested in. One of the soldiers this week said, as I was setting the truth before him and three other comrades, ‘What a happy land ours would be, if there was a spiritual revolution; how much better it would be than one by shedding one another’s blood."

On Oct. 2, 1867, this brother writes from Paris: "I find continual demand for Spanish Bibles and Testaments. I met with several yesterday who expressed themselves very gratefully for the portions I gave them, and yesterday a great number of excursionists arrived from Madrid, and I trust I shall meet with some of them. On Last Lord’s day I had an extraordinary day of service among the crowds who were here. For four hours I never moved from one spot, dealing out with both my hands to the outstretched hands, the majority of which were hands hardened by toil; by which I could see, without looking in their faces, that they were peasants."

On Oct. 15, he writes: "Since I last wrote, two or three interesting things have occurred. A young French physician said he was visiting his patients in an hospital here, and seeing one man in his bed reading a gospel which had been given away in the Parc, he asked him how he obtained it. He replied, that one of the sisters of mercy had given it him. The Doctor said, ‘I told him to go on and read it.’ A priest brought one of his peasant parishioners to the stall for the sale of Bibles and bought one for him. Two priests who went into the Gospel Hall to hear the addresses in French, were touched to the heart, it is hoped, and have become obedient to the faith. I bought three Testaments for three French Jews, who were too poor to pay for them, who yet greatly desired to have them, yesterday and today. A great many Arab soldiers have come for copies of the Word, and have received them. Oh! that they might receive Him, of whom it speaks, as gladly as they have received the Word."

After the close of the Exhibition in Paris, the same brother writes, on Nov. 6, 1867: "With this I enclose you a further account of Bibles and Testaments purchased. Some of the French ones I purchased were for a Swedish brother who is going to Austria, to a water establishment; he wished some of large type for some aged ones he knew there, and also in Paris. Others I obtained for our brother V—, some of which he wished for the Mayor of—, who was once a persecutor, but now preaches the faith he destroyed. Many of the New Testaments I gave to the Police, with whom I became acquainted. One of these, to whom I gave one last Wednesday, came about a quarter of an hour afterwards, accompanied by the page of the Empress, and asked me if I would give him one. I gave him a Bible, for which he appeared very grateful. The next day he came, asking me if I would give one to her Majesty’s coachman, which I gladly did, telling him if he knew any of the Imperial household, who would like a copy, I would gladly give them one. 14 large-type Bibles were for some poor workmen in an establishment where about 100 men are employed, as firemen and machinists in the public service. The foreman of the brigade, about two months since, received a gospel portion, which led him to buy a Bible, which he began to read in his family. Afterwards he began to speak to the men under him, and to read portions to them, which constrained twenty-nine of them to buy family Bibles, and they meet in their workshop to read them. This foreman seems in great earnest that others should possess what he says is the most precious book in the world. A brother told me he was present when, at the railway station, this man in taking leave of a companion who was going to another city to reside, handed a Bible to him, saying, "Here, friend, accept this as the most precious souvenir I can offer to you," the tears falling from each other’s eyes as they separated. Up to the very last moment I had Spaniards coming to get portions and Bibles. Seven persons from different parts of Spain came for the same object just as I was on the eve of quitting the wonderful exhibition of man’s greatness, industry and skill, and where there has been one of the most wonderful exhibitions of the love and zeal and successful efforts of the Lord’s children to spread the knowledge of the uncorrupted word of truth."

Brother D., the other Missionary, who laboured at the Paris Exhibition, writes from Paris on Aug. 12, 1867: "I feel I can by no means do justice to the glorious work of distribution of the Word at the International Exhibition. One million and a quarter have been distributed in sixteen different languages; of course the bulk was among the French. I am happily surprised to see the readiness with which they are accepted, and even with thankfulness by many. Some of the priests accept gratefully the books, but others show their hatred. The Irish seem the most bitter, I have seen few of them accept. I feel sure, if ten thousand colporteurs were sent out to distribute the same books all over France, they would not be able, in ten years, to spread so many as the Exhibition labourers are now doing in six months. Thousands of country people accept the little books at the Exhibition, who would be afraid to take one from a colporteur in his own village. I have it laid on my heart to give gospels to the omnibus conductors and drivers. These men can never leave work, therefore I feel them laid on my heart. Not one has ever refused, but in every instance the gospel has been thankfully accepted. Men and boys have been seen in the fields reading the little books. Many are seen reading the same on the benches of the Boulevards of Paris. May the dear Lord enable all these to see the disease of sin, and then the dear Physician. We have all many opportunities to speak to poor sinners of different nations."

The same brother writes on Sep. 3: "None could credit the readiness and thankfulness with which the visitors of the Exhibition accept the gospels; there are not so many refusals as there are in England. I remember two Spaniards coming and obtaining two Spanish Bibles; the same evening, when going to my lodgings, I saw them sitting on one of the benches of the Boulevards reading the precious volume. About three months ago I was passing through a street near the Notre Dame Church, when I saw a porter resting himself on his burden, with one of the gospels in his hands. I observed him reading it for a long time. A few weeks ago a brother was in the country, and saw a man and a boy reading one of the same gospels. We have reason to believe that these are only samples of what may be seen in many parts of France. We preached at Cuisse on the Lord’s day. Some came eight miles to the preaching. About forty met in a large room of the house of L—. Many present had found peace in Jesus. One poor woman came nine miles with her two daughters, of about seven and nine years of age. Her husband had threatened to kill her, if she continued to go to the meetings. One Sunday evening he had the sword ready to kill her, but the neighbours stepped in and took the weapon from him. She told her husband she could not give up Christ, she felt determined to follow Jesus; she also told him, she would rather die with Christ, than live without Him, The husband said, at all events she should not go to the meeting the following Sunday. When the day came, the wife prepared food for her husband and carried it to him to the field. He felt astonished to see this good for evil, and said "Tu es si aimable, tu peux aller à la réunion." (You are so amiable, you may go to the meeting.) The poor woman got herself ready and went to the meeting. There are some in the same meeting who have wives persecuting them, others have husbands doing the same; but they all seem so happy and willing to suffer for Jesus, and pray that their ungodly partners may be converted. After all the meetings of the day were finished, we walked about the large village and distributed the Epistle to the Romans; all accepted but three. We had several opportunities to speak of Jesus, the friend of sinners. We saw two old men talking, to whom we gave the same Epistle, one began to read and the other went into the house for his spectacles, that he also might read the little book. Many read the little book that evening. We left on the following morning (Monday) for a village at the other end of the forest, and gave gospels to every one we met. We arrived at the village at 7 o’clock. In an hour seventy people came to an old sister’s house to hear the gospel. We had as many on Tuesday evening. There are one thousand inhabitants in the village which is called Saint Sauveur. We went about distributing gospels in the village; not one was refused, and we had many opportunities to speak of Jesus. Only three adults go to the Roman Catholic Church. We went into the church on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock and found the priest saying mass with no more than two little boys of eight years of age."

Again the same brother writes from Paris on Oct. 3, 1867:—"Thousands come daily to the Stand and accept the portions of the New Testament thankfully. We all have opportunities to speak to the French and to those of other nations about God’s Exhibition on the Cross. I cannot describe either on paper or vocally the joy and thankfulness with which the country people accept the portions. On Sunday evening brother L., three other brethren, and myself were busily engaged for three hours distributing to pressing crowds, and I believe I am not mistaken, in saying, that more than half were peasants, come to see the Exhibition. Many of the priests accept cheerfully the little books; one yesterday handed a gospel to one of his parishioners. Hundreds of soldiers receive the Gospels daily. The reception is not confined to one class, but all sorts come and accept the little books. I seldom see a torn book anywhere. I am thankful to see so many Poles and Russians, chiefly men of position, come to get the gospels. An English Christian man came and asked for a Russian gospel; he has offered to distribute some of the Gospels in Russia, and he is going to put one in every parcel of goods he sends off to his correspondents. It is clearly seen that it is not the present good only, but it will open many doors for the distribution and circulation of the blessed Word that giveth Light and Life. I have it laid on my heart to visit men who cannot come to the Exhibition, viz.: the drivers and conductors of omnibuses, also the cabmen. I have been to many of the principal omnibus stations and stood waiting for the vehicles to pass, and slipped into the hands of the conductors two gospels, sometimes having only time to tell them, "Ce sont deux petits livres, l’un pour vous et l’autre pour le cocher." (Here are two little books, one for you and the other for the driver.) Out of the many I have given I have had only three refusals. I went on Monday night to Chemin de Fer du Nord, about 8 o’clock, and distributed a goodly number before 9. One Tuesday afternoon I went to an omnibus station on the Boulevard de Prince Eugene, where many different omnibuses met for passengers. I distributed half my bagful. Then the thought struck me, I can go and preach to the soldiers to whom I had to speak that evening, and afterwards I can resume this work. After the meeting one of the soldiers accompanied me; he loves the Lord, and has walked Godly for about five years. We went to the same place and distributed all the remaining ones, my companion giving one to each of the policemen, who thanked me much for them. I went yesterday afternoon to the Strasbourg railway station, and distributed the gospels to the omnibus drivers and conductors, and also to cabmen. What a pleasant sight to see all these men sitting on the coach boxes reading the little books which speak of Jesus. One day, whilst distributing the gospels near the Bastile, one coachman was so pleased with the book, that he said, ‘How kind of you to give me this little book, I shall read it and shall take it home to my family.’ I gave him another, and he thanked me repeatedly."

The same brother writes on June 3, 1868:—"During our stay in Paris I had many opportunities to preach the Gospel; several times to the soldiers, who listened most attentively to the Word. There were blessed opportunities to speak to people in cottage meetings. I visited with a brother and sister in Christ some of the most wretched parts of Paris. I spoke to every body with whom I had any conversation about the blessed gospel. I found some had found peace simply by reading the New Testament."

The last short extract I have simply inserted, to show in some small degree the fruit which has been seen from these labours in Paris.

As an encouragement for circulating the Holy Scriptures, I also mention, that one of the Bibles, which I had sent out, during the year, for circulation among the poor, was given to a young man, who had enlisted as a soldier, and who was by means of that very Bible converted. I read his own letter, in which he gives the account of the blessing bestowed upon him, through reading the Holy Scriptures.

From May 26, 1867 to May 26, 1868, there was expended on Missionary operations £5,396 10s. By this sum One Hundred and Thirty-three labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were assisted. Precious as very many of the letters were, which I received during that year, from these preachers of the Gospel, I must not give any extracts from them, but can only refer the reader to the Report of the Institution, published in 1868; yet I have to state, that again many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, through these dear servants of Christ, during that year.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, the sum of £729 2s. 11d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions (exactly 2,121,157) of Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1868, is nearly Thirty One Millions (exactly 30,889,274).

More than One Million and a half (exactly 1,558,187) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A Home Missionary, labouring in Staffordshire, writes on April 15, 1868:—"I write to ask you if you will be so kind as to grant us another parcel of tracts, to assist us in our mission work here. I am happy to inform you that much good has resulted from the distribution of the former tracts we have received from you. One man was at our preaching last night, ‘clothed, and in his right mind,’ who, two months ago, was a most profligate character. A tract was put into his hand, entitled ‘This is the Day;’ he read it over; came to the chapel; gave himself to Jesus, and is now giving evidence of a change of heart. Praise the Lord! Other instances I could give of blessing received through this means."

A brother labouring in Scotland, whom I have supplied with tracts, writes on Dec. 19, 1867:—"The tracts you sent me have all been given away some time. I believe the Lord blessed them to many. I know one woman who was brought to rest on Jesus by reading one about two weeks ago."

Another brother, also labouring in Scotland, to whom I have for several years sent many thousands of tracts, writes from Glasgow on July 2, 1867:—"About a fortnight ago I was in the east-end of the city, where meetings are held in the open air by our dear brother, whose labours have been blessed to the conversion of about forty souls. After the preaching he told me, that he had always forgotten to tell me, that it was a Tract, which he got from me at one of the meetings in the City Hall, about three years ago, that was the means of his conversion. He is a most Godly earnest young man, and I had often heard of his work of faith and labour of love; and it is very remarkable that I was led to hear this from him at a time, when I was somewhat low-spirited in regard to the Tracts, not having heard before of any blessing having resulted to any one from the many thousands which I had distributed all over the country during the last ten years. I was sustained, however, in the work by many stimulating passages of the Word being brought to my mind from time to time, and at present by this, ‘Be ye steadfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.’ Glasgow annual fair begins next week, and it has been laid on my heart to take my holiday then, when I shall be at liberty to join the army of the Lord against the host of Satan. I shall be glad to receive as many as the Lord may dispose you to send me for that occasion."

A Christian gentleman in the Isle of Man, writes on July 20, 1867:—"I give thanks to the Lord Jesus Christ, for the packages of tracts you sent last winter. I trust they have been distributed in the best manner, and I believe they have been much used by the Holy Ghost in the blessed revival that has been going on in this island."

A brother labouring in Cheshire, writes on Oct. 21, 1867:—"I had a letter a few days ago, informing me of blessing afforded to a lady to whom I gave one of your tracts some time ago; she carries the tract about with her, as that which the Lord used in drawing her to Jesus. Is not this encouraging?"

Another brother, also labouring in Cheshire, writes on May 26, 1868:—"The Gospel tracts you kindly sent are such a help to me; I give away five or six hundred some days, to those only who seem very anxious to receive them. Several cases have already come under my notice, in which the reading of them has been much owned of the Lord in blessing to their souls."

A Christian gentleman writes from Nottingham on Oct. 11, 1867:—"Your parcel of Tracts is to hand this day. I thank you; but what is better, my young friend informs me today, of one porter at the station, who has found Christ, and there are two others who are awakened, and seeking, through the Tracts already given! Praise God!"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 149 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1868, would have been 1,299, had there been no changes; but of these 1,299, eighteen children died, 2 of whom were young infants, and 12 gave us great comfort in their end, as they had been previously brought to the knowledge of the Lord. One of those who died, Mary Brain Linthorn, who had been 9 years and 5 months under our care, without knowing the Lord, drew nearer and nearer to the close of her life, being ill in consumption. However, we continued to pray for her, and from time to time, at suitable occasions, the truth was brought before her, and at last, about 24 hours before her end, she was brought to great peace and joy in the Lord; and we had thus the joy of having our prayers answered, though so late, regarding this dear girl. One girl, with whom we had very long borne, we were at last obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to her companions, on account of her very injurious influence. We follow her, however, with our prayers, hoping that yet it may please God to convert her. Eleven of the children were returned to their relatives, who were now able to provide for them, and wished so to do. Seven Orphans were returned to their relatives, who, either on account of epilepsy, of which we had not been informed on their admission, or weakness of mind, or a totally diseased constitution, were unfit to be trained for service, or to be sent out as apprentices. Nine boys were sent out as apprentices, and One Hundred and Four Girls to service. Seven of the 9 boys, who were sent out, were believers, and 31 of the girls sent to service, which, with the 12 who died as believers, makes altogether 50 believers who passed through the Orphan Institution during the year. These 150 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,299, so that on May 26, 1868, there were only 1,149 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 400; and in No. 3, 449. There was expended during the year on the support of the 1,299 Orphans, who were under our care, £13,754 4s. 5d., besides £20,016 4s. 2d., which was expended on the building and fitting up the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869.

During this year Six Day Schools, with 398 children in them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and fourteen other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 182 children, was entirely supported, and eleven others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 27 scholars, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, is £686 4s. 11½d.; and during the whole time from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1869, £14,856 7s. 1d. From the beginning up to May 26, 1869, there were 16,801 souls brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in all the Schools, entirely supported by the Institution; besides the many thousands in the schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, British Guiana, the West Indies, the East Indies, China, etc., which were to a greater or less degree assisted.

During this year there were circul ated 4,115 Bibles, 6,655 New Testaments, 104 copies of the Psalms, and 9,602 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £635 9s. 3d., and from the beginning of the Institution, up to May 26, 1869, £10,106 12s. 2d. There were circulated from the beginning up to May 26, 1869, altogether 48,705 Bibles, 47,340 New Testaments, 1,411 copies of the Psalms, and

29,848 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During no previous year, since the formation of this Institution, were so many copies of the Holy Scriptures circulated as during this year; and during no previous year did we circulate so many copies of the Holy Scriptures in foreign languages, as during this year. The latter was chiefly owing to the fact, that two of the Missionaries, who are assisted by the funds of this Institution, were almost the whole time, while the Havre Exhibition lasted, during the summer of 1868, labouring among foreigners at Havre, preaching to them, and especially circulating the Holy Scriptures among them. One of these brethren speaks 8 modern languages, and the other three, and through their instrumentality a great number of copies of the Holy Scriptures of various languages, were circulated; and since the Exhibition at Havre, by one of these two brethren and another Missionary, also assisted by the funds of this Institution in Spain. During this year alone we circulated 94 Italian Bibles and 652 Italian Testaments, 67 French Bibles and 1,715 French Testaments, 1,112 Spanish Bibles, 756 Spanish Testaments, and 5,724 Spanish Gospels, besides Bibles and Testaments in many other foreign languages. To the above, however, I especially referred, because those copies of the Holy Scriptures made their way into those countries where so little is known of God’s Holy Word.

I received many letters from the two brethren who laboured at the Havre Exhibition for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and preached the Gospel to the many Thousands of Foreigners who were assembled there; but as their work was much the same as at the Exhibition in Paris, and as space fails me, I must refer the reader to the Report of 1869, for these deeply interesting details.

During the latter part of the Exhibition at Havre, the state of Spain gave hope to our brother L., who had laboured there before in the Gospel, that he would be able to go on with circulating the Holy Scriptures and preaching the Gospel in Spain, so dear to his heart; but which some years ago he had been obliged to quit with his fellow-labourer, our brother G., because of want of liberty. Accordingly, as the land seemed to be open, when the Exhibition at Havre was over, he set out with his family for Bayonne, that on the borders of Spain he might embrace the first moment, that appeared to him favourable, for entering Spain, to preach the Gospel, and, especially, to circulate the Holy Scriptures, for which purpose I ordered a large quantity of Bibles and New Testaments to be sent to Bayonne, to be used by our brother and his fellow-labourer, our brother G.

The next extract is taken from a letter written by Brother L., dated Bayonne, Nov. 16, 1868, which relates his impressions and experience, on first entering Spain, after the Revolution. "Yesterday I went to San Sebastian, as I wrote of my intention. I had hardly crossed the frontier and got into the midst of a Spanish speaking people, before finding a state somewhat similar to boys when holidays commence; relief from the restraints and pressure of school life, and high hopes of pleasures in store: this carried one’s heart onward to another national redemption, when Israel shall return and come to Zion, with songs and everlasting joy; and the still higher hope of the whole creation being delivered and the manifestation, with the head of all the members of His body, the Church. The farther I went into the country, the more I could discern, that everybody was speaking as if a wonderful burden had been taken from their shoulders, My first introduction on my way was to four Spaniards, one an aged man, another a young deserter who had given himself up—poor fellow, his state looked as if he had suffered from want of food and clothes; another young man from Burgos, where there are signs of disquiet among the poor; and another man of the mountains. After speaking of general matters and of the great change, I pulled out some Gospels by John, and, distributing them to my four friends, asked them if they thought the time had arrived when such portions of God’s word would have free distribution. A general answer ‘You may be sure of that, Sir.’ The next question was, what such a book cost; when I told, them they were welcome to them, I received many expressions of thankfulness and a general remark, that these were just the books wanted. Said the young man from Burgos, ‘I possess a New Testament which was given to me years ago in Santander.’ I asked the old man, as having long experience of the national mind, and having, as I supposed, shared in the national sufferings, what he thought of the present change—would it be lasting? would there be any more civil wars? He replied, ‘As to my experience, you can see its effects;’ showing me four large sword and knife cuts, which he had received at different periods of his life. ‘I have no doubt there will be a little more yet, but never as it has been. You see, friend, that it is a very difficult thing to bring people all at once from under the power of the priests, who have such hold upon the women and children. What we want and what we must have, is a good education for our children.’ Saying this, he got down from the carriage, bidding me many adieus and thanks for his little book. Then a number more, about ten persons, got into the compartment, and I began to distribute among them. Some persons, who were in a distant part, when they found what sort of books their neighbours had received, reached over eagerly to get some. A general burst of thanks and happy remarks were exchanged without exception as to the value of the portions, and a country woman who could read, when she found what class of books she had, stood at the door, and in a loud voice and significant way said ‘mil gracias cabballeri, mil gracias.’ Her manner made her companions laugh, all understanding that her approval was more than she would at one time have given. I then got into another train, so as to reach as many persons as possible. Here the same reception awaited me, and to one, who appeared to be much pleased with a portion, I gave a New Testament; and, as we got down from the train, his companion followed me, saying what a pleasure it would be, if he had just another copy like his friend had. I gave him one. Arrived at San Sebastian, which you remember was the place where our books were taken from us, you may think, dear brother, with what joy and thankfulness I entered the town. Passing the door of an aged shoemaker, to whom I offered a Gospel, at first he refused, thinking I was selling them. When I told him it was a Gospel by John, he took it and began to read, and I had a happy moment in showing him some of the glorious things it contained; and thankfully he took it, wishing me many long and happy years. The next was an old gentleman, who was looking over the sea wall. With him, after a short introduction as to its character, I left a little portion; and a quarter of an hour after, as I passed by under the wall, I saw him busily reading. I presented two Custom House Officers each with a portion; but I saw by the way one held the book upside down, he could not read. I took no notice of this, but told him of its contents, which pleased him; and then he remarked as to the darkness and corruptness of those who professed to be their guides and said, ‘If I had my way, I would not only send the Jesuits out of the country, but would destroy the whole priesthood.’ I advised moderation, and remarked that many knew no better, never having been taught to read and preach God’s Word. He admitted this, and referring to the little book, he said, about four years ago I took a couple of hundred of these little books from an Englishman. ‘Where?’ ‘Why, here in San Sebastian, but you know that was not my fault, it was the fault of those over me.’ ‘And what did you do with them?’ ‘Why I took them to the Customs’ warehouse.’ ‘Do you think they are there now?’ ‘Indeed, I don’t know.’ ‘Perhaps the officers have distributed them among their friends,’ I replied, laughingly. He said ‘That is likely enough, Sir.’ I gave some portions to some aged men, who began reading aloud. This brought about a dozen more, to whom I gave portions, and said something of the truth. This received approbation from them; and certainly it was a sight to see these hardy looking men in one of these squares, each busily trying to decipher the truth. Just then a priest passed by, and great was his surprise at seeing each with a book in hand. One of them made some remark, and the priest got out of sight. I was recognised at the station, several asking for some portions for friends. Many were the wishes of success from a number of persons collected there; and, getting back to the train, I could say, Bless the Lord, O my soul, for all that I saw in the first few hours in the land of our many prayers." The same brother writes from Madrid on Nov. 26.— "On my coming here on Monday last, a box of Bibles, Testaments, portions, hymn and little books was detained. I reasoned with the chief officer and offered to pay duties on books, but in vain. Several persons who saw the transaction advised me on my arrival in Madrid to go to the Minister of ‘Gracia & Justicia’ and explain matters, as they were sure the laws were altered. This I shall hope to do in due time. My personal luggage was examined by another class of persons, and although the box was full of Bibles, Testaments, and portions, these officers only regarded my wearing apparel, which took up very little space, and occupied them only for a moment. In comparison with what I wished to bring, they were only as the ‘little smooth stone of the brook;’ but they were safely lodged by my side in the train, and I began my journey to Madrid, with about 600 Gospels by John, 200 other Gospels, 6 Bibles, and 8 New Testaments. I was very sorrowful the first part of the journey; but presently, after prayer, I remembered many precious portions the Lord had given me and my wife before leaving her and the dear children; one especially was ‘This Gospel must be preached as a witness to all nations and then shall the end come.’ I soon began to open my mouth and to ask my fellow-passengers to accept a portion of God’s word. Never shall I forget the first moment in presenting the little book. All eyes were upon me. ‘What is it he has got?’ was the general question; and when I began to make known what I had, then there were demands from all in the train to possess one, and directly all was silence, and each began to read, one or two aloud; and I heard two or three say—this is just what we want in Spain. Just then we stopped at Vittoria, the scene of former persecutions. Here several persons got out and came up to the compartment where I was, to thank me; and one, a country woman, came and presented me with two apples, as a testimony of her gratitude. Just after this, a young man asked if he could procure anyhow, a whole Bible of which he heard me speak. I produced one for which he instantly paid a peseta. ‘Have you another,’ an aged gentleman asked, and then many hands were stretched out with the money, and very soon my stock was disposed of, and many were disappointed they could not get one. One Bible, which remained hidden under the other books, was reserved for a physician further on the journey, who also desired a Bible, and who said, ‘This I intend to read with my family every day.’ The scenes I witnessed on that and on the following day, brought prayerful tears, that God, in His great mercy, would soon visit this people with showers of blessings. I stopped one night at Valladolid and then resumed my journey. The scenes of the preceding day were repeated; and, as on former occasions, a guard of the train, much interested in this work, promised to bring to Madrid as many Bibles, &c., as we could send to Hendage. At each station he informed the people in the train, that a man was giving Gospels, and I was continually surrounded by people of the different classes, some asking, if I had no Bibles to sell. One man pulled out three pesetas for one. Being very tired I got into another carriage, and also wishing to save some portions for friends in Madrid; but I had only just laid down, when an inspector of the line came, while the train was in motion at quick speed, saying, there were some persons in the train to whom he had shown the Scriptures, and asking to give them portions." On Jan. 31, 1869, brother L. writes from Madrid:—"For the last month I have hired a glass case in one of the best streets in Madrid, and through the kindness of the man who lets it me, who has his shop inside the arcade, I have had a little table on the steps near the street, and here I have taken my post daily, from ten in the morning till seven and eight in the evening. Great has been my joy in seeing an open Bible in the streets of Madrid, and crowds coming up daily to read the portions which I had opened, such as Ps. 51, Isaiah 53rd, Luke 15, portions in Romans, Galatians, Peter, &c. I had been able to get some Bibles and Testaments; some I brought in; some from Brother G., some from a brother in Malaga; some from Brother C., who sent me 370 Testaments; and 70 Testaments from another brother here. I brought from Bayonne about 400 portions, so that I made a goodly show. They had not been long in the window, before prices were asked and some sold. To persons who appeared interested, I presented a portion. This went on for a day or so, as for two reasons I could not begin a general distribution. First, because then I had only a limited stock, and because in the excited time of revolution I feared to collect a crowd. But one day I was observed giving a couple of Gospels, and almost instantly a dozen persons came up, and this was enough to call general attention; and soon I was surrounded so, that in a couple of minutes the street was blocked up, and I saw that the enemies of the truth would make this an occasion to complain; and I said I could give no more then and went inside; but they followed. ‘Do give me one, Sir,’ was the general request. I managed to mix among them, and so for a time was unobserved, and I heard some saying, ‘Where is he?’ ‘Stop awhile and he will give us some.’ Just then a gentleman called me to come and sell a Bible, and then the demands came for portions. I contented them by saying, I had only a few and there were many applicants; that I would sell them at half a real (½d. English) each and give bread to the poor. This pleased them, and instantly they reached out their money faster than I could receive; and, as they saw the stock diminishing, many pressed to buy the Word of God, and in half an hour I had sold about 300 and also some Testaments. The day before yesterday I had the crowd for about an hour so great, that the officers had to beg me to go further in, as the thoroughfare in the street, which is a wide one, was stopped. I sold about 400 in an hour, besides distributing gratis to the military. I have sold all my Bibles, and few Testaments remain. Yesterday I sold the last of seven large family Bibles at a dollar each, and I have long ago sold all smaller editions, and now it is most painful to be asked so frequently during the day if more Bibles have arrived. Scio’s version I could have, but I do not wish to sell it; and the people will not have Scio. ‘Are you sure this is Valera’s version?’ ‘Is this a Protestant edition?‘ is daily repeated. ‘I don’t want Scio, nor his company,’ said a gentleman. Daily I have discussions with those who appear desirous of knowing the truth, and preach it to those who gather round. Many are enraged against the government, for their religious tolerance and sanction given to Protestants. I get now and again some specimens of their wrath. Some cannot contain themselves, as they see me selling God’s Word, and in their months are bitter threats, as also from the press threatenings and slaughter are daily breathed against us. One evening lately a man went to the shop opposite, seeking information as to my name and address. The man, guessing his intention, would not satisfy him. He went away saying.—’Well, I’ll find out all their names; it is a disgrace to allow such things.’ When I heard this I turned to God and his Word of grace, and my eye rested on the word, ‘no man taketh it from me.’ A very kind friend pressed me to accept his six barrel revolver. A very dear brother was quite astonished I did not arm myself: but I told him, that I should never more be happy, if I harmed another. Of course it is trying to the flesh, but my eyes are so full of God’s almightiness and the inward assurance that my hour is not yet come, that I fear not them that can kill the body. A few days ago a girl, whom we have to assist us, was sitting over the fire of her cousin; she had just stooped her head, when two shots passed over her, carrying away a piece of a table. Some wicked person, for unknown reasons, fired into their cot. This is just under our window. Every man is afraid of his fellow. A few nights ago, I received at midnight a telegram from Brother H., asking me to get stereotyped the Gospel by John; at the door stood the night watchman with his drawn sword and pistol in his girdle; the house porter with his hand upon a large knife; while the railway servant delivered his message. This is the world we live in. ‘Destruction and misery are in their ways, and the way of peace have they not known.’"

Again he writes on Feb. 8th —"The other evening I sold in about an hour and a half over 350 copies of the Word, besides during the day being able to speak words of life to many. Of course we feel our need of God’s almighty protection, knowing that the cruel assassin stalks about us. Our poor friend the hatter, who let me the Vitrine where I first exposed the Scriptures, and who was very zealous and useful, was shot in the head the day after I wrote to you. It was done by a friend, I hope, in accident—who was examining the hatter’s revolver, and it went off in his hands, the ball entering his head, but marvellous to say, not piercing his skull. I bore him to a house of succour, where the bullet was extracted, and thence to the hospital, where he goes on recovering—saved I hope in body and to be saved in soul. He has stood many evenings behind me with his pistol, ready to fire on anybody he thought would harm me; and at night would beg me to carry it to protect me home, as I had to pass some lonely spots. I have tried to set before him from time to time a better defence.—Concerning the help you have now sent, dear brother. Yesterday Brother G. mentioned in our meeting for breaking bread, that we had not been asking the Lord for temporal bread, but I told the Lord in secret that I should need that for the morning’s meal, and just after a letter came from Brother — with a little help and now today yours with full supply. Last evening in about two hours I sold, and distributed to soldiers gratis, 500 portions of the Word.—P.S. Not being able to send the enclosed by the post I wished, I just add a line as to the distribution. Last evening I sold and distributed over 700 portions, and passing home late I saw several persons reading them, among them two officers. It is the carnival time, but it is very quiet in comparison to other times. Yesterday as I was going up the widest street in Madrid, quietly meditating upon the deep necessities of the country, a band of students came dancing down the streets in their masquerade dress. Two of them came and laid hold upon me, holding out their bag—saying in English ‘A Shilling, Sir.’ I said, ‘I have a vitrine in the Passage del Iris, where every morning I give meat and bread to several widows, if you will come there too, I will give you some. They loosed my coat, and took hold of my hands, shaking them heartily and saying, ‘You are one of the right kind, good bye, dear Sir.’ In the evening several of them came for Gospels." In March he writes again from Madrid, giving an account of his journey from Madrid to Bayonne, to obtain some of the Bibles and Testaments which I had ordered to be sent to Bayonne, but which as yet could not be brought into Spain.

"The future of this poor land, while it will give increasing opportunities for bringing many sons to glory, still shows a pathway of misery and bloodshed for the sons of the people, and increasing difficulties to the servants of the Lord Jesus and the only true servants of the people which this land has; but so it must be to the end, and our joy is, that He will come and will not tarry, beyond the time appointed of the Father. ‘I will overturn, overturn,’—confusion upon confusion—but ‘for ever Thy Word is settled in heaven.’ We have received a kingdom that cannot be moved. Knowing the higher order of blessings which the God of all grace has given us, makes one feel the world’s misery the more, and inspires a stronger zeal to lead the poor miserable world to the fountain whose waters are life and peace. My late journey into France to procure whole copies of God’s Word has made me see fresh cause for diligence in our calling to work, while it is called day. On every side of the land we hear of desires to read the Word of life; and from the very first station, on thro’ the hundreds towards France, wonderful desires are manifested by those in the trains and those waiting at the stations. Among those now foremost to obtain copies, who were our former tormentors, are the civil guards. At almost every station I had only to hold up a copy of the Word, and generally these led the van, and came up, and by their example others were emboldened to come. One of these, who had been to Madrid to buy school books, was delighted with some Gospels, and insisted on paying and brought up, at the station where he descended, two of his companions in arms to get copies. Twelve persons also who got out paid for Gospels. I was delighted the other day by a sergeant of this company coming and buying a family Bible. I had also the pleasure of giving to a colonel of them a Gospel by John, and saying a few Gospel words to him, for which he thanked me, saying ‘they wanted indeed a Messiah in Spain.’ Another company of military men are the Custom Officers, who used to give us great trouble: these were now as anxious to procure portions for themselves, as once they were to take them away from us. The military generally in Spain and France, I have found desiring the better knowledge. Today I had at the shop a young captain, who staid an hour with me, whose whole soul is rejoicing in the work we are engaged in. In my late journey, at one of the stations about 100 persons were waiting to go to a feast at another village. The military and railway officials first came up and then the body of the people. Two gentlemen from Burgos, who saw the peoples’ desire and their joy when they found out what class of book they had received, took up some of my books and went to the other window to the people, awaiting the down train, and called upon them to receive them; and at the next station they got out and went with a packet to give them. This they did, not even asking my consent. They said ‘Well for you, Sir, that the priests in our town cannot get hold of you, or they would serve you and us as they just have done our poor governor.’ At the next station, after this scene, the railway guard asked me to give the Station master a Gospel by Luke. This happened to be in my box in the luggage van, and which I was reserving for the return journey. He said ‘If you will come down, I will get them to have you open it;‘—he called three officials to witness that I had opened it in their presence, and many persons came after me to get portions; and by this the train was delayed ten minutes, the station master being the cause. On my way down to France I conveyed a parcel of 500 Gospels to our friend and brother B., who has since written to me, expressing his great joy in receiving copies of God’s Word printed in Madrid. One of the gentlemen from Burgos, at one of the stations wrote his name on one of the Gospels, and threw it to a station master as the train passed that station. He was an acquaintance of his. This was about the close of the first day’s journey. Night came on, and we rolled ourselves up to get an hour’s sleep, which, through mercy I was able to get, arriving in Bayonne next day afternoon. At 5 o’clock next morning I again commenced my journey. My pockets were filled with Bibles and Testaments, also a carpet bag and box which I had for the purpose, containing altogether 46 Bibles, 6 large family Bibles, and the rest pocket ones. No one can imagine the anxious moment, when we thus come into the searching room. I was full of trust that my needed cargo would pass. As I passed the first sentries, I was directed to the counter. There I waited some time, and not getting dispatched to my liking, as I knew the hurry that afterwards comes from this delay, I passed through the midst of the watchers and deposited my bag in the train and then went to open my box. The first thing that attracted the soldier’s notice was a Gospel in French, which he passed to the chief officer, who threw it back, indignant that the man should have troubled him with such matters, as the great matter now is a search for firearms, which the Carlist party are introducing, in order to get up a civil war; so, in answer to prayer, I obtained full possession of my prize. At one of the stations, just coming out of France, a station master came up and asked if I would sell him a Bible; he was apprised of my being in the train by the guard who knew me. I sold him one, with which he was well pleased; and, in doing so, I attracted the notice of the people in the train to the number of sixteen, among them a young well dressed priest, whom, at first, I did not notice to be among the company. A young man who had travelled from London, where he had been for fifteen days, and was full of the difference between the two countries Spain and England, passed a Bible to the young priest, who, on seeing it, and hearing the demand of the station master, and seeing his readiness in paying his money for the Word, remarked rather ungraciously, ‘Oh a Protestant Bible.’ This led me to say that the Bible was neither Protestant nor Catholic, it was the Word of God. He said he was sure that that book was not the book. I asked him for the people’s benefit, if he would please to read a portion, and say what was bad in it. After some trouble I got him to read, but he opened the book so awkwardly that any one could see he had not been accustomed to the sacred text. He ventured to read 3 verses in the 1st chapter of Genesis, and, as if afraid of the voice of the Almighty as was Adam in the 3rd chapter, he closed the book, saying, that was not in his Bible. I asked him if he could read the language in which Jehovah spoke under the old covenant, and also in which the Lord Jesus spoke; he confessed he could not, which seemed to surprise the people, who by this time were greatly interested in our debate; and their surprise seemed great indeed at the way in which I dealt with the priest. I then began to read the 1st Psalm, asking them to judge if these were bad words; but the priest interrupted, insomuch that two women rebuked him for not allowing me to have my say. Their interference only made him the more angry, and he appeared to use a supposed right of silencing them by a sort of learned discourse of his priestly power. Finding I could not read, I reached out Gospels by John, and asked each to accept gratuitously a book, by which they might judge for themselves, if the books were bad books. Soon every hand was stretched out, and each began in earnest to read, which they did for more than half an hour, excepting one woman (who came from our old place of service, Bilboa) who engaged in conversation with the priest; and, by her remarks I saw she was a woman of uncommon sense, and by no means one who would spare the patent and open vices of the priests. After some time a man, a farmer of the Pyrenees, reached over and asked me what was the price of the little book. I told him it was a free gift, like the salvation it proclaimed. ‘I would rather buy it,’ he said. I replied it was selling in the streets of Madrid for two quartos; he gladly produced his money and others followed his example, which seemed greatly to confuse the priest. Three young men who were busily engaged reading a gospel, returned it, as we neared a station, at which the priest would have to get out; but before we arrived the priest called out ‘What is the price of this book?’ I told him 2 pesetas. He produced his money and holding it up said, ‘Now I will just compare this book with my Latin Bible, and see if it is correct.’ I replied with great delight in my face ‘That is just what I wish, and I will give you its weight in gold, if you can find aught contrary to the revealed will of God;’ and my joy was great in seeing the manifest simplicity of the young man, and my hope of seeing him among the blood washed company who have been made wise through the Scriptures. As he got out of the train, 3 men of the mountains of the Basque provinces entered. Two of the Bibles were in my hand, one of them noticed them, and asked to be allowed to see one. After a time he returned it, saying in a good loud voice—’Last week in our village we bought four of these Bibles, not so nicely bound, but Bibles. I have read it for years. Living near the railway station we got not less than 17 copies of the different books in our village, but which the priests always took from my friends; but now they cannot do this. That is the book we want.’ An old man by his side, who had entered the train with him said ‘Yes, but these books do not speak anything of the virgin.’ I read to him Luke 1st chapter. The old man said ‘Yes, yes, but we do not believe it like that.’ I replied, but you must believe just what the book says; it is God’s book. I told him the whole story of God’s love, his companions who entered with him listening most attentively; and the old man, not convinced, tried to keep to his point about the virgin, and began to sing a song in her honour. I said yes, yes, she is blessed indeed among women, and is now among the spirits of just men made perfect; but when she was on earth, you know she lost her son and sought Him sorrowing, but He was found doing the will of His heavenly Father.’ These words were like a general earthquake among the people who heard what I said, and the man who said he bought the Bible, dropped his head, at the same time giving such a look of joy, as much as to say, that is a terrible blow. Getting out of the train he shook my hand most affectionately and significantly, and his companions did the same; the two latter being from Vittoria. The three young men I mentioned, one of whom returned the Gospel, were listening most attentively, and when the others got out of the train, one of them reached over 2 quartos, asking to please to give him the Gospel again. These three young men then told us, that they had just returned from Rome, whither they had gone only 20 days previously from their country homes, to fight for the Pope; but having to pay so much for their board and lodging and so much for ‘las bulas,’ and finally not getting sufficient food, they determined to go home. For many miles after this I was able to point out to them the falsity of all human systems, and when they got out to go to their mountain-homes I knew I had obtained their love, and they would be sure to keep sacredly the Word, which they had at first refused. The night had far advanced when this little history finished, and I was glad to rest from conversation, and should have liked to sleep, but we were just entering the snow covered mountains, and with intense cold sleep was impossible. Next day at about 10 o’clock I arrived at Madrid, and placed our stock of 50 Bibles and Testaments on the table, which all disappeared in two days and a half, and now we wait for more; but our joy is that we go on with portions, of which I sold last Lord’s Day over 500 copies. These daily and hourly sales of God’s Word are a cause of continual joy. A few days ago a man bought a Bible. He told me he had been in the habit for years past of writing out the sayings of Luther and sending them to his friends. Many held him for a devil in his village; he rejoiced in seeing and in being able to take back to his friends the Gospels. Yesterday, another man from Catalonia, bought 50 to take to his friends. In several clubs established here, the Gospels are regularly read and are purchased by the members, to put on the tables."

On April 4th he writes again:—"The great question of the day here is, the religious one; and, no doubt, seeing the danger we are exposed to, the Government sent one of their officers and three magistrates, who came saying, they had brought an officer whose special duty was to watch over the stand, and that he had instruction to lay hold immediately, upon any person who offered the least insult by word or look, and begged of me not to hesitate in giving information immediately, as they were determined, at whatever cost, to protect us. I thanked them for their kindness, but said I hoped we should not need to call in their assistance. One of them asked me to give him the Gospel by John, which he wanted to pay for. I showed him the ticket I gave to the poor to procure meat and bread, the produce of the sale of books. He said, ‘Ha! we know all about it; you have a great deal more religion than those who oppose you.’ This state of affairs makes us hide our poor feeble heads very closely under the wing of our Almighty Jesus. We have had great comfort and direction from the Word in all these exercises."

Once more brother L. writes from Madrid, on May 22, 1869:—"Having been unwell the last two days, I could not acknowledge your kindness of £20 for personal and family need, and also £15 for portions of the New Testament. During the last seven days there has been a large pleasure fair held about two miles and a half from this, where we have had the great joy of putting into circulation many thousands of Tracts, portions of the Word, Bibles and Testaments; our sales for the latter amounting to about £10. It is called the fair of San Isidro. He was an hermit, and was chosen as the patron saint of Madrid. He was a ‘tiller of the ground,’ and while living in his hermitage a fountain was discovered or revealed to him which has the legendary virtue of taking away fever. It runs by the hermitage, and on these feast-days people pay half a real for a drink; and judging from the crowds who were standing for the turn, a goodly sum must have fallen into the saint’s treasury. But this was nothing in comparison of the sums received for kissing a finger of the saint, which is preserved inside the hermitage and presented to the kneeling devotees in a silver case; and which the attendant priest passes three times in the form of a cross over the mouth of the worshipper; and another stands with a large salver in which the offerer’s money is dropped. The grovelling idolatry of the heathen cannot compare with the superstitious reverence which is paid to the relic; and the riches collected must be great. The money used to be given to the poor, but now, according to general information, the priest has need of it all; and when I referred the many beggars to their rightful possessions, I got the reply, ‘They give? they are too egotistic for that!‘ In the vestry of the hermit’s church I made application for a tent, in which to sell Bibles, &c. Of course, under present law, I could not be refused; and the letting of the ground being the business of the civil authorities, I not only obtained permission, but was received very kindly by them, and a space given right in front of the hermitage, and by the side of the tent of the authorities. What the aged priest thought, who formed one at the table in the vestry, I cannot say. Here, in connection with Mr. — and —, and two young converted Israelites intrusted to their superintendence, with brother R., and the Frenchman of whom I last wrote, and who gives us much joy in his desire that others may share his newly found treasure, we pitched our tent, set off by Scriptural subjects and engravings, descriptive of the Lord’s parables: and on a large sheet brother G. had fixed in large letters in Spanish, ‘God is love,’ and also ‘Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners,’ which tens of thousands read, as we were just on cross roads, and in the centre of the fair. General Prim read it, as also the Lord Mayor, and also the nobles of the city, ladies and gentlemen. On a table which covered the entrance we placed piles of the Gospels, and the flag which was used at the Kiosk at Paris over the table, with the words ‘Parole de Dieu.’ We sold on the first day nearly £5 worth, chiefly in Gospels, with some Bibles and Testaments; this was the chief day. Up to today we have sold about £10 worth. As you may imagine, it caused great attraction, and many were the instances which gladdened our hearts by remarks made as to the value of our work. Many also bought for friends. One aged man, who appeared not worth a penny, bought 18 to take to the city of Toledo, where he said, he should put them in circulation among his friends. H. and B. [the writer’s children] are most useful saleswomen, going outside the crowds to persons who stood at a distance to read ‘God is love;’ and many were sold in this way to persons who would not venture near. An aged gentleman, to whom they sold one, went away crying; it so affected him to see children offering him God’s Word; and, as he said, ‘to see the difference to Spanish children.’ Our Brother H. is a great comfort to us, he is a fatherly man, and knows how to turn away wrath by a soft answer: he distributes a goodly number of portions among workmen. There is another large fair to be held here next month, and our Brother G. is designing a tent which our friend the Frenchman will make, and in which we shall contrive some things for domestic comfort, from the lack of which I am still suffering, as I could not get food at proper hours. I have made application for 500 Bibles detained, to enter under the old law, which now the Government have managed to find out; and my petition has been accepted, and the order is gone forth from the Minister of Public Works, that over 500 of any book may not enter, but the order may be renewed, so we expect a fresh supply soon of those Bibles which you sent to Bayonne."

The letters received from the other missionaries are of a similar character. As this work commenced in the year 1868, so it has been going on since. Tens of thousands of copies of the Holy Scriptures have been circulated since, by the missionaries who are aided by the funds of this Institution. Nine Day Schools for children have been established by them in Madrid and Barcelona, in which Thousands of children have been instructed, besides the Sunday Schools and Adult Schools. This blessed work has been continued now for nearly six years, at an expense of many thousand Pounds Sterling, with which the Lord has supplied me in answer to prayer.

During the year from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, was expended of the funds of the Institution for Missionary Objects, the sum of £7,330 1s. 6d. By this sum One Hundred and Forty-one labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

The number of letters received from these brethren during the year was so great, and they were so full of deeply interesting matter, that a profitable volume might be published from them alone. I gave very many of these letters in the Report of the Institution for 1869, which may be still obtained; but am unable to give any here. I only state that many, many hundreds of precious souls were during this year brought to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these 141 labourers in the Gospel.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, the sum of £1,090 7s. 7d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions and Four Hundred and Forty-eight Thousand (exactly 2,448,507) Tracts and Books.

More than One Million and Seven Hundred and Sixty Thousand (exactly 1,768,066) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

From a Christian brother engaged in an agency for female servants in London, to whom I have sent many thousands of tracts, and who is in the habit of giving a tract to every one who applies for a situation, I received on May 18, 1869, the following letter:—"Enclosed is a sweet little flower, given to me this morning, in the midst of my registering, by a most respectable person, by the name of Miss W., now residing at Messrs. —, of H., who said ‘You do not remember me.’ I said ‘No.’ ‘About twelve months ago,’ she said, ‘I called on you, and you spoke to me and gave me a tract, entitled ‘Scriptural Repentance,’ which tract has led me to the Lord, through whom I now possess joy and peace in believing. I have called, being in London, to tell you of the fruit of your labours, and to encourage you in the good work.’ For the same purpose, dear sir, I send you this, that you also may afresh take courage; for doubtless you need it as do I. I had long desired, if the Lord would, that some tangible evidence of blessing might come to light through the numbers of these precious little silent messengers of truth distributed by me. May the precious Lord pour greater blessing yet on your labours, is the prayer of yours very affectionately in Christ Jesus."

From Wales I had, on October 22, 1868, the following information from an evangelist whom I have often supplied with tracts:—"Since I wrote you last, two cases have come under my notice of God using some of the tracts I had from you. One was in Pembrokeshire. I gave a tract to a working man, the father of a family, at the fair at Narberth, as he stood with others at my Bible stand, where I was quoting the Scriptures, and seeking to speak a word in season. Meeting him and his wife the week following, he asked me to give him another of the same tract as that he received at the fair. I asked why he wished another, had he read the one I gave him. His wife smilingly said, ‘Yes, master, and he is now, what they call, converted, is quite a different man and has left off his drunkenness.’ The man said he wanted another tract, that he might keep it, as he had given the one he received from me before to one of his fellow workers. He should never, he said, forget standing at my stall and receiving the tract.—The other case is of a poor working man, who was laid all last winter on a bed of affliction. I visited him and left tracts with him, which were blessed to his soul. On his applying for fellowship with us at the Lord’s table, he mentioned, that, on his getting better, though unfit for work, having kept all the tracts that had been left with him, he took them with him when he went out, and gave them to others. He was led to visit an old bed-ridden man and spoke to him about his soul and about the things of eternity. The old man told him it was too late with him, but he persevered and read to him a tract and prayed for him. On calling a second time he found an alteration in him, and was hopeful concerning him. Again he read a tract and prayed. Calling subsequently be found the old man had departed, and was told that he had died happily in Jesus. Praise the Lord!"

At the commencement of the year, from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, there were 1,149 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 467 Orphans were admitted into the four houses then in operation (as No. 4 was opened in November, 1868); so that the total number on May 26, 1869, would have been 1,616, had there been no changes; but of these 1,616 ten died during the year. Only ten! We own the hand of God in the fact, that only one out of each 161 Orphans, who were under our care, died. As in every way, so in this particular also, we have had, year after year, God’s especial blessing. Out of the ten who died, seven were believers in the Lord Jesus, and one a young infant. Three of the Orphans we were obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to the other children. Ten Orphans we had to return to the relatives, either because they had epileptic fits of which, previous to admission, we had not been informed; or because they had other incurable diseases, unsuitable for inmates of an Orphan Establishment, and only fit for a hospital; or on account of mental weakness; or because they could not for other reasons be recommended to situations or be apprenticed, when their time came to be sent out. Ten Orphans were by relatives or friends taken back, because they were now in a position to provide for them, and who considered it their duty and also desired so to do. Seven boys were apprenticed to trades, of whom five were sent out as converted lads. Seventy-eight girls were sent out for service, of whom twenty-three were converted, and some of them had been for a long time. These 118 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,616, so that on May 26, 1869, there were only 1,498 under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1—300, in No. 2—399, in No. 3—450, and in No. 4—349.

The amount of means expended on the support of the 1,616 Orphans, who were during that year under our care was £16,657 5s. 5d. Besides this was expended on the building and fitting up of the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and 5, £11,020 10s. 7d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870. There is one point especially to be noticed with reference to this year, viz., the great enlargement of the various Objects of the Institution. I. The School Department was increased by 10 Day Schools being added to the Institution for entire support; also 6 Sunday Schools and 4 Adult Schools. Thus the School Department was more than doubled during the year. II. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures was twice an great as during any previous year, and a very considerable portion of this circulation took place in Spain. III. The Mission Field, likewise, was considerably extended, especially in Spain. There were, also, many more labourers in the Gospel in China assisted, than before, indeed their number was more than doubled—the number being 25 instead of 10 as before. IV. With regard to the circulation of Tracts, every open door, which the Lord was pleased to set before us, we were able to enter to the full, and to give always abundant supplies. Though our gratuitous circulation, as usual, was again very large, amounting to nearly two millions and a half, yet we always had an abundance of means to respond to every suitable application made to us. V. Lastly, as to the Orphan Work, it was considerably enlarged, so that we had during the year 269 Orphans more under our care than we had the year before; and this number was week by week further being added to. And for all these enlargements of the various Objects of the Institution it pleased the Lord to supply us most bountifully. Though the current expenses for the Institution were far greater during the year, than during any of the previous thirty-five years, yet we abounded more than ever. I delight to record this abounding kindness of the Lord, in order that my dear fellow-believers may be encouraged, increasingly to look to the Lord, fully and solely to trust in Him, and not in circumstances, nor in their own exertions, nor in their fellow-men. He has never failed me. I have trusted in the Living God alone now for more than forty-four years, and I joyfully record to His praise, that He has always helped me, and that I have not been confounded. The longer I go on in this way, the more blessed I find it, to have such a never-failing almighty Friend, who is ever able and ever willing to help me. It is true that sometimes I have long to wait, before the help comes; and sometimes, also, the appearance is as if God had forgotten me; but He still, in His own time and way, after faith and patience have been sufficiently exercised, helps again. And thus, I believe, it will be to the end of my pilgrimage, if God will only enable me to walk in His ways, and to continue to trust in Him.

We still, as from the beginning of the Institution, never go in debt for anything. The reason why we refrain from doing so is, because it would otherwise appear as if God were too poor to pay for His own work. If indeed our work is the work of God; and if indeed we are the individuals, to do this work for Him; and if, lastly, His time is come, when we shall do this work for Him, He will surely make it manifest, that we are not mistaken, by supplying us with the needed means. But the work we are engaged in may not be according to His mind; if so, we cannot be surprised that He does not give us the means. Or, though the work is according to His mind, we may not be the persons whom He means to use in His work; and, therefore, He may withhold from us the means. Or, lastly, though the work is the work which pleases God, and though we are also the individuals, whom He will condescend to use in doing this work, His time may not have come for our doing this work. It may please God, for the trial of our faith and patience, to withhold from us, for the time being, the means for doing the work. What, then, have we to do under such circumstances? Shall we seek, any how, to obtain the means? Shall we, by our way of acting, appear to say, that we know better than God? Verily we ought not; but rather it becomes us to wait God’s own time, which will bring blessing to our own souls; which will prove that we are true servants of the Master, because we wait on Him; and it will thus be helpful to our fellow-disciples; whilst the opposite course rather encourages others to act rashly, to run in debt for the work of God, and thus to bring trouble upon themselves and others.

There were from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, sixteen Day Schools, with 1,165 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution: four in Bristol, one at Callington, in Cornwall, one at Kenilworth, in Warwickshire, two in London, three on the Black Down Hills, in Somersetshire, one in Liverpool, and four at Barcelona, in Spain. The reader will see from this, that, while there were at the end of the previous year six schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were now sixteen; and while we had 398 children before in those six schools we had now 1,165 under habitual instruction. In addition to this, however, I have to state, that there was during the year, the Lord’s decided blessing resting upon these Schools. In the Day Schools in London there were seventeen children, who had found peace to their souls, by believing in the Lord Jesus, regarding nine of whom the teachers felt fully satisfied, and of the other eight they had reason to believe that they were converted, though they had not yet had so much time to watch the work as with respect to the other nine. In the Schools on the Black Down Hills there was also a work of grace going on among the children, several of whom became decided for the Lord. In the School at Liverpool one girl died as a happy believer in the Lord. Two other girls, about whose conversion there is no doubt, left the School to take respectable situations. At Kenilworth, also, one of the girls in the School died during the year, of whose salvation the teacher had no doubt. In one of the Day Schools in Bristol, there were also two very hopeful cases of conversion. In addition to the 16 Day Schools, which were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were twelve other Day Schools assisted—1 in Cornwall, 1 in Dorsetshire, 2 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Worcestershire, 1 in Hampshire, 3 in Middlesex, 1 in Norfolk, and 1 in Scotland.

During the year from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there were seven Sunday Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, instead of one only formerly, viz., 1 in Bristol, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 at Callington, 1 in London, 2 on the Black Down Hills in Somersetshire, and 1 in Liverpool. These seven schools contained 776 children. There were also, besides, sixteen other Sunday Schools, in various parts of the country, assisted—2 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Monmouthshire, 1 in Dorsetshire, 2 in Hampshire, 3 in Devonshire, 2 in Middlesex, 1 in Herefordshire, 2 in Yorkshire, 1 in Staffordshire, and 1 in Suffolk. Three of the Sunday school children in the Bristol School became decided for the Lord Jesus during the year, and were united with the children of God in visible fellowship.

There were during this year six Adult Schools supported by the funds of the Institution, with 129 adult scholars in them: 1 in Bristol, 1 at Callington, 1 in London, 1 at Clayhidon on the Black Down Hills, and 2 in Barcelona in Spain. In the Adult School at Callington, there were five of the Adult Scholars brought to the knowledge of the Lord during the year.

The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, was £1,192 12s. 5d.

During this year there were circulated 7,867 Bibles, 13,761 New Testaments, 757 copies of the Psalms, and 37,058 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During this and the previous eight years and a half we especially availed ourselves of the openings, which the Lord was pleased to give for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Italy, so that thousands of Italian Bibles and Testaments were circulated.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during this year, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, was £1,260 8s. 2d.

During this year the circulation of the Holy Scriptures was twice as great as during any previous year, which was chiefly owing to the large openings which it pleased the Lord to give to the Missionaries, assisted by the funds of this Institution, who labour in the Gospel in Spain. During this year alone 3,517 Spanish Bibles, 5,006 Spanish Testaments, 603 Spanish Psalms, and 32,963 Spanish Gospels were circulated.

As I received many letters from Spain, with reference to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, I give extracts from some of them.

Mr. L. writes on June 8th, 1869, from Madrid:—"I have much joy in telling you that I received 2 cases of Bibles today, containing 500 copies, the majority being the cheap Bibles which you purchased and which have been so long lying at Bayonne. About 30 Reference Bibles and a good number of Family Bibles were obtained by Brother G. before leaving for Spain. I think in my last I told you I hoped to obtain them through instructions given me by one of the Clerks in the Office of the Minister of Public Works, as he knew there was an old law, which admitted books of any kind, whose number did not exceed 500; and if I addressed a petition to the Minister he would be sure to grant it. And so it proved, and today our hearts were gladdened by their arrival. We have to pay a real a copy for some, and a little more for others. Of course we would have liked, for the country’s sake, that they had come in freely; but we know they could not, under existing laws and pressing prejudices, do otherwise than they have done; and we thank the Lord daily for the liberal principles of the Government, and for the unsought protection given to us. The day for the proclamation of the New Constitution has passed without the least disturbance, contrary to the anticipations of some. I was advised, by no means to open the depot on that day, but faith did not fail; indeed I never felt less timid, and we had cause to rejoice in the manifest blessing. Great numbers of country folk came to see the doings on this great national fête, and we were able to distribute and sell about 3000 portions of God’s word, and our brethren distributed about 20,000 leaflets and tracts in one of the squares, where a statue had been erected to the memory of Mendizabal, a great religious and political reformer. It is wonderful, after such large sales, that the interest keeps up; but, instead of abating, it increases. We are having a tent constructed to go to another large fair held near this. Every prophecy that these great gatherings were not the places to sell God’s word, and that, to do so, would be certain to cause disturbances among Romanists, has failed of fulfilment; the contrary has been our experience."

Again he writes from Madrid, on June 15th, 1869:—"We have made another application to the Government, and hope to get in 1000 more Bibles in a week or so. We continue to have, almost daily, good sales of Bibles. One day 10 were sold at the shop; and in the fair held last week near this, called San Antonio, we sold 33 Bibles, 19 New Testaments and 1,760 portions; besides giving many away."

At the end of September, 1869, Mr. L. went with his family to labour at Barcelona, as there were by this time a number of labourers in the Gospel in Madrid, and as he had a desire to spread the truth and circulate the Holy Scriptures in this large mercantile town of Spain.

As I had found out by careful examination, that by far the best translation of the Greek New Testament into Spanish had been prepared at the cost of the American Bible Union, I obtained, through their kindness, at the expense of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, a set of Stereotype Plates of this excellent version of the New Testament, and sent these plates to Spain, that there an edition of this translation might be printed, as the land was still not open for the introduction of printed bound books, without great difficulty and without considerable expense. To this matter Mr. L. refers, in a letter from Barcelona, Nov. 19, 1869.

"I am happy to inform you of the safe arrival of the plates of the New Testament, which I have passed through the Customs, and that I now have them in the house. I wait your advice as to the numbers to be printed. As I see my way to remain here for a time, and as it is even a better place than Madrid in which to get work done well, I judge it would be better to print and bind here."

Since then, 2 editions of this translation of the New Testament, of 5,000 copies each, have been printed and circulated; and more, God willing, will be printed.

On Dec. 28, 1869, Mr. L. writes again from Barcelona:—"We have been in Spain just 12 months. What a year of peculiar mercies! What great things God hath done for us; preserving and protecting us in our journies; and how greatly has He honoured us in the sowing of much precious seed! Blessed public testimonies have been given to the Word which endureth for ever. But of all occasions yet under our notice, I have seen nothing like the one we have been allowed to witness during three days’ Christmas fair held in this city. The day before the fair I applied at the Town Hall for space for a tent. I was told there could be no objection, that at 9 o’clock that night the superintendent would be in the square and would find me a place, which they considered the best spot in the city for such a work. So at that hour I went, and after walking about until 11 o’clock, a place was given me at the entrance to the square, at the top of the principal street, and right under the eye of the Town Guards. Next morning the pretty tent, as it is called in one of the daily papers, drew hundreds up to it. ‘God is Love,’ What is this? asked dozens on each side, reading aloud. ‘Faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation.’ ‘God is Light.’ Jesus said, ‘I am the Light of the world, he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.’ Spreading the table with Gospels, I had no sooner announced them for sale, than they began to sell just as fast as we could deal them out—not allowing us time to arrange them. We sold a Sheet Almanac, The Old, Old Story, in Spanish verse, and a Gospel for ½d. But the night did not end without the enemy showing signs of anger. Two young students came and purchased and tore them up: this roused the anger of the bystanders, and just at that point one of the district inspectors came up, and, finding what had happened, warned the young men not to repeat such insulting conduct, telling them, they could do as they liked with the books away from the tent, but not to tear them in a person’s face. Next morning my faithful friend, Francesco, had arranged the tent by 7 o’clock, and from that hour until 3 o’clock in the afternoon, I had no time to eat. We then opened the other side of the tent, and put a table there. Fernando took to this. Then Mr. U. and his colporteur came to our help, and so each worked away with much boldness, reading portions, explaining them, and preaching the Word to the hundreds in front and at the back. Now and again the enemies would send a boy to purchase, in order to destroy; but we got to know them. A woman came up and tore them, but she soon got away, the bystanders beginning to hoot her. While I was very busy selling, a gross looking priest came up to the tent and called out in my face in Spanish, ‘Liar, liar.’ The crowd called out, ‘No no, you are the liar;’ and as I was higher than the crowd, I saw a movement towards him, and rough words began to pass. I begged the people to let the priest speak. I took off my hat and said to him, ‘Do, Sir, come forward and say anything you please, I will reply when you have done; this is the only way to convince each other.’ At this he came forward and I called for silence. The priest said ‘Tell us then when did your religion begin?’ I replied, ‘My religion, Sir, began with Abel, who was killed by his brother Cain, because he thought and acted in religious matters in a different way to his brother Cain. I was going on to say more on the point, when the priest interrupted, ‘Oh, then your religion did not begin with Luther.’ ‘No, Sir.’ Again he stopped me. The people cried out, ‘Don’t interrupt the stranger, you have had your say. At this the old man grew impatient and excused himself that he had to go and see a sick person. Some cried ‘go,’ others used to him not quite such kindly expressions. When he was gone I went into the subject, lifting up my heart to the Lord for wisdom and strength. I poured forth words of saving truth, showing the difference between Rome’s perplexing way of saving, setting forth truth, comparing the simple statement ‘God is love,’ with the expensive, tormenting and uncertain ways of Rome. When I had done, the people manifested much approbation. The last day, a man snatched a book out of Fernando’s hand, the people ran after him and delivered him up to the mayor. The under mayor stood by the whole time at evening and night. The Secretary of the Civil Governor came to learn the truth of the matter, and the Inspector of the secret police recounted to him matters, telling him how wisely, and gentlemanly, I behaved the whole time. At night he sent a sereno to accompany me home, and to carry my heavy bag of money. The last night we seemed to be on the point of another assault, but nothing happened beyond the throwing a stone and an old shoe, and the bespattering my cloak. It was a glorious testimony; we sold all our books, and having left only the Gospel by John, and no Testaments, I distributed the Gospels among the people, who received them orderly, and thankfully. Our three days’ sales amounted to £30, mostly in coppers. The next day several of the authorities went to the shop for Bibles. In parting, the Mayor said, ‘Well Sir, you have carried the palm in Barcelona.’ I left him £5 to divide among the poor; this greatly pleased him. We thank God and take courage for the future. I must add one more incident of the fair, which appears to me to show the hand of the Lord to be with us. A blind man came up to the tent, with his guitar in one hand and a flute in the other. One of the men knew him, and told me he was one of the greatest propagandists they had in Barcelona. One of the friends asked him to play some of the gospel hymns, and very sweetly did he play some of our old tunes set to Spanish words. I asked him to abide by the tent and play these hymns, and of course his doing so did not diminish the attraction; and we sold many hymns and gospels as a consequence. I invited him to come and visit us, and he came to our meeting on Sunday night. ‘Don Garcia,’ I said to him, ‘Where were you born?’ ‘In Victoria,’ he replied. ‘How long have you been here?’ ‘About 3 years; I left Madrid the night of San Daniel. I was known as an enemy to Rome, always preaching against the system, and I had to fly, dressed as a priest.’ I told him that was the very night we entered Madrid, when they were killing the people in the streets. I invited him to say something to us at our meeting, and soon he gladdened our hearts, as with animation he set forth the simple Gospel, and with a wonderful controversial power, at the same time making all to point to Jesus and His resurrection. After the meeting I said to him ‘Don Garcia, have you never wished to have some way of providing for yourself, wife and three boys?’ ‘Dear Sir, I should think so, I have said to my wife, I shall be an evangelist; she replied, ‘how can you? you cannot read.’ ‘How much might you get by playing in the week?’ I asked. ‘Some days,’ he replied, ‘I get 1s. 6d., others 2s., and others again less, but always a little to buy food.’ ‘Do you think you could manage a table, with Bibles and Tracts, and teach some of your hymns?’ ‘I should delight to do so,’ he said. So you see, dear brother, I have to offer you the services of this poor blind one, who, without doubt, can see Jesus, and has come to declare the works of God. I look forward to his being of great service in the fairs. Francesco, also, I have great comfort in. Fernando is best fitted for a shop. The printer hopes soon to have a book bound as a proof. I will write you again shortly. I have today received 65 Bibles and 300 Testaments from Seville. I could have so1d a large number of Testaments if I had more."

This blind Christian Spaniard has now been for more than four years labouring most usefully as colporteur in connexion with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, and his walk has been very consistent.

On Jan. 22, 1870, Mr. L. writes from Barcelona:—"The printing of the New Testament from the plates is so far advanced, that by the time agreed upon, the 25th of this month, we shall have books on sale. I intend sending you a copy of the Testament as soon as it is finished. I have had a sort of travelling kiosk made, which I think may be even better than a stationary one, as we can thus visit different places of resort. It is filled with Scriptures, Almanacs and books, such as ‘Andrew Dunn,’ ‘The Church in Spain,’ &c. I have intended the blind man to be with it; the more of whom I see, the more I believe him to be very faithful. I have besides made particular enquiries about him. I am also preparing a portable tent, which, in summer time, will be useful to take to village feasts and fairs. I have also my eye upon a young Frenchman, who has been 15 years in this place. I was pleased with an answer he gave me the other day, when talking about physical force, which some brethren were disposed to use. I instanced one brother using a revolver. He drawing a New Testament from his pocket, said, ‘This is my revolver, and I find it often a very powerful one.’ I want to order on your account 1,000 Psalms, 5,000 of each Gospel, and 2,000 Epistles."

Again he writes on March 14, 1870:—"Three days after the time agreed upon by the binder, we began to receive copies of the New Testament, and as you will see by the report, we have done a good sale, and I believe this edition will soon be in circulation. Shortly I shall send a box to Madrid. I took 25 with me, and the brethren say, it is the best Testament they have seen as yet in Spain. The 10,000 Gospels are those used by Brother G. in Madrid and at the fairs, for which please pay him as he has paid the printer for them. I have not yet received your 5,000 of each Gospel, but hope soon to get them from Madrid. I have been today to see about a place in which to begin a day-school, which Brother F., I believe, according to his letters, will take the direction

of. Francesco and Fernando have just returned from Figueras, where they have given excellent testimony, and sold Scriptures in one day to the amount of 600 reals. Their enemies tried to do them bodily harm, but some workmen saved them from violence. Three priests and a bookseller bought a Bible, 5 Testaments, and 12 Gospels, then dipped them in turpentine and made a bonfire in the square, just before the tent. A workman snatched the Bible out of the flames, and Francesco has brought it back in its half consumed state; it drew the tears from all our eyes, when he presented it in the house. The carriage and the blind brother attract much attention, and sales are made daily. One day a Romanist began a controversy, which soon drew a great crowd; and some tradesmen, who listened, said, the blind man made his opponent look small, and that the people showed much approbation at what the blind man said, as also at his cool manner."

Did not space forbid, many more similar extracts would be given.

From May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, was expended of the Funds of the Institution for Missions, the sum of £9,590 18s. 1d. By this sum One Hundred and Seventy-Nine labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

The reader who desires to know the particulars of the labours of these Missionaries, with reference to this year, is referred to the many letters given in the Report of 1870, from which he will see, how abundantly God helped these beloved brethren in their service. how he watched over the lives of several of them in a remarkable way, and how abundantly their labours were blessed in the conversion of many hundreds. Persons whose means are limited, may have the back Reports at half price, if they will kindly apply to me direct for them. 25 of the 179 Missionaries laboured in China, 8 in the East Indies, 2 at Singapore, 2 at Penang, 2 at Malacca, 1 in Australia, 1 at the Cape of Good Hope, 1 in Morocco, 6 in British Guiana, 1 in Trinidad, 1 in Granada, 1 in the United States, 2 in Canada, 2 in Nova Scotia, 14 in Spain, 11 in Italy, 3 in France, 1 in Belgium, 1 in Switzerland, 1 in Germany, 1 in Jersey, 4 in Ireland, 3 in Scotland, 3 in Wales, and 82 in various parts of England.

From May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there was expended for the circulation of Tracts £1,218 3s. 11d.; and there were circulated in this year more than Two Millions and Six Hundred and Eighty-three Thousand (exactly 2,683,630) Tracts and Books. More than Two Millions and Three Hundred and Eighty Thousand of the tracts and books circulated, during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals, to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother, labouring in the Gospel in Ireland, writes, on Oct. 1, 1869:—"The parcel of tracts, which you kindly sent, has reached me safely; accept my cordial thanks in the name of our Master. I trust in Him for a blessing on their circulation. Last week I met with one instance of blessing through the reading of a tract which I had given away: it was the means of leading a young man, who was convinced of sin, to rejoice in Jesus as his Saviour."

A Christian lady in Wales, to whom I have repeatedly sent tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Oct. 28, 1869:—"God has graciously blessed some Tracts already: one of the last instances is that of a man named G., an Englishman. Coming from the station, he received a tract from me, with the title, ‘A few words on Repentance,’ he read it going home. His words to me afterwards were ‘I had no rest after I read it, and could not sleep that night.’ Hearing about our meetings in the Hall, he came under strong convictions of sin, and without peace. He heard at the first meeting Mr. H. preach, and afterwards Mr. D. He has been a regular attendant since, his place never being empty. Three weeks ago he joined us in prayer. Yes, behold he prayeth! He has full peace now, and, if we live, he is going to break bread with us next Lord’s day, if God will."

A Christian brother in Oxfordshire writes, with reference to tracts which he had received, on Nov. 13, 1869:—"In some cases I have received the testimony of good resulting from the reading one of them; just before me is a case in point. After giving one of the tracts to a woman at S., she read it and is now converted, and she told me it was through reading the tract I gave her with the title ‘The Gospel.’"

The same Christian brother writes, on Jan. 12, 1870:—"I can give you many passages from my journal, showing the good your tracts have done. I just give one; I gave a tract to a man at a place called S.; the title of the tract was, ‘Do you love Jesus?’ He read it, and began to feel a concern for his soul. I was called to speak for Jesus in the same village, and he came there, and since then he has been a changed man. I saw him on Tuesday the 11th, and he told me he had to bless the Lord I ever gave him the tract. He once spent his nights and Sundays in a beer-house, and went home to curse and beat his wife and family; and now, seven of his household, including himself and wife, are savingly converted to the Lord I trust. Previous to his conversion he was the worst of men."

A brother in the Lord, labouring in Lancashire, writes, on Jan. 27, 1870:—"The Lord is continuing His goodness to us in the Dispensary; we have 150 persons some days, most attentive to the Word of the Lord and most anxious to receive and read Gospel tracts. I met a young man in the streets a few days since, who stopped me by saying, ‘Mr. G., have you any of those nice tracts you give us at the Dispensary? Oh! they have been such a blessing to me, and the words you speak from them. I had been a very sinful careless man till I went to the Dispensary and heard you speaking from the title of a tract ‘Are you sure you are saved?’ From that day there was a happy change in my heart and soul,’ &c. I would be very thankful for another parcel of tracts, if it would be convenient. I believe they have been much owned of the Lord in the Dispensary; and I am very nearly run out now.

A brother in the Lord, labouring among sailors at Hamburg, writes, on Jan. 7, 1870:—"The large box filled with English, German and French tracts, books, &c. which you sent me so kindly upon my coming here, is getting well nigh empty, and therefore I venture again to ask for a fresh supply of tracts at a scale of circulation: three-fourths German and one-fourth English, with about 300 of Italian tracts, for the grant of which I should feel most grateful. Since my coming to Hamburg, those tracts have been of incalculable value to me in my evangelistic labours, which I have given away when going from vessel to vessel of various nations for the purpose of speaking to single individuals or to groups of men (just as I find them disengaged or while they are taking their meals) of their soul’s salvation, and who have carried tracts to parts nigh and far; and as they have not been dispatched without prayer, and our living God saith, that whatsoever we ask in faith believing, we shall have, I can calculate with certainty, that the Lord hath clothed many of them with an irresistible power from above to the salvation of some ignorant careless sinners. And how great an encouragement it is to me to see how gratefully these tracts are often received, not only from those who have long ago learnt the value of a good tract, and, because of their containing God’s Word, have a secret feeling of reverence towards them; but to see those, who from childhood had been trained in infidelity, and to make a mock of eternal things; to see hundreds of such men, who at my first coming here were ashamed to accept a tract from my hands, to see such now, as it were, hunger and thirst after them, and with evident satisfaction if not with rejoicing, hide that which they have received like a treasure in their pockets; this is truly encouraging. At other times I have supplied emigrants with tracts, who have carried them to America or Australia; at other times again I have carried them to shops and dwelling houses. A little while ago, when for the sake of being able to pursue my work more boldly and effectually, I applied to the authorities for a license to distribute tracts, they told me, that I must first bring them a sample of the tracts, to be distributed, before they could grant me the respective license, which I seized as an excellent opportunity to bring the true Gospel before the Officials, who, being struck with the titles, instead of returning them, kept them for their own use."

From Cape Town I received in a letter, dated April 19, 1870, the following information:—"One of the little books has been made a blessing to a young man, who sees now his acceptance in Christ, and that all his sins are put away through faith in the precious blood: the title of the little book is ‘Is it well with thee?‘"

A Christian Tract Distributor, whom I have often supplied with tracts, wrote me, on May 21, 1870, in applying for a fresh grant for the Bath races, &c.:—"I had a very interesting case about three weeks ago at Cardiff races. I gave a young man a tract, title, ‘Gospel or Glad Tidings;’ he returned to the entrance of the race course, where he received the tract, and seemed thoroughly broken down with a sense of his guilt. I talked with him some time, when he besought me to say no more as I was breaking his heart; he left me bathed in tears, telling me it would be the last race-course he should see, but thanked God for the little tract put into his hands there."

In connexion with this last case I offer a few remarks. I am often asked by Tract Distributors for "Narrative Tracts," as being more likely, they say, to be read; and, on the other hand, the last tract referred to because it is no "Narrative Tract," and in other respects not of the character of many Tracts now in circulation, though full of sound and good statements of truth has not been valued by some dear Christian friends. But how does God judge? Many instances of blessing have come before me, through this very tract. May I also say, that while I do not at all object to a good "Narrative Tract;" yet, if we lay too much stress on the fact, that the tract is a "Narrative Tract," we shall find ourselves disappointed. In many instances the Narrative only may be read, and, when the practical application comes, the tract may be put aside, because the natural mind is now no longer interested. What then have we to do as Tract or Bible Distributors? 1, Never to reckon our success by the number of Bibles, or Testaments, or Tracts, which we circulate; for Millions of Bibles, Testaments and Tracts might be circulated, and little good result from our efforts. 2, We should, day by day, seek God’s blessing on our labours in this particular; and on every Tract or Copy of the Holy Scriptures which we give, we should, as much as possible, ask God’s blessing. 3, We should expect God’s blessing upon our labours, and confidently expect it; yea, look out for His blessing. 4, We should labour on in this service, prayerfully and believingly labour on, even though for a long time we should see little or no fruit; yea, we should labour on, as if everything depended on our labours, whilst in reality, we ought not to put the least confidence in our exertions, but alone in God’s ability and willingness to bless, by His Holy Spirit, our efforts for the sake of the Lord Jesus. 5, And what will be the result of labouring on patiently in such a spirit? We find the answer in the epistle to the Galatians vi, 9 "Let us not be weary in well doing; for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not." Observe, in due season. The whole of our earthly pilgrimage is a sowing time, though we may be allowed to see now and then, already in this life, fruit resulting from our sowing, to a greater or less degree; but if it were not thus, or if comparatively but little fruit were now, in this life, reaped, the due season is coming. At the appearing of our Lord Jesus all will be made manifest; our reward of grace will be given to us for our patient service then; and, in the prospect of that day, we have patiently to continue in well doing. But this patient continuing in well doing calls for much prayer, for much meditation on the word of God, and for much feeding on the work and person of our Lord Jesus, in order that thus our spiritual strength may be renewed day by day.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there were 1,498 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4. During the year 388 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1870, would have been 1,886, had there been no changes; but of these 1,886 nineteen died during the year. This number is very small if it is remembered, as I have stated before, that three-fourths of all the Orphans under our care, which we know from the official certificates, lost one or both parents in consumption. Seven out of the nineteen were very decided believers, and two were very young infants. Nineteen of the Orphans were returned to their relatives, either because they were by that time able and desirous to provide for them, or because the Orphans were in such a state physically or mentally that they were unsuitable for an Orphan Institution. Twenty-eight of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed during the year, eleven of whom had been believers for some time. Lastly, Ninety-eight of the girls were sent out to service during the year, of whom twenty-four had been believers for a longer or shorter time. 164 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,886, so that we had on May 26, 1870, only 1,722 Orphans under our care, viz. 300, in No. 1—395 in No, 2—433 in No. 3—443 in No. 4—and 151 in No. 5. There was a good and solid spiritual work going on in the hearts of not a few of the Orphans then under our care, though these cases were not so many as in the years 1859, 1860, and 1866.

The amount of means expended on the support of the Orphans, during the year, was £20,197 14s. 9½d., besides £4,171 3s. 9d. expended of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871.

During this year it pleased the Lord greatly to try us, in having several hundred Orphans ill in Scarlet Fever; but very few, comparatively, died in consequence. We had also the trial of faith in the sickness of some of the helpers; in the great want of rain, and consequent increased work, and expense in the procuring of water; in the having had often to call upon God for suitable masters for the boys, ready to be apprenticed; and in the removal by death of dear Mr. Lawford, a most valuable helper to me for 16 years; but in all these things we found that we did not call upon God in vain, and were supported and helped. This we also found, that, when teachers and other helpers were needed, the Lord always supplied us, in answer to believing and expecting prayer. Great also was His kindness, in allowing me to enlarge considerably every part of the work. The number of Schools was greatly increased. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures was during this year far greater than ever before; and we were permitted in Rome itself to circulate Thousands of copies of them. The Mission Field was considerably extended, and the number of Missionaries assisted was greater than ever, and the amount expended on this object was far greater than during any previous year. The circulation of Tracts, especially of simple Gospel Tracts, was very great during this year, and especially in the way of gratuitous circulation. The Orphan Work, which had been year after year increasing, was also during this year much increased. In looking back, therefore, upon the small beginning of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, on March 5, 1834, I exclaim with gratitude: What has God wrought! He put into my heart to begin this work; He sustained me in this work, amidst great, and many, and varied difficulties; He upheld and enlarged the work; and He condescended to increase this little work to what it is now. I therefore praise God for the past, and will yet trust in Him with regard to the future.

During this year Thirty-two Day-Schools were entirely supported by the Funds of the Institution, and nineteen were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of the Thirty-Two Schools, which were entirely supported, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington in Cornwall, one at Kenilworth in Warwickshire, two at Walham Green near London, one in Liverpool, three on the Blackdown Hills in Somersetshire, one at Burrington in Devonshire, two at Barnstaple, one in Exeter, one at Howle Hill in Herefordshire, nine in Spain, five in India, and one in British Guiana. The master of one of the Schools for Boys in Bristol, stated, that a boy of 14 years of age gave evidence of true conversion to God, and that most of the older boys appeared to enjoy the Bible readings. Another master of one of the Boys’ Schools in Bristol stated, that the moral character of the boys was greatly improved.—The mistress of a Girls’ School in Bristol reported, that two girls, who were removed by death, gave good proof of trust in the Lord Jesus for salvation; and one rejoiced in the prospect of going, to be, as she said "with Jesus for ever."—The mistress of the School at Kenilworth reported, that some of the children appeared greatly interested in the Word of God.—The report of the Liverpool School was, that there was great improvement in the character of many of the boys during the year.—In the Boys’ School at Clayhidon, Blackdown Hills, many children were exercised about their spiritual state, and one gave good proof of trust in the Lord Jesus.—In the School at Burrington, there was one instance of decided conversion to the Lord, and another child was awakened, and in a hopeful state.—There was reason to hope that four children in the School in Exeter were brought to the knowledge of the Lord.—One of the scholars of the Day Schools at Callington died in the Lord during the year.—The letters from the Missionaries in Spain were full of most interesting details as to the Lord’s most abundant and most manifest blessing resting upon the Schools in Spain.—In these Thirty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1871, altogether 2,665 children. Of the Schools, merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked. Of the nineteen Day Schools, which were assisted during the year, there were four in British Guiana, one in Scotland, one in Cornwall, five in Devonshire, one in Dorset-shire, one in Gloucestershire, one in Worcestershire, one in Herefordshire, one in Wiltshire, one in Middlesex, one in Norfolk, and one in Yorkshire.

There were ten Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these ten Sunday-schools, there were on May 26th, 1871, altogether 1,084 children. There were likewise during the year, Twenty-seven Sunday-schools, to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these twenty-seven Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise, was requested to be sent in. Of the ten Sunday Schools entirely supported, three were in Spain, one in Liverpool, one at Burrington, one at Callington, one at Clayhidon, one at Kenilworth, and one at Walham Green. Of this last School, the account sent in, is, that there was one decided case of conversion during this year; and that those, who were reported as converted during the previous year, were walking in the truth, and proved that the work was of God. Of the Bristol Sunday School, in connexion with the Institution, the account was, that there had been a considerable increase of senior boys, which was very encouraging to the teachers; and two of the elder girls had made confession of faith in the Lord Jesus.—Of the twenty-seven Sunday Schools, which were assisted by the funds of the Institution, there were four in Devonshire, one in Cornwall, two in Somersetshire, two in Gloucestershire, three in Hampshire, six in Middlesex, one in Kent, one in Norfolk, one in Oxfordshire, one in Lancashire, one in Yorkshire, two in Wales, and two in Scotland.

There were, during this year, Nine Adult Schools, with 339 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by the funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, two at Barnstaple, and one at Callington. Of the last Adult School the Report sent in was, that two of the scholars gave satisfactory evidence of having passed from death unto life.

It will, therefore, appear from the foregoing statement that there were altogether fifty-one Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (32 Day Schools, 10 Sunday Schools, 9 Adult Schools); and that during this year Forty-six schools were assisted, viz., 19 Day Schools and 27 Sunday Schools. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the fifty-one Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1871, altogether 4,088 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning to May 26, 1871, amounts to Twenty-three Thousand and Ninety-six, viz., there were 13,606 in all the Day Schools, 5,312 in all the Sunday Schools, and 4,178 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £1,908 10s. 3¼d. This does not include £683 3s. 1¼d. expended on the Mission Schools.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there were circulated 7,599 Bibles, 23,886 New Testaments, 528 Copies of the Psalms, and 30,143 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, chiefly Gospels.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during that year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,002 3s. 6d.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, the Missionaries in Spain again circulated many Thousand Copies of the Holy Scriptures, and most deeply interesting letters were again received from them with regard to this part of their work, of which several are given in the Report for 1871. During this period also the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in the Ex-Papal State, which was now opened for their spread, we earnestly sought after, by Mr. W. labouring in Rome, who was authorised to circulate as many Bibles and Testaments, at the expense of the Institution, as he found it desirable; and by whom, since then, many thousand copies have been circulated.

Mr. W. writes from Rome on Jan. 7, 1871:—"Since I last wrote, we have passed a very remarkable period. Last Monday week I was awakened by claps of thunder; the rain fell in torrents, and a stroke of lightning fell on the palace of the Pope. It penetrated even to the Chapel, and for the time prevented the performance of Mass. This stroke of lightning, the only one, it seems, which fell on that occasion, was the beginning of our difficulties. The rains continued, the snows on the mountains began to melt, and the day following the Tiber overflowed its banks and flooded half of Rome. This disaster, which has been so ruinous to thousands, has, under the providence of our Heavenly Father, been the cause of my being furnished with a large supply of Scriptures. If I remember rightly, I told you in my last of the scruples of the agent of the Bible Society to let me have Bibles even at cost prices. Shortly after my interview with him, the shop was inundated, and two-thirds of the whole stock submerged. He was therefore willing to let me have the whole of the damaged copies. These have been transferred to a heated room, where they have been in part dried, and shortly the whole of them will be fit for circulation. When properly dried, the copies will be as good, I believe, as before. I was obliged to see in this instance the care and assistance of our blessed Saviour. Though the rain has been almost incessant, I have been able to carry on the distribution of whole copies. I go from shop to shop and house to house, and speak with the inmates, and, when I find desire on their part to possess a copy, I leave one. The day before yesterday, after conversing with a carpenter who desired to have a copy, I offered one to him. He did not for the moment believe I wished to give it, and when I repeated that it was gratis the tears came into the poor man’s eyes. I have to do this work somewhat privately, because if it were known that I dispense gratuitously, my present stock would be exhausted in a day, such is the willingness of the people to possess the Word. I have reason to believe that the copies received are generally read, and I notice that, after I have been in a street distributing, the people in many instances salute me with kindness, which indicates their thankfulness. Some of the priests are furious, but this was to be expected. I feel that in this work I shall have the presence and blessing of the Master. The meeting in my house is as large as the room; some I trust have been gathered to Jesus."

Again Mr. W. writes from Rome on Feb. 17, 1871:—"While I am limited with regard to the entire Scriptures, I am thankful to have been able to do much with the separate portions. Since I last wrote I have received 10,000 copies of Romans, and these are nearly all distributed. The people receive as willingly now as at the beginning. Of the perhaps 26,000 portions which have been distributed in Rome and its vicinity, only five or six have been torn to pieces in the streets. This proportion is smaller than it would have been, I believe, in any other part of Italy. The towns in the provinces are as ready to receive as the city. A short time since I went with the aged brother, who is labouring with me as Bibleman, to Frascati, with a large supply of portions and 50 or 60 Bibles and Testaments. We began to distribute in the centre of the city, and in about half an hour 600 Gospels and Epistles were given away. The crowd was so great, that I thought it best to retire from the city to a grove outside, some distance from the wall. Some few followed us: I sat down. and spoke to them of the precious love of Jesus. They listened, some of them with tears, and showed much desire to possess the whole Scriptures, and to hear some one speak upon the same. I gave them copies and instructed them to meet and read it together. One offered his house, and others promised to attend. This was all I could do at the time, but I trust to the Lord to be able to return. I felt at that moment, that if such visits were made on an extensive scale, many of the Lord’s hidden ones would be called out. When I returned to the city, it was soon known that I had given whole copies of the Word, and many persons gathered round the house, where I was taking food. Some came in to ask for the Testament, among them fourteen or fifteen women, several with children in their arms. I had thus the opportunity of speaking to them individually, and our conversations were most interesting. I know of no means of reaching the women of Italy like this, and, as the Lord opens my way, I hope to continue it. When I left the house, there was a crowd; but I could not give Testaments to a fourth of those who sought to obtain them. The meeting in my room has been owned by the Lord. Several have been brought to the knowledge of the truth. Here in Italy we are sending Gospels and Epistles by post. Postage is cheap; for one-fifth of a penny we can send a Gospel to any part of the country. In this way we work among the upper classes."

On March 12, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"The distribution excites great opposition on the part of the priests, and has been referred to not only in their discourses, but in their journals and proclamations. The desire of the people for the Word is greater than ever. A large portion of those I give are to persons who either come to my house, or see me after the meetings. Being limited as I am in the number, I feel I ought to do so at present. The preaching of the Word is well attended, and some already rejoice in Jesus. Next Lord’s day I open another room in a part where many Bibles have been distributed, and where several who have read them desire to hear the Gospel."

On April 18, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"Since I last wrote I have, through the goodness of our Heavenly Father, been able to continue the work here in the city and in the country round. From the accounts enclosed you will see, that I have received Scriptures nearly to the amount you kindly sent me. Many interesting facts come under my notice in connection with this blessed work, which show how deeply the people are interested, and how the Lord blesses His own Word. At Tivoli the coachman, who had received a New Testament from me, showed it to his aunt who resided in that city. She no sooner saw it, than she took the book and locked it in a strong chest, saying that she had for years desired to possess it, and that now she had it she would keep it. The coachman received another. At Albano, where we distributed many Gospels and some Testaments, a man who had received a New Testament came to Rome to see me, in the hope of inducing me to go and preach there. He had read his Testament to 14 or 15 persons, who met with him every evening to listen to the Word. I gave him other copies for this little Bible-class, and purpose returning to that city. Here in Rome we have many proofs of the willingness of the people to receive, and no proof of any weight of the contrary. I had hoped to have done much more during the past few months than has been done, but the Lord has much blessed me in the preaching of the Word, and though I have waited upon Him no one has been sent to help me. Now, however, I expect a brother who will relieve me of one meeting, and thus leave me freer for the work both in Rome and the cities round, so that I shall be able to distribute (D.V.) not only what I may obtain from the depot here, but any quantity Count G. may forward from Florence. The work of the Lord here in Rome is very encouraging. Various evangelists are preaching Christ, and the various rooms are, I believe, well attended. Many souls, I trust, are being brought to Christ. In my own meeting there are many who give evidence of the simplest trust in the precious Saviour, but their ignorance of Scriptural truth is very great; their desire, however, for instruction is very strong. There are some signs of a movement among the educated classes in favour of the Gospel; indeed there are many indications that the Lord is working in grace among this long benighted people."

On May 25, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"The attendance at the meetings is larger now than when I wrote last, many apply for admission, and some give proof of conversion; but we find the greatest caution needful in receiving, because of the fearfully immoral state of Roman society. I still continue to receive proofs of the blessing which accompanies the distribution of the Word. This morning one, who came to my house for a Testament, told me he was sent by a shoemaker, who, some weeks since, received a copy, and who reads it continually, both in the shop and in his family. At Civita Vecchia there has been a brother for some time, but little progress seemed at first to be made. I went there with some Scriptures, and gave Testaments in the principal street. The result of this was, that the little room in which this brother lived was soon crowded with persons, who wished to have some explanation of what they read. That brother writes to me, begging me in most pressing terms to return. At Marino, a city near Albano, I thought I would begin with the authorities, both civil and military, of the place. The Sindaco received a Bible, conversed freely, and invited me to dine with him. The military officers received me with the same willingness, so did the police. In the streets some few Gospels were torn, and I was insulted by one who seemed to have the rage of Satan against the Scriptures; but the Lord defended me. At the house where we stayed, we had a meeting of 25 or 30 persons, who listened to the Gospel. The woman of the house refused to receive anything for cooking our dinner, and offered her room for a meeting, in case we would return. Several invited me to their houses, and many saluted us as we came out of the city. On the way back to Rome I passed some who were reading the Word; the next day a man came down to Rome for some copies, and a few days after a letter was sent to one of the journals of this city, stating the satisfaction of the people, and blaming the opposition of the priests. I am glad to be able to say, that I have not met with, or even heard of, a single case of the tearing or burning of a New Testament; and the opposition of the people generally against the destruction of the portions is such, that the priests will scarcely continue it without peril. In proof of this I may refer to the following fact:—A man at Genzano, a town near Rome, received a copy of John’s Gospel, and having read it with pleasure, kept it. The chief priest of the parish discovered it and tore it up. The man, on finding the priest had taken and torn the Gospel, was so enraged, that he loaded his gun and lingered for two days about the parish church, with the intention of shooting the priest. —Could you, my dear sir and brother in Christ, send, or perhaps write, a small tract for circulation with the Scriptures here on the necessity and best mode of reading them? I have received the 400 Bibles and 800 Testaments from Florence, and some few besides those mentioned in the enclosed account. I am also expecting 1,500 which have been forwarded to me at the Depot here. Please to let me have as many copies as you may think best from Florence. With many thanks, and earnestly desiring you to pray that we may be guided and defended in this city, where Satan is resisting us on every hand, I remain yours in the kingdom and patience of Jesus."

As I found that Mr. W. had difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of copies of the Bible and of the New Testament in Rome itself, I made arrangements to send to him many hundreds of Bibles and of Testaments from Florence; and this way of supplying him goes on now regularly, so that he has been able to circulate thousands of Bibles and Testaments, as well as many thousands of copies of the Gospel of John and of the Epistle to the Romans.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there was expended on Missionary Objects, the sum of £11,638 9s. 1¼d. By this sum 186 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of these 186 Missionaries, 25 laboured in China, 10 in the East Indies, 2 at Singapore, 2 at Penang, 2 in Australia, 1 at the Cape of Good Hope, 2 in Cuba, 7 in British Guiana, 1 in Trinidad, 1 in the United States, 3 in Canada, 2 in Nova Scotia, 16 in Spain, 12 in Italy, 2 in France, 1 in Belgium, 1 in Switzerland, 1 in Germany, 5 in Ireland, 3 in Scotland, 3 in Wales, and 84 in various parts of England.

I had intended to give extracts from the many hundreds of letters received from the Missionaries during this year, as they are full of the deepest interest; and I had actually begun to write out some of them; but I have given it up, as I could not possibly do justice, even in a small degree, to the labours of those beloved servants of Christ. Though in the Report issued in 1871, there are only a very small number, comparatively, of these extracts, yet they would fill at the least One Hundred pages of this Narrative. I must therefore confine myself to saying, that there is the fullest reason to believe, that by these Foreign and Home labourers in the Gospel, during that year, Thousands of souls were won for our Lord Jesus; and that the reader, who wishes to know particulars, must read the missionary letters of the Report.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, the sum of £917 15s. 1d. was expended on the circulation of Tracts; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions and Eight Hundred and Seventy-two Thousand (exactly 2,872,301) Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1871, is about Thirty-Nine Millions (exactly 38,893,712).

More than Two Millions Three Hundred and Eighty-three Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during this year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A labourer in the Gospel in Yorkshire, whom I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, wrote to me on Nov. 7, 1870, when applying for another grant:—

"I was pleased the other day to hear of a conversion through the reading of a Tract, which I put into a man’s hand in the street. He crumpled it up, and thrust it into his pocket with disgust, and the next day during the meal time at the mill, he took it from his pocket and read it, and God spoke to his heart. The next Sunday he went to a chapel in the town, and there found peace in Jesus, and has become a most active Christian in the Wesleyan denomination. I heard that he had sent for 1,000 tracts at his own expense for distribution."

An evangelist labouring at Portsmouth and the neighbourhood, whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on March 24, 1871:—

"Dear Mr. Müller, I am very grateful to you for 6,000 tracts, which came quite safe to hand last evening, carriage paid, for which please to accept my sincere thanks. I do trust the Lord will continue to follow them with His blessing. I could tell you of several cases of special blessing, either directly or indirectly through the tracts; and in a great number of houses I gain admittance, where it would be most difficult, without such an introduction, and am generally enabled to read some portions of the Word of God."

A Christian Physician in Nottinghamshire, whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on April 3, 1871:—"Will you kindly thank Mr. Müller for the Grant of the Eighteen Thousand Tracts, which are already in full play; and I am most thankful to say, that I have heard within this day or two of some decided cases of conversion from the last he sent. One came under my own notice after our evening meeting. In going out of the door, I handed one to a man. He knew but little of what was said, but, said he, ‘it was that tract that did it.’ Did what? ‘Stopped me, and brought me to Jesus, and now I am resting on the blood. The tract said, that was enough.’ May the Lord add manyfold such like, and the colporteur told me, he had known some also."

A Missionary who labours among sailors, and chiefly foreign sailors, at Sunderland, and whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Jan. 24, 1871:—"A large ship from Riga came to our port. Brother M. went on board to invite the sailors to our meeting. They belong to Russia, but speak the German Language. Dear Brother M. went on board first, to preach Jesus to them; afterwards I went, and several of them came to our meeting. The mate was awakened under the Word, to see his danger, as a lost sinner before God; but had not found peace in Jesus. One Monday morning dear Brother M. went on board to see this young mate, and gave him one of your German tracts. One evening, as I was sitting and thinking of the Lord’s goodness, the mate of the Riga ship came in, saying I want to speak to you alone. ‘Oh!’ said he, ‘I thank you for that beautiful tract. I never read such a tract before. I have read it over three times and carefully meditated upon it. I am now upon the Rock, I am saved, I have peace in Jesus. I see it all clearly now. I am happy, happy.’ He had found peace in reading your tract. Afterwards he came up every evening to our house. We read the scriptures together and had blessed fellowship together. He often said, ‘What a change I have experienced in passing from darkness to light. How unspeakably happy I feel. I shall never forget you.’ This dear brother is well educated and speaks five different languages of the Russian empire. He often said, ‘I long to get back to Russia, to speak to the people about Jesus,"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there were 1,722 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the past year 308 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1871, would have been 2,030, had there been no changes; but, of these 2,030, Twenty-nine died during the past year. We had several hundred of the Orphans ill in scarlet fever. Eight of those who died were decidedly resting upon the atoning death of the Lord Jesus for salvation, and some of them had known the Lord Jesus a good while; of a few others, besides, we were not without hope. Twenty-five out of the Two Thousand and Thirty were either returned to the relatives, as we could not train them for service or apprentice on account of their physical, mental or moral state; or relatives, whose temporal circumstances had improved since they placed them with us, desired now, or felt it their duty, to provide for them. Ninety-nine girls were sent out to service, eight of whom had known. the Lord some time before they left. Thirty-two boys were sent out to be apprenticed, seventeen of whom had been previously brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus; 185 are therefore to be deducted from the 2,030, so that we had on May 26, 1871, only 1,845 Orphans under our care, viz., 280 in No. 1, 356 in No. 2, 450 in No. 3, 450 in No. 4, and 309 in No. 5. The amount spent for the support of the 2,030 Orphans under our care, during the year, was £22,660 16s. 5d., besides £629 4s. 11d. spent of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872. Before giving the statistics of the Institution, I desire to mention some of the especial blessings, which it pleased the Lord to bestow upon it, during this year.

1. For more than twenty years, previous to May 26, 1872, it had been stated to me again and again, by many different individuals, "What, Mr. Müller, will become of the Orphan Houses, when you are removed?" My reply was, invariably, "The Orphan Houses, and the land belonging to them, are vested in the hands of eleven trustees, and therefore the Institution stands on the same footing, in this particular, as other charitable Institutions." Then I heard it said, in reply, again and again, "But where will you find the man, who will carry on the work in the same spirit in which you do, trusting only in God for everything that in any way is needed in connection with the work?" My answer to this was always something like this: "When the Lord shall have been pleased to remove me from my post, He will prove, that He was not dependent on me, and that He could easily raise up another servant of His, to act on the same principles, on which I have sought to carry on this work." It was also stated to me again and again, by Christian friends, that I ought to pray that God would raise up a successor to me in the work. To this I generally replied, that I did so; and I have now the joy of announcing to the reader, that God has been pleased to give me the desire of my heart. In my son-in-law, Mr. James Wright, I have found what I had longed for, and prayed for, even a helper in assisting me in the direction of the Five Objects of the Institution, and, in the event of my removal, a successor. But lest any, who neither know me nor him should suppose, that, because Mr. Wright is my son-in-law, I have chosen him for this post, I state the following particulars. Mr. Wright was known to me 31 years, previous to May 26, 1872, as a consistent Christian. From his boyhood, when he was brought to the knowledge of the Lord, I have known him; and for above twenty years I had especially good opportunity of watching his most consistent godly deportment. During thirteen years, previous to May, 1872, he had been one of my most valuable helpers in the work of the Institution, I may say my right hand, in all the most important matters. As long as twelve years before May, 1872, my beloved departed wife and I began to pray regarding him, that God would fit him more and more to become my successor. This prayer was repeated hundreds of times during the lifetime of my late beloved wife, and both of us became more and more assured, that, in Mr. Wright, God had given to us, what we desired regarding this point. In February, 1870, my beloved wife was taken from me, and about ten days after I myself became very unwell. During this time it was, in February 1870, when the late Mrs. Wright was in her usual health, and when there was therefore not as much as a shadow of appearance, that Mr. Wright would ever become my son-in-law, I sent for him and opened my mind to him, that I considered it to be the will of God, that he should become my successor. His great humility, however, found a number of reasons, why he considered himself unfit for it, none of which I could allow to stand in the way as a hinderance, as I knew him so well with regard to his fitness. A second difficulty was this, his excellent Christian wife considered that he would be greatly burdened by accepting my proposal, and therefore sought to induce him not to accept it. After some weeks, however, her mind was altered on the subject, and she yielded her objections, if he saw it to be the will of God. Mr. Wright then, after long hesitation, came to the conclusion, that it would not be his duty any longer to refuse. It was eighteen months, after I had first spoken to him on the subject, that he asked for the hand of my daughter, a thing of which I had not had the faintest thought, though so intimate with him; and they were united in marriage in November 1871. I have been so minute in all this, that there may not remain in the mind of any of the readers the slightest thought, that the relationship, in which Mr. Wright now stands to me, has had anything to do with my uniting him with me in the direction of the Institution, and appointing him as my successor.

By the Lord’s kindness I am able to work as heretofore, I may say with little hinderance through illness; yet I cannot conceal from myself, that it is of great importance for the work that I should obtain a measure of relief. This relief, however, can be really only given to me by one who stands in a similar position to the work, and who, when I am away, or when I may feel it desirable to have real rest, could do all I ordinarily do in directing. On this account therefore, I not only appointed Mr. Wright as my successor, in the event of my death, but from May 26, 1872, associated him also with me in the direction of the Institution, which year by year increases in extent.

The reader has to remember, that, great as the Orphan Work is, yet it is only One out of the Five different Objects of the Institution, all of which Five Objects being not only connected with much work as to the direction, in their present state, but as they are becoming larger and larger with every year, will require more and more strength for direction.

From May 1872, then, Mr. Wright has shared with me the direction of the Institution, and I cannot describe my joy, in having found in him a successor, in the event of my death.

It may be well to state here, that, as formerly, I hold myself responsible to the public for the administration of the funds committed to my trust, and would therefore request, that all Bank Orders, Cheques, Post-office Orders, &c., be drawn in my name, and payable to my order, and that, with regard to Post-office Orders, which I always pay into the Bank, the most convenient way would be, to make them payable at the Head Office in Bristol.

2. The second great blessing, received at the hands of the Lord, to which I would especially direct the reader, is the mighty working of the Holy Spirit among the Orphans. We had been again and again blessed in this way, during the previous thirty-five years. Even when the Orphans lived in rented houses in Wilson Street, Bristol, we had often a number of them at once led to the Lord; and this blessing had been repeated by God again and again, since the Orphans have been on Ashley Down. In particular there were great numbers of them, almost all at once, brought to the knowledge of the Lord in the years 1859, 1860, and 1866. Now, though since 1866 we had not been without spiritual blessing among the Orphans, and though again and again some were truly converted, still, on the whole, there was little spiritual life manifested among them, considering the many hundreds under our care; and I had the deep sorrow and grief of finding one after the other leaving our care, to go out as apprentices or servants, without being born again. At last I mentioned this fact several times when assembled with the teachers and other helpers at our prayer-meeting, seeking to bring before them the importance of more earnest prayer regarding this point; and we waited not in vain on the Lord. On January 8th, 1872, the first day of the week for united prayer during the year, God the Holy Ghost began to work among the Orphans in a most marked way, without, apparently, any particular instrumentality, to make His hand the more manifest. From that time this blessed work went on, so that we have reason to believe, that hundreds among them were brought to the knowledge of the Lord during this year.

3. It pleased the Lord, to lay upon us during the year the heavy trial of allowing the Small Pox to enter among the Orphans, though every child under our care had been vaccinated. In the New Orphan House No. 5 in particular we had many cases, and also at No. 2 and at No. 3; but there was only one at No. 4, and none at No. 1. We had only few deaths, as the result of this trying disease, considering that the five Orphan Houses are inhabited by Two Thousand individuals. I desire especially to notice this among the particular blessings we received at the hand of God during the year. The Lord was pleased to bring great blessing out of this great trial, which lasted for about six months. Two godly and valuable teachers died in this disease, and three other helpers were afflicted by it, though they had the disease very lightly.

4, With the exception of the Small Pox, we were unusually free from illness, during the year, among the Orphans. All the thirty-six years that the Orphan work had been in existence, we had never had a better state of health among the children generally, than during this year. I enumerate this among the particular blessings received from the Lord.

5, During this year the Lord permitted us, in various ways, to enlarge the work, especially with regard to establishing schools, and more than ever to circulate in larger and larger numbers the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. As to the Schools, besides establishing several new ones in England, we were also in Foreign lands able to establish some, and in Italy this was likewise done, where up to that year we had none connected with the Institution. Our Schools in Spain gave to us, during this year, especial comfort. In circulating the Holy Scriptures, we were not only at home and abroad in general able to accomplish much; but in particular in Spain and Italy, and in Rome itself. The Tract circulation was so increased during the year, as that One Million more of them were given away gratuitously, than during the previous year.

6, Lastly, I mention to the praise of the Lord, that again during this year His blessing was spiritually resting upon all the different Objects of the Institution, and not on the Orphan work only.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, forty Day Schools were entirely supported by the Funds of the Institution, and thirteen were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of the Forty Schools which were entirely supported, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, two at Walham Green near London, one in Liverpool, three on the Blackdown Hills in Somersetshire, one at Burrington, two at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, one at Howle Hill in Herefordshire, one at Purton in Gloucester, eleven in Spain, four in India, three in British Guiana, and two in Italy.

The master of one of the Schools in Bristol reports, in reference to that year: "I am thankful to say, that there is a spirit of inquiry among the boys, and I hope one or two have accepted the Lord Jesus, as their Saviour."—Another teacher of one of the Bristol Schools reports: "I feel thankful, that I have again the privilege of bearing testimony to the goodness and mercy of God, through the past year. My heart has been greatly cheered and encouraged by seeing the work of the Holy Spirit amongst my dear scholars. From personal conversation with them, respecting their souls, I found several were earnestly seeking Jesus. One dear child was rejoicing that He loved her. Another little girl, about two months ago, became anxious about her soul, and wrote me a little letter shortly after, in which she expressed her hope, that God would bless to her, what she had heard from my lips, and also added, ‘I would like to love Jesus with my whole heart, because I know He loves me, and has died to save me.’ Another dear child was melted to tears by the simple story of Christ’s love, and gave evidence of a saving work of grace in her heart, before she left the School. She was 14 years old and has gone to service during the past year. There are two other little girls, who are seeking and desiring to realize their personal safety in Jesus. The earnest attention, which the dear children give to the word of God, is also a cause of much thankfulness. Many have given evidence, that they have been impressed by the truth of God. One little girl asked, whether God could not have saved the souls of men, without Jesus dying for them. When the answer to that question was given, she listened with profound attention and seemed to see more clearly than before the necessity of an atonement for sin by the spotless Lamb of God. There is an eagerness amongst the children, to know the truth of God, which I have never before seen to such a degree as during the last six mouths. I have heard from parents, that some of them have taken home the Bible Lesson, and have desired to read it over again in their hearing. May the Lord yet more and more honour His own precious word!"—The master of the School at Callington writes: "The increased veneration of the children for the Holy Scriptures is worthy of notice. There is hope that many of them will be rescued from the great enemy, and washed from every defilement in the fountain open for sins. During the past year it has pleased God to call unto Himself one of the scholars whose name has been on the books for upwards of ten years. For more than three years he witnessed a good confession for Christ, and died, sweetly resting in the Lord."—The master at Walham Green School writes: "The two monitors mentioned some time since, give proof, both at School and at home, that they have life in Christ."—The master of one of the Schools on the Blackdown Hills writes: "You may remember my mentioning a remarkably affecting scene on Break-up Day. That was the commencement of visible signs of the Lord’s blessing among us. We thought it would be very desirable to end the last year’s studies with an earnest appeal to the hearts of the children. The afternoon of Friday, previous to Christmas, was devoted to simple addresses, and the scene was most marvellous. The children were crying one over another, and I could but weep with them. The fruit was yet to be seen, and I believe is still to be manifested. Three of the dear girls in one family were a day or two after sweetly brought to Jesus, and still continue in His love. One of my boys, who was blessedly brought to Jesus on Good Friday, tells me, that for weeks the Word had been searching him and making him unhappy, though I had not known it. Often had he been late at School on purpose, to escape the Bible reading, and often he had intended never to come to School again; but somehow he could not remain away, and he can now understand the reason. God had a revelation still further to make to him. He tells me, he would not give up, what he has got by coming to School, for a house full of gold and silver. He is very bold for Jesus, and shows a Christlike spirit in School. Another, who has left me for Durham, writes very encouraging letters, bearing decided proofs of the genuineness of the work in his soul.—This morning I had a precious season with the children. Several were moved to tears, and two or three gave me to understand, that they had kept Jesus outside long enough, and would now let Him in. That they did love Him, they were sure. This is the Lord’s doing. In the letters which they write one to another in School, they gave positive proof; that their hearts receive the Word."—The master of the School at Barnstaple writes: "Six girls and one boy, we trust, have received spiritual blessing."—One of the three teachers in the Exeter Schools writes: "It is very gratifying to observe the interest which the children take in the Bible reading and exposition, morning by morning. Some seem to have given their hearts to Jesus. But we do not know that any of them have been led openly to confess and trust in Him. We wish we could see some unmistakeable signs of the working of the Spirit among them."—The master of the Howle Hill School writes "One dear boy is, I am happy in saying, converted to God, and tells me that he is very happy in the Lord. He has been very ill, and is now far from well. He tells me he found his illness greatly blessed to him, and had enjoyed the Lord’s presence. There is one girl, I hope to see brought to rest on Jesus. She melts when spoken to, but as yet is not decided."—The master of the Purton School writes: "I do not think there have been any converted to God; but the upper classes evince great interest in the Scripture lessons, especially the young women in the Sunday School, several of whom are often moved to tears under the close application of the Word of God, which we regard as strivings of the Spirit." The Schools in Spain, as will be seen, are full of the deepest interest.

Mr. and Mrs. L., after having laboured for several years in Spain, were obliged to leave for a time in May, 1872, for England, on account of their health, and Mr. L. writes on June 6, 1872, from Leominster the following deeply interesting letter, which more than anything proves the blessing of our schools in Spain:—"It is now a month since we left Barcelona, and 4 years since we left this the second time for Spain, and 10 years since I began to work directly for that land. In looking back, what cause for thankfulness have we for personal mercies and deliverances from the hands of our enemies. In contrasting our first visit with the second what cause have we to praise our God, and still, as ever, not to be ashamed of His good news concerning His Son, whom He raised from the dead. Before, caution, restraint, and the iron hand of persecution hindering us at every turn; now, what freedom to labour and what joy in the fruits! Before, it is true, we gathered a few ears; now we seem to be bringing in sheaves and these only the first fruits of a rich harvest behind. We shall reap if we faint not. Paul planted; Apollos watered; God gave the increase. What cause for praise, to remember the many thousand copies of the Word which we have been able to put into the hands which before handled only images of wood and stone; of those who before had never beheld the image of the invisible God, as seen in His word of truth; who had only handled rosaries and crosses, relics and rags and bones of the dead, but who now love and cherish the Scriptures, which are able to make wise unto salvation. What an exchange! And what cause for praise have we, that we have so many agencies in operation to do this blessed work! The shop, the only fixed place where persons can purchase copies of the Word, this is still open in that populous and largest commercial town of Spain, and the open Bible can still meet the eye of passers by. The small hand carriage, with Garcia, the blind man, who now daily takes his stand with his open Bible, while his fingers move over the raised letters, and his clear musical voice proclaims the living Word. Group after group gather round him, and he gives rise to as much discussion as did one of his predecessors mentioned in the Gospel. Often have I seen persons look close into his eyes to see if he were really blind. Some have said, ‘He must see a little;’ others, ‘He knows it by heart.’ Some would mock, but the reading of the Word of God has too much power. The day I took my leave of him, I went up and found a group round him: I prayed the Lord to give me a parting word from his lips, and I came up just as he finished the words, ‘He must increase but I must decrease.’ I knew my Master’s voice and I rejoiced in His Word, and, not wishing to stop the reader, I tapped him on the shoulder and whispered ‘farewell.’ The large coach continues its blessed work through towns, villages and hamlets, never before visited by the dispenser of the Scriptures, and many and beautiful are the incidents which reward the zeal and faith of those brethren who go with it. Just now they have been shut up in one town through the Carlist war, but are again on the way south. We too have been able to send by post many thousand Gospels to persons whose names are found in a Directory: persons who could not otherwise know anything about the Word, thus receive it from an unknown and unusual source. Again, to look back 3 years and remember that we had no schools in which the young might be trained in holy and pure principles, and now to see the numerous, joyous groups respond to Bible questions, and hear their Gospel melodies, and to see one and another giving signs of the quickening power of that Word, this is joy indeed. I shall not forget the day of parting, when the majority of these dear children came with their parents to say ‘Good bye.’ Such a scene in the town as they came along, so orderly and so nicely dressed. ‘What are the Schools?’ one woman asked of another. ‘Oh, these are the Christian Schools.’ ‘Really: how glad I am they are not the Protestant Schools.’ Then the parting. Mothers and children clinging round my wife and weeping like the rain. ‘Ah! we shall never see her again.’ Some of the bigger boys kept up to the last moment, but could refrain no longer. A couple of priests, who stood looking on, appeared confounded as they witnessed the love of these boys, and saw how they wept. And, then, how rejoiced I am that we have been able to begin a kind of training school for some of these elder boys and girls. This was absolutely needed, so as to give a finish to our school work. Many of these boys and girls were coming to such an age, that, if we could not retain them a little longer, some of them must fall back to Romish schools in order to complete their education: now we are able to do this, and with the hope that many of these young people will soon be able to become assistant teachers in our increasing schools. And now we can praise the Lord for the workers we have left behind—for their qualifications, their zeal and love. I feel that I can say, ‘Lord now lettest thou Thy servant depart in peace, for mine eyes have seen Thy salvation."

In the Forty Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 2,955 children. Of the Schools, merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked. There were, during the past year, Eight Day Schools assisted, viz.: one in Scotland, one in Norfolk, one in Middlesex, one in Worcestershire, one in Gloucestershire, one in Somersetshire, one in Dorsetshire, and one in Devonshire.

There were during this year, fourteen Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these fourteen Sunday-schools, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 1,372 scholars. There were likewise, during the year, thirteen Sunday-schools to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these thirteen Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the fourteen Sunday-schools, entirely supported, 4 were in Spain, 1 at Hyde Park, Demerara, 1 in Bristol, 1 at Burrington, 1 at Callington., 1 at Clayhidon, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 in Liverpool, 1 at Purton, 1 at Walham Green, London, and 1 at North End, Fulham. Of the thirteen Sunday-schools, which were assisted, 1 is in Wales, 3 are in Devonshire, 4 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Somersetshire, 2 in Hampshire, 1 in Kent, and 1 in Lancashire. The Lord was pleased to work decidedly in the Sunday-school in Bristol, during this year, in the way of conversion.

There were, during this year, Eleven Adult Schools, with 420 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were six in Spain, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, two at Barnstaple, and one at Callington. Of the last Adult School the Report sent in by the teacher is: "I would desire to mention, to the praise and glory of God, that one of the scholars, from the Adult School, has, during the past year, been regarded worthy to labour in the Gospel. He came at a very early age into the Day School. In reference to his education, he had none but that which he received with us. Many, who have been under our care in the School, are now engaged in different localities in various spheres of usefulness amongst the different sections of the Church." The teacher of the Adult Schools at Barnstaple states, that he considers six of the Adult Scholars to have been spiritually benefited, and that he has seen both Adult Schools greatly affected, so that there may be others who have been impressed, of whom he does not know.

It will appear, from the foregoing statement, that there were altogether Sixty-five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (40 Day Schools, 14 Sunday Schools, 11 Adult Schools); and that during the year Twenty-one Schools were assisted, viz. 8 Day Schools and 13 Sunday Schools. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the Sixty-five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 4,747 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning to May 26, 1872, amounts to Twenty Seven Thousand Four Hundred and Eighty-eight, viz., there were 16,455 in all the Day Schools, 6,275 in all the Sunday Schools, and 4,758 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year, in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £2,284 8s. 1½d. This does not include £1,235 8s. 4½d. expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, there were circulated 11,221 Bibles, 54,231 New Testaments, 10,909 copies of the Psalms, and 35,085 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,942 13s. 10d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during this year, as during the previous year.

Before leaving this part of the operations of the Institution, I make the following remarks: 1, To the careful readers it will be obvious, how greatly this part of the Institution, as well as the School department, has been of late years enlarged, and more particularly during this year. And yet the openings become more and more still. 2, During this year we sought, by the help of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire and Yorkshire. About thirty thousand copies of the New Testament and many Bibles were thus placed, during the year, in the hands of men, women, boys, and girls working in these factories and mills; and this work is steadily going on. This dear man goes from one mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The expense to meet this is considerable; but the importance is so great, that of late I have given still further considerable help to several Christian colporteurs to go on with this kind of work in Wales, Gloucestershire, Somersetshire, etc. The greater the efforts which are being made, to put aside the Word of God, or to do without it, the more it becomes us to spread it abroad, with earnest, believing, expecting, persevering prayer. 3, It will be interesting to the Christian reader to learn, that during this year alone, we circulated in Spain 3,105 Bibles, 7,822 Testaments, 5,674 Psalms, and 31,614 Gospels. In Italy we circulated during this year alone, in the former Papal State, 1,541 Bibles and 7,164 Testaments.

With reference to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in the former Papal State, from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, I can only give the following account, as a specimen of the letters received.

Mr. W., who labours in the Gospel in Rome, and the former Papal State, writes on August 10, 1871, from Albano:—"My dear brother in the Lord, yours of the 28th of July, containing cheque for £40, has reached me. I thankfully acknowledge the same. You will see from the enclosed account that I have been to various cities in the province, several of them at a considerable distance from Rome. At Corneto the reception given to us was most enthusiastic. At Subiaco there was quite a different state of things. The priests of Tivoli had sent a telegraphic despatch in cyphers to that city, so that, on commencing the distribution in the streets, I found four or five priests were passing from shop to shop exciting the people against me. I therefore retired for a little while to a café. A considerable crowd gathered in the piazza, and the head of the police came to speak with me. He said that there was extreme peril, and besought me not to expose myself again. After a long conversation with him, I consented to work privately. The crowd, however, continued to increase in the piazza, and when I had finished the distribution of the New Testaments, a man followed me out of the city with the intention of stabbing me. But this was providentially prevented by the Christian brother who accompanied me, and a second attempt by two policemen, who came from a bye-way just as the man was about to effect his design. Subiaco is a city of brigands: many are very sincere Catholics, but I believe the Lord is calling some to Himself there. I found on my return to Tivoli, where on a former visit I had distributed Scriptures, that the priests had arranged to shoot us on our descent through an olive-yard: but the thing failed, and now there is a weekly meeting in that city, which is well attended. I came to Albano in consequence of the great heat in Rome and the malaria, which had brought several attacks of fever to my children. Here in Albano, we have had a glorious proof of what the word of God, under the blessing of the Spirit, can accomplish apart from the preaching of the same. My time, for some weeks after coming here, was so occupied at Rome and in other parts that I did very little here, and nothing in the way of preaching. Meanwhile Mrs. W. went from shop to shop and house to house, leaving copies of the Word, and thus the whole city was stirred. The priests did all they could to obtain the Scriptures given, but, as far as we are able to judge, have not been able to get more than two or three copies. One of these was torn in pieces and strewn round my house. Another was given to a priest by a man who attends our meeting. When it was known that he had done so, some who frequent our meeting desired that he should be excluded as a traitor. About a fortnight since I opened my house for the reading of the Scriptures. Several came the first night, about 30 the second, and last night about 50 came. Ten or twelve women were present, and some seemed much impressed. Poor people! their condition. is deplorable, much worse than in Rome itself, because these mountainous districts have been long infested with brigandage. Even the children carried arms, and the most horrible crimes are frequently committed. Last week a mother, in her rage, bit pieces out of her own child, and then in a fit of rage murdered her. Popery has thus degraded the people. Mrs. W. has been much encouraged among the soldiers here. The officers desired all those who wished to possess the New Testament to add their names to a list. Sixty-nine made application in writing. One, whose time of service has expired, professes to be converted, and left for Rome this morning, in the hope of giving himself ere long to the work of the Lord. Others desire a meeting during the day, being unable to come at night. Next week I purpose (D.V.) going into the northern part of the Roman State, round about Viterbo, which is a large and important city. Mr. Rosetti will, by your direction, forward Scriptures to me there. I take the liberty of asking him to send me another thousand New Testaments to that address. I have bought a mule and a small carriage, which I propose using to visit the towns and cities round Rome. As many of the towns are on the mountains, to escape malaria, this seems the best way of visiting them. I should be thankful to have 10,000 or 12,000 copies of the Scriptures in September, and as many for the following month. The openings are great. I have now many acquaintances in many parts of the State, and I trust the Lord will raise up groups of Bible readers on every hand."

During this year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for Missions, the sum of £11,640 9s. 4½d. By this sum One Hundred and Eighty-seven labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree assisted. Their labours were again blessed, during the year, in the conversion of thousands of souls.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, £1,118 11s. 7d. was expended of the Funds of the Institution on the circulation of Tracts; and there were circulated during that year more than Three Millions Six Hundred and Eighty-four Thousand (exactly 3,684,842) Tracts and Books. More than Three Millions Three Hundred and Twenty Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during that year, were given away gratuitously. During this year very many cases came before us, in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the beginning of the period from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, there were 1,845 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the year 260 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1872, would have been 2,105, had there been no changes; but, of these 2,105, Twenty-three died during the past year. This number is exceedingly small, if it is remembered, that three-fourths of all the children under our care lost one or both parents by consumption, which we know from the official certificates of the death of the parents. Of the twenty-three who died, two were infants, and fifteen died as believers, indeed most of these fifteen were in a most blessed state of soul before their removal, longing to be with the Lord Jesus. One of the girls we were obliged to expel from the Institution, on account of the evil influence which she exercised over the other children. Twenty-three of the Orphans were returned to their relatives, either because they were by that time able to provide for them, and wished to do so; or because the children were afflicted with epileptic fits, spinal disease, mental weakness, or could, for other reasons, not be trained for service or sent out as apprentices. Forty-six of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed, at the expense of the Orphan Establishment. Twenty-two of those Forty-six boys had known the Lord some time, before they were sent out. One Hundred and Nine girls were sent out to service, Twenty-seven of whom had been believers some time previously. Two Hundred and Two are therefore to be deducted from the 2,105, so that on May 26, 1872, we had only 1,903 Orphans under our care, viz.: 298 in No. 1, 362 in No. 2, 444 in No. 3, 450 in No. 4, and 349 in. No. 5. The total of the expenses, connected with the support of the 2,105 Orphans under our care during that year, amounted to £24,190 12s. 5¼d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873.

In giving the statistics of the previous year, I referred already to the great spiritual blessing, which it pleased the Lord to grant to the Orphan Work at the end of that year and the beginning of this; but, as this is so deeply important a subject, I enter somewhat further and more fully into it here. It was stated before, that the spiritual condition of the Orphans generally gave to us great sorrow of heart, because there were so few, comparatively, among them, who were in earnest about their souls, and resting on the atoning death of the Lord Jesus for salvation. This our sorrow led us to lay it on the whole staff of assistants, matrons and teachers, to seek earnestly the Lord’s blessing on the souls of the children. This was done in our united prayer meetings, and, I have reason to believe, in secret also; and, in answer to these our secret and united prayers, in the year 1872, there were, as the result of this, more believers by far among the Orphans than ever. On. Jan. 8, 1872, the Lord began to work among them, and this work was going on more or less afterwards. In the New Orphan House No. 3, it showed itself least, till it pleased the Lord to lay His hand heavily on that house, by the small pox; and, from that time the working of the Holy Spirit was felt in that house also, particularly in one department. At the end of July, 1872, I received the statements of all the matrons and teachers in the five houses, who reported to me, that, after careful observation and conversation, they had good reason to believe that 729 of the Orphans, then under our care, were believers in the Lord Jesus. This number of believing Orphans is by far greater than we ever had, for which we adore and praise the Lord! See how the Lord overruled the great trial, occasioned by the small-pox, and turned it into a great blessing! See, also, how, after so low a state, comparatively, which led us to prayer, earnest prayer, the working of the Holy Spirit was wore manifest than ever!

I will now notice some of the especial blessings which the Lord was pleased to bestow upon us, during the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, in connexion. with the Institution.

1, During the whole of the year we were remarkably free from illness among the Orphans. It would be difficult to fix upon any one year, since the commencement of the Orphan Work, during which we were more free from disease among them, considering the vast number who were under our care.

2, I also gratefully own, that the Lord’s working by His Holy Spirit among them continued during the whole year more or less.

3, We were enabled still further greatly to enlarge the School department of the Institution, as during this year twelve more Day Schools were added to the Institution and seven Sunday Schools; so that there were then fifty-two Day Schools, 23 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools entirely supported by its funds. I gave myself particularly to the increase of this part of the work, as I consider it to be more and more important to this country, as well as to Spain, Italy, India, British Guiana, etc., to seek to bring the truth of the Holy Scriptures before the rising generation.

4, We were again permitted, during this year also, very largely to circulate the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts, and that with manifest blessing.

5, During this year also the Lord’s blessing rested upon all the various Objects of the Institution, upon which hereafter I shall dwell more particularly, in giving an account of the operations in connexion with the Objects of the Institution.

6, The considerable help which I received from Mr. Wright during this year, in the direction of the Institution, as well as the valuable aid received from my other fellow-labourers, calls for particular notice among the especial blessings, which the Lord bestowed upon the work during the year.

Though during this year the price of provisions was considerably higher than usual, and the price of coal nearly twice as much as in former years; yet the Lord was pleased to give us all we needed for the 2,208 Orphans who were under our care. And though the expenses in connexion with all the Schools, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, the aiding Missionary operations at Home and Abroad, and the circulation of Gospel Tracts, called for such large sums; yet this year also we were helped. The total amount expended from May 26, 1872 to May 26, 1873, was above Forty One Thousand and Five Hundred Pounds (£41,537 16s. 10½d.).

As the statistics of the various parts of the Institution, in this volume, draw now to a close, I will, on that account, for the sake of the readers who are unacquainted with the Reports, be somewhat more minute.

The Objects of the Institution are:—

1. To assist Day-Schools, Sunday-Schools, and Adult-Schools, in which Instruction is given upon Scriptural principles, and, as far as the Lord may give the means, supply us with suitable teachers, and in other respects make our path plain, to establish Schools of this kind.

a. By Day-Schools taught upon Scriptural principles, we understand Day-Schools in which the teachers are believers,—in which the way of salvation is scripturally pointed out,—and in which no instruction is given which is opposed to the principles of the Gospel. From May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, Fifty-two such Day-Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which number twelve were added to those which were in the previous year supported. Of these Fifty-Two Schools, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, one in Liverpool, one at Howle Hill, one at Burrington, two at Walham Green, three on the Blackdown Hills, four at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, two at Purton in Gloucestershire, one at Cubitt Town, London, one at Saul, Gloucestershire, one at Yeovil, one at Otterford, one at North End near London, one at Chittlehamholt, one at Cow Cross, London, and one at Hopton. These are the Home Schools, besides which there were seven in Spain, five in India, three in Italy, and six in British Guiana. Besides these Fifty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, five other Day-Schools were assisted, two in London, one in Dorsetshire, one in Worcestershire, and one in Scotland.

By Day-Schools taught upon Scriptural principles, we understand Day-Schools in which the teachers are believers,—in which the way of salvation is scripturally pointed out,—and in which no instruction is given which is opposed to the principles of the Gospel. From May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, Fifty-two such Day-Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which number twelve were added to those which were in the previous year supported. Of these Fifty-Two Schools, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, one in Liverpool, one at Howle Hill, one at Burrington, two at Walham Green, three on the Blackdown Hills, four at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, two at Purton in Gloucestershire, one at Cubitt Town, London, one at Saul, Gloucestershire, one at Yeovil, one at Otterford, one at North End near London, one at Chittlehamholt, one at Cow Cross, London, and one at Hopton. These are the Home Schools, besides which there were seven in Spain, five in India, three in Italy, and six in British Guiana. Besides these Fifty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, five other Day-Schools were assisted, two in London, one in Dorsetshire, one in Worcestershire, and one in Scotland.

The master of one of the Bristol Schools writes: "In answering the question, ‘Any conversions?’ I should not like to speak positively, but I have reason to believe that four of my elder boys are the subjects of Divine Grace."—Another master of one of the Bristol Day Schools writes, in reporting about his School: "One boy professes to love the Lord who died for him. His father, a Godly man, believes his son to be born again. Another boy, lately arrived in Canada, writes to me, ‘I have Jesus in my heart, and feel very happy.’ A third, who has been very ill and lost a brother, was deeply impressed and anxious about his soul, and his conduct is evidently influenced by thinking of the next world. There are a few other cases that are encouraging. I feel very thankful to God when I meet with one and another of my old scholars who believe in Jesus and have joined Christian churches. This year there has been more spiritual work among the boys than with the adults. During part of the year prayer meetings have been held after school for any boys who wanted their souls blessed. They have on the whole been well attended, and I feel the Lord has blessed them,"—A third master of one of the Bristol Schools reports thus about his School: "During the past year a weekly prayer meeting has been held by the children, myself presiding. Previous to prayer I have spoken to them of their sinful state by nature, and of the amazing love of our Lord Jesus Christ in dying to save them, and have, at the same time, earnestly entreated them to consecrate themselves at once to God. Many of the children seem to be impressed. I have been much cheered by many of the children manifesting a growing love for the Bible lessons."—The mistress of a fourth School in Bristol sends the following account about her school: "The Lord has again given great cause for praise and thanksgiving, during the past year, for His rich blessing on the dear children through the instrumentality of His own Word. Nine of them have been awakened to see their need of a Saviour, and are anxiously enquiring after the things which make for their everlasting peace. The other dear children, who were during the previous year brought to a saving knowledge of Christ Jesus, are very desirous of knowing more of Him, and are also concerned about the souls of some of their relatives and companions: thus they testify that they possess a faith which worketh by love."—Themaster of the School at Callington sends this information to the School Inspector: "One dear little boy has died, we trust he is now with the Lord. The young man to whom I called your attention, during the Inspection last year, professes to belong to the Lord Jesus, and manifests by his general conduct that his name is indeed written in the Lamb’s book of Life. The general condition of the School, I believe to be much improved through the Divine blessing."—The master of the Howle Hill school writes: "I grieve to say we have but one case of conversion to God, to report amongst the children."—The mistress of the Burrington School reports thus about her School: "There have been no conversions to God, but a thoughtful attention on the part of several of the elder ones, and a growing interest among all. They love their School, most of them, and would not be absent a day if they could help it."—The master of Walham Green Schools writes to the School Inspector: "The school is much as you saw it last, excepting that the routine for the afternoon is altered considerably (much improved I think). We admit but few now, have had to refuse about 60 children. You know we have a reading meeting for the children at Land’s End, to which are specially invited those who profess to be the Lord’s. Twenty-one gave me their names and addresses, professing to have been converted, besides eight or nine others. For the consistent walk (as far as we may judge) of six others, we have reason to praise the Lord, and in many others there is, we believe, life."—The master of the school in Silver Street, Barnstaple, reports: "As to conversions, we have three decided cases in my school, and a few hopeful ones. My chief trial is the lack in the regular attendance of the children. Nevertheless there are some things which encourage us very much, and we therefore thank God, and take courage."—The master of the Boys’ School, in Bear Street, Barnstaple, states: "As to conversions, I cannot say there have been any; but I am greatly encouraged in the boys by the attention which they give, which manifests that they are interested in hearing of those things which are necessary for their present and future welfare."—The mistress of the Girls’ School, in Bear Street, Barnstaple, writes: "One little girl we believe to be truly converted, and the interest manifested by the dear children, when reading the Scriptures, encourages us to expect greater things from the Lord."—The master of the School in Exeter writes: "As yet we are denied the joy—and it is a grief to us—of having to relate facts of conversion to God. Those children in whom we had hope are still in an undecided state. It is not well, I think, to press them much. Great care is needed also, I think, lest harm be done, by hastily recognizing a change. However it is our work—and a glad work it would be—to encourage and foster, not discourage any signs of spiritual life. Let me ask you to continue to unite with us in prayer, that the Divine blessing may accompany our endeavours to furnish the youthful mind with Bible truth."—The master of the School at Purton, in Gloucestershire, writes: "Of the spiritual state of our schools, we feel that through all eternity we shall have to praise God for having so abundantly blessed our labours. Last May we spoke of signs which we regarded as evincing the strivings of the Spirit, and, soon after, our hearts were melted at the gracious outpouring of the Spirit upon the children. In the month of October, the work of conversion began, and, we bless God, we can say, since that time has gradually gone on, so that now we have fourteen children, and one since removed to Bristol (in all fifteen), all of whom we hope are truly converted to God. Four have joined the Church, and give us great joy, as do also several of the others. Then the work of conversion has not stopped here, but has spread also to the Parents, four of whom we hope are converted, two of them have joined the Church, and one has let us a room about a mile from here, in which to preach the Gospel, and where we are looking and praying for great blessing, as many of the people, living there, never go anywhere to hear the Gospel. Thus we are lost in wonder, love and praise, when we think of all the Lord has done for us. I should also state that the children have a prayer meeting every Tuesday evening for those who are converted, and any who are seeking the Lord, after which I take them in a Bible class. There is also a prayer meeting among the children who stay to dinner, in the day school."—The master of the School at Otterford, in Somersetshire, reports thus: "I think I may confidently state one conversion to God (a girl), who some few weeks since ‘fell asleep.’ I visited her after she left the School (during her sickness); she then said that at the School she found that she was a lost sinner, but was exceedingly happy to say that she also found the lost sinner’s Saviour. She died very happy."—The mistress of the School at North End, near London, states in her report: "The Lord is blessing us at North End, and I believe there is a good work begun in some of the elder ones, manifest in their walk, and a desire to know more of Jesus. That they may soon know Him as their Saviour, is my earnest prayer. I have had great encouragement in my Sunday School Class, five of my girls have been converted, and are now on their way rejoicing. I feel very happy in my work, and that the Lord placed me here in answer to prayer."—The mistress of the School at Chittlehamholt, Devon, writes: "The children manifest great interest in the Scriptures, but I have not yet seen any decided conversions."—The master of the School at Clayhidon, Somersetshire, writes: "I believe there are quite ten if not a dozen of the boys and girls in the day school, that are really the Lord’s; they are never ashamed to confess as much, and although they need correction sometimes (children-like) yet I think they are truly lambs of Jesus’ fold. I should not forget to say that several who have during the past year left the school, have given very clear and decided proofs of their conversion to God. We are in constant communication with them, and in each letter they evidence a certain and unmistakeable manifestation of the real heart change. One young man who left me last summer for America, of whom I gave a few particulars for the last Report, and who was brought to Jesus last Good Friday twelve-months, still writes of his peace and joy in the Lord, and of the blessing he received while at the school. There are others who have left, who are now feeling the power of the truth, sown in their hearts while at school, thus proving the truth of God’s Word, ‘My word shall not return unto me void,’ and again, ‘the word of the Lord liveth and abideth for ever.’"

The schools in Spain were full of the deepest interest. In the Fifty-two Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1873, Three Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty-six pupils. Of the Schools merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked, nor other particulars.

b. Sunday-schools, in which the teachers are believers, and in which the Holy Scriptures alone are the foundation of instruction,—are such only as the Institution supports or assists; for we consider it unscriptural that any persons, who do not profess to know the Lord themselves, should be engaged in giving religious instruction.

Sunday-schools, in which the teachers are believers, and in which the Holy Scriptures alone are the foundation of instruction,—are such only as the Institution supports or assists; for we consider it unscriptural that any persons, who do not profess to know the Lord themselves, should be engaged in giving religious instruction.

There were during this year twenty-three Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these twenty-three Sunday-schools, there were on May 26, 1873, altogether 2,452 scholars. There were likewise, during the year, eleven Sunday-schools to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these eleven Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report, as to numbers or otherwise, was requested to be sent in. Of the twenty-three Sunday-schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 6 were in Spain, 1 in British Guiana, 1 in Bristol, 1 at Callington, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 at Liverpool, 1 at Burrington, 1 at Walham Green, 1 at Clayhidon, 1 at Purton, 1 at Cubitt Town, 1 at Otterford, 1 at North End, 1 at Cow Cross, 3 at Portsea, and 1 at Hopton. Of the eleven Sunday Schools which were assisted, 4 were in Gloucestershire, 1 in Worcestershire, 1 in Devonshire, 1 in Suffolk, 1 in Kent, 1 in Sussex, 1 in Yorkshire, and 1 in Ireland.

The Lord was pleased to grant again much blessing in the Sunday School in Bristol during this year also, as during the year before. The Report about the Sunday School at Burrington is: "One has been received into fellowship during the past year, and is now a teacher in the school; and we may hope there is a steady work going on in the hearts of some others." The superintendent of the North End School writes:—"I will not say much about conversions, as to number. The Lord has been working in some during the past year, and we believe has brought some to the knowledge of Himself, especially the class called the ‘Girls’ Bible Class.’ Mrs. A. has a prayer meeting with her class once a month, and she tells me that those who professed Christ pray very sweetly and earnestly for those who are unconverted in the school. There are others who are very anxious, and I trust will soon be brought to settled peace. We have been much troubled during the year with the first class of boys; they are so unruly and inattentive. It is very singular that the lad, who was the greatest trouble to me when unconverted, sometimes almost unbearable (now grown a young man), has volunteered to take this troublesome class, because he says he was like them once, and is so glad he was not turned out of school, but that the Lord met with him and saved him. I saw him the other Sunday after his class was gone, the tears in his eyes, and oh! how earnestly he prayed for them. We do hope the Lord will yet hear prayer and save those, the worst in the school, that His grace may be magnified. We are constantly changing scholars, some moving to other parts of London, others to America; but the number is steadily increasing."

c. The Institution does not support or assist any Adult School, except the teachers are believers. There were, during this year, Eight Adult Schools, with 332 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in India, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, and one at Callington. In addition to these eight Adult Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there was one at Barnstaple assisted.

The Institution does not support or assist any Adult School, except the teachers are believers. There were, during this year, Eight Adult Schools, with 332 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in India, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, and one at Callington. In addition to these eight Adult Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there was one at Barnstaple assisted.

It will appear, from the foregoing statement, that there were altogether Eighty-three Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (52 Day Schools, 23 Sunday Schools, 8 Adult Schools): and that during the year 17 Schools were assisted, viz. 5 Day Schools, 11 Sunday Schools, and 1 Adult School. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in the Eighty-three Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1873, altogether 6,620 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, up to May 26, 1873, amounts to Thirty-two Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-nine, viz., there were 19,763 in all the Day Schools, 7,796 in all the Sunday Schools, and 5,300 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year, in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £2,920 9s. 3¼d. This does not include £1,330 7s. 6d., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund. There was expended on the Schools from the beginning of the Institution, to May 26, 1873, £23,162 7s. 2d.

2. The second object of the Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

We sell Bibles and Testaments to poor persons at reduced prices, or, if the cases be found suitable, give them altogether gratuitously. In cases of needy schools, carried on in the fear of God, it would be joy in the Lord to us, to supply them with as many copies of the Holy Scriptures as they may require. This applies especially to all missionary efforts in foreign lands, or to any Scriptural means which are used to spread the truth of God in the dark places of our own land.

Our particular aim, in circulating the Holy Scriptures, is, to seek out the very poorest of the poor, through visits from house to house, in order to find out the need of the Holy Scriptures, and to supply persons either entirely gratis or on the payment of a small amount. With this we especially combine the furnishing aged persons with copies in large type, a point of great moment, as the smallness of the type, even where a copy of the Bible is possessed, would keep many aged persons from reading it; and, also, because it is well known that Bibles, printed in large type, are, up to this present day, expensive, considering the means of the poor. We have been greatly assisted in these efforts of searching out the most needy persons, destitute of the Holy Scriptures, by many servants of Christ, who, in England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Nova Scotia, Canada, British Guiana, the East Indies, Australia, Africa, China, &c., have sought to circulate God’s Holy Word.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the holy Scriptures, which were circulated from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, is as follows:

5,439 Bibles were sold.

879 Bibles were given away.

22,574 New Testaments were sold.

12,852 New Testaments were given away.

453 Copies of the Psalms were sold.

213 Copies of the Psalms were given away.

4,153 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were sold.

18,328 ditto were given away.

There were circulated from March 5, 1 834, to May 26, 1873, through the medium of this Institution, 81,710 Bibles, 174,644 New Testaments, 14,271 copies of the Psalms, and 150,939 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

Bibles, New Testaments, and smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures may at any time be procured at the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 34, Park Street, Bristol. There are kept in stock, 180 different sorts of English Bibles, each varying from the other in type or binding, or by being with or without marginal references. Their prices range from 6d. to £4 18s. The large assortment of Pocket Bibles, from 6d. to £1 6s. 6d. furnishes the public with a great variety for choice. There may be had also 28 different kinds of New Testaments. By personal application, or by writing to Mr. James L. Stanley, the manager of the Depository, 34, Park Street, Bristol, a catalogue of the whole Stock of Bibles, Testaments, and other portions of the Holy Scriptures, with their prices, may be obtained.

During the past thirteen years and a half we have especially availed ourselves of the openings which the Lord has been pleased to give for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Italy, so that many thousands of Italian Bibles and Testaments have been circulated.

Mr. W., labouring in Rome and the ex-papal state generally, writes in June, 1872:—"Notes of a Bible tour in the Cioceria or in the valley of the Sacco, on the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th of June, 1872. The Cioceria is one of the least civilized parts of Italy. It is separated from Rome by the uncultivated and pestiferous Campagna. Physically the people are the finest in Italy. Many of them come to Rome in the winter and gain their livelihood by hiring themselves out as models to the painters and sculptors of the world, who flock to the city during that season. The children seemed to me lovely, and I could not but feel sad at what the second fall, the pagan system of Rome, has prepared for them. The old people seem to have lost all traces of amiability, to be stripped of everything like light, and to be clothed with degradation and sin. In these parts crime of every kind is rife, ignorance and abject superstition hold sway, and brigandage infests all parts of the province. Though the soil is mostly fertile, great poverty is visible; and though the district is situated between Rome and Naples, the people, for shoes, wrap pieces of hide about their feet, plough their ground with pieces of wood, and the women sit grinding at the mills, while the water passes unutilized to the plains below. Tuesday, 11th. Left Rome by the Via Appia. Gave copies of the New Testaments or Gospels to all we met. At a cottage door near Albano, I saw a boy sat down reading a New Testament, which he had received from me some time before. The people in Albano were surprised to see me, the priests having circulated the rumour that I had been swallowed up in the recent eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Went to salute the brethren, who prayed us very tenderly to come or send some one to preach to them. Continued the journey to Velletri. Distributed by the way. Met two men who had the Word, and several who had received it from me. My companion offered a Gospel to a friar, and, when the latter was about to tear it in pieces, snatched it from his hands. Much difficulty in finding beds at Velletri. Passed the night in a wretchedly small room, where we suffered much from the lack of cleanliness and ventilation (27 miles the first day). Wednesday. Started early in the morning and went to Cisterna, where we sold 140 New Testaments and gave away tracts and Gospels. The people received us with the greatest expressions of kindness. Conversations very interesting. I made an effort to go to Cori, a place where the Word was torn on my former visit, but did not succeed. The mule started aside and threw one of my companions with violence to the ground, bruising his face in such a manner, that I was obliged to send for a surgeon from Cisterna. Returned to Velletri (today travelled about 25 miles). Thursday. Velletri to Montefortino, a town on the slope of a mountain. Went into many houses, sold 30 New Testaments, gave tracts, &c. Went on fifteen miles farther to Segni, a city far up among the mountains. This city, like many others in this province, is scarcely ever visited by strangers. The people, cut off as they are from the great centres of Italian life, remain in the state they were under the Pope. They are often greatly prejudiced against the present government, and in this city against the Gospel. As most of the men descend at this time of year from the city to the vineyards and fields on the plain, we arose at 4 a.m. and took our stand at the gate of the city, sold 32 New Testaments, and distributed. Friday. Left Segni at half-past six a.m. and proceeded to Anagni, a large city on a hill on the other side of the valley. Here I visited a large number of prisoners in the public prison; they received the Scriptures with joy. Most of them were brigands. The people received us with enthusiasm. In a very short time we distributed tracts, gospels, and sold more than 200 New Testaments. I was obliged to go away from this city, or I should not have kept a copy for the next place. (Note. Since my visit, some who received and read the Scriptures have invited my companion in labour at Rome to go and preach. Not being able to do so, the Wesleyans have accepted, and now there is a numerous meeting in that city.) Arrived at Ferentino at 4.30 p.m. Having but 66 New Testaments with us, we sold them very soon. A priest, to whom I offered a New Testament, said he would soon have one. Thinking he meant some of the copies distributed would soon be brought to him; I said, our Lord was permitted to be slain and guarded in the tomb by His enemies, but He was raised with glory; and that the same power kept the word of Scripture. The priest said, you mistake me. I mean to take the Gospel, and preach it soon to this poor people. We conversed with him for some time, and when we left he publicly kissed one of my companions, and expressed great thankfulness to me. As we were descending from Ferentino towards Frosinone, thanking the Lord, and being almost overcome with joy, a carriage came behind us, driven furiously. As it passed us by, we saw from the back, that it belonged to the bishop, and contained a priest with three gentlemen, who looked ferociously at us as they passed. When we arrived near Frosinone we met the same carriage, descending from the city, and encountered the same menacing glances. When we had entered Frosinone, and taken some refreshment, two gens d’armes came to us, and desired us to accompany them to the guard house. As I had not my passport with me, and as it was not possible to find a magistrate, or official of any influence, we were rudely searched and then conducted to the inner prison, a small room, without ventilation, unwholesome and unclean, in which there were two bags of straw for three of us, and a bottle of water. We spent some time in reading the precious Word of the Master and were greatly cheered; then sang praises, and, after blessing His holy name that we were counted worthy to work and suffer for Him, slept as best we could. The next morning there was quite a stir in the place, and we appeared before various authorities, and had much conversation. Several came to ask for Scriptures. In the prison I found one soldier had a Gospel, and another a New Testament, which I had given to him at Tivoli. The Lord gave us several proofs of His presence here, but we thought it well to defer the distribution of the Scriptures in that city; so we drove to the station and had the boxes waiting for us returned. Then we drove 36 miles, after which I took train to be in Rome for the Sunday services. I desire to remark: I. That the new field, open to us here, is evidently ripe unto the harvest. Though there is much opposition, and much brigandage, there is scarcely any Atheism. II. I sold New Testaments at 1d. the copy, and this commends itself to my mind. III. I am trusting to the Lord to furnish me with 100,000 Scriptures for the thickly populated district between Rome and Naples. IV. I have no one to whom I could entrust this work, which seems to need a special call and much grace; so that at present I must look to the Lord to enable me to do it myself. V. As the cities are among the mountains (some of them 4,000 feet high) and the railway is in the plain, while I can make use of the latter for the transfer of boxes, I shall need a strong horse for visiting the cities on the mountains."

For some years past, we have also circulated many Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Swedish, Danish, Welsh, and Dutch Bibles and Testaments; likewise Testaments in Russian.

There are kept for sale at the Depository, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol, cheap Bibles and Testaments in the following languages: Welsh, Danish, Dutch, French, German., Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Also the New Testament only in Russian, Swedish, Ancient Greek and Greek and English. Likewise the Old Testament and Psalms in Hebrew.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,281 4s.

The total amount spent from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1873, is £15,593 1s. 8d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, was continued by the Missionary brethren labouring in that land, during this year, as during the previous years; but for all the deeply interesting letters received from Spain, with regard to the circulation of the Word of God, as well as with reference to the Schools, which were established by them in that country, the reader is referred to the Report for 1873.

Before leaving this part of the operations of the Institution, and writing about Missions, I make the following remarks: 1. To the careful reader it will be obvious, how greatly this part of the Institution, as well as the School department, has been of late years enlarged; and yet the openings become more and more still.

2. During the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, we continued, by the help of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Many thousands of copies of the New Testament and many Bibles were thus placed again in the hands of men, women, boys, and girls working in these factories and mills; and this work steadily is going on. This dear man goes from one mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The expense to meet this is considerable; but the importance is very great.

3. The third Object of the Institution is, to aid missionary efforts. During this year was expended of the funds of the Institution, for this Object, the sum of £10,737 14s. 0d. By this sum One Hundred and Eighty-seven labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

The Reader will have observed, how greatly the Missionary Object of this Institution has been of late years enlarged; and, by the help of the Lord, our intention is, to enlarge it yet further and further.—With regard to these 187 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, whom we sought to assist during this year, I repeat, that they are not the Missionaries of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, nor do we bind ourselves to give them a stated salary, for this would lead them out of the position of simple dependence upon God for their temporal supplies; but when we hear of any man of God labouring for the Lord in the Word, whether in a more public or private way, whether at Home or Abroad, who is not connected with any society, nor in the way of receiving a regular salary, and who seems to us to stand in need of help, and is working in such a spirit, as that, with a good conscience, acting in the fear of God, we could help him with the means, with which Christian donors entrust us; we are glad to assist such an one. Moreover, as the number of these brethren, who have been brought to our knowledge by the Lord’s ordering, has more and more increased, and a large sum has been required to help them even in a small degree, we have laboured in prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to intrust us with means for this purpose; and, accordingly, He has given us larger and larger sums.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1873, is £127,075 10s. 5½d.

4. The fourth object of the Institution is, the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers. As it respects tracts for unbelievers, we especially aim after the diffusion of such, as contain the truths of the Gospel clearly and simply expressed; and as it respects publications for believers, we desire to circulate such as may be instrumental in directing their minds to those truths which, in these last days, are more especially needed, or which have been particularly lost sight of, and may lead believers to return to the written Word of God.

There was laid out for this object, from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, the sum of £1,254 19s. 8d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Three Millions Six Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand (exactly 3,625,203) Tracts and Books. The sum total which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1873, amounts to £22,211 10s. 3½d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1873, is above Forty-six Millions and Two Hundred Thousand (exactly 46,203,757).

More than Three Millions and Sixty Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. During this year many cases came before us, in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

Tract distributors who can afford to pay for publications, and who desire to procure them from us, may obtain Tracts for this purpose with a discount of one-half, or 50 per cent. from the retail price, and Books with a discount of 25 per cent. or one-fourth from the retail price. We state this, as many believers may not like to give away what does not cost them anything, and yet may, at the same time, wish to obtain as much as possible, for their money. Applications for this would need to be made verbally or in writing to Mr. James L. Stanley, at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol. To him, also, application may be made for specimen packets, containing an assortment of the Tracts and small Books which are kept. By sending 3s., 5s., 7s., or 10s., in postages to Mr. Stanley, packets will be sent to any part of England, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Jersey, Guernsey, &c., containing specimens to the amount of the postages which are sent.

A Catalogue of the various Books and Tracts sold at the above Warehouse of the Institution, with their prices, may be had there, by applying either personally or by letter to Mr. Stanley. There are kept on sale 1,032 different books, large and small; and 809 different Tracts, which number is continually added to.

5. The fifth object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and Scripturally educate destitute children who have lost both parents by death.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, there were 1,903 Orphans in the new Orphan. Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the year 305 Orphans were admitted into the five houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1873, would have been Two Thousand Two Hundred and Eight, had there been no changes. But of these 2,208 Twenty-five died during the year, 15 of whom fell asleep in Jesus as decided believers, and four were young infants. Three we were obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to the other children, whom they sought to corrupt. After all means had been tried to benefit them, this measure, as the last, was resorted to. We follow them with our prayers. Six of the Orphans we were obliged to return to their friends or relatives, on account of incurable diseases, which made them suitable inmates for an hospital, but not for a training institution for domestic servants or apprentices for trades. Fourteen girls were returned to their relatives or friends, because they could not be recommended for service, either on account of moral or physical defects. Twelve Orphans were given up to relatives, who were then able to provide for them and desired to do so. One of these was a believer, as was also one of those who were returned on account of incurable diseases. Forty-six of the boys were apprenticed to trades or businesses. Out of these 46 boys, 24 left the Institution as believers in the Lord Jesus. One Hundred and Nine girls were sent out as servants, Seventy-three of whom had been believers in the Lord Jesus, before they left. During no previous year, since the work has been in existence, have we had the joy of sending out so many believers to service or as apprentices, as during this year. Two Hundred and Fifteen are therefore to be deducted from the 2,208, so that on May 26, 1873, we had actually only 1,993 Orphans under our care, viz., 291 in No. 1, 378 in No. 2, 435 in No. 3, 450 in. No. 4, and 439 in No. 5. The total number of orphans under our care, from April 11, 1836, to May 26, 1873, is 4,140.

The amount of means expended during the year, on the support of the 2,208 who were under our care, was £25,292 14s. 9d.

I notice further the following points respecting the Orphan work:

1. The girls, who are received into the establishment, are kept till they are able to go to service. Our aim is to keep them till they shall have been sufficiently qualified for a situation, and, especially also, till their constitution is sufficiently established, as far as we are able to judge. We uniformly prefer fitting the girls for domestic service, instead of apprenticing them to a business, as being, generally, far better for their bodies and souls. Only in a few instances have female Orphans been apprenticed to businesses, when their health would not allow them to go to service. If the girls give us satisfaction, while under our care, so that we can recommend them to a situation, they are fitted out at the expense of the establishment. The girls, generally, remain under our care till they are about 17 years old. They very rarely leave sooner; and, as we receive children from their earliest days, we have often had girls 13, 14, yea, above 17 years, under our care. They are instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, geography, English history, a little of universal history, all kinds of useful needlework, and household work. They make their clothes and keep them in repair; they work in the kitchens, sculleries, wash-houses and laundries; and, in a word, we aim after this, that, if any of them do not do well temporally or spiritually, and do not turn out useful members of society, it shall at least not be our fault.—The boys are, generally, apprenticed when they are between 14 and 15 years old. But in each case we consider the welfare of the individual Orphan, without having any fixed rule respecting these matters. The boys have a free choice of the trade they like to learn; but, having once chosen, and being apprenticed: we do not allow them to alter. The boys, as well as the girls, have an outfit provided for them; and any other expenses, that may be connected with their apprenticeship, are also met by the funds of the Orphan Establishment. It may be interesting to the reader to know the kind of trades to which we generally apprentice the boys, and I therefore say, that during the last twenty- five years, all the boys who were apprenticed, were bound to carpenters, or carpenters and joiners, cabinet makers, basket makers, boot and shoe makers, tailors and drapers, plumbers, painters and glaziers, linen drapers, printers, bakers, grocers, hairdressers, ironmongers, tin-plate workers, confectioners, hosiers, builders, millers, gas-fitters, smiths, outfitters, provision dealers, sail-makers, upholsterers, wholesale grocers, chemists, seed merchants, umbrella makers, or electro plate manufacturers. Some have been sent out to become post-office and telegraph clerks. A few were also sent out as clerks to offices. The boys have the same kind of mental cultivation as the girls, and they learn to knit and mend their stockings. They also make their beds, clean their shoes, scrub their rooms, go errands, and work in the garden ground round the Orphan Establishment, in the way of digging, planting, weeding, &c.

2. Without any sectarian distinction whatever, and without favour or partiality, the Orphans are received in the order in which application is made for them. There is no interest whatever required to get a child admitted, nor is it expected that any money should be paid with the Orphans. Three things only are requisite: a, that the children should have been lawfully begotten; b, that they should be bereaved of both parents by death; and c, that they should be in needy circumstances. Respecting these three points, strict investigation is made, and it is expected that each of them be proved by proper documents; but that being done, children may be admitted from any place, provided that there is nothing peculiar in the case that would make them unsuitable inmates for such establishments as the New Orphan Houses. I state here again, that no sectarian views prompt us, nor even in the least influence us in the reception of children. We do not belong to any sect, and we are not, therefore, influenced in the admission of orphans, by Sectarianism; but from wheresoever they come; and to whatsoever religious denomination the parents may have belonged; or with whatever religious body the persons, making application, may be connected; it makes no difference in the admission of the children. The new Orphan houses on Ashley Down, Bristol, are not our Orphan Houses, nor the Orphan Houses of any party or sect; but they are God’s Orphan Houses, and the Orphan Houses for any or every destitute Orphan who has lost both parents, provided, of course, there be room in them.—We particularly request that persons would kindly refrain from applying for children who only virtually are Orphans, but who have not lost both parents by death, as we shall be obliged to refuse them admission, without exception; since this Orphan-work has been from the beginning only for destitute children who have neither father nor mother.

3. The New Orphan House No. 1 is fitted up for the accommodation of 140 Orphan Girls above eight years of age, 80 Orphan Boys above eight years, and 80 male Orphans from their earliest days, till they are about eight years of age. The infants, after having passed the age of eight years, are removed into the department for older boys. The New Orphan House No. 2 is fitted up for 200 Infant Female Orphans, and for 200 older female Orphans. The New Orphan House No. 3 is fitted up for 450 older female Orphans. The New Orphan House No. 4 is fitted up for 210 Boys of eight years old and upwards, 208 Infant Boys under eight years of age, and 32 older girls, to do the household work—450 in all. The New Orphan House No. 5 is fitted up for 210 Infant female Orphans, and for 240 older female Orphans.

4. The New Orphan House No. 1 is open to visitors every Wednesday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 2 every Tuesday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 3 every Thursday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 4 every Friday afternoon, and the New Orphan House No. 5 every Saturday afternoon; but the arrangements of the establishments make it needful, that they should be shown at those times only. No exceptions can be made.—The first party of visitors will be shown through the Houses at half-past two o’clock, God permitting; the second at three o’clock; and should there be need for it, the third and last party at half-past three o’clock.—As it takes at least one hour and half to see the whole of each establishment, it is requested that the visitors will be pleased to make their arrangements accordingly before they come, as it would be inconvenient should one or the other leave, before the whole party has seen the House.—From March 1st to Nov. 1st there may be three parties shown through the Houses, every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoon; but from Nov. 1st to March 1st two parties only, at half-past two and three o’clock, can be accommodated, on account of the shortness of the days.

5. Persons who desire to make application for the admission of orphans, are requested to write to me and address the letter to the New Orphan House, No. 3, Ashley Down, Bristol.

6. I again state, as regards the funds, that the income for the Orphans has been kept distinct from that for the other Objects, and I purpose to keep it so for the future. Donors may therefore contribute to one or other of the objects exclusively, or have their donations equally divided among all, just as it may appear best to themselves. If any of the donors would wish to leave the application of their donations to my discretion, as the work of God in my hands more especially may call for at the time, they are requested kindly to say so, when sending their donations.

It now only remains, to refer very briefly to the last nine months of the fortieth year of the existence of the Institution, from May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874.

Up to the last, as from its commencement, the Institution is growing still. During this period, we established 6 more Day-Schools, so that now there are altogether 58 Day-Schools entirely supported by the Institution. And there are 23 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools connected with it, making 89 Schools in all, entirely supported by its funds, besides the very many Schools, which more or less, year after year, are assisted. These 89 schools contain more than Seven Thousand pupils. The number who have frequented the schools of the Institution, from the beginning up to March 5, 1874, is 37,230. The total amount expended on the Home Schools, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1870, amounts to £25,688 18s. 6d. The Mission Schools are charged to the Mission Fund, to which they more properly belong.

From May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, we circulated 5,041 Bibles, 24,626 New Testaments, 718 copies of the Psalms, and 5,636 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. From the beginning of the Institution to March 5, 1874, there were circulated altogether 86,751 Bibles, 199,270 New Testaments, 14,989 copies of the Psalms, and 156,575 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The total amount expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874, is £16,393 1s. 8d. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures is carried on at Home and Abroad, as in previous years.

From May 26, 1873 to March 5, 1874, there were 190 Missionaries assisted by the Funds of the Institution. The total amount of means, expended on Missions, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874, is £134,075 10s. 5½d.

From May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, there were circulated above Two Millions Six Hundred and Eighty-one Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 2,681,183); and from Nov. 19, 1840, to March 5, 1874, nearly Forty-Nine Millions (exactly 48,884,940). The total amount expended on this Object, from the beginning, is £23,011 10s. 3½d.

From May 26,1873, to March 5, 1874, we had altogether 2,186 Orphans under our care. There were, during that time, 193 Orphans received and 199 were sent out. The total number of orphans, who were under our care from April 11, 1836, to March 5, 1874, is 4,333. The amount expended on the Orphan Work, from May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, is £18,856 9s. 1½d. The total amount, which it pleased the Lord to send in for the support of the Orphans and for the building of the Orphan Houses, from December, 1835, to March 5, 1874, is Four Hundred and Nine Thousand, Eight Hundred and Seventy-Nine Pounds (£409,879 18s. 6¼d.) The donations for the first four Objects of the Institution amounted to One Hundred Seventy-nine Thousand Four Hundred and Seventy-six Pounds (£179,476 12s. 3d.), from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874; and that which came in by the sale of the Holy Scriptures, from the commencement, amounts to £6,346 12s. 9d.; by the sale of Tracts and Books £11,472 8s. 8d. and by the payments of the children in the Day Schools, £4,850 7s. 5d. The total amount which it pleased the Lord to give me, therefore, from the beginning of the Institution to March 5, 1874, is Six Hundred and Twelve Thousand Pounds (exactly £612,025 19s. 0d.). Now, esteemed Christian Reader, admire the Lord with me! Exclaim with me, from your inmost soul, What has God wrought! Remember the small, yea, most insignificant beginning of the Institution, as to outward appearance; but couple with this, at the same time, that we set up our banners in the name of the Lord, and that we purposed, that the Living God should be our only Patron. And in this way I have continued to carry on the Institution. Weak, erring and failing, I have been in numberless ways; but, by God’s grace, I have truly sought to carry on this work to His honour and glory; and thus it is, that the Institution has become what it is now in 1874, after its existence for 40 years. Faith in the Living God, and in Him alone, coupled with prayer, has been my way from March, 1834, to March, 1874; and thus it came, that such numberless blessings were obtained; and thus we were carried through the numberless difficulties and trials which befell the work, during these forty years; and, in this way, by the grace of God, I purpose to go on to the end of my course; for so far from being tired of this way, I delight more and more to walk therein.

I proceed now to the last chapter.

CHAPTER IV.

 

In this chapter will be found the statistics of the Institution, from May 26, 1850, to March 5, 1874, as to the number of the attendants, year after year, in the Day Schools, Sunday Schools and Adult Schools; also how much was expended year by year on the schools, and the results of our labours, in the way of spiritual blessings, in so far as they are known. Further, it will be stated how many copies of the Holy Scriptures were circulated year by year, at what cost, and the spiritual results of these operations, if any have come before us. Further, how many Missionaries at Home and Abroad were assisted, year after year; how much was expended on this part of the work; and what were the spiritual results of these Operations. Further, it will be stated, how many religious Tracts and Books were circulated, year by year; at what cost; and what has been the spiritual result of these labours, in so far as it is known. Lastly, how many Orphans were received and dismissed, year by year; how many each year were under our care; at what cost; and what were the spiritual results of this part of the work. In addition to these various points, statements of a miscellaneous character will be added, which may be of interest to the reader.

From May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution four Day Schools, with 181 children in them, and six other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 175 children, was entirely supported by the Institution, and six others were assisted. One Adult School, with 72 scholars, was entirely supported, and two others were assisted. The total amount of means, expended on all these schools, during the year, was £385 14s. 8½d. If the reader will observe how the Lord was pleased afterwards to increase the School Department, he will see, that it has been multiplied since then more than ten times. —During that year we circulated 2,077 Bibles, 1,222 New Testaments, 151 copies of the Psalms, and 316 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds, spent on this Object, was £521 7s. 1½d.

I will now give a few instances in which the circulation of the Holy Scriptures was blessed, in order that believers thereby may be encouraged, prayerfully and diligently to continue to circulate them, and, at the same time, look out for blessing upon their labour. A brother in the Lord from Devonshire wrote to me in December 1856: "I thank you, my dear Sir, for your kind offer in reference to a supply of Bibles, etc. I hope to avail myself of it, when in need. I have just received an account of conversion through giving one of your Bibles. A sailor, who had been at sea in the Royal Navy many years, returned to this his native place, six months ago, and, because of his good behaviour, he was drafted into the Preventive Service, and stationed in the neighbourhood of W—. While he was in this neighbourhood I sent for him. He came to my house, I spoke to him about his soul, and the precious blood of Christ. He kneeled down while I commended him to God. I then presented him with a copy of God’s truth, supplied to me by you, with the request that he would read a portion every day, which he promised me to do. He has sent several most beautiful letters, stating, that, in reading that Bible, which is his constant companion, God gave him not only to feel he was a sinner, but that the blood of Jesus Christ, His Son, cleanseth from all sin. And further, that, being justified by faith, he has peace with God, through our Lord Jesus Christ. His wife is also deeply concerned. They have been found out and visited by a sub-officer, who reads and prays with them very frequently. This same brother, in a letter of March 4, 1857, refers again to this circumstance, and states that the wife was also converted through reading that Bible that was given to that sailor.

A brother in the Lord wrote to me that he had it in his heart to visit from house to house, in a large manufacturing town in Yorkshire, and, if possible, to supply each house with a tract, and to seek out persons who were destitute of copies of the Holy Scriptures. I supplied him, therefore, with 10,000 Gospel Tracts and 30 Bibles, and subsequently with 127 more Bibles, and finally with 10,000 more Tracts and 74 Bibles. I now give two letters from this brother in the Lord, to show both the spirit in which the work is done, and the way in which it is done, and likewise that such kind of service is not in vain. * * * * "Feb. 28, 1857. My dear Brother, In answer to your question, I mean, all the last sent Bibles are gone, the 127; and since they have been given, I have given away amongst the poor 15 copies of the New Testament, which the Lord gave me the means of obtaining. I have had some assistance from other saints, amongst us in scattering the precious seed. The weather has been very favourable for the work. ‘Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might.’ ‘I must’ (says Jesus) ‘work the works of Him that sent me, while it is day; the night cometh when no man can work.’ This has been the feeling that has moved my heart, in the circulation of these Bibles, without losing any time. I have come home at night so wearied, that I have had to stop by the way, and lean against something to rest myself; but the sympathy of Him, who sat on the well, wearied with His journey, was sweet. I remain, dear brother, yours affectionately in Him * * * *." "* * * * April 24, 1857. My dear Brother in Christ, All the Bibles are not yet distributed. This has arisen from the fact of finding so many openings for testifying of Jesus to poor sinners, in the course of visiting from house to house, where I found the Lord had made an impression by His truth on the minds of any, I have been led to repeat the visits, setting forth Jesus as the way to God. This has prevented me getting over so much ground rapidly; yet this, I am persuaded, has been of God. In the course of one week two poor men were brought to receive the Lord Jesus, by the Lord enabling me to set before them the Gospel of the Grace of God. Ignorant almost as heathens, when God opened their eyes to see the work of Jesus, how they gloried in the blood of Christ! One of them reminds me much of the Tract called ‘Poor Richard.’ Both were afflicted. One, who yesterday fell asleep in Jesus, how he was lying on his bed, crying in delight, ‘Oh the blood of Christ, the blood of Christ; I depend on none but Jesus.’ When I first visited him, he knew not even the theory of the way of salvation, and had no Bible. I gave him one you sent, which he read as long as he was able, and the Tracts were used to strengthen his faith. Another case, where I testified of Jesus and directed it all to the husband, I found afterwards that the wife was brought to receive Jesus as well as her husband. Another case where I meant the Gospel for the husband, because he was poorly, I found the wife seemed to have received it while the husband remained in darkness. Meeting cases of this kind, I have thought it good to attend to them, and have had much joy in seeing God opening blind eyes, and poor sinners casting themselves on the work of Jesus. ‘There is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth’; and we too share the joy, etc."

In a similar way have many servants of Christ, by going from cottage to cottage, from court to court, from ship to ship, etc., sought in many parts of the world, for many years, to help me in circulating the Holy Scriptures, making it their particular business to find out the very poorest of persons who desired to possess a copy, but were not able to pay for it. With this is also combined the endeavour to discover cases in which, very poor and aged persons, had not a Bible printed in large type, in order to furnish them with a copy.

From May 20, 1850, to May 26, 1857, we expended on Missionary Operations, £3,177 17s. 11½d. By this sum seventy-four labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

During this year, intelligence was received, that very many in Canada, British Guiana, India, China, the United States, Sardinia, Switzerland, Belgium, France, etc., had been brought to the knowledge of the Lord through the instrumentality of the missionaries, who were assisted by the funds of the Institution; but it would take up too much space here, to give again the letters, which were printed in the Report for 1857. This only would I say, that there is good reason to believe, that these dear servants of Christ had been used in the conversion of hundreds of precious souls, and that thus our prayers had been answered.

From May 20, 1850 to May 26, 1857, there were more than One Million and Three Hundred Thousand Tracts and books (exactly 1,313,301) circulated; and on this Object was expended £975 18s. 7½d. During that year there was not, as for many years previously, a single open door set before us, where we could profitably have circulated the Holy Scriptures, or given away Tracts, but the Lord was also pleased to enable us to enter those doors. These opportunities had during the previous years increased more and more, but the Lord was also pleased, along with them, to give increased means.

As we had been enabled, day by day, to seek the blessing of the Lord upon this part of the work likewise, so He was pleased, during the year from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, also, to grant His blessing to rest upon it. I will now relate some of the instances in which the Tracts were blessed.

A brother from Sunderland writes thus: "I have to tell you of a case of true conversion, which I have just found out, by one of your Tracts delivered among the mob at the Sunday bands. We have not laboured in vain, and I expect to hear of more. We intend to go on Sunday and Tuesday, and to have a large distribution on the race-course here. May they be blessed! The Tract in question is headed " The Substitute."

A brother labouring in Devonshire writes to me thus, on May 15th, 1857: "You will be pleased to hear of a case of blessing through the Tracts. Yesterday fortnight I determined, notwithstanding the distance, to visit T., a secluded village. I had once been there before and carried two packets of Tracts. The Misses F. told me that the Tract "Peace with God," had been blessed to an old woman of 82 years of age. The words which gave her liberty were, "if you cannot say it, God can," referring to the text. She is full of joy, and having been a servant to Sir —’s family, residing in their almshouses, bears a precious testimony to these Tracts, the whole of which she reads with avidity, much to the annoyance of some people who cannot understand, why she could not get much joy out of other things.

A brother residing at Hull writes on May the 24th, 1857, thus: "This week we heard of one poor soul, a German, who died in the infirmary here a few days ago, who seemed to have received real blessing through one of your German Tracts. It is rarely we know what is the fruit of their distribution; but this poor fellow was a dying man, when he came into the hospital, and, being a foreigner, remained there till he died."

The following information was sent from Somersetshire: "In returning you my most sincere thanks for the liberal supply of Tracts, I am happy to say, that, without a single exception, they have been most thankfully received by the people. I also feel great pleasure in informing you, that God, in a very gracious manner, has caused the reading of one of them, viz.: "Christ between the two thieves," to be blessed to the salvation of a poor old man, of whom there is every reason to think that he is a child of grace. Many other instances there are in which the "Serpent of Brass," "Naaman the Syrian," and others have been of great benefit to many individuals, in some producing conviction of sin, in others strengthening their faith in Christ. A further supply of Tracts from you would be most thankfully received."

The following instance may show, in what a variety of ways these Tracts are circulated. A brother in Scotland writes thus on May the 15th, 1857, "Yesterday I received by railway the Tracts, as mentioned in your last. I am most thankful for them. They are a great boon, and I trust they will turn out to be a great blessing to many souls. At our steeple-chase I sent off and dispersed among the returning crowds no fewer than 7,000. This was 2,500 more than I had done at any previous period. I had more helpers in their distribution. We had with us 9,250 Tracts."

In like manner have the Tracts been distributed at agricultural shows, fairs, and races; also in various places the passengers of the Sunday excursion trains have been met by Christian men, who have offered to each of them a Tract. Likewise in certain places the passengers of the government trains have been frequently supplied. In other places all the passengers of emigrant vessels have each a Tract given to them. All this has been done in addition to visiting from house to house, from court to court, from vessel to vessel. Also, frequently, the assembled persons who had the Gospel preached to them in the open air have had a Tract given to them afterwards. On these labours we seek the Lord’s blessing, and we fully expect His blessing. Day after day, and year after year, our heart has been drawn out in prayer to God upon this part of the work, and, therefore, we take this as an earnest that God will own and bless it; yea, we expect to meet thousands of souls in the day of Christ, who were brought to know Him and to believe in Him, through these Tracts and Books, of whose conversion we hear nothing on earth. Nearly a million of Tracts and little Books were, during the year from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, given away gratuitously. We do not, however, depend upon the number of copies which are circulated, but upon the blessing of the Lord; yet, at the same time, we would seek to labour on, embracing every opportunity, just as if everything depended upon the number we circulated.

How greatly this part of the work was already in 1857 increased will be seen, if it be remembered, that during the first period of its existence, we circulated 19,609 within 18 months, and in this period we circulated 1,313,301 within one year. The Lord be praised for His help in every part of the work, and for His kindness in this particular also!

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 1857, there were 299 Orphans in the New Orphan House No. 1. During the year, there were admitted into it 30 Orphans, making 329 in all. Of these 329, one died during the year, the dear girl who died in the faith, whose letters have been given in this Narrative. Only one died! I desire to dwell upon this with gratitude to the Lord. God helping us, we desire to trace His hand in everything; at the same time, the longer I am engaged in the Orphan work, and see the effects which are produced by regular habits, cleanliness, nourishing food, proper clothing, good ventilation, a healthy locality, etc., the more I am convinced, that at least one-half of the children among the poor who die, die for want of proper attention. I do not state this to find fault with them; I rather mention it in the way of pity and commiseration, and, if it may be, to draw the attention of the public to the fact. If anywhere the mortality among children should be great, humanly speaking, it should be so among us, because we generally receive the children very young, and also, because the very fact of these children, while so young, having been bereaved of both parents by death, shows that their parents, generally speaking, were of a very sickly constitution. Indeed the greater part of the Orphans whom we have received, lost one or both parents through consumption. And yet, though such is the case, we have seen again and again, how children who came to us in a most diseased state, have, by the blessing of God, through proper attention, been brought out of that state, and are now very healthy. But again and again we receive children whose countenances at once show that they have not had sufficient food, or were in other respects greatly neglected.—Three of the Orphans were received back again by near relatives, who, by that time, were able to provide for them. 14 boys were fitted out and apprenticed at the expense of the Institution. 12 girls were sent to service, each having been provided with an outfit, at the expense of the Establishment. Several of those who left the Orphan House, we had the joy of sending out as believers. These 30 vacancies, thus occasioned, left on May 20, 1857, only 299 Orphans under our care, being one less than our number. The total expense for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, during the year, ending May 26, 1857, was £5,076 0s. 5d.; and the total expense for the support of the Orphans, was £3,893 6s. 2½d.

The Lord was pleased greatly to bless, during that year, our labours among the Orphans.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858. During this year there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution four Day Schools, with 206 children in them. In addition to these four Day Schools, seven others were assisted. One Sunday School with 157 children was entirely supported, and eleven others were assisted. One Adult School with 95 scholars was entirely supported. From March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, there were 6,440 children in the Day Schools, 3,068 in the Sunday School, and 2,807 persons in the Adult School, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; besides the Tens of Thousands in the Schools which were assisted, of which no Report is asked, as to numbers. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 12,315 souls were brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these various Schools, up to May 26, 1858. The amount of means spent on the Schools during the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, was £381 15s. 0¼d.; and from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, £8,320 8s. 4¼d.

During this year there were circulated 2,521 Bibles, 1,153 New Testaments, 107 copies of the Psalms, and 182 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There were circulated, from the commencement of the Institution, up to May 26, 1858, altogether 20,722 Bibles, 12,655 New Testaments, 565 copies of the Psalms, and 1,442 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during this year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £445 14s. 10½d. The total amount spent from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, is £4,853 2s. 1d.

For the encouragement of believers who seek to serve the Lord in circulating the Scriptures, I relate the following case, communicated to me in October, 1857, by a brother in the Lord, who helps me in the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts, and who labours in the West of England.

"A young woman has lately returned to this neighbourhood, in an advanced state of consumption, from P—, where she had been in service. She was very thoughtless about her soul. Though she was well able to read, I found out she had no Bible. I commended her to God in prayer, and marked the 51st Psalm and the 3rd chapter of the Gospel by John, and gave her a Bible. She says that, in reading these two passages, God gave her the peace which passeth understanding. She is at present giving the most decided evidence of conversion to God."

During the year, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, was expended on Missionary operations £3,531 12s. 4d., whereby 82 labourers in the Gospel, to a greater or less degree, were assisted.

Though the Orphan work required during this year by far more means, than during any previous year, since it had been in existence; yet the Lord enabled me to enter into every door which He was pleased to open before me as it regards the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and to expend several hundred pounds more upon Missionary objects, than during any previous year. But while I was glad to be able to assist 82 Servants of Christ, in various parts of the world, I am especially rejoiced and thankful, that it pleased the Lord to own their labours greatly, so that during no former year I had more cheering accounts than during this year.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1858, is £25,325 19s. 10d.

From May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, we circulated more than One Million and Three Hundred and Thirty-four Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 1,334,791), at an expense of £785 6s. 4½d. The sum total, which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1858, amounts to £5,421 1s. 7¼d. The total number of Tracts and Books, circulated during that time, was above Seven Millions and Forty-five Thousand.

I will now relate some of the instances in which the Tracts were blessed, in the year from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858.

A brother in the Lord, labouring in Somersetshire, writes: "A woman between 80 and 90 years of age, (through the tract called ‘The Substitute’), who was altogether ignorant of her real state, has been led, I trust, to cast her soul upon Jesus, for the forgiveness of sins."

A brother in Sunderland writes: "We should be glad of another supply of tracts at your convenience; and Bibles of any kind would at all times be acceptable. There has just been a decided case of usefulness by one of the tracts, ‘The Brazen Serpent.’ I doubt not, many more are blessed." The same brother again writes: "I have the pleasure of adding that we have manifest fruit from the distribution of tracts. I have just heard of two cases, one an ungodly pilot, to whom Mr. L. gave a tract on Sunday morning; another case in which Mr. R. gave one, entitled ‘The Compassion of God,’ which was blessed to the woman’s soul, who is now proposed for communion with us."

A brother in Devonshire writes, July 7, 1857: "I thank you for the 6,000 tracts. I have found a special blessing to accompany Bunyan’s ‘Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ.’ I will relate to you what occurred on Wednesday last. Several weeks before an inquirer, to whom I had given a copy of this tract, and finding it a blessing to her, sent it to a dying friend of hers in London, and wished from me another copy for herself. On Saturday morning I called on a sister in the Lord, leaving for this inquirer the desired tract. I was about leaving, when a stranger to me entered, to whom I gave another tract, and spoke a little to her of the Lord, but she was quite silent. I afterwards learned that this second inquirer was reading Bunyan’s tract with great interest, the copy I had left for the first; and, on Wednesday last, again calling at the house, as the sister living there was relating to me the account, she said, ‘There she comes.’ Instead of the former timidity she at once confessed Christ in a manner one could not doubt to be genuine. She told me that, when I had seen her, she was anxious, but did not think herself fit to receive the promises; but that Bunyan’s tract had been blessed to her, particularly the hymn at the end ‘If you tarry till you are better, you will never come at all!’ I was filled with joy at seeing what the Lord had wrought in her soul." The same brother writes a day later: "I afterwards learnt that the person in London, to whom ‘Come and Welcome’ had been sent, departed last week, as it is hoped, to be with Jesus."

About a million of Tracts and little Books were, during the year, given away gratuitously.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, there were 299 Orphans in the New Orphan House, No. 1.

During the year there were admitted into it, and into the new house for 400, altogether 219 Orphans; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1858, 518 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 518 there died 4. Only four! For this we desire to feel grateful, especially when we consider that by far the greater part of these Orphans are the offspring of very diseased parents. A short time since, when examining the certificates, sent on behalf of the children for whose admission application had been made, I found that, in five successive cases, both parents of all the children, i.e. all the ten parents, had died in consumption. To speak within bounds, at least two-thirds, if not three-fourths of the parents, whose children are now under our care, died in consumption. On this account the very small mortality among the children is a matter of thankfulness to God. Two out of these four Orphans gave us great comfort in their removal, as they bore full and distinct testimony as to their trust in the Lord Jesus for the salvation of their souls. Two of the Infants were sent back to their relatives, who were able to care for them; also 1 boy of such an age as that he might be apprenticed, and 1 girl of an age to earn her own bread, whom the near relatives desired to have, feeling it their duty to provide for her. Besides this, 3 of the elder girls were at the expense of the Institution fitted out, and placed in service; and 8 boys were at the expense of the Institution fitted out and apprenticed; so that there were only 499 Orphans actually in the two houses on May 26, 1858.

May 26, 1858. During the past twenty-two years the Spirit of God has been again and again working among the Orphans who were under our care, so that very many of them were brought to the knowledge of the Lord; but we never had so great a work, and, at the same time, one so satisfactory, within so short a time, as during the past year. I will enter somewhat into details, for the benefit of the reader. There are 140 elder girls in the New Orphan House No. 1. Of these there were at the beginning of the last period ten who were considered to be believers. Some of my readers may remember, that certain letters are printed, written by an Orphan, Caroline Bailey, who died on May 26, 1857. The death of this beloved girl, who had known the Lord several months before she fell asleep, seems to have been used by the Lord as a means of answering in a goodly measure our daily prayers for the conversion of the Orphans. It pleased God at the beginning of the last period, mightily to work among the Orphans, so that all at once, within a few days, without any apparent cause, except it be the peaceful end of the beloved Caroline Bailey, more than 50 of the 140 girls were brought to be under concern about their souls, and some with deep conviction of sin accompanying it, so that they were exceedingly distressed. And how is it now? my readers may ask; for young persons are often, apparently, much concerned about the things of God, but these impressions pass away. True, dear reader, I have seen this myself, having had to do with many thousands of children and young persons. Had, therefore, this work among the Orphans begun within the last few days, or even weeks, I should have passed it over in silence; but more than a year has now elapsed since it commenced, and it will, therefore, give joy to the Godly reader to hear, that, in addition to those ten, who were previously believers, and of whom one has been sent to service, there are 23 Orphan girls, respecting whom, for several months, there has been no doubt as to their being believers; two besides, died in the faith, within the year; and there are 38 more who are awakened and under concern about their souls, but respecting whom we cannot speak as yet so decidedly. All this regards only one branch of the Orphan Establishment, the 140 elder girls of the House No. 1. In addition to this, I am glad, also, to be able to state that among the other girls in the New House No. 2, and among the boys also, some are interested about the things of God; yea, our labours begin already to be blessed to the hearts of some of the newly received Orphans.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans, from May 26, 1857, to May 26, 1858, amounted to £5,513 5s. 7½d., and we also spent, for the building, fitting up, and furnishing of the New Orphan House No. 2, £17,419 1s. 7½d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859.

During this year we had still only Four Day Schools connected with the Institution, entirely supported by its funds; for at that time it pleased the Lord to lay still more and more upon my heart the care for destitute Orphans in particular; but, after five large Orphan Houses had been built, with an accommodation for 2,050 Orphans in them, it pleased the Lord, just in the same way, to bestow upon me the great honour and privilege to care for the instruction of children in Scriptural Day Schools, as the Reader has seen already, and will further see. In the four Day Schools, there were, from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, 242 children. In addition to the entire support of these four Day Schools, there were seven such Schools assisted. In the one Sunday School entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were 143 children; and nine other Sunday Schools were assisted. There was only one Adult School connected then with the Institution, in which there were 14 adults. During this year came before us several instances in which the instruction, received in our Schools, had been blessed after the pupils had long left the Schools. A young man died a consistent Christian in Barbadoes, who many years before was under our care; another became decided for the Lord, though far away at Philadelphia; another in Cornwall; another, who gave us great sorrow for a long time, and who lived near London, became a believer, the instruction, formerly received being blessed at last, though only after many years. The amount expended on the Schools, during this year, is £439 8s.—During this year we circulated 2,347 Bibles, 1,311 New Testaments, 91 copies of the Psalms, and 186 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. On this object was expended £430 7s. 7½d. During this year we expended on Missionary operations £4,149 17s. 5d., whereby 91 labourers in the Gospel were assisted.

The Orphan work required during the year, from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, for current expenses, far more than ever before; but, notwithstanding, I was enabled to respond in full to every application which was made for Bibles and Tracts; and, in the way of Missionary operations, there was expended £618 5s. 1d. more than during any previous year. While, however, it is to me a cause of thankfulness, that the Lord allowed me to increase this part of the Institution more and more, and to make it increasingly, as its name indicates, an Institution for Abroad as well as for Home; yet that, which still more calls for thanksgiving, is the fact, that I received from the greater part of the brethren, whom I sought to assist, the most encouraging letters, regarding their labours. Many hundreds of souls were again, during that year also, brought to the knowledge of our adorable Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these His servants. I received several hundred letters from them during the year, very many of which are of such deep interest, and so full of cause for praise and thanksgiving, that they would in themselves form a valuable volume; but I cannot give any extracts from them, on account of the size of this Narrative.

During this year, from May 28, 1858 to May 26, 1859, was spent on the circulation of Tracts £992 19s. 6½d. There were circulated above One Million Eight Hundred and Eighty Five Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 1,885,401). I will now refer to a few instances in which the Tracts were blessed.

A brother, labouring in Devonshire, who has often been supplied with large quantities of tracts, writes on March 7, 1859: "Will you kindly send me some Tracts. I have heard of several cases in which they have been useful."

Another brother, labouring in Cornwall, writes on January 16, 1859: "You will be interested to hear, that a brother in the Lord, once resident here, but now residing at B. A., some time since, on finding a comrade, a carpenter of the same mine of which he is the engineer, not at home, left a tract fixed to the door handle. A few days after, the friend named L. K. said, "O—, do you know some one left a tract on my door the other day, and it was a word exactly in the right minute;’ and then declared that it had led him to see the need of a Saviour. This occurred a few months since; but yesterday I walked over, and O— told me the title of the tract, which before he had not known. It is a leaf tract, having the last verse of the 6th chapter of Romans for a heading: ‘The wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.’ The new convert is quite alive to the truth, and much interested in reading anything that may aid his progress."

Another brother, labouring in London, writes on Dec. 1, 1858: "I awaited this post, that I might enclose the accompanying letters, which you will be pleased to read, the fruit of giving a tract in the streets of London, so many hundreds of which I have been enabled to circulate through the liberal supplies you have sent me. I may also add, that this poor sister’s happiest moments are now spent in reading one of the Bibles you last sent me. I hope and believe that we shall hereafter see many who have been similarly blessed through the Gospel Tracts. I met this poor woman in the summer, and through the goodness of the Lord was enabled to take care of her until her illness, a few weeks since, when I got her into the infirmary of St. Pancras Workhouse."

I read the letters of the convert with much interest. She was just on the point of becoming a Roman Catholic, when the tract was put into her hand, which was used of God to lead her to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus.

A brother of the Lord in Exeter, who for many years past has been supplied with large quantities of tracts, writes on Dec. 1, 1858: "I am happy to say that the Circus, which was opened in this city, has been closed, and that the company is gone, who, according to reports, and the substantial character of the building, intended to continue in Exeter through the winter months. Great efforts were unitedly established by Christians here, to neutralize the objects of the Company, and to persuade persons not to go to their performances. These were by the posting of large bills, and the printing and distribution of tracts, which were given away in the neighbourhood in large quantities, and even at the very doors of the Circus, greatly to the mortification of the company, one of whom took up the subject in the public papers. It is a glorious defeat of Satan’s plans, and for which we offer God the praise. Some hundreds of your last supply to us were circulated there, and one of them put into the hands of the clown (the writer of the paper to which I referred), who promised to read it carefully in his own room after the close of that evening’s performance, which he was then about to engage in.

On Oct. 25, 1858, a brother writes from Sunderland: "Our usual half yearly fair has just passed over, when, with several beloved brethren, I helped to distribute a large quantity of tracts. The brethren came to my house, when we asked a blessing upon our intended work, and then went forth, expecting blessing to follow. Already one person has come forward, awakened about his soul, with the tract which awakened him, and I hope many more may be saved from the wrath to come."

Another brother writes from Sunderland on March 7, 1859: "Another of your tracts has been a blessing to a man and to a woman."

A Christian lady writes on Nov. 22, 1858: "‘The aged Swiss Peasant’ was read last week to a deeply attentive audience of the very poor. A striking sense of solemnity prevailed during the reading. An aged man present was observed to be much affected; his neighbour thought him ill, and wished to remove him home; but he said he would like to stay and hear the ladies. He spread out his withered hands to the company, and entreated them to accept the offer of salvation, saying that he had been a great sinner, but that he believed God would have mercy upon him. The scene was very touching, and many wept; for he was known to be a great sinner. Fervent prayer was afterwards offered on his behalf, and for all present, under a sense that ability was given thus to plead, that, at the eleventh hour, this aged one might be snatched as a brand from the burning. On attempting to rise from his seat, it was found that he had no power to use one leg, and he was carried at once to bed. It was thought he was slightly paralyzed. He recovered the use of his limbs the next day, and subsequently told the lady who read the narrative, that, while she was reading, he felt so much, that it overpowered him. He said, that during the night he found such a heavy burden on his conscience, that he could have no rest till he had taken it to the Saviour. He was so far restored as to be able to attend the Cottage reading again on the Lord’s day (yesterday), when the tract ‘Poor Richard’ was read, and again ability was granted earnestly to plead for each one present."

A brother at Hull writes, April 25, 1859: "I am again without tracts, except a few German ones. All which you sent have been circulated; and, amongst other results, we have to thank God for three poor girls of the town, who, I trust, are rescued from their miserable ways. Two of them seem really converted to God; the other, though not converted, seems most anxious to live a better life. Oh! for divine wisdom and love to know how to serve such. Oh! for Christ’s life manifested in us in everything."

A brother, who labours in Wiltshire, wrote to me, on Aug. 4, 1858, at full length, respecting the conversion of a very great sinner, a young woman of 22 years old, who, by means of one of the tracts sent to him, had been brought to the peace and joy of the gospel, through faith in the Lord Jesus, and who afterwards fell asleep in much peace.

A brother at Exeter, whom I have been permitted to supply with many thousands of tracts, writes on August 27, 1858: "I desire to lay before you a little statement of the way in which the tracts you so kindly sent me have been disposed of. Before leaving my house for this work, I fall on my knees before the Lord, and ask His blessing to accompany me in my labour, that sinners may be made willing to receive the word of life, which is able to make them wise unto salvation through faith which is in Jesus Christ. I then go from house to house, and from room to room, in the dark streets, lanes, alleys, and courts, of this city; also I attend the fairs, markets, revels, wakes, and places of public amusement; also the fashionable walks of the pleasure seekers; also the railway platforms; so that wherever crowds of persons are found together, these I have distributed among them the word of life. I found two persons this week, to whom the Lord has blessed the labours of His unworthy servant. One has since found peace, the other is under deep conviction, yea, great distress of soul. And now, dear sir, what has been the cause of this consecration of my time and self to the Lord? it is through reading your Report for 1857. In going through that report, I was much like one that could not afford a penny a week for the Lord. I besought the Lord to give me more faith, and He heard and answered my prayer; so that, while at one time I could not afford any time or money for the Lord or His work, now, through His grace, I am enabled to give two days in the week, and sometimes more, to this work, besides paying a man to do my work in my absence; yet I have no Jack."

The same brother writes on May 10, 1859: "Will you permit me to give you a little account of the great Tract distribution of Easter week. Several Christians here held a united prayer meeting, to ask the Lord’s blessing on the distribution of tracts and preaching of the gospel; and twelve brethren, from various branches of the Church of Christ, went together to the fair, where about 10,000 persons were present, when in three days we distributed more than 20,000 Tracts. This work has not been without its happy result. The fields here are white to harvest. I should feel very thankful if you will send me more Tracts for the Lord’s work."

On May the 16th, 1859, the same brother writes: "I desire to acknowledge the receipt of 10,000 Tracts you so very kindly sent me for the Lord’s work here. May He abundantly bless their distribution to many poor sinners. Since I wrote to you last, I have heard of 27 persons to whom the Tracts were blessed which were distributed during the Easter week in this city."

Day after day, and year after year, my heart has been drawn out in prayer to God for this part of the work, and, therefore, we take this as an earnest that God will own and bless it; yea, I expect to meet thousands of souls in the day of Christ, who were brought to know Him and to believe in Him, through these tracts and books, though I should hear nothing of their conversion at present. Above Twelve Hundred Thousand Tracts and little Books were, during the year, given away gratuitously. We do not, however, depend upon the number of copies which are circulated, but upon the blessing of the Lord; yet, at the same time, we would seek to labour on, embracing every opportunity, just as if everything depended upon the number we circulate.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, there were 499 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 212 Orphans; so that there would have been on May 26, 1859, 711 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 711, seven died. Only seven! This I desire especially to notice, with gratitude to the Lord—One of the girls was taken by her relatives to Australia, as they were going to emigrate, and wished to provide for this child.—Another girl and a boy, who had been 8 years and 3 months under our care, and who were now ready to be sent out, were received back again by a relative, now able to provide further for them.—Fifteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, and were also each of them provided with an outfit.—Thirteen girls were sent out to service, each of them having been provided with an outfit.—To one of the Orphans, who had been 14 years and 6 months under our care, and who for more than 11 years out of that time had been a believer, I gave a situation in the New Orphan House No. 1; so that on May 26, 1859, there were only 672 Orphans in the two houses.

May 26, 1859. Though, during this year, we had not so great and so sudden a work of the Spirit of God going on among the Orphans, as during the previous year, when, within a few days, above 50 out of one department of 140 girls were suddenly brought under deep concern about their souls; yet, the blessing of the Lord was not withheld even spiritually. There are already many caring about the things of God among the 424 Orphans who were received within the last eighteen months, and who ask it, as a privilege, to be allowed, in the summer, to take their Bibles with them to bed, so that, should they awake early in the morning, before the bell is rung, they may be able to read them. Out of the 13 girls, who were sent to service, 9 had been believers for some time before they left the Establishment.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans from May 26, 1858, to May 26, 1859, amounted to £6,974 17s. 0½d.; and there was expended besides, of the Building Fund, £3,983 17s. 2½d. for the Orphan work.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860.

During this year there were four Day-schools entirely supported by the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, with 339 children in them. In addition to the entire support of these four Day-schools, eight other Day-schools were assisted. One Sunday-school was entirely supported, with 160 children in it; and seven others were assisted. One Adult school, with 48 scholars in it, was entirely supported. During no previous year had we so many instances brought before us, in which our former instructions were blessed, as this year; and as, on many accounts, it was the most remarkable of all the previous years of the existence of the Institution, so in this particular also; for instance upon instance was brought before us, in which young men and young women, once under our instruction, were, by the power of the Holy Spirit, enabled now at the last, to stand manifestly on the Lord’s side, through faith in our Lord Jesus. But this is not all. We had, during the past year, as far as we were able to judge, more manifest blessing in the way of conversion among the children in the schools, than during any former year since the Institution had been in existence. In the schools in Bristol there were 37 of the children converted. We thanked God for it, and were yet further encouraged by this blessing to go on in our labours.

There was expended on the Schools £515 4s. 4d. From May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, we circulated 1,699 Bibles, 1,134 New Testaments, 63 Psalms, and 248 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended, on this object, during the year, £398 3s. 7d.

As an encouragement to my fellow-believers, I relate the following instance of blessing, through the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, in answer to our daily prayers, with which we follow the copies of the Word of God which are sent out. The facts were communicated to me in a letter, dated London, Oct. 30, 1859, by a Godly man, whom I have supplied with Bibles and Tracts, for gratuitous circulation. "I have been hesitating to write to you, knowing your hands are full of important and blessed work, and thinking it would be an addition to your already many engagements. But now I have it pressing on my heart, especially because I have to relate an interesting case, in which the Lord has begun to work in a family through one of the Bibles kindly sent by you to me this year. On Oct. 2 (1859), I found the family, poor and in need of a Bible. This was taken, and given at the door, with a few words spoken to the conscience of Mr. S. He took the Bible upstairs to read. The first words which met his eyes were these: ‘The wicked walk on every side.’ These words pierced his heart like an arrow from God, and made him feel his guilt and danger. Five days after, the Lord took his youngest child, an only son; four or five days after this, he himself was brought home ill. He is weeping under a sense of guilt, but has not found peace yet. Through the introduction of that Bible, the Lord seems to be working in two or three families in the same house. I trust it may prove like seed, sown into good ground. The 10,000 Tracts you also sent me, have been scattered in almost all parts of the East of London, etc."

From May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, was expended of the funds of the Institution £5,019 6s. 1d. on missionary objects, whereby 101 servants of Christ were aided to a greater or less degree.

During this year the current expenses for the support of the Orphans were greater than ever; the outgoings for the circulation of Tracts also, together with the expenses for the Schools, were greater than ever; and yet, in addition, I was enabled to expend on missionary operations £869 8s. 8d. more than during the previous year, though this part of the work had been increasing year by year, for more than twenty years. Thus the Institution, as its name indicates, practically became more and more the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. But while I desire to be truly grateful, for having been enabled to accomplish so much, simply in answer to prayer for means, in aiding a hundred servants of Christ to a greater or less degree, that, which especially calls for gratitude, is the fact, that, during this year, by far more souls, as far as it is known, were brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these labourers in the Gospel, than during any previous year. Many hundreds were converted through them. I received about 600 letters from these brethren, and at least one half of that number recorded instances in which their labours had been blessed; but I must refrain here from giving any of them.

I now enter on the Tract work. We expended on this Object, during that year, £1,650 11s. 4d., and there were more than Two Millions Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand Tracts and Books circulated (exactly 2,562,001). About two millions of these Tracts were given away gratuitously.

I had heard from a believer at Belfast, to whom I had sent large supplies of tracts for gratuitous circulation, and who by means of other believers had spread them abroad in the North of Ireland, that many persons had been converted through these tracts, and I requested him to let me know some of the particulars. His reply is given in a letter dated April 28, 1860, as follows: "I have been asking the Lord what to write to you, and I send you Isaiah xxxii. 20, being disappointed in receiving the particulars from the persons who spoke to me of the Lord’s blessing on the tracts. They say He has blessed them, greatly blessed them, and they are delighted with the conciseness yet fulness of each; but the individual cases of conversion cannot be recapitulated."

A clergyman in the North of Ireland, to whom I had repeatedly before sent tracts, and now again 10,000 for gratuitous circulation, writes thus on Aug. 5, 1859 "An absence of a few days prevented me acknowledging earlier the arrival of the tracts. For so large and helpful a supply, it is impossible that I can return you any adequate thanks. They are just such as are needed, and are most eagerly read. One, the "Blood for a Token," was blessed some time ago to a young girl of about twelve; and no doubt each has its history, and in many cases has been, I trust, a savour of life unto life."

The next is an extract from a letter written by a brother who labours greatly in the circulation of Tracts in the North of Devon, and who writes thus on Oct. 17, 1859: "I can relate to you another instance in which the Lord has blessed the tract, Bunyan’s ‘Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ.’ A middle-aged woman, living very near to this house, had been observed to be very regular lately in attending the chapel, and to pay great attention to the Word spoken. I was asked to visit her, and learned that she had in secret been mourning for sin for two or three months, having been impressed by the tract, ‘Come and Welcome,’ which, she tells me, I gave her on the main road, though the circumstance has escaped my memory. However, it was the Lord’s ordering, and it is His work. I pointed her to Christ, and she is now rejoicing in Him, as I trust."

A brother in Norfolk writes thus on December 17, 1859: "My dear wife tells me that one of the little tracts, ‘It is the Blood that maketh Atonement,’ was made a blessing to a young man who died a little while since. We cannot tell how much good has been done, but I can tell of this."

A brother in the Lord labouring in the Gospel among sailors in the county of Durham, writes on Oct. 7, 1859: "During the last three months, three hopeful cases came to my notice among Prussian seamen. One of them found peace while I preached Jesus to him on board a Prussian ship. Your German tracts had been the means of impressing his mind greatly, so as to lead him to care for his soul and see his need of a Saviour."

The same brother writes on Jan. 18, 1860: "Your tracts sent to me to distribute have found their way into all parts of the world, and many instances came to my notice during the past year in which they had been blessed to the souls of sinners. Some were sent in letters to German soldiers serving in the East Indies, and have been blessed to their souls."

From Derbyshire I had, on Feb. 2, 1860, the following communication: "I have visited some fresh places since I last wrote, and have given thousands of tracts. I called yesterday at a house at A., where a woman says that the tracts I have given her helped her more than everything she has ever had. She also told me of a man, a relative, who visited her last summer, and read some of the tracts I had left her, and they were the means of his conversion."

From Exeter I had the following intelligence, in a letter dated March 22, 1860: "I have just heard of a tract, which I gave to a young lady, having been greatly blessed to her, in setting her mind at liberty as before the Lord. It was one of the tracts you sent me, and I am hopeful that in more cases around this place there will be fruit from this department of labour."

From another brother in Exeter, who also has often been supplied with tracts, I had the following communication on March 28, 1860, concerning tracts, which I had sent him, and of which he had given some to a brother of his for circulation: "On a former occasion I stated, that I had occasionally, during my affliction, forwarded some tracts to a brother of mine, a sincere servant of Christ, and who feels it his joy to labour in every way he can for the good of poor sinners. His residence is in D., and I frequently have the gratification of hearing from him of the heart-cheering and blessed results of his endeavours. A few days ago I received a letter, in which, alluding to the work and the distribution of the tracts, he says: ‘I have so much to say about them, that I hardly know where to begin. I gave a tract to a young man, which was the means of bringing him to Jesus. He is now a member of a church. We, including two or three pious young men, left tracts, some little while since, and a Bible, at a very low house at the back of N. C., where we had been several times. Now, there is a prayer-meeting held there three evenings every week, and much good is being done there.’"

A third brother in Exeter, who has often had large supplies of tracts, writes thus on April 4, 1860: "I desire thankfully to acknowledge the receipt of 9,900 tracts and 200 little books for children. I have lately found one soul brought to Jesus through a tract given her. She is very happy in the Lord. Many have received much blessing from the tracts; some have had comfort in sorrow, others have had their doubts removed, their faith strengthened, and their hopes confirmed. Our labour is not in vain in the Lord."

And again this same brother writes on May 15, 1860. "I desire to lay before you the way in which those 10,000 tracts you sent me last have been disposed of. Six thousand of them were distributed at the Easter fair here, the remaining 4,000 have been distributed on Lord’s days in the streets of this City and neighbourhood, at open air preachings, railway stations, etc. I must also lay before you some interesting account of the Lord’s blessing on the tracts. At the fair this year a young woman came in from the country to spend her time at the fair; she was met with a tract which was given her, and she read it. The Lord fastened conviction of sin on her conscience, she left the fair, came to a prayer-meeting with the tract in her hand, in deep distress of soul, and after some time found peace through faith in the precious blood of Jesus. I have had cause for special praise to the Lord this year in the case of many youths, who were last year at the fair, tearing up all the tracts they could get at; but this year the Lord has met with them, and those lads have been a great help to me in this work, by standing in the streets leading to the fair, distributing tracts, and speaking and warning those who were going there. The Lord has raised up many helpers here in this work, so that the Word of Life is circulated far and wide. He is also continuing to bless the tracts in an especial way to the young converts; for your tracts are eagerly sought after for instruction, and I feel much pleasure in going in and out among these young disciples. There is still much blessing here in this city. I should be glad to receive some tracts, as I am quite out of gospel tracts. Those little books you sent me were much prized by the children who have been converted. If you can spare some more I should be glad."

In August, 1859, a brother in the Lord and two sisters went out from our midst for missionary service, to labour in Penang, Straits of Malacca. We had especially asked the Lord, among other things, that He would be pleased to bless the labours of this little missionary party, whilst yet on board, and thus give them an earnest concerning their future service. I had also supplied them with tracts and bibles for the sailors. This prayer was answered. The wife of the missionary writes from Singapore, Jan. 19, 1860, thus with reference to their voyage, and blessing on one of the tracts: "I think I mentioned we had a meeting every night for reading the Word, the captain and officers not on duty being present, and with joy I have to tell you that the Lord has blessed the Word to the conversion of two, the chief officer and the carpenter, one a Welshman and the other a Scotchman, who for some months walked so as to give us real joy. I believe the chief officer was in a thoroughly self-righteous state, and the tract ‘Alonzo or the Vain Endeavour’ was used by the Lord in showing him his real state; and both he and the carpenter have again and again spoken of God’s goodness in bringing them on board the Ballarat. Three of the sailors were also impressed, and we hope that the Word spoken and the prayers treasured up for them will at last give us to rejoice over them."

I refer now briefly to the Orphan work.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, there were 672 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 70 Orphans; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1860, 742 under our care, had there been no changes. But of these 742 three died. Only three! I notice this especially, with gratitude to the Lord. All three died as believers. One of the children was returned to her relatives, because they would not submit to the regulations of the Establishment. Three others were, after sufficient trial, returned to their relatives, because their state of health rendered them unfit to be inmates of an Institution in which the girls are trained for domestic service, and the boys for being apprenticed to a trade. Two boys were returned to their relatives to be apprenticed by them. One boy was expelled from the Institution, having been long borne with, and found too injurious to the other children. One girl, when old enough to be sent out to service, was returned to her grandmother, because we could not recommend her, though for nine years we had tried every means to fit her for service. Fourteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, 6 of whom were sent out as believers; and 16 girls were sent to service, having, as well as the apprentices, been supplied with a suitable outfit by the Institution. Of these 16 girls, 8 left us as believers, and some of the other eight were in a hopeful state. One of the girls, who had been for 2 years and 8 months a consistent believer, was sent to London, to be trained for a teacher, at the expense of her uncle. Thus it came, that, on May 26, 1860, there were just 700 Orphans under our care, our full number in the two houses, i.e. in No. 1—300, and in No. 2—400.

May 26, 1860. Day after day, and year after year, by the help of God, we labour in prayer for the spiritual benefit of the Orphans under our care. These our supplications, which have been for 24 years brought before the Lord concerning them, have been abundantly answered, in former years, in the conversion of hundreds from among them. We have, also, had repeated seasons in which, within a short time, or even all at once, many of the Orphans were converted. Such a season we had about 3 years since, when, within a few days, about 60 were brought to believe in the Lord Jesus; and such seasons we have had again twice during the past year. The first was in July, 1859, when the Spirit of God wrought so mightily in one school of 120 girls, as that very many, yea more than one-half, were brought under deep concern about the salvation of their souls. This work, moreover, was not a mere momentary excitement; but, after more than eleven months have elapsed, there are 31 concerning whom there is full confidence as to their conversion, and 32 concerning whom there is likewise a goodly measure of confidence, though not to the same amount, as regarding the 31. There are therefore 63 out of the 120 Orphans in that one school who are considered to have been converted in July, 1859. This blessed and mighty work of the Holy Spirit cannot be traced to any particular cause. It was, however, a most precious answer to prayer. As such we look upon it, and are encouraged by it to further waiting upon God.—The second season of the mighty working of the Holy Spirit among the Orphans, during the past year, was at the end of January and the beginning of February, 1860. The particulars of it are of the deepest interest; but I must content myself by stating, that this great work of the Spirit of God in January and February, 1860, began among the younger class of the children under our care, little girls of about 6, 7, 8 and 9 years old; then extended to the older girls; and then to the boys, so that within about ten days above 200 of the Orphans were stirred up to be anxious about their souls, and in many instances found peace immediately, through faith in our Lord Jesus. They at once requested to be allowed to hold prayer-meetings among themselves, and have had these meetings ever since. Many of them also manifested a concern about the salvation of their companions and relatives, and spoke or wrote to them, about the way to be saved.—Should the believing reader desire to know, how it has been with these children since the end of January and the beginning of February, our reply is, we have in most cases, cause for thankfulness. The present state of the 700 Orphans, spiritually, is, that there are 118 under our care, regarding whose conversion we have full confidence, 89 regarding whom we have also confidence, though not to that full degree, as concerning the 118; and 53 whom we consider in a hopeful state. To these 260 are to be added the 14 who were sent out as believers, and the three who died in the faith during the past year. It is to be remembered, that very many of the children in the Orphan Houses are quite young, as we have received them from 4 months old and upward.—During no year have we had greater cause for thanksgiving on account of the spiritual blessing among the children, than during the last; and yet we look for further and greater blessing still.

There was expended for the support of the Orphans, from May 26, 1859, to May 26, 1860, £7,699 13s. 11½d., and £2,428 5s. 6½d. was expended in connexion with the building of the Orphan Houses.

I enter now upon the year from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861. The total of the expenses during this year, for the various objects of the Institution, amounted to £24,700 16s. 4d. So greatly was already, by this time, that work enlarged, which had so small and insignificant a beginning on March 5, 1834; but prayer, and trust in the Living God, had enlarged it thus, and went on enlarging it, further and further, till it came to what it is now in the year 1874.

From May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, there were four Day Schools, with 302 children, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and eleven besides were assisted. One Sunday School, with 177 children, was entirely supported, and thirteen others were assisted. One adult School, with 34 scholars, was entirely supported.

From March, 1834, to May 26th, 1861, there were 7,178 children in the Day-Schools. In the Adult-Schools there were 3,019 persons. The number of Sunday-School children amounts to 3,294. Thus, without reckoning the Orphans, 13,491 souls were brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these various Schools: besides the many thousands in the Schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, British Guiana, the West Indies, the East Indies, &c.; which were to a greater or less degree assisted. During the year from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, we had again repeatedly instances brought before us, in which our former instructions had been blessed, and, among others, there was the case of one who is now himself a preacher of the Gospel. In addition to these instances of blessing on our former labours, we had also the joy of receiving 8 from among the Sunday Scholars into Church Fellowship; and in the Day-Schools, though we had not so many conversions as during the previous year, yet there were at least a few. There was expended on the Schools, during this year, £484 9s. 0½d. During this year we expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £569 10s. 6d., and there were circulated 2,756 Bibles, 3,144 Testaments, 87 copies of the Psalms, and 292 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

As an encouragement for circulating the Holy Scriptures, and, at the same time, to show the great importance of providing the poor with copies of a large type, I relate the following circumstance, communicated to me by a servant of Christ labouring in Devonshire, whom I have for years supplied with Tracts and copies of the Scriptures. "An old man died a few days ago, to whom about 3 years ago I gave one of the large Bibles you sent me. I have a good hope he died in the Lord; but I was much encouraged to hope the gift of God’s word was not in vain, from the knowledge he seemed to possess of the Word, and how, when I would quote or read parts of it, he would anticipate the words, as I read or spoke. He suffered excruciating pains; but the word of God was precious, and Christ alone was his hope. I felt the more interested in his value of the word of God, as he told me he had been desiring a large Bible for 17 years previous to the time I gave him one."

The following touching little narrative was sent to me by a missionary in Nova Scotia, whom I have for years supplied with Bibles, Testaments, Tracts, and little books, which he seeks to circulate in the most destitute parts of that spiritually needy district, in which he more especially labours.

"Between the settlements of Cape North, and Bay St. Lawrence, there is a public road, recently cut through a dense forest, and entered by a deep gorge, causing an abrupt break in a chain of mountains, commencing at the extreme point of Cape North, and running about 70 miles along the western side of the island, the mountains varying in height from 1,000 to 1,300 feet. On entering the gorge, and ascending by a circuitous road half way up the Sugar Loaf Mountain, so named from its shape, you emerge upon a mountain valley, and thus proceed a few miles, when you again descend into the Bay St. Lawrence settlement. Along this road there are scattered a few miserable huts, the habitations of very poor and generally a very degraded people. Having upon one occasion ascended to the valley, I sat down to rest, when suddenly, by the sound of an axe, I was attracted to a spot, where stood a little boy felling a tree. I called the boy to me, and asked him to take a seat beside me. He obeyed, evidently surprised. I said to him, my little boy, you appear to be working very hard for your years, are you obliged to do so? ‘Yes, sir,’ he said, ‘Father is away fishing, and there is no one at home to get fire wood but me.’ Can you read, my child? ‘A little, sir; I go to the Doctor’s when I can, and he teaches me to read.’ (The Doctor occupied a little hut about half a mile from where we sat, down in a deep glen, where he was clearing the forest, planting potatoes, and growing oats, in order to provide for his family). Can your parents read? ‘No, sir.’ Would you like to read to me? giving him a little tract book. ‘I will try, sir.’ He did his best, and appeared greatly pleased at my interest in his welfare. Would you like to read in the Word of God, and to receive a New Testament. ‘Oh! yes, sir; indeed I should,’ his eyes sparkling with joy. ‘And I’ll go to the Doctor’s every time I can, and learn as fast as I can.’ After conversing about the love of the Saviour, and commending him by prayer to God, I proceeded on my journey. But from this point the poor child’s sorrows began. His parents were Roman Catholics and intemperate. When they found the child in possession of a Testament, they were angry, and said they would burn it. The boy wept, and besought them not to do so. He was beaten. At length they told him, to take the book and sell it for four pence, and bring them rum with the money, or they would destroy it. This the poor boy did, to pacify them. The Doctor, when relating to me the circumstance, said—"When the child came to me, he trembled, fearful that he should not get the money. He said, ‘Oh! Mr. Christy, only buy the book for me, and I will come and chop firewood for you whenever I can. Oh! I cannot spare the book, &c.’" Said the man, ‘I had but sixpence in the house, but I could not but give the money. The boy now comes every night to read in his Testament, he appears deeply interested, and is learning to read very correctly.’ We expect D.V. to hear from this little boy again, and hope to find him, through grace, sitting at the Master’s feet, learning of Him, and perhaps, yet to become a shining light in the midst of darkness and delusion."

During this year there was expended on Missionary operations the sum of £5,273 7s. 6d., whereby 107 servants of the Lord Jesus were assisted. There came to hand during this year, about 700 letters from these brethren, but as space does not allow me to insert any of them in this volume, I feel it necessary to state, that during that year it pleased the Lord to bring many hundreds of souls to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of those brethren, who were helped out of the Missionary fund of this Institution.

There was expended on the circulation of religious Tracts, from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, £1,264 8s. 3½d., and there were circulated above Two Millions and Four Hundred Thousand (exactly 2,408,659) Tracts and Books. Above Two Millions of the Tracts were given away gratuitously.

I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these Tracts were sent.

A brother in the Lord, who labours in the Gospel in Devonshire, and whom I have repeatedly supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes with reference to one of them on Feb. 14, 1861:—"The Lord is still carrying on His work among us. A poor man that was a swearer and a drunkard, who spent the Lord’s day in reading the newspaper, was one Lord’s day morning passing by a brother’s door, and he offered him some tracts to read instead of the newspaper; and the Spirit was pleased to impress upon his mind the words, ‘Why will ye die?’ and he came under the sound of the Gospel, and found peace in believing. It is very precious to see him taking those, that were his companions in the ale-house, under the sound of the Gospel."

The same brother writes thus on May 25, 1861, about the same individual:—"When I last wrote to you, I mentioned that a person was converted by means of a tract given to him. Since then he has opened his house for meetings, and it has been so filled, that I have not had room to stand. I have seen seven or eight in deep distress about their souls at once; and I do not think that there has been one meeting without some fresh case of blessing, either of conviction of sin, or of those convinced brought into liberty." This shows what abundant blessing may result from the circulation of tracts, not only to the individuals to whom they are given, but to great numbers besides.

On April 17, 1861, I had the following lines regarding one of the tracts, from a Christian person, whom I had repeatedly supplied with tracts:—" You will rejoice to hear that the Railway Tract ‘Progress’ has been, we trust, blessed to the conversion of a poor man."

A labourer in the Gospel in Herefordshire, who has often been supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes concerning them:—"A woman came this week to our house, and told my wife that she had borrowed a tract, she had left at a neighbour’s house. It’s title ‘Grace.’ She was specially struck with the words, ‘waiteth to be gracious,’ and thought, ‘Why should he wait any longer for me? I found that all through my life I have been limiting the power of His grace.’ Another woman, that has been a ‘sinner,’ found peace through the little book, ‘The Passover.’ She has been coming to our house for the last five months under deep concern. Mr. C., of London, was preaching in this town about three weeks since, and, at the close of his address, I spoke for a short time on the words—"When I see the blood I will pass over,’ and ‘The blood shall be a token to you.’ When this poor woman got home, she remembered I had given her a little book upon the subject, and thought she would read it; and, while so doing, felt the joy of a finished salvation. She told me, since she found this joy, that many times she had left her bed and prayed to the Lord, and that, before, she had often fasted whole days together, hoping to get peace."

A brother in Wiltshire, who has for many years been supplied with tracts, writes on Jan. 17, 1861: "I can inform you of the happy departure of J. S., the first person in this hamlet, whose mind was opened to see and feel himself a poor lost sinner, through reading the tracts you supplied us with; and who was led to embrace the Saviour as his great High Priest, and, resting on His atoning blood, found pardon and peace some years ago. I was privileged to be the last person he spoke to on earth. I asked him how he found himself in the near prospect of eternity. He replied with great firmness, ‘I am on the Rock Christ Jesus; I am trusting to the blood, and I have no doubt, no fear.’ These were his last words. After uttering them he gently breathed his last."

A brother in the Lord at Sunderland, who, together with other Christians, has circulated many tens of thousands of tracts, which I have sent him, writes on Nov. 7, 1860: "I take the opportunity of telling you, that your tracts have been lately very much blessed to souls, by the grace of God. The missionary at S. has found many cases of special blessing. G. G. has also found them very useful, especially the German tracts. One Swedish Captain was so fond of your German tracts, that he said he intended to have some of them translated into his own mother tongue. Brother L. has had a remarkable case of usefulness in the Union. A very hardened prostitute, who hated the truth, and even wept with rage when it was presented to her, has been completely broken down by reading ‘The Converted Negress,’ and is now saved from the wrath to come. She has an awfully bad leg, the fruit of her life of sin, and is daily expecting to have it cut off, else she must die. She is a trophy of divine grace indeed."

The following extract from a letter, dated Sunderland, Oct. 10, 1860, refers to the case just related, and gives some further particulars: "I thank you for so large a supply of tracts; many have expressed themselves as benefited by them. One instance of real good has during the last month come to light. A woman, whom I had often spoken to about her past sinful life, and who was one of the most hardened women I had ever met with, I gave one of your tracts to, entitled ‘The Converted Negress.’ The reading of this so affected her, she told me, that it was the first and only thing that had ever done her good. She could not sleep all night, and felt for the first time how merciful God had been to her, that He did not cut her off in her sins."

A godly man in Gloucestershire, whom I have supplied for many years with tracts for gratuitous circulation, in applying for more, writes thus on April 13, 1861: "May I once more beg of you to forward to me a large parcel of tracts for the young men of the Royal North Gloucestershire Militia, who are to be here for a month. After many years acquaintance with your Evangelical Tracts, I can say for myself, they have often cheered me when downcast during my sojourn here of 12 years. Some hundreds here have borne similar testimony. With regard to the young men of the R. N. G. Militia, many of them appreciated the tracts, and I know that many of them traced their conversion to their agency. May I hope you will send me a large supply for them and others."

A godly man in Glamorganshire, in applying for a further supply of tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on July 1, 1860: "I have to day finished giving away the tracts you last sent me, hoping they may be blessed to many souls. They have been accompanied with many prayers, and many have professed to have been profited by them. I have this day visited in the infirmary a poor woman who is fast sinking. She dates her conversion from reading the tract entitled "Truth and Grace." The last time before this, that I visited her, her almost first words were, "I am waiting till the Lord shall call for me." Her mind seems to be calm and peaceful, stayed on the Lord. I should be glad to receive some more tracts."

The following case was recently communicated to me, concerning one of the tracts, which a Christian farmer had bought at the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Institution: "An aged man had the tract, ‘Thy kingdom come,’ given to him. The result was, that he was awakened to a sense of his condition as a lost sinner, and was soon led to Christ as his only refuge, whereby he obtained peace, through believing; and is now waiting, with joyful anticipation, for the coming of that kingdom, for which he had so often, in words, prayed, but never knew its power in his own soul, until he received the said tract."

The following communication was contained in a letter, dated March 22, 1861, and written by a believer in Devonshire, whom I have for years supplied with large quantities of tracts for gratuitous circulation: "Since I wrote to you for the last parcel of tracts, I have had cause of joy in previous seed sown, which is bringing forth fruit, to the glory of God. A dear Christian sister had a relative in the Isle of Wight, to whom she enclosed a tract, entitled ‘The Passover,’ in a letter. The Lord blessed it to the salvation of his soul. This will encourage and give you joy, also that your labour is not in vain in the Lord."

Some months since a Christian in business, in Gloucestershire, who employs a number of men, requested me to send him a quantity of tracts, especially with the view of having them read by his workmen, instead of unprofitable or bad publications. I gladly complied with his request, and shortly afterwards received the following joyful communication, that five of his workmen had been converted through these tracts. The letter is dated Feb. 1, 1861, in which he writes thus: "The Lord Jesus has been pleased to give us unmistakeable proof of blessing attending the reading of the tracts you sent me, in my workshop, in the conversion of five of my work people. We have had a noonday prayer meeting among them for a month past, and such was the spirit given us on last Saturday, that we continued in prayer from 12 o’clock till 5, except while we paused to take a little refreshment. Our souls were drawn out especially for one to be set at liberty. The new converts prayed like those who are taught of the Spirit. The Bible is read at least six different times in the workshop, and we have commenced reading among the cottagers at night around us, and are encouraged to go forward."

Christian Reader, labour on for the Lord, and your labour will not be in vain. Circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts with the greatest diligence; speak also for the Lord, as if everything depended on your exertions; yet trust not in the least in your exertions, but in the Lord, who alone can cause your efforts to be made effectual, to the benefit of your fellow-men or fellow-believers. Remember also, that God delights to bestow blessing, but, generally, as the result of earnest, believing prayer.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1860, to May 26, 1861, there were 700 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and 2. During the year were admitted into the two Houses 46; so that there would have been, on May 26, 1861, 746 under our care, had there been no changes; but of these 746 ten died. This is the largest number up to that time, that ever died of the Orphans under our care, in one year. Generally there were not half so many. During the previous year only three out of 742 were removed by death. Still, even ten is a small proportion, considering that by far the greater part of the parents, of the children under our care, died in consumption, which is known by the certificates. Most of those ten who died were very delicate, when they were placed under our care. Yet, as it is, we had joy in the end of almost all of them. Eight out of the ten died as believers, concerning whom we have a good hope; one was an infant; and there was only one concerning whom we had no hope.—Two boys and two girls, of such an age as that the boys might have been apprenticed, and the girls sent into service, we were obliged to return to their relatives, as we could not recommend them to any master or mistress, on account of their moral state. This is one of the painful experiences with which we now and then meet, and which in every work for God will be met with; yet we have cause for thankfulness, that cases of this kind are comparatively so rare. We have, moreover, under such circumstances, also repeatedly found, that, after all, our efforts had been blessed, the seed which was sown springing up to the glory of God and our comfort, when the individuals were no longer under our care.—Four of the children were given up to their relatives or friends, after having been a considerable time under our care, as these relatives were able and desirous now to provide for them,—One of the children, who was only taken on trial, on account of imbecility of mind, was, after 16 months fruitless endeavour to benefit her, given up again to her relatives, on account of the entire want of mental capabilities—Four of the Orphans were given up to their relatives, on account of their state of health, as there was no prospect of their being benefited by remaining in the Institution; and as, especially in two cases, their native air seemed the only thing likely to benefit their health. We had, however, the joy of seeing two out of these four brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, and they had been consistent believers for a considerable time, before they left our care.—One of the girls was sent out to be trained as a teacher. She had been a believer for eleven months, before she left.—Eight of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed, at the expense of the Institution, and were also provided with an outfit. Out of these eight, four had been believers some time, before they left.—Fifteen girls were sent out into service, having been each, at the expense of the Institution, provided with an outfit. Out of these 15, twelve had been believers for a considerable time, before they were sent out. We had therefore, on May 26, 1861, only 699 Orphans in the two houses, viz., 299 in No. 1, and 400 in No. 2.

May 26, 1861. The previous part of this Narrative, has given to the Christian reader proof upon proof, how greatly the Lord has condescended to bless our labours, spiritually, among the Orphans. This blessing continues. During this year there were not such instances of the working of the Holy Spirit, as during the two previous ones, when great numbers of the Orphans, all at once, were led to care about their salvation, yet we had not a few instances regarding individual children. The chief cause for thankfulness we have, with regard to the present spiritual state of the Orphans, is, that by far the greater part of those, who professed faith in our Lord Jesus during the two previous years, when the Spirit of God wrought mightily among them, have not been allowed to go back, but have continued on the Lord’s side. Out of the 700 Orphans under our care, there are 127, concerning whose conversion we have full confidence, and 65 regarding whom there is also a goodly measure of confidence, though not to the same extent. There are 32 besides, who profess to be believers and to have been converted, regarding whom, however, the teachers, as yet, are not satisfied. To these 224 are to be added the eight who died during the past year as believers, and the 19 who were as believers sent out.

The current expenses for the support of the Orphans, during the year, were £8,022 7s. 10d.; and there was expended in connexion with the building of the New Orphan House No. 3, £9,060 8s. 2d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862. This period was especially marked by furnishing a full answer to the prayers which day by day had been brought before God for more than eleven years, from November, 1850, with reference to the enlargement of the Orphan Work. It was also marked by the expenditure of £26,029 16s. 7½d. during the year, for the various objects of the Institution. And it was finally marked by the Lord’s most manifest help, in every way, in connexion with the work; and by the continuation of spiritual blessing, resting on the various objects of the Institution.

During this year we had four Day Schools connected with the Institution, with 320 children, which were entirely supported by its funds. In addition to these four Day Schools, which were entirely supported, ten other Day Schools were assisted. There was one Sunday School with 164 children entirely supported by the Institution, and 12 others were assisted. One adult school, with 55 scholars, was entirely supported. There was expended on the School work, £498 5s.

From May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there were circulated 3,017 Bibles, 1,732 New Testaments, 42 copies of the Psalms, and 66 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended on this Object £498 14s. 4d.

On Missionary Objects we expended from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, £5,527 5s. 2d., whereby 116 servants of Christ were assisted. During this year there were received above 800 letters from these 116 Missionaries, full of deep interest, and showing that their labours had been blessed, during that year, in the conversion of many hundred souls. Gladly, would I reprint here the extracts from their letters, which were published in the Report of 1862; but space forbids me so to do. As, however, the Reports published since 1846 may yet be had, they can, at a trifling cost, be obtained by applying to Mr. Sarsfield, Manager of the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, No. 78, Park Street, Bristol, should any of the readers desire to see these Missionary letters.

From May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there was expended on the circulation of Tracts £1339 7s. 1d., and for this amount there were circulated more than Two Millions and Seven Hundred Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 2,711,501). During this year more than Two Millions One Hundred and Fifteen Thousand were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother, who labours in the Gospel in Ireland, wrote on Sept. 9, 1861: "I am sure you will be anxious to know what I have done with the large parcel of tracts you kindly sent me. I have given samples of them to several of the Lord’s dear saints, who are in the habit of distributing tracts in schools and prayer-meetings, asking them to pray over them before they gave any of them away. The Revival of 1859 having raised up many, devoted young men, who preach in their respective neighbourhoods, but who are in a great measure ignorant of the simple Gospel, I have made it a special point to put a number of your tracts into their hands; and, with God’s blessing, my object in doing so has been gained, which was, that they might be led to state more simply the doctrine of the Cross, without adding ordinances or duties of any kind to the work completed by Jesus. I know for certain they have been greatly blessed in this respect. But while I know they have been blessed in building up and comforting great numbers of weak believers, I do not know of any that I could certainly say were converted by them. One old sinner I hope was blessed by them, but I am not quite sure. I went to see him on his death-bed, and, after conversation and prayer, I left him a few tracts. I saw his friends about four weeks after the time I left the tracts, who told me he often wanted to see me, and that he had been greatly comforted by the tracts, which he often caused to be read, after he was unable to read them himself. The rest I have distributed in public meetings and by the way-side as I travel, or by any other means I have of getting them into the hands of sinners, and I have still a number of them on hand."

The same brother writes on April 26, 1862: "On Monday last a man came to our meeting who is deeply concerned about his soul. He has been a professor many years, but now feels he needs a Saviour. He told my wife it was reading one of the tracts you sent me that led him to see his need of salvation. The name of the tract was ‘How does a man become a soldier?’ I am to preach at his house on Thursday week, D.V."

A brother, labouring in Yorkshire, who has been supplied with many tens of thousands of tracts, for gratuitous circulation, writes on Nov. 11, 1861: "The enclosed tract (‘The Dying Peasant Lad’), which I had from you, was the means of much blessing to a man about three weeks ago; and he walked five miles the next day to meet me where I was expected to preach the Gospel, that he might tell me how happy he felt. He had been unhappy about his sins for some weeks before."

A godly man at Manchester, who has been repeatedly supplied with large quantities of tracts, for gratuitous circulation, writes concerning them: "For the last four months the Corn Exchange has been opened for the preaching of the Word, and a congregation of 1200 people come regularly to hear words whereby they may be saved. During these meetings I have taken the opportunity of circulating these tracts, which were thankfully received and read while waiting for the time to begin the service. A Roman Catholic came up to me one day last week, and while in conversation with him he pulled a tract out of his breast pocket (‘The Incorruptible Seed), remarking that this was the tract that made him decide for Christ, and that he needed no Saviour but Jesus."

A brother, labouring in Surrey, writes on Jan. 17, 1862, with reference to tracts, which I had sent him for circulation: "A poor woman, whom the Lord had brought to Himself at W—, was first led to think of her soul through a tract (‘The Two Cabmen’) I left at her house with her little children, she being from home. The few words spoken to these lambs were used of the Lord to her blessing in this way: ‘She felt’ (so she told me) ‘the kindness of anyone so speaking to her children.’ I believe I mentioned her case before. She appears to grow in grace, and the work seems real."

A godly man in Cheshire, whom I have repeatedly supplied with tracts, writes on May 5, 1862: "One woman has been brought to God by reading one of your tracts."

An evangelist, labouring in Somersetshire, writes on May 27, 1862: "The little books and tracts are nearly all given away; if convenient, I shall be thankful to receive a fresh supply. I know of one case of deep impression in a man I could not get access to till just before he left Y—. The tract ‘A Just God and a Saviour’ had evidently affected him. As it was one lent from house to house, he requested me to procure him a copy to keep, and detained the one he had till I supplied him. He offered to give anything for it. He returned to his native place and died in a few days."

The following interesting communication was sent to me by a brother labouring in Devonshire, on Sept. 9, 1861, and shows, that, above five years since, God was pleased to bless a tract, which I had sent him, though recently only the circumstance had come to light. Thousands of instances of blessing may never come to our knowledge until the Lord comes. We have, therefore, patiently, prayerfully, and in faith to go on with our service, being assured, that, if we faint not, in due season we shall reap. "I have no doubt that you will be glad to learn the following incident: Five years since, when in Cornwall, I gave a tract to a very low dissipated woman, who received it mockingly, and at once put it into her pocket. When she got to her house, she took it out of her pocket, to help light her fire. It was a tract of two pages. She read the following text, heading the first page: ‘The wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. Rom. vi. 23.’ God the Holy Ghost flashed the light of conviction upon that poor dark depraved heart. The tract fell from her hand, dropping on her knees. Her cry went up to God. For hours she continued in an agony of soul. When she bethought herself again of the tract, snatching it from the floor, the first word on the other page now caught her eye, and that word was ‘Mercy.’ God used it instrumentally in leading her to the cross of His Son, then and there. After maintaining a beautiful consistency of Christian walk and testimony, she recently fell asleep in Jesus. Let my last end be like hers! With the Bibles, Testaments and tracts that you have so liberally supplied me with, I have regularly supplied several ships that sail from S—. A nice young Christian seaman always takes a large supply with him, to give away to the sailors in foreign ports, for which his vessel is bound. Some months since, while speaking to a young man at Georgetown in Demerara (that young man was also from this neighbourhood, but not converted), he says: ‘It was as if a voice said to me, give that young man some tracts. And on learning that the crew numbered forty, I gave him a large packet, which he promised faithfully to distribute amongst his shipmates. The next day that vessel sailed for Liverpool; but she had not sailed many days before 29 out of the 40 had fallen victims to yellow fever. The first that died was S. P—, the young man to whom I gave the tracts.’ Surely this was a remarkable providence. When at home, those young men lived within four miles of each other; yet meeting thousands of miles away, the one to speak faithfully to the other of Jesus, and to supply the Gospel through the tracts only a few hours before so many were taken. I shall be glad of some Bibles, tracts, &c., when you can send them, as I am now getting very low."

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1861, to May 26, 1862, there were 699 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the year were admitted into the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3, altogether 159 children, so that the total number on May 26, 1862, would have been 858, had there been no changes; but of these 858, seven died. Only seven! Six out of the 7 who died were believers, and the seventh was an infant. One of the girls was delivered up to her relatives, by their wish, as they were now able and willing to provide for her. Two of the boys, who were ready to be apprenticed, were not apprenticed by the Institution, as they could not be recommended; but were delivered up to their relatives to be apprenticed by them. One of the boys, ready to be apprenticed, and who could have been recommended, was not apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, because his relatives were able and willing to do it. Twelve boys were provided with an outfit and apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, 6 of whom had been believers for some time before they left. Twenty-four girls were provided with an outfit by the Institution, and sent out to service, eleven of whom had been believers for some time before they left us. Deducting these 47 from 858, there were only 811 Orphans actually under our care on May 26, 1862.

We enter now upon the year, from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863.

In reading these particulars with reference to these various years, we pass on rapidly from one year to the other; but, as to our actual experience, each year was marked by many thousands of petitions, thousands of difficulties, if not heavy trials, of one kind or another; but, at the same time, with thousands of joys in one way or other. It will be difficult for the reader to place himself in our position, except he himself has been occupied in similar work, and has acted on the same principles on which we act. Nevertheless, I will go on, finishing the history of this Institution to the end of its fortieth year, as I trust that, after all, many of my readers will be convinced of the power of prayer, and the blessedness of simple trust in the living God, in carrying on his blessed work.

During the year, from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, there were four Day Schools, with 321 children, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. In addition to these four Day Schools, 6 others were assisted. One Sunday School, with 160 children, was entirely supported, and thirteen others were assisted. One Adult School, with 48 Scholars, was entirely supported, and two others were assisted. The amount expended, on these Schools, was £536 19s. 10½d.

During this year 2,227 Bibles, 1,183 New Testaments, 54 copies of the Psalms, and 125 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were circulated. The amount spent, on this object, was £400 1s. 1d.

During this year was expended, of the funds of the Institution, the sum of £4,929 3s. 10½d. on Missionary operations, and by this sum One Hundred and Sixteen labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted. I received again, as usual, many hundreds of letters from those servants of Christ; but as space does not allow me to reprint here, what was given of them in the Report published 1863, I only say, that a considerable portion of these letters speaks of blessing, which the Lord was pleased to bestow on their labours during this year.

There were circulated between May 26, 1862, and May 26, 1863, Three Millions and Thirty-nine Thousand Tracts and Books, at an expense of £1,263 6s. 2½d. Two Millions Four Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand of this number were given away gratuitously. Hundreds of believers were engaged in spreading them abroad, not merely in many parts of England, Scotland, and Ireland, but in various other parts of the world. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

An Evangelist, who labours in Scotland, and moves about from place to place, writes on Oct. 3rd, 1862: "Many thanks for the bountiful supply of Tracts which came to Tain. Several tracts have been blessed this season in Ross-shire, e. g. ‘Mercy,’ at Dingwall, and ‘Two things which God hath joined together,’ at Ullapool."

A brother, who labours in the County of Durham, and who is habitually supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Aug. 29, 1862: "Your Tracts, I believe, will prove a blessing to many. A man came to me a few days ago, saying he was in distress. I asked him if his circumstances were bad; ‘No,’ said be, ‘I have plenty of work, but you have often given me a tract in the street; and the reading of one of them has made me very uneasy, as it speaks of a change of heart, which I am convinced I have not.’ He seemed to be in earnest. This is one of the many instances of the effects of tract distribution which have come to my knowledge."

The same brother writes on Oct. 17th, 1862: "I have visited regularly for two months a man who is laid up with a broken leg. When I first saw him, I reminded him of the goodness of God in sparing his life in the time of danger. I said to him pointedly, ‘What would have become of your soul, if you had died then?’ He was affected to tears, and replied, with a full heart, ‘I should have been lost.’ I have repeatedly visited him since. Two days ago I asked him how it was with his soul; he said, ‘I am happy now.’ I said, ‘What makes you happy?’ He replied, ‘Christ.’ I asked him when he first became happy; and he told me it was while reading the Tract, ‘Poor Richard.’ I gave him another tract, and told him to look to Jesus alone for salvation."

A brother in Yorkshire, who has been frequently supplied with large parcels of tracts gratuitously, writes on Sep. 1st, 1862: "The tracts you kindly sent me arrived quite safely, and we have begun distributing them. One of the distributors, who has taken out hundreds into the country, says that he can trace in 7 or 8 instances that the tracts he has left at different houses have been distinctly blessed to souls."

A godly man in Cheshire, whom I have often supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Aug. 1st, 1862: "I have great pleasure to inform you that several cases have come under my notice of good being done by your tracts. I gave a tract to a man, who became so uneasy after reading it, that he could not rest. He was pointed to ‘the Lamb of God who taketh away the sin of the world.’ He is now walking in the ways of the Lord. A second case is that of a woman, who was so affected by a tract which I gave her, that she cried for mercy. She is now on the Lord’s side. In a third case I left two tracts with a family. The father was such a wicked man that his wife could scarcely live with him, but he is now quite another man. His wife told me this week that she should have to thank God that he ever sent me with those two tracts; she added, ‘he is now asking God to save him from all his sins, and he says the Lord will save him."

A Christian tract distributor in Staffordshire writes on Oct. 11, 1862: "I am most happy to inform you that the tracts you sent me have been the means, through the Spirit of God, of doing much good. I have one instance before me of a poor old woman who was often in doubt and fear about her interest in Christ. One Sunday afternoon I found her in a desponding state of mind. I prayed with her, and read the tract entitled ‘I do depend upon the blood,’ when, to my joy, light began to dawn upon her soul, and from that time I have reason to believe she has rejoiced in a crucified Saviour. Other instances might be mentioned of the good which the tracts have done, through God’s blessing."

A missionary among sailors, labouring in Suffolk, who has been gratuitously supplied with tracts, writes on Sep. 15, 1862: "I am pleased to inform you that the tracts were well received, and that one case of conversion has come to my notice. It resulted from the reading of a tract that I gave after an open-air meeting."

A brother in Somersetshire, who has been for many years supplied with tracts gratuitously, writes on Nov. 18, 1862: "You will be pleased to hear that a dear sister in the Lord, who lives at O., and to whom I gave a packet of your tracts, told me a few days ago that two instances of true conversion through them have come to her knowledge. One was rather remarkable. She was taking some of them from house to house; but when she came to a gentleman’s boarding school, she said to herself, ‘I fear to leave a tract here;’ she heard a loud laugh from an usher; but she determined to persevere, and the tract was given to a young lady, who had recently gone there to keep house for her brother. She read it; was convinced of sin; obtained peace; and is now a happy believer. The tract was entitled ‘The Heart made Captive.’ Your tracts have been conveyed into many a dark district around, and I am sure the Lord will bless them."

A brother labouring in Devonshire, who has been habitually supplied with tracts for many years, writes on July 9th, 1862, concerning the blessing on one of them: "I think I mentioned a woman near W., who had been converted by a tract, the title of which I did not then know. I have recently been there, and, on visiting this woman, handed her the tract entitled ‘The Gospel or Glad Tidings,’ when she immediately exclaimed, ‘That is the tract,’ and turned to the last page, where are the words, ‘God is no respecter of persons,’ etc., which had led to her conversion."

The letters that have been received show, also, the variety of opportunities which are embraced by distributors for the abundant and wide scattering of the "good seed" contained in the tracts. Large quantities have been circulated amongst the attendants at open air preachings, the passengers on board emigrant ships, and by railway trains, the frequenters of fairs, races, steeplechases, and the spectators at executions. As an illustration of the way in which the last-named sad occurrences were turned to profitable account, I give the following letter from a brother who labours in Cornwall. It is dated Aug. 19, 1862: "I embrace the first opportunity to thank you for the 9,500 tracts received on Saturday evening. Brothers B., R., T. , and myself left here at 2 o’clock yesterday (Monday) morning, and got to Bodmin about half-past 6, so that we had a nice long morning for work before the execution took place. Two of us took one part of the town, to meet the people as they came in, and two of us the other part. As we gave the tracts into the hands of the people, we quoted a few words of Scripture, or put a pointed question, such as, ‘Saved, or not saved?’ ‘Do you pray?’ ‘Prayer won’t save you; Jesus saves;’ ‘The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord;’ Jesus says, ‘Come unto me,’ etc. About 10 o’clock, brother B. and I went into a field near the prison, where the people had assembled in thousands to see the poor man hanged. Here we had nice opportunities for preaching to large crowds, who listened most attentively; and, as I was able to speak of having, a short time ago, preached in the open air in the village where the murder took place, and where the murderer lived, and of well remembering seeing the man, now about to be hung, leaning against the hedge, while I was preaching, without his jacket, in his shirt sleeves and working clothes on a Lord’s day morning, the people were the more interested and attentive, and seemed deeply impressed. We each preached two or three times, then walked through the large field, where, as the people were seated in rows, we warned and exhorted as we walked with the tracts which B. brought with him. We gave away nearly 15,000 altogether, I should think. We purposely left the place whilst the execution took place, and returned when it was over. The Lord was very manifestly with us, and we prayed that much blessing may be given. It was very interesting to see such an immense number of people reading the tracts, and, apparently, so interested."

Christian Reader, labour on for the Lord, and your labour will not be in vain. Circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts with the greatest diligence; speak also for the Lord, as if everything depended on your exertions; yet trust not in the least in your exertions, but in the Lord, who alone can cause your efforts to be made effectual, to the benefit of your fellow-men or fellow-believers. Remember also, that God delights to bestow blessing, but, generally, as the result of earnest, believing prayer.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1862, to May 26, 1863, there were 811 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 323 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1863, would have been 1,134, had there been no changes; but of these 1,134, eight died during the year. Only eight! One of these eight was a young infant; 4 died as decided believers, one was in a very hopeful state; and of the other two we have some hope in their end. Three of the girls were expelled from the Institution, as the last means that we could use, in seeking to benefit them, after they had been long borne with. Four girls were sent back to their relatives, on account of their being in such a state of health of body or mind, as rendered them unsuitable inmates for the Orphan Houses; yet there was nothing in their conduct, morally, to make it needful to send them away. One boy, having come to such an age, as to be ready to be apprenticed, was delivered up to his relatives, and not apprenticed by the Institution, as he could not be recommended. Another boy was sent out ready to be apprenticed, but was not apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, but by the relatives, as they were able to do so. Eight girls were delivered up into the hands of their relatives, who desired to have them, as they were by that time able to provide for them. Eighteen boys were apprenticed at the expense of the Institution, eleven of whom were sent out as believers. Thirty-one girls were sent out to service, having had situations and an outfit provided for them by the Institution; nineteen out of these were sent out as believers, and most of them had been converted for some time. Deducting these 74 from 1,134, there were only 1,060 Orphans actually under our care on May 26, 1863, viz. 299 in No. 1, 397 in No. 2, and 364 in No. 3. The amount expended on the support of the Orphans was £11,194 4s. 7½d., besides £1,867 8s. 8d. of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864. During this year there were 6 Day-Schools, with 516 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and nine others wore assisted. One Sunday-School, with 146 children, was entirely supported, and five others were assisted. Two Adult-Schools, with 76 Scholars in them, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various schools, amounted to £587 12s. 2d.

During this year were circulated 1,682 Bibles, 1,828 New Testaments, 49 copies of the Psalms, and 107 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, was £406 0s. 2½d.

During this year was spent on Missionary Objects the sum of £5,600 7s. 9d., whereby One Hundred and Twenty labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were assisted. Though, for the reason before stated, I cannot give extracts from the many hundred letters received during the year, from these 120 labourers in the Gospel, yet I cannot leave this part of the operations of the Institution, without adding to the praise of God, that there is the fullest reason to believe that, during this year, many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these brethren, who laboured at home and abroad, and whom I sought to assist.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864, the sum of £1,394 2s. 5d.; and there were circulated within the year 2,704,348 Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1864, is 22,357,137

Nearly Two Millions (exactly 1,923,835) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother in Devonshire, whom I have for many years supplied gratuitously with copies of the Holy Scriptures and tracts, for circulation among the poor, writes on July 22, 1863:—"The tracts, I am happy to say, have been made a blessing in various instances coming to our knowledge. Two recent cases are a great joy to us. One a Unitarian: leaving ‘Over Luggage’ at his house, seeing it he took it up, saying to his wife, ‘What have you got here?’ The title attracted his curiosity, he read the paper, and, by the blessing of the Holy Spirit, it has resulted in his unquestionable conversion. Unto the remark of a friend lately to him ‘Then you feel yourself a Sinner?’ his answer was, ‘The greatest Sinner out of hell!’ The other case is the conversion to God of a very bad man, through the tract, ‘Your Dying Hour.’ He behaved very cruelly to his poor wife prior to this, but is now truly ‘A new creature in Christ Jesus,’ and has joined the Wesleyans. To God be all the glory; ‘for of Him and through Him and to Him are all things, to whom be glory for ever and ever.’"

The same brother writes on Feb. 2, 1864:—"Our Christian friend, the packman, of whom I have before spoken in my letters, is desirous to have more tracts to distribute in the country (obscure places) at a distance from here. We have received many times most gratifying intelligence of the usefulness of the tracts in the parts he visits. I some time since referred to one instance in the true conversion to God of a very bad man, to whom the tract ‘Your Dying Hour’ was made a blessing. He is now a ‘New creature in Christ Jesus,’ and devoted to the service of God. Another case I may mention which I think gratifying. A woman of some little property in the village, was deeply impressed by the circumstance of our friend labouring to do good in his journeys, and his having given a Bible (one of yours) to a poor family. She reflected on her own hitherto indifference to spiritual things, and that it was in her power to do some good after the example of this poor man. ‘What! (said she) shall he try to be a blessing to others and give them Bibles, who is so dependant, and I, who have money, let them perish for want of the Word of God?’ She resolved to set to work, and went away and purchased 62 Bibles, which she at once distributed among her poor neighbours, having sent a man to inquire who needed them. And who can tell the extent of this act? What it may further lead unto? And by the Spirit’s blessing shall prove at the end! All resulting from the one gift of a Bible (of yours) and the distribution of the tracts in that quarter."

Another Christian in Devonshire, whom I have often supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes "I do not think I ever told you of one to whom I took tracts a long while ago; the reading of them was made a blessing to her soul. In visiting her from time to time I find real progress."

A believer at Penzance, whom I have also supplied with tracts for circulation, writes on Oct. 23, 1863:—"I am thankful to say, the tracts which I have received from time to time, have been blessed to souls, one especially, viz., the tract ‘Come, Sinner,’ on one side, and ‘Glad Tidings’ on the other. About two months since I was out of town and distributed some tracts. The next week I had to visit that place again, and on the quay a man came and asked me if I knew him. He told me I gave him last week a tract, and am thankful to say I found by reading it, that there is salvation for me. I thought there was no salvation for such a sinner as I am. I have been a wicked man, and I gave myself up to the wicked one, but, thank God, you gave me this precious tract, here it is, thank God there is salvation for me,"

A brother in Devonshire writes on April 18, 1864:—"Your last gift of tracts was large, but with the exception of one packet, they have been with fervent prayer distributed and sent on their mission; and I am thankful to be able to say, that I know of one case where, under God, they were made instrumental in the conversion of a poor sinner, an old man, and of many others where men and women have, through reading them, been brought under deep concern for their souls, and to seek the Lord."

Another brother in Devonshire writes on April 29, 1864:—"One manifest case of blessing seems to have taken place, through the tracts distributed, the particulars of which are contained in a letter written by the person to her father, brother and sister, which I here enclose."

The letter was sent, giving the details of the conversion of this person, and the blessing granted on the tract "Why will you die"; but, as it was written to near relatives, I thought it best not to give the particulars.

A Christian gentleman in London writes on March 9, 1864:—"I yesterday received a note from a female in the neighbourhood of Exeter, to whom I had forwarded a packet of your tracts. She avers that they have been manifestly blessed in two cases within her own knowledge."

From the commencement of the Institution up to May 26, 1864, above Thirty-Four Thousand Bibles, about Twenty-Three Thousand Testaments, and above Twenty-Two Millions of Tracts and Books were circulated, in connexion with this Institution; but while, on the one hand, we would labour, as if everything depended on our exertions, on the other hand, we would not in the least degree depend upon the number of copies of the Holy Scriptures or Tracts which we circulate, but only on the blessing of God. This blessing, by God’s grace, we seek daily, and, therefore, we expect fruit, abundant fruit, to result from our labours, though this fruit should only in a small degree be witnessed by us in this world.

If any of the Christian readers are in the habit of circulating Tracts, and yet have never seen fruit, may I suggest to them the following hints for their prayerful consideration. 1, Seek for such a state of heart, through prayer and meditation on the Holy Scriptures, as that you are willing to let God have all the honour, if any good is accomplished by your service. If you desire for yourself the honour, yea, though it were in part only, you oblige the Lord, so to speak, to put you as yet aside as a vessel not meet for the Master’s use. One of the greatest qualifications for usefulness in the service of the Lord is a heart, truly desirous of getting honour for Him. 2, Precede all your labours with earnest, diligent prayer; go to them in a prayerful spirit; and follow them by prayer. Do not rest on the number of Tracts you have given. A million of Tracts may not be the means of converting one single soul; and yet how great, beyond calculation, may be the blessing which results from one single Tract. Thus it is also with regard to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and the ministry of the Word itself. Expect, then, everything from the blessing of the Lord, and nothing at all from your own exertions. 3, And yet, at the same time, labour, press into every open door, be instant in season and out of season, as if everything depended upon your labours. This is one of the great secrets in connexion with successful service for the Lord; to work as if everything depended upon our diligence, and yet not to rest in the least upon our exertions, but upon the blessing of the Lord. 4, This blessing of the Lord, however, should not merely be sought in prayer; but it should also be expected, looked for, continually looked for: and the result will be, that we shall surely have it. 5, But suppose, that, for the trial of our faith, this blessing were for a long time withheld from our sight; or suppose even that we should have to fall asleep, before we see much good resulting from our labours; yet will our labours, if carried on in such a way and spirit as has been stated, be at last abundantly owned, and we shall have a rich harvest in the day of Christ.

Now dear Christian reader, if you have not seen much blessing resulting from your labours, or perhaps none at all, consider prayerfully these hints, which are affectionately given by one who has now for more than forty-eight years in some measure sought to serve the Lord, and who has found the blessedness, of what he has suggested, in some measure in his own experience.

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1863, to May 26, 1864, there were 1,060 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 181 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1864, would have been 1,241, had there been no changes; but of these 1,241, seventeen died during the past year, 3 as infants and, of the other 14, ten were believers. We own with especial gratitude to God the smallness of the number of deaths, since for more than two years all around us infectious fevers and the small-pox have been so prevalent. Almost all the 17 children died of consumption in one form or other, at which we are not surprised, as about three-fourths of the children in the Orphan Houses lost one or both parents in consumption. Five girls were returned to their relatives, as they had epileptic fits (of which no information had been given by the relatives before admission) or other diseases, on account of which they were unsuitable inmates for such an Institution as the New Orphan Houses; 10 children were given up to relatives, by their desire, as they by that time were able and willing in future to provide for them, the temporal circumstances of some having become better; 16 boys were sent out to be apprenticed; 2 girls were sent out to be apprenticed to dressmaking, the one being unsuitable for service, and the other having a sister a dressmaker who desired her to be with her; and 41 girls were sent out to service. Of the boys who were sent out, 8 were converted, and of the girls 14. Thus 91 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,241, which left just 1,150 on May 26, 1864, in the 3 houses, the number for which the New Orphan Houses were fitted up, namely 300 in No. 1, 400 in No. 2, and 450 in No. 3. The expenses for the support of the Orphans amounted to £11,948 10s. 4d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865.

In looking back upon the Thirty One years, during which this Institution had been in operation, I had, as will be seen, by the Grace of God, kept to the original principles, on which, for His honour, it was established on March 5, 1834. For 1, during the whole of this time I had avoided going in debt; and never had a period been brought to a close, but I had some money in hand. Great as my trials of faith might have been, I never contracted debt; for I judged, that, if God’s time was come for any enlargement, He would also give the means, and that, until He supplied them, I had quietly to wait His time, and not to act before His time was fully come. And further, that, being engaged in the work, which I had Scriptural warrant to believe He had given me to be engaged in, I needed not to be afraid of being supplied with what I might need, but that, if I would quietly wait His time, patiently wait, continue in prayer and believing expectation, His help would come. And thus it had been thousands of times during the Thirty-one years. 2, Another principle, with which I set out, regarding the formation of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, was, that the Living God, and He alone, should be the Patron of the Institution; that I would trust in Him, and in Him alone; lean upon Him, and upon Him alone. To this, by God’s grace, I had been enabled to cleave for the Thirty-one years. And now I have to say, to the honour of His name, that He has helped me more and more, and that it is a blessed thing indeed to have Him as our Patron; for I have the fullest reason to believe, that I have been enabled to accomplish ten times, if not a hundred times more, than if I had sought after the patronage of the great and wealthy in the land. 3, The line of demarcation between believers and unbelievers, with regard to active engagements in connexion with the Institution, as teachers, or otherwise, with which we set out at the first, has been adhered to ever since.—By the help of God, we intend in future also to act according to these original principles.

When one year and nine months later, in December, 1835, the Orphan work was added to the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, my especial object was, as has been stated at large in this Narrative, vol. I, page 143-146 of the Seventh edition, to show how much could be accomplished through the instrumentality of prayer and faith. I had, indeed, the bodily, mental, and spiritual benefit of poor children, bereaved of both parents, at heart; I would, with all diligence, as God should help me, labour for this; yet, the primary object was the glory of God, in seeking to set before my weaker brethren in the faith, as their servant and fellow member in the body of Christ, the encouragement connected with this work, for the strengthening of their faith. And now, going on in this part of the work, in the thirty-ninth year, what have I to say? Nothing less than this, that the Lord has never left us nor forsaken us. Great have been our trials of faith, year after year, without exception; but God has helped continually. With regard to pecuniary means, we were at one time, for about five years, almost daily, in the trial of faith; but we were, also, continually helped. And as the work enlarged, instead of needing hundreds of pounds, as at the first, we now needed tens of thousands, yea hundreds of thousands; yet the Lord helped as before. But not merely with regard to pecuniary means, but in every other way, we were continually helped, through prayer and faith. When teachers and other assistants were required, we gave ourselves to prayer, and were helped. When suitable Christian servants were needed, we looked to the Lord, and were helped. When the health of the children tried us, or the health of the teachers or other assistants, we still looked to the Lord, and were supported, and in His own time helped and delivered out of the trial. When situations were needed for boys ready to be apprenticed, or girls to be sent to service, we looked to the Lord for suitable openings; and, in hundreds of instances of this kind, we received precious answers to prayer, though sometimes we had often and long to call upon the Lord for the needed help. And thus in hundreds of other difficulties, necessities, and wants, we have invariably found that prayer and faith, our universal remedy, was sufficient. Whatever the difficulty might be, whatever the need, however great the perplexity of the position; we trusted in God, and were sustained and at last delivered.

I relate here, for the encouragement of the reader, a few instances, in which the help of God, in answer to our prayers, was very manifest, and which occurred during the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, about which I am now more particularly writing.

It may be remembered by the reader, how great the scarcity of water was in the summer of 1864 in almost all parts of England. Long before we felt any want in the Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, many thousands of the inhabitants of Bristol, as well as elsewhere, had been tried by the lack of rain. At last, however, all our fifteen large cisterns in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 were empty, and almost all our nine wells in these 3 houses, most of which are deep, failed also; yea, even one with a good spring, which never had been out before, was also pumped dry. Now, dear Reader, place yourself into our position. For all the various purposes in these three houses, we use from 2,000 to 3,000 gallons of water daily. Under these circumstances, we were daily waiting upon God, that He would be pleased to give rain to supply our cisterns and wells, or that He would otherwise help us. Now see how he kindly interposed. About one-third of a mile from the Orphan Houses resides a farmer, who had three wells, filled with water, which he had never known to fail, and he very kindly sent word to say, that he would gladly supply the Orphan Houses with water, as long as he had any. This was thankfully accepted, as a precious answer to prayer, and we had the water hauled, about 1,000 or 1,500 gallons daily, the remainder of what we required being supplied by what our wells yielded, by being pumped every four or six hours. Thus we went on, day by day, and were helped over a most difficult time, whilst the distress in Bristol increased more and more. At last, however, these wells, which never had failed before, and out of which, day by day, for about six weeks, we had drawn so much, without the least apparent diminution at first, were nearly emptied, so that the kind farmer was under the necessity, though reluctantly, of letting me know that he should need the little water which remained for himself and his tenants. We thanked God for having helped us for about six weeks in the way mentioned, and asked Him for further help, though we knew not how that help was to come, the scarcity of water being now all around greater than ever. Our hope, however, was in God, being fully assured that this time also we should prove His faithfulness. On the very day on which the information was received, that that day would be the last day we could be supplied with water from those wells, another kind farmer, about a mile and a half from the Orphan Houses, sent word to me, that we could have as much water as we liked from a brook which ran through his fields. This offer was thankfully accepted. We made a dam in the brook, which soon made the water to rise four feet high, and thus we had an abundance of water, till God was pleased to send rain. The only difference in the latter case was, that we needed three carts instead of one or two, and several men more, than before. Thus, by prayer, we were helped through the great drought of the summer 1864.

I relate another precious deliverance, in answer to prayer. During the three years previous to May 26, 1865, scarlet fever, typhus fever, and small-pox were to a greater or less degree prevalent in Bristol and the neighbourhood. We gave ourselves to prayer, that, if it might be, the Lord would mercifully preserve us from these diseases in the Orphan Houses; and, if they must come, we might be sustained and helped. So far as it regards scarlet fever and typhus fever, we had not one single case during the whole time. With regard to the small-pox, too, we were preserved for many months, yea nearly two years it had been more or less raging in the neighbourhood; but at last it pleased the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, to allow it to enter among us. We now were indeed dependant upon the Lord, that this disease might not infect hundreds of children, yea the teachers, matrons, nurses and servants of the Institution; for though it was only as yet in the smallest house, still there were 320 persons in it, and 50, 100, 150, or even more might be laid down at once. Nothing remained, therefore, but our universal remedy, prayer and faith, that the Lord would have mercy upon us, and cause us not to be tried above our measure. In all childlike simplicity we told Him how we were situated, how great the difficulty and trial would be, if a great number of children were at once ill in the small-pox. All necessary precautions were, of course, at once used, in separating the diseased children entirely from the rest, and cutting off, as far as was at all practicable, the intercourse with the infirmary rooms; for a different course would not have been faith but presumption, as we had the ability for so doing; but who does not know, how powerless after all such precautions are in themselves. Our only trust, I confess it frankly to the honour of the Lord, was in His pity and compassion, in His tender, fatherly heart; for He knew our case. The result was, that, though week by week, and month after month, for about seven months, we had the disease at the New Orphan House No. 1, yet there were only 5, 6, 8, or 10 ill in the house at one time, and all the cases light, yea, very light for the most part. No. 1, however, was not the only house; but after some time the New Orphan Houses No. 2 and No. 3 were also afflicted with this disease. In No.2 the cases were only eleven altogether, and very light, though there are 400 children in that house, one half of whom are young infants. We felt this an especial mercy, and a particular answer to prayer, that the cases there were so few. In No. 3 we had case after case, sometimes 4 or 5 children in one day were taken ill. At one time all the available beds in the Infirmary rooms were filled, having 15 down at one time in this disease, besides other sick children. In this our great extremity we entreated the Lord, that, if it might be, He would not allow fresh cases to occur, as we could not, without great difficulty, keep anymore children separate from the rest. He had mercy on us. Not a single other case occurred, until the number in the Infirmary rooms was considerably diminished, and there were only altogether a few more fresh cases after this. At last, in Dec. 1864, the disease disappeared entirely, having been 9 months constantly among the 1,200 inmates of the three Orphan Houses. Almost all the cases were light, most of them very light, and not one child died. Only one of the teachers out of all the grown up persons had the disease, and that very lightly. Thus we proved the Lord, as the prayer-hearing God in this matter also.

On Jan. 14, 1865, there were tremendous gales in Bristol and the neighbourhood. When I arrived at the Orphan Houses, about eleven o’clock in the morning, I found our roofs greatly injured, and laid open in at least twenty places, and about twenty large panes of glass broken; in two cases also the woodwork of the windows, the wind having blown the slates against them. This being Saturday, and the Orphan Houses a good distance from the place of the glazier and slater whom we generally employ, and all his men out and engaged, when he received our order to send men, nothing could be done that day, and of course nothing on the coming day, it being the Lord’s day. Under these circumstances we besought the Lord, that, if it might be, He would mercifully be pleased to keep off the rain and remove the gales. If there had been any heavy rain, the houses would have been much damaged; and, if the wind had blown as in the morning, many hundreds more of the slates might have been blown off. Now see as to the wind. In the afternoon of Saturday it was comparatively calm; but in the evening it began again to blow much, at the very time while I had with my dear wife my usual time for prayer. But, having six or seven times called upon the Lord, it grew calm, not a single slate more was blown off as far as I could learn. And as to the rain, only a few drops fell on Saturday, none on the Lord’s day, and on Monday we had a number of men on the roofs, and others to mend the windows and make good the broken wood-work. On Monday and Tuesday rain and wind were stayed. The sky was full of clouds, but only a few drops fell; nothing to hurt the houses or hinder the work. By mid-day of Wednesday the roofs were so far repaired as that all the worst places were made good, except one. But now it began to rain, and rather heavily. The slaters had to leave the roof and come into the house; and the appearance was, that still much damage might be done. We saw the state of things, and my dear wife and I fell again and again on our knees, and, after three or four times praying, the rain was stayed, the men could go on with their work, and that very afternoon the worst of all the places was repaired, and it was found that the rain had done no damage, for the opening was on the south side, whilst the rain came from the north. By the end of the week all the other slighter injuries were also repaired; and thus we had, in the face of great damage and difficulty, most precious deliverances in answer to prayer.

The reason why I relate these circumstances so minutely, and why similar instances will still further be given, is to shew, that, if we trust in God, and betake ourselves to Him in believing prayer, we are helped, and our hearts are kept in peace. If the reader has had typhus fever, scarlet fever, the smallpox, or other infectious diseases in the house, he will know how the natural tendency is, to be very anxious under such circumstances, and, in this great anxiety, often to anticipate the very worst as to the infection, and to be in danger of acting unscripturally; whilst, on the other hand, if the ordinary proper precautions are used, we cast our burden upon God, and say, it is my Heavenly Father who sends this disease; He, who is full of pity and compassion, will not lay more upon me than He will enable me to bear, therefore I will trust in His love and wisdom and power; and then the soul will be calm and quiet, yea very peaceful. This is to be aimed after, not only for our own good, but because it tends to the glory of God, and is a testimony to the unconverted as to the reality of the things of God, and tends to the strengthening of the faith of our fellow believers.

At the end of the year, from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, the Lord allowed us to have our faith again exercised in the way of an infectious disease. The scarlet fever, from which we had been so long preserved, made its appearance among the children; but only four cases occurred, and they were of so light a character, that I should scarcely have mentioned the circumstance, except I had before said, we had had no case of fever in the houses. Of course we knew not how it might be the Lord’s will to act in this matter; yet our minds were again kept in peace, and we again proved the compassionate heart of our Heavenly Father, who laid no more on us than He enabled us to bear.

In the year from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, there were six Day Schools, with 485 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution; and eleven other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 140 children, was entirely supported, and five others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 29 scholars, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. The amount, which was expended on these various schools during the year, is £650 7s. 8d.

There were circulated 2,323 Bibles, 4,106 New Testaments, 104 copies of the Psalms, and 293 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £404 14s. 10d.

From May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865. there was expended on missionary operations, £5,669 9s., 5½d., whereby 122 labourers in the word and doctrine were assisted. I give a very few extracts from some of the many hundreds of letters received from the missionaries during the year as specimens.

A brother, labouring in Demerara, writes on Nov. 22, 1864:—"Through the loving kindness of our gracious God and Father, we continue in this work here, unworthy as we are; and He does use us a little, I trust, for His name, both in helping on His people and gathering some of the ‘other sheep.’ He brings them by us, blessed be His holy name, into the fold! You will be pleased to hear that I baptized twelve brothers and sisters last Sunday week the 13th inst. Africans and Creoles. I often think that there is very little thankfulness in me when ones and twos, and nines and tens, are brought to the Lord. I have often found myself looking at the hundreds and thousands of unconverted, instead of the brand plucked from the burning; still I would bless the Lord from my heart for the smallest manifestation of His grace, while I mourn over, labour and pray for, the thousands of unconverted around us."

The same brother writes on May 6, 1865:—"Through our Heavenly Father’s loving care, I am kept in good health, and enabled to work in the vineyard, daily. The field is large, and therefore more labourers are needed; but one who loves the Master, and loves His work, cannot be discouraged: one loves to think that it is not here that we see, or are meant to see, the full fruit of our labours. We must sow now the seed; we shall see the harvest gathered in hereafter; and sure it is, that it is not in vain that Christ’s servants have laboured. I baptized six here last month, one brother and five sisters: they were Creoles and Africans, all with black faces; but as cleansed by the blood of Jesus, He can say of them ‘thou art all fair, my love, there is no spot in thee.’"

Another brother, also labouring in Demerara, writes on Feb. 3, 1865:—"You will be glad to hear that many of the Chinese have been brought to the knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus. Last Friday I baptised 26 persons, 21 were Chinese, and, it being their New Year, a great many were assembled at the Old Colony House, as they are allowed a few days holiday at this time; some came a great distance to the meeting."

A brother labouring at Ningpo, China, writes on Nov. 5, 1864:—"Accept again, dear brother, my sincerest thanks for your kindness. I shall be glad to use your bounty for the object mentioned. I am not only thankful for your kind remembrance in this way, but I am glad to think that I am remembered also in your prayers. I am sure I must be prayed for by some one; for my work, not withstanding all my littleness of faith and unfitness in other respects, seems to prosper. Two months ago I had the pleasure of baptizing at one time sixteen persons, twelve in connection with the congregation left in my care by our dear brother J., and four in connection with my own. Since then six more candidates have been accepted in connection with the former, and there are several applicants connected with the latter. Mrs. L’s orphan school is also prospering. The house that has been building during the past year, is now nearly ready for occupation. It will afford very good accommodation for fifty girls and an assistant, if Mrs. L. should ever have one. Her present number of girls, however, is only twenty-three. They will doubtless increase, and as fast as we shall be prepared for them. The mission generally at Ningpo, I believe, is prospering. And numerous stations and churches are springing up in the region round about. There are difficulties and discouragements connected with it. But it is the Lord’s work and it will prosper."

A brother labouring at Penang, writes on Aug. 8, 1864:—"We have cause for much praise and thanksgiving to our loving Father in Heaven for bringing some to put their trust in Jesus, and rely on Him alone for the salvation of their souls. A few weeks ago, I was invited by one of the brethren to go to his house as some young persons desired to hear the Gospel. The wife of this brother is also a believer; they have both been in fellowship a few years. I went to the house about five o’clock in the evening, and found two young women, his wife, and two strangers from India, one of whom was a believer, and married, the other has entered the school. These two young women had never heard the Gospel, and their native language being Malay, was an advantage to them; both were Mohammedans. I told them, before we commenced, I would kneel down and ask God’s blessing upon the Word, and that He would be pleased to open their hearts to understand the truth. We all kneeled down and I prayed; afterwards I read to them several portions of the Word and simply preached to them Jesus. I set before them, as the Lord enabled me, His sacrifice, the sacrifice of Himself for sin. They quite understood the meaning of a sacrifice, and whilst relating to them the wondrous story, their eyes were fixed upon me the whole of the time. I went once or twice in the week for a few weeks, setting Jesus before them as the only way of salvation, and through whom alone men could be pardoned and saved. They both received the Gospel and believed in Jesus. One of them was baptized on the 24th ultimo. Her name is Lydia. The other is near her confinement; she also will, God willing, be baptized on her recovery. On the 28th ult., four Chinamen were also baptized, after giving evidence of their faith in Christ; they were four clear cases of conversion. Last Thursday evening two more Chinamen were examined; they desire to be baptized, both cases were satisfactory. Since Lydia was received into fellowship, her step-father has been very angry, and on her leaving the chapel yesterday week he came and made an attack upon her, as she was returning home. She escaped from him; and brother G. and I went to see him, but he was not in his house. In the evening we went again and found him at home. I then expostulated with him and told him not to persecute his step-daughter, as that religion was not of God that persecuted. I exhorted him to come to Jesus and trust in Him, though he might have to suffer shame and reproach. He promised he would not molest her again, and if she wished to go that way she might do so. The Lord’s dear people who pray for us may see from this, that their prayers are not in vain."

The same brother writes on Nov. 22, 1864:—"The latter end of last month brother G., a Chinese brother and myself, took a tour for three days on the Mainland. We left the Mission about nine o’clock in the morning and took a small boat. In this boat we sailed about five miles and arrived at the opposite shore. We then proceeded on foot for about two miles, until we came to a house where reside a country born man and his wife. He is a manufacturer of cocoanut oil, and employs a great many hands. This couple live very much alone and are well disposed to the Gospel. I should think the wife to be a believer. At twelve o’clock we had a meal with them, called tiffin, rice and curry, and some coffee. After reading a portion of the Word, we went on our journey, they kindly lending us a conveyance drawn by a bullock, as it was very hot in the day. We arrived at a village called Ager Tawer. Here we stayed and commenced at once to preach the glad tidings; a crowd of Malays gathered around. Brother G. went further into the village and preached to the Chinese. The population consisted principally of Chinese and Malays. We continued preaching for about three hours. One man, evidently with an air of self-reliance, asked how many had become Christians there. I replied, I did not know one; but I further said, when you have to stand before Jesus Christ, who will be your Judge, for every one will have to be judged by Him, you then cannot say you never heard these glad tidings. During the afternoon a large number of people came into the village. I asked what it meant; they told me it was a funeral of a young man who had died from fever. They went into the Mosque, but would not allow me to enter. I preached to them under the wall, and, after they had done, many of them came to the front of the Mosque and sat down; some listened and others cavilled. After we had done preaching, we went into the house of the Punghulu, the chief man of the village, something like an inspector of police in England. This man was very kind to us: he prepared us rice and fowls for dinner. We spoke to him, and preached Jesus. In speaking of the death of Jesus (the Mohammedans deny the death of Christ, and he being a Mohammedan, denied it too), the Lord enabled me to speak so forcibly, proving the death of Christ, that he got up from his seat and went out. He was an intelligent Malay. In this place we lodged for the night; we lay down on the floor, each of us having a pillow and a mat, but no covering; hence the mosquitoes were very troublesome. However we slept, the Lord watching over us in this place, surrounded by hundreds who were enemies to Christ. In the morning we awoke early and travelled on foot three miles further till we came to another village. During the walk we meditated on the Word and had our souls fed. The name of the village is Penaga. We had some refreshment here, and a season of prayer; we then went out and preached to those in the village, who listened to the wondrous story of the Cross. We found one of the chief men in this village who had been in the Mission School during Mr. B.’s time. He was a Mohammedan, he said, but not a rigid one. After publishing the Gospel, we left about three o’clock in the afternoon, and arrived in the dusk of the evening at the house of the oil manufacturer, who kindly lodged us for the night. He allowed his workmen to leave off work sooner, in order that they might get ready to come and hear the Gospel. They all came together, men and women, about ten. I preached Jesus to them in Malay, and set before them God’s way of salvation. About nine o’clock we retired to rest very fatigued, and slept soundly. We took our leave in the morning and arrived at the Mission safe and well."

The same brother writes on Jan. 6, 1865:—"The Chinese young woman of whom I wrote, was baptized on the 1st of last month. Her name is San Yong. And a brother was baptized on the 18th of the same month, Sieu A Loy. The Word by the Holy Spirit still takes effect. We have an open door in the town, and many listen to the glad tidings. Dear brother G. and I were in the province on the Mainland, and had good opportunities; many heard."

Another brother, also labouring at Penang, writes on 7th July, 1864:—"Brother C. and I continue to have, weekly, good meetings on board ships. We have been printing large placards with Scripture texts, which are exhibited outside the chapel gates for the passers by; in no other way can we reach the Europeans on shore. We have reason to believe they have already been touching some; for it has been said, Why not put them in the native languages for the heathen? This island is in a fearfully dead state. Yet the Chinese listen very attentively to the Word preached,—and power belongeth unto God. The Lord is our portion; and He graciously lets us see from time to time His working among the few believers in church fellowship here."

The same brother writes on Oct. 7, 1864:—"There has been an addition of six Chinese brethren here since the 28th July last."

A Christian captain, who saw the missionary operations at Penang, in writing to me a description of it, on Nov. 15, 1864, gives this statement:—"With the exception of the missionaries, the church consists of native Christians, Chinese (principally), Malays and Klings, numbering 67 adults with 30 communicants in the schools. There are 45 boys, boarders, 20 girls, boarders, 20 day-scholars, and 5 native teachers; 55 men and 12 women have been baptized. The women are not so seriously inclined as the men; the generality of them think they have no aim or object in life except to get married and have children. One Chinaman in particular appears very serious; he walks a distance of ten miles to meeting every Sunday morning. The others are all very attentive during worship, and the singing is very good; the words in their own tongue are set to psalm tunes."

A brother labouring in the Madras Presidency, East Indies, writes on May 11, 1864, received the end of June, 1864:—"The Lord is greatly encouraging our hearts now, to see that, here and there, the Word is taking effect, and in several places I hear of persons professing themselves Christians, who simply believe that Jesus died for them on the cross as their substitute, and that they can only be saved by Him. Two cases have come to my notice of persons in two different villages about twenty miles west of this, and there are some cases of peculiar interest."

The wife of the same brother writes on 27th June, 1864:—"One of the oldest converts in Palcole fell asleep in Jesus last week, leaving precious testimony of his faith to the last."

Her husband writes again on Jan. 11, 1865:—"On the 1st, New Year’s Day, three natives were baptized; one had formerly been a Hindoo, but had turned Mohammedan; he came out from among the latter in 1857, during the time of the mutiny. He is now a humble follower of Jesus. The other two, a young man and a young woman, were both formerly in our humble school at Palcole. On Lord’s Day last my dear wife and I went over to Palcole, for the day, and during the night were joined by brother H—, and by J. B., when we all proceeded to Martair, 16 miles from this, arriving at day break, where a man and his wife were to be baptized, which baptism took place at 9 am., in the Canal. Many of the Palcole Christians came over, and we had a good day. The Gospel was preached several times during the morning. This man is a very sincere man, and though he has not much knowledge, yet he is, and will be, a light in these dark regions: and he has great confidence that God his Father will not allow them to remain alone there, but will give others to join them. Already he sees some signs of willingness to listen to the truth among his neighbours. His wife is a gentle humble woman. There are many round about as desiring baptism, and we hear of many in distant places who are anxious to hear the Word. Allasahib (a native Christian), a few weeks since visited some of the villages from whence many formerly came to hear the Word. At one of these, one of the men was on his death bed. He embraced A. most affectionately, and said, ‘I am going to Jesus who died for me,’ and the next day fell asleep, we trust in Jesus. Several cases of this kind have from time to time come to our knowledge, and I have no doubt they often occur."

Another brother, also labouring among the heathen in the Madras Presidency, East Indies, writes on the 7th June, 1864:—"I have been enabled to preach the Gospel to a good number in these parts lately; and as I turned a deaf ear to their foolish, and at times blasphemous arguments, had more attentive audiences than usual. The other day I visited a festival where six sheep were offered up to a goddess who is supposed to delight in blood. I spoke to a crowd of people before and after the slaughtering of the sheep, and some listened with marked interest, and asked what they should do. Oh! how I do long to see sinners feel themselves (through the power of the Holy Ghost, by the Word) to be sinners."

The same missionary writes on Feb. 19th, 1865 "When your letter arrived, I was absent from home, at a village about 20 miles distant from this, with brother B. Our chief reason for going there, was to see a couple of men whom I had met at the festival which I was about to visit, when I last wrote, and who then appeared anxious about their souls. We found one of them, and had opportunities for reading and speaking in the evenings and during the night to him and about 20 others belonging to his sect. He and two or three others are, no doubt, anxious about their state; but I do not think they as yet read their title clear; they seem quite ill at ease, not knowing what to do. As I mentioned in my last, we (my wife, children and myself) went to the festival at Antrivady and met large numbers of people, to many of whom I was enabled to preach the everlasting Gospel. There was scarcely an hour of the day in which we were without hearers, for the five which we spent there. The remembrance of that time, and the readiness with which many appeared to listen to the good news, will, I feel, be ever fresh to my mind. Do pray regarding the incorruptible seed which we scattered at Antrivady. On the first day when speaking to some hundreds who were on their way to the sea side, one, a high caste man, who had listened very attentively for some time, came out from the crowd and said something to this effect: ‘Well, I have come so far, but I will go no further; I shall not bathe in the sea, but go home at once; we are on the wrong track.’ He then walked to the tent door, sat there for a short time, then, amidst the jeers of some, started for his home, which was some miles distant. Since that, I have been permitted to visit two other festivals, one in company with brother B., and the other alone. At both many poor dark souls heard of Jesus, and some bought books and tracts. As you may suppose, we met with oppositions. At Antrivady some bought tracts and afterwards tore them up before my face; I could do nothing but pity them. Two men were crushed under the idol’s car. Whilst all appeared awe stricken at the accident, I took the opportunity of preaching Christ; may the Lord bless His own word. Brother B. baptized five native females, and one young man the other day; others are desiring baptism. May the Lord work mightily by His Holy Spirit.

A brother, labouring in connexion with the last two missionaries, writes on Jan. 6, 1865:—"Regarding the school, I cannot with certainty say much as to the manifest results of the daily declarations of the precious Gospel of our Saviour, amongst the poor boys, though, we cannot but have great hopes of the secret working of the Spirit, in the hearts of some of them. The manifest attention paid by them to the preached word, and the very evident interest taken in its precious truths, as well as their disregard of all their idolatrous practices and ceremonies, lead us to form hopes, that the seed sown has not altogether proved to have fallen by the way side. Oh! may the Lord grant His word to grow up and bear fruit. The bonds with which the Satanic system of caste binds these poor youths, are indeed very strong, and it needs the mighty influence of the ‘constraining love of Christ,’ to cause them to break through the meshes of this net of the enemy of souls, even when the light of the Gospel has, in a measure, shone into the heart, and revealed the preciousness of Jesus; as I believe it has in one or two cases. In other respects the Lord’s work here has met with blessed results. Even our little English gatherings together have been blessed to the souls of two or three; while to the native brethren, there have been several additions by baptism. It was a most delightful sight, to witness on new year’s day the whole of the native Christians, amounting to about 50, gathering together, and a most precious privilege it was to meet with them in communion, after the admission of three more converts who had that day professed to put on Christ. Several more we hope to receive shortly into the visible church, and at the same time we have great cause for thankfulness regarding the interesting state, in general, of the natives in neighbouring parts, who seem anxious to hear, and quite prepared to receive the Gospel tidings. Our dear brethren B. and H. find in this an especial cause of joy, as it shows that their labours in the Lord have not been in vain."

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834 to May 25, 1865, is £61,494 17s. 0d.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, the sum of £1,068 12s, 0½d.; and there were circulated within the year 2,659,016 Tracts and Books. The sum total which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1865, amounts to £14,394 8s. 7d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1865, is above Twenty Five Millions (exactly 25,016,153).

Above One Million and Six Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,615,725) of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously.

I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from brethren to whom these tracts were sent.

A Christian brother in Worcestershire wrote to me, "I have received a parcel of Tracts from Bristol, for which I thank you. You will, I am sure, feel refreshed when I tell you, I know of some blessed cases of conversion, resulting from Tracts I have received from you previously."

A Christian brother in Devonshire, who has been for many years regularly supplied with Tracts for gratuitous circulation, wrote on Oct. 31, 1864: "Some time ago I gave the Tract, ‘Almost and Altogether,’ to a farmer, who was standing where I was preaching the Gospel in a village. It was blessed to his conversion, and shortly after his wife and daughter and two servants were converted."

A brother in Sunderland writes, on Dec. 8, 1864: "Sometime since I was called to visit a sick man. He had been formerly most careless. After I had spoken to him, and read to him from the Word, I took one of your Tracts, entitled ‘Poor Mat cannot Pay, Jesus has Paid.’ When I had done reading, he said: ‘Oh! that is I. My name is Mat. Jesus has paid; I cannot pay.’ I did not know before his name was Mat; but he found peace, and died most happy in Jesus. His last words almost were: ‘Mat cannot pay. Jesus has paid.’ This same Tract proved a blessing to another, a friend of his I visited, who thought that I had got the history of him printed on this Tract. Bursting out weeping, he said, ‘This is my poor friend Mat, who could not pay.’ I said, ‘But Jesus paid for him, and in this hope he departed to be with Jesus.’"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1864, to May 26, 1865, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No, 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 124 Orphans altogether were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1865, would have been 1,274, had there been no changes; but of these 1,274, fourteen died during the past year. Only 14! Out of these 14, 11 gave us comfort in their death, as they died as believers in the Lord Jesus, 2 out of the 14 were infants, and the state of one only was not satisfactory. Two of the girls we were obliged to expel from the Institution. We had long borne with them, and at last resorted to this painful mode, as the last thing we could do for them, to arouse them out of their state. Fourteen of the Orphans were taken back by their relatives, partly because their circumstances had altered, and they were now able themselves to provide for them; or, partly, because they were now of such an age, as they would be of use to their relatives. Ten of the Orphans we were obliged to return to their relatives, as they either were mentally or physically in such a state of weakness or disease, that they were not suitable for the New Orphan Houses. Twelve of the boys were apprenticed, eight of whom had been for some time believers, before they left. And, lastly, 72 girls were sent out for service, seven of whom had been for some time believers. This makes the dismissals during the year 124, the same number as the receptions; so that on May 26, 1865, there were just 1,150 Orphans under our care, our full number for which the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, have been fitted up, namely, 300 in No. 1, 400 in No. 2, and 450 in No. 3. The amount of means, spent for the support of the 1,274 Orphans under care, during the year, was £11,839 12s. 2d., and £5,588 19s. was spent of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866.

For the encouragement of the Christian reader, and especially for the benefit of younger believers, I would refer to some precious answers to prayer which we had during that year.

As during the previous year, so in June, 1865, we had again before us the prospect of much difficulty and considerable additional expense, in connexion with the Orphan Houses, for want of water, particularly want of soft water in the cisterns, as during the spring of 1865 there had fallen very little rain, and as the season appeared to remain as dry as during the previous summer. This, in an establishment where from 2,000 to 3,000 gallons of water are daily consumed, the reader will see to be no small difficulty. But we betook ourselves to God in prayer, we earnestly sought His help, and we sought it not in vain; for though we had many times to call upon Him in May and June, yet in the beginning of July, 1865, abundant showers began to fall, and the Lord was pleased to give unto us such help as it regards water, that we never passed a period of eleven months so easily as from the beginning of July, 1865, to May 26, 1866; for we had generally in our cisterns enough soft water to last us two months, though there should have been no rain at all. I gratefully record this mercy, though such a common one, to the praise of the Lord.

During this year we had repeatedly to wait upon God for helpers, situations having become vacant through sickness or otherwise. In these cases we might advertise for candidates; but, though we should not consider it wrong to do so, we prefer simply to wait upon God, asking Him to direct the right persons to us; for He knows our need; the work is His and not ours; and He knows who are fit for the work. In all simplicity we ask Him, under such circumstances, that He would be pleased to make known our need, and incline suitable persons to apply for the situations; and during this year we were thus again and again helped in answer to our prayers. In one instance, when we needed a laundress, we began to pray on July 15, 1865, and brought this matter before God day by day, and generally two or three times a day; but no answer seemed to come. In the beginning of October, it appeared as if the answer were given; but all proved a disappointment. Instead of being discouraged by this, and thinking it useless to continue in prayer, we began afresh, and with more earnestness than ever to call upon the Lord; and on October 26th, after we had thus daily waited upon God for three months and eleven days regarding this matter, our prayers were answered.

During this year it pleased the Lord to exercise our faith greatly with reference to Scarlet-Fever and the Hooping-Cough. In Sept. 1865, the Scarlet-Fever broke out at the New Orphan House No. 2, in which house there are 200 Infant Girls and 200 Elder Girls. It appeared among the Infants. The cases increased more and more. But we betook ourselves to God in prayer. Day by day we called upon Him regarding this trial, and generally two or three times a day. At last, when the infirmary rooms were filled, and also some other rooms that could be spared for the occasion, to keep the sick children from the rest; and when now we had no other rooms to spare, at least not without great inconvenience; it pleased the Lord to answer our prayers, and in mercy to stay the disease. There were in all 36 children ill in the scarlet fever at No. 2, but not one died of the disease. The same malady broke out also at No. 3. But the Lord dealt there very gently with us; only 3 children were ill in the fever, and all recovered.—At the end of the year 1865 the hooping-cough appeared among the 450 girls of the New Orphan House No. 3. This disease was very general in Bristol, and many children died in consequence. Parents and others, who have an affectionate heart, and who feel for the suffering of children, can easily suppose, how our hearts were affected, when we heard these dear children labouring under this trying malady. But, while we thought it right, to take all the necessary precautions with regard to the spread of the disease, and to use the needed remedies; yet our chief and universal remedy, prayer and faith was again resorted to. We trusted in God, and betook ourselves to Him, and we were not confounded. When it is considered that we had 1,150 Orphans in the 3 houses, and that the hooping-cough was so general in Bristol and the neighbourhood, and in many instances so fatal, the hand of God, in answer to constant daily prayer for several months, regarding this disease, is marked enough, in that we had only in all the 3 houses 17 cases of hooping-cough, and that only one child died in consequence of the hooping-cough, this dear little girl having constitutionally very weak lungs and a tendency to consumption, which followed the hooping-cough.

But of all the many answers to prayer, which we had during that year, the choicest was, that it pleased the Lord to work greatly by His Spirit among the girls, especially in two schools at the Orphan Houses, as He had been pleased to do in the previous year among the boys. Without any apparent means, humanly speaking, all at once, God stirred up more than one hundred girls to be greatly in earnest about their souls. We are not surprised at His thus working, for we look for it, and daily pray for it, and generally several times daily; yet when the answers come, they are very refreshing to the inner man, and they greatly quicken the divine life, and lead to further and yet greater trust in God.

As it regards pecuniary supplies, I again found, during this year also, as during former years, what resources we have in God. Though the expenses for the support of the Orphans were greater than during any previous year since the commencement of the work, on account of the high price of animal food, and increase of the price of butter, milk, oatmeal, rice, etc.; yet the Lord supplied us abundantly. The total of the income for all the various objects of the work, from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, was £26,852 12s. 5d.

There were during this year 6 Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, with 450 children in them; and eight Day Schools, besides, were assisted. One Sunday School, with 150 children, was entirely supported, and four were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 40 scholars, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, is £663 7s. 8½d.

There were circulated 2,123 Bibles, 2,249 New Testaments, 62 Psalms, and 376 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £423 3s. 4d.

During this year was expended on Missionary Objects £4,235 13s. 2d., whereby 125 labourers in the Gospel were assisted. Gladly as I would give extracts from the many hundred letters which I received from the 125 servants of Christ, the size of this book forbids my doing so. I only have to say, that many hundreds of precious souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, during the year, through their instrumentality; and especially, also, the labours of evangelists at Home were blessed.

There was laid out on the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, the sum of £756 19s. 0½d.; and there were circulated within that year nearly Two Millions (exactly 1,927,360) of Tracts and Books.

Nearly One Million and Seven Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,695,415) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A sister in the Lord in Cornwall, whom I have often supplied with tracts, writes on Aug. 5, 1865:—"A sister in the Lord has told me of blessing to three, through reading your Gospel Tracts. One of the three died in peace last year. I think it was ‘The Serpent of Brass,’ that was used for blessing to this one. I was with my friend at the first interview with the other old man. When we met with him he was in quite a self-righteous state; he seemed willing to receive tracts, which my sister took him from time to time. She was led to do this, knowing how much time he had, having only to keep a stop gate, where he stayed from 8 o’clock in the morning till 6 o’clock in the evening. My sister visited the wife of this old man, and found her in an awakened state. They are now, from what my friend says, enjoying peace, through the atonement of Jesus, and she said it was from the tracts that were lent to them."

A brother in the Lord in Devonshire, who has been for many years supplied with large quantities of Tracts, Bibles and Testaments for gratuitous circulation, writes on Aug. 12, 1865:—"I am happy to say we have repeated proofs of the usefulness of the tracts. It will be a great joy to your heart to know, as it is to me to say, that ‘The Substitute’ has recently been blessed unto the conversion of a poor woman in the country. I bless God for this instance of His grace:—perhaps we know but little in this world, and in many cases nothing, of the good effected by their distribution."

The same brother writes on Feb. 28, 1866:—"I am happy to assure you that the tracts are in most cases not only willingly, but thankfully, received; and occasionally we are rejoiced to know of sanctified effects following. One dear woman, who, then in good health, was converted by means of one of your tracts, not long afterwards died, very happy, with the same tract in her hand, clasped to her bosom—so precious was it to her as the instrument of leading her to Jesus and of her soul’s salvation. Such blessings on the work are both encouragements to perseverance, and rewards of grace of unspeakable joy unto our hearts."

A Bristol Christian Tract Distributor, who has also been repeatedly supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Oct. 5, 1865:—"Dear Sir,—Some good while since you were kindly pleased to supply me with some tracts and leaflets for gratuitous distribution, and, as my number is nearly exhausted, I again venture to solicit a renewal of your assistance. Dear Sir, I feel very desirous of giving some account of the manner in which I dispose of the trust you commit to my charge. As our city is well supplied by various distributors, I have taken other ground within a radius of 5 miles from our city, from Dundry to Shirehampton, and from Frenchay and Hambrook to Pensford; and the classes among whom I labour are such as the following:—Soldiers, sailors, water-men or wherrymen, bargemen or canal men, cabmen at all the cab stands, omnibus men, railway navvies, gypsies, colliers, city and county police, field strollers, turnpike road gamblers, wayside cottagers, milkmen, farmers’ servants and all others, as circumstances allow. I am thankful I am not without good hope that your tracts have been the means of doing much good. I always leave home praying for the leadings of the Holy Spirit, that I may put the right tract into the right hands; and that the same good Spirit may work on the heart, to bring glory to God and extend the kingdom of our most blessed Redeemer. Last Lord’s-day I spent the afternoon among the soldiers in our barracks, giving them such tracts as I thought most likely to induce them to read. I find that among most of the classes before described, tracts of a narrative, or anecdote character, are most acceptable. Dear Sir, should you again help me in my work, a supply of the above kind will be thankfully received by your distributor."

A London Tract distributor wrote some months since:—"Dear Sir and Brother in Christ,—Might I venture to ask you for another supply of Gospel Tracts for free distribution, and likewise ask an interest in your prayers? For encouragement, I may say that several persons have been brought to the Lord Jesus through the other grant. I remain your affectionate, although unworthy brother in Christ," &c. The following is a letter from Buckinghamshire, dated May 17, 1866:—"In writing you again for a few tracts, I might refer you to some and not a few cases in which they have been blessed of the Lord; but one I must tell you. I think I told you in my last of one of my visits to P. and staying the evening to speak unto the people. I was there again last week, and found that I gave to an old man of 92 years of age, ‘Your Dying Hour.’ It was blessed to his awakening, and caused him great uneasiness. His granddaughter, with whom the old man lives, was listening to the Word in the evening, and I am happy to say that now in both a change is effected, which is as conspicuous as it is joyful."

A brother, labouring in the Gospel in Cornwall, writes on June 1, 1866:—"The Lord continues to bless the circulation of tracts. A few days since I heard that a young man in consumption, at a village some distance off, to whom I gave that tract, entitled ‘Pardon through the Blood of Christ,’ was led to the Lord by it, and has since died."

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 123 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1866, would have been 1,273, had there been no changes; but of these 1,273, eleven died during the year. Only 11! Out of these 11, five died as decided believers, 1 as a young infant, regarding 1 we had some hope, and the state of 4 was uncertain.—Five girls were expelled from the Orphan Houses, their ages varying from 16 years and 9 months to 18 years. We had long borne with them, and at last, in mercy to the other Orphans, this painful remedy was resorted to, as the last means of seeking to do them good. We had no prospect of ever being able to recommend them, for situations, though they were all able to earn their living.—Eight Orphans, out of the 1,273, were returned to their relatives, because, after long trial, we found that two of them were so weak in intellect, that we never could have recommended them as servants or apprentices, and six of them had spinal or scrofulous or other incurable diseases, so that they never would be fit, humanly speaking, to take situations, yet were now of an age to leave the Institution.—Five children were given up to their relatives, who, by that time, were able to provide for them, and were desirous of doing so.—Fifteen boys were sent out to be apprenticed, of whom eleven had been believers for a longer or shorter time before they left.—Eighty girls were sent out to service, of whom twelve had been for a longer or shorter time believers, before they were sent out. These 124 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,273, so that on May 26, 1866, we had 1,149 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 399; and in No. 3, 450.

I have already stated in the previous pages, that it pleased the Lord, to give to us, as the choicest answer to prayer, during the year, that He had been pleased at the beginning of this year 1866 to stir up all at once above One Hundred Orphans to care about their souls. From the moment I heard of this blessed work of the Spirit of God among these dear children, my prayer was daily, that God would be pleased to deepen it, that He would extend it through each department of the three houses, and that He would not allow Satan to mar it. The like petitions, I doubt not, my dear fellow-labourers brought before God. And now rejoice with us, dear Christian Reader, in what I am going to relate to you further. Towards the end of the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, one of the Orphans, Emma Bunn, more than seventeen years old, was taken ill. As we soon learnt that her case was hopeless consumption, and her soul unprepared for eternity, we were the more earnestly concerned about her salvation. But though she had been fourteen years under our care, and therefore from very early days, she was unconcerned about the things of God, yea to a very high degree indifferent. She grew weaker and weaker, but remained as careless as ever. She was often spoken to; the Scriptures were in small portions read to her; prayer was offered to the Lord on her behalf continually, both in her hearing, and otherwise; but all, apparently, of no use. Her case became more and more discouraging. On May 26 she was yet again visited by my dear wife and several of my helpers; but her case was as hopeless as ever, though the appearance was, that she would live only a few days longer. On the following day, however, it pleased God to reveal the Lord Jesus to her heart. She was able to put her trust in Him for the salvation of her soul, and thus obtained peace. This dear girl, who had been so entirely careless about the things of God, was now unspeakably happy in the Lord, which was coupled with great self-loathing and confession of sin. She expressed in the fullest way one could have wished, how sorry she was, for having so long neglected the salvation of her soul, how she had disliked to be spoken to about the Gospel, and how even, on one occasion, when one of my helpers, was again coming to her bedside, to speak to her, she feigned to be asleep, when she heard him coming, to escape being spoken to. When now this dear girl was convinced of sin, and made so unspeakably happy through faith in the Lord Jesus, she manifested the deepest concern about the salvation of her young friends and companions in the New Orphan House No. 3, and sent several messages to them from her dying bed, intreating them to seek the Lord. On Sunday, May 27, 1866, she found peace in the Lord, and on Tuesday morning, May 29, she fell peacefully asleep in Jesus. Her thoughtlessness and carelessness regarding the things of God had been well known among the Orphans, and her conversion and her messages were now used by the Lord as the instrument of the most extensive and glorious work of the Spirit of God that we ever had had among the children, during the whole time that the Orphan Work has been in existence. 350 Orphans in the New Orphan House No. 3 alone were led to seek the Lord, and the greater part of them found peace for their souls, through faith in the Lord Jesus, shortly after. These dear children, formerly almost all careless and indifferent, and most of them much like what Emma Bunn had been, afterwards had their prayer-meetings among themselves, as often as they could, and, in other ways, gave joy to our hearts. I have so minutely dwelt on these facts for the following reasons:—

a. Many individuals are discouraged, because they see their children or other relatives remaining indifferent about the truth, and they are ready to consider that it is useless to pray any longer for the conversion of these their relatives, or to set the truth any further before them. Let such remember Emma Bunn. Her case was indeed, humanly speaking, of the most hopeless character; and yet our prayers were at last most fully answered; and any special efforts, which had been made to impress her heart, were most abundantly recompensed. Similar instances we have had again and again among the Orphans.

. Many individuals are discouraged, because they see their children or other relatives remaining indifferent about the truth, and they are ready to consider that it is useless to pray any longer for the conversion of these their relatives, or to set the truth any further before them. Let such remember Emma Bunn. Her case was indeed, humanly speaking, of the most hopeless character; and yet our prayers were at last most fully answered; and any special efforts, which had been made to impress her heart, were most abundantly recompensed. Similar instances we have had again and again among the Orphans.

b. In the case of Emma Bunn we saw the benefit of storing the memory with the truth, and the benefit of Biblical instruction; for, when she was once brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, it was most manifest how the Spirit of God was pleased to use all this, and how rapid her progress during the little while she continued to live, after her conversion.

. In the case of Emma Bunn we saw the benefit of storing the memory with the truth, and the benefit of Biblical instruction; for, when she was once brought to believe in the Lord Jesus, it was most manifest how the Spirit of God was pleased to use all this, and how rapid her progress during the little while she continued to live, after her conversion.

c. Some children of God almost think, as if there could be no reality in the conversion of young persons, and especially of a number of young persons, all at once; and yet we have had instance upon instance that children of the age of nine or ten years old have been converted and remained steadfast in the ways of God for many years; and we have also seen, how at least the greater part of the children, who in large numbers were stirred up to care about their souls, continued to do so. Let us, then, expect great things from God, and we shall have them.

Some children of God almost think, as if there could be no reality in the conversion of young persons, and especially of a number of young persons, all at once; and yet we have had instance upon instance that children of the age of nine or ten years old have been converted and remained steadfast in the ways of God for many years; and we have also seen, how at least the greater part of the children, who in large numbers were stirred up to care about their souls, continued to do so. Let us, then, expect great things from God, and we shall have them.

During the year from May 26, 1865, to May 26, 1866, was expended on the support of the 1,273 Orphans, who were under our care, £12,520 3s. 8d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867.

The Institution, having been formed on March 5th, 1834, had now been above thirty-two years in operation. Its beginning was most small, but it had since been almost year by year enlarged, and that to such an extent, as that the expenditure in connexion therewith, during the year of which I now write, amounted to £34,849 0s. 6d. To large houses of business, or even to some private wealthy individuals, this sum may not appear a very large one; but it is to be kept before the Reader, that the means to meet such an expenditure are obtained simply by asking God to work in the hearts of His stewards to help us; for in no case is an appeal made to any individual for help. From this we abstain, not that we consider it sinful in it self to apply to individual believers for help in the cause of Christ; but, because one of the especial reasons for the formation of this Institution, and especially of that of the Orphan Work, was, that it might be seen to the glory of God, how much can be accomplished simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith; in order that thus there might be, in this work, a witness to the faithfulness of God for the believer, and that the unbeliever might see, in it, the reality of the things of God, and thus be led to seek Him while He is to be found.

I notice a few out of the many especial blessings, mercies, and answers to prayer, granted to us during this year, for the encouragement of the Christian readers.

When the cholera appeared in England, during the summer of 1866, and when there were even some cases in Bristol, it had been, from the commencement, our special prayer, that, if it might be, the Lord would mercifully shield the Orphan Houses against this fearful disease. And so He did. Not a single instance occurred. We had, however, many applications for the admission of children, who had lost both parents by cholera, and in one single letter 23 such children were applied for.

During this year the hooping-cough again broke out among the Orphans. We asked the Lord, that, if it might be, He would graciously prevent the spreading of this trying malady; and He did deal very pitifully with us; only eight children, out of all the hundreds under our care, took the disease.

During the summer and autumn of 1866 we had also the measles at all the three Orphan Houses. After they had made their appearance, our especial prayer was, 1, That there might not be too many children ill at one time in this disease, so that our accommodation in the Infirmary rooms or otherwise might be sufficient. This prayer was answered to the full; for though we had at the New Orphan House No. I not less than 83 cases, in No. II altogether 111, and in No. III altogether 68; yet God so graciously was pleased to listen to our supplications, as that when our spare rooms were filled with the invalids, He so long stayed the spreading of the measles till a sufficient number were restored, so as to make room for others, who were taken ill. 2, Further we prayed, that the children, who were taken ill in the measles, might be safely brought through and not die. Thus it was. We had the full answer to our prayers; for though 262 children altogether had the measles, not one of them died. 3, Lastly we prayed, that no evil physical consequences might follow this disease, as is so often the case; this was also granted. All the 262 children not only recovered, but did well afterwards. I gratefully record this signal mercy and blessing of God, and this full and precious answer to prayer, to the honour of His name.

During the whole year, we were mercifully preserved from trying infectious fevers. I gratefully mention this particular mercy of God, to the praise of His name.

There never was a year, since this work had been in existence, that our current expenses were so great as during this year, which was occasioned by the high price of provisions, &c.; added to this, the three Orphan Houses were taxed, with all the ordinary city taxes, which, for more than 30 years before, while the Orphan Work was in operation, had not been the case. But while, on the one hand, our outgoings were greater than ever they had been, since the 5th of March, 1834, our income too was greater than during any previous year, since the Institution had been in existence; whereby God not only again showed how able He is to meet the increase of expenses in connexion with His work, but He was, as it were, likewise saying to me, I will also provide means, when the two new houses, now in course of erection, shall have been filled with destitute Orphans.

I record it as a marked blessing from God, that we had no difficulty during this year, nor for a number of years previously, in placing out the Orphans, when ready to leave the Institution; but had far more applications for apprentices and servants than we were able to supply.

I cannot pass over noticing especially the small number of deaths we had during this year among the Orphans. Only eleven died, out of 1,304, who were under our care from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867. When it is considered, that by far the greater part of these Orphans lost one or both parents in consumption, and that, therefore, almost all inherit from their parents a weak constitution; we have especial cause for thankfulness in the small number of deaths. We indeed see, on the one hand, the importance of cleanliness, regular habits, wholesome food, and suitable clothing with regard to these children; and we are, moreover, fully convinced, that for want of these requisites, so many tens of thousands of the children of the poor go to an early grave; yet, on the other hand, we do own the gracious blessing of God upon these means, which are used for the preservation of the health and life of these children.

The greatest of all the blessings, however, which it pleased the Lord to bestow upon us in connexion with this Institution, in answer to daily prayer, was the mighty awakening among the Orphans, which occurred at the end of the previous year and the beginning of this. This was the greatest spiritual blessing we ever had had among the Orphans, at one time, till then.

From May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there were six Day Schools, with 425 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and nine other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 150 children, was entirely supported, and eight others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 32 scholars, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. The amount of means, which was expended, in connexion with the various Schools, is £686 19s. 11d.

There were circulated 3,193 Bibles, 4,572 New Testaments, 61 copies of the Psalms, and 6,702 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, at an expense of £530 4s. 2d. From May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there was expended on Missionary operations of the funds of the Institution, £5,010 18s. 2d., whereby 125 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, were assisted. There rested upon the labours of these brethren again abundant blessing during this year, and many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord; but I am unable to give extracts from about One Thousand letters, received from these brethren, for want of space. As, however, the Reports may yet be obtained, the Christian reader who feels interested in the matter, may send for the Report from 1866 to 1867, in which 20 large pages are occupied with these extracts.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, the sum of £731 1s. 11d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Eighteen Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,824,604) Tracts and Books.

More than One Million and Four Hundred Thousand (exactly 1,403,432) of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother in the Lord, whom I have often supplied with tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on July 2,1866:—"The Tracts which I last received have been carefully distributed, and I have reason to believe, by communications made to me, that much blessing has resulted through these silent messengers. A poor woman told me, three weeks ago, that she found peace through reading one of the Tracts which I left at her cottage.

Another, residing in Wiltshire, writes on Aug. 14, 1866:—"I was rejoiced to find, that a Tract entitled ‘I do depend upon the Blood’ was blessed to the salvation of a poor profligate woman. She was one who had drunk deeply of the cup of this world’s pleasure, but at last, in the decline of her life, her only theme was, ‘The blood of the Lamb.’"

The next extract is from a letter received from London, dated Feb. 22, 1867:—"You kindly sent us during the past year 18,000 Tracts. I have much pleasure in informing you, that two distinct cases of conversion have come under our notice by their distribution. One of the Tracts was lying on a table at a factory, and while the men were having their breakfast, one of them read it and was deeply convinced of sin. Before the day closed, he found peace through believing in Jesus by no other means than the application of the words of the Tract by the Spirit to his soul. He is now earnestly engaged with us in scattering far and near these heralds of mercy, praying that the Lord would again choose the weak things of the world to confound the things that are mighty. The other case is that of a young woman who was very worldly; she was aroused to a sense of sin by reading a Tract, and is now trusting in the Lord. She has since been the means of bringing her sister to a knowledge of the truth. We have distributed about 60,000 during the past year; they have been distributed during open air services, at lodging houses where services are conducted, in the hospital, in every house in the neighbourhood, and by the way side. The Lord has, in mercy, set His seal to each of these efforts, and though He has not yet given us our heart’s desire, still we go out, trusting to Him, who hath said, ‘They who go forth weeping bearing precious seed shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing their sheaves with them.’ We are in need of Tracts, and if the Lord should incline you to send us more, they will be gratefully received and prayerfully distributed."

The following is an extract from a letter, dated Aug. 1, 1866, written by a believer in Wales, whom I have often supplied with parcels of Tracts for gratuitous circulation.—"We are still distributing many Tracts round the hills, and, praise the Lord! we have reason to believe much good is being done by them. I neatly folded, and prayed for the divine blessing on a number, that my dear sister N. took to the Pontypool fair last month. She gave one to a poor man, he unfolded it, and having read the title, ‘Behold He cometh,’ he said with tears in his eyes, ‘I hope I shall be ready to meet Him.’ Brother N. has been very much blessed in giving Tracts at a village about two miles from where we live, where backsliders have been reclaimed, believers strengthened, and a prayer meeting begun: to God be all the praise and glory. And, dear brother, I must tell you about a poor man who had a stroke about a year ago. Sister N. called to see him, and left him a Tract. The next time she called, he said, that Tract had showed him the way of salvation, and he repeated nearly all the Tract to her, and said that he now saw that Jesus had paid his debt, and that he that believeth hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation, but is passed from death unto life. He got a little better and managed to reach our house a few months ago; he was quite clear on these truths, and trusting in what Christ had done for him; but he said he wanted to feel fit for heaven, he did not always feel happy. We had a nice time in prayer together, and we gave him a Tract we thought the Lord would bless to him. I was glad to see him again this week, he said he had seen from the Tract he had last, that Christ was his righteousness in which he was to appear before God, and that what he had to do, was, to trust in Christ, to look to Him, and not trouble about his feelings: he said, ‘Payment, God will not twice demand, first at my bleeding Surety’s hand, and then again at mine,’ He said, when I am persecuted, these words keep me up: ‘Love your enemies, and pray for them that despitefully use you,’ and I tell it all to the Lord in my simple way. Praise the Lord for this victory gained! My dear brother, we should be very glad of another grant of Tracts, if you could please to send us some. Many thanks for past favours."

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, there were 1,149 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 1,154 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1867, would have been 1,303, had there been no changes; but of these 1,303, eleven died during the year. Eight of these eleven fell asleep in Jesus as believers, one was an infant, and the two others gave us no satisfaction as to their spiritual state. Three out of the 1,303 were expelled during the year, on account of violence of temper, insubordination, and habitual bad behaviour. They were all three girls, able to earn their bread as servants. Fifteen Orphans were during the year removed by relatives, who, by that time, were both able and willing to provide for them in future; out of these fifteen, six left us as believers in the Lord Jesus. Nine boys were apprenticed, of whom eight left our care as believers. One hundred and fifteen girls were sent out, fit for service, of whom sixty were believers. These one hundred and fifty-three are therefore to be deducted from the 1,303, so that on May 26, 1867, we had 1,150 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 400; and in No. 3, 450.

I notice further the following points respecting the Orphan work:

1. From what I have just stated as to those who died as believers, or were apprenticed or sent out to service as believers; and from the letters received from Orphans, which have been given in this Narrative, the reader must have seen how greatly the Lord is pleased to bless the Orphan work spiritually. To this, however, is to be added, that there were then a considerable number of converted Orphans under our care, and that hundreds left us in previous years as believers, or fell asleep as true Christians whilst in the Orphan Houses. For all this we thank the Lord, and in it we gratefully own His hand; but we expect far greater spiritual blessing still, as it regards the Orphans.

2. The greatest of all the spiritual blessings, however, resulting from this work, I judge to be this, that the Reports which have been issued in connexion therewith, have not only been instrumental in the conversion of many sinners, by leading them to see the reality of the things of God, but have, also, in the cases of many thousands of Christians, as their letters have testified to me, during the past 36 years, been a great spiritual help to them, in comforting them, leading them more fully to cast their burdens upon the Lord, increasing their faith, showing to them practically and experimentally that the Living God is still the Living God, and in other respects benefiting their souls. This point was the great and chief end of the establishment of the Orphan Work, that thus God might be glorified. This end has been answered beyond the largest expectations which I had in the year 1835. But now, my faith having been greatly increased, by the grace of God, since then, which I thankfully own to His praise, my expectations are far greater in this respect, than they were in the year 1835, and I expect far greater blessing, therefore, in this particular for the time to come, although I am in myself unworthy of being thus used by the Lord, even in the very least degree.

There was expended from May 26, 1866, to May 26, 1867, for the support of the 1,303 Orphans under our care, the sum of £13,456 17s. 4d.; and in connexion with the building of the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5 £14,407 6s. 2d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868.

In looking back upon this year, my soul does magnify the Lord, for all the help He was pleased to give to me. Difficulties, greater than ever I had them for the previous thirty-three years, were overcome during that year, by prayer and faith; work, which is increasing with every year more and more, was not allowed to overwhelm me; and expenses greater than during any previous year, amounting altogether from May 27, 1867, to May 26, 1868, to £41,310 16s. 8½d. were met, without my ever being unable to satisfy to the full at once all demands, though sometimes amounting to more than £3,000 at a time. We were then going on in the Thirty-Fourth year of this Institution, proving day by day, that the Living God of the Bible is still the Living God. Elijah has long since been taken up into heaven, but the God of Elijah lives; and all, who truly depend upon Him, will find Him ever ready to help them.

By the grace of God we hold fast the principles on which, in March, 1834, the Scriptural Knowledge Institution was formed, of which I would here only refer to the following. 1, God Himself was from the beginning sought to be the Patron of this Institution; and He alone is our Patron still. We are grateful for any kindness manifested towards this Institution, even the least, whether in the way of donations or otherwise; but we are with every succeeding year more and more convinced, that, if we would really prosper, God must not theoretically only, but practically be honoured above every one, even the most exalted or rich persons; and He must be confided in, and not any human being. And how have we succeeded, you may ask, esteemed Reader, with the Living God alone as our Patron? All who know the small and most insignificant beginning of the Institution bear us witness, that we have not in vain set up our banners in the name of our God, and confided in His power and willingness to help us. Four Hundred Thousand Pounds Sterling the Lord was pleased to send into our treasury, in answer to prayer, since we began to confide in Him alone, on March the 5th, 1834, up to May 26th, 1868. 2, We decided, in particular also, from the beginning, never to go beyond the means which we had actually in hand, whilst enlarging the field of labour. To this we have habitually adhered; which has kept us from going before the Lord. Sometimes we have had to wait on God a long time, before the means were obtained, which it appeared to us desirable to have; but they have always been sent to us in the end. We judged it to be for the glory of God, patiently to wait His time, and not to make haste in doing His work, by contracting debt. This happy way, this peaceful way, this prosperous way, this Scriptural way, I affectionately commend to all my brethren in Christ, especially to my younger brethren, who seek to work for God; for I have proved its blessedness for about Forty Four Years.

The Reader may ask, And what was done with the Four Hundred Thousand Pounds Sterling, which were given for the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad up to May 26, 1868? The answer is, that above Sixteen Thousand Five Hundred children or grown up persons were taught in the various Schools, entirely supported by the Institution; more than Forty-Four Thousand and Five Hundred Copies of the Bible, and above Forty Thousand and Six Hundred New Testaments, and above Twenty Thousand other smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures, in various languages, were circulated from the formation of the Institution up to May 26, 1868; and about Thirty-one Millions of Tracts and Books, likewise in several languages, were circulated. There were, likewise, from the commencement, Missionaries assisted by the funds of the Institution, and of late years more than One Hundred and Twenty in number. On this Object alone Seventy six Thousand One Hundred and Thirty-seven Pounds were expended from the beginning, up to May 26, 1868. Also 2,412 Orphans were under our care, and five large houses, at an expense of above One Hundred and Ten Thousand Pounds were erected, for the accommodation of 2,050 Orphans. With regard to the spiritual results, eternity alone can unfold them; yet even in so far as we have already seen fruit, we have abundant cause for praise and thanksgiving.

From May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, six Day-Schools, with 415 children in them, and seventeen other Day-Schools were assisted. One Sunday-School with 194 children was entirely supported, and eighteen others were assisted. Two Adult-Schools, with 40 Scholars in them, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various schools, was £787 0s. 0½d.

From May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were circulated, 2,501 Bibles, 6,771 New Testaments, 129 copies of the Psalms, and 10,409 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the Funds of the Institution, spent on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £557 1s. 2d.

During no previous year, since the formation of this Institution, were so many copies of the Holy Scriptures circulated as during this year; and during no previous year did we circulate so many copies of the Holy Scriptures in foreign languages, as during this year. The latter was chiefly owing to the fact, that two of the Missionaries who are assisted by the funds of this Institution, were almost the whole time, while the Paris Exhibition lasted, during the Summer of 1867, labouring among foreigners in Paris, preaching to them, and especially circulating the Holy Scriptures among them. One of these brethren speaks 8 modern languages, and the other three, and through their instrumentality alone were circulated during the year, chiefly at the Paris Exhibition, 163 French Bibles and 1,600 French Testaments, 212 Spanish Bibles and 461 Spanish Testaments, 24 Italian Bibles and 182 Italian Testaments, 44 Portuguese Testaments, 32 Russian Testaments, 3 Polish Testaments, 11 German Bibles and 602 German Testaments, 2 Modern Greek Testaments, 1 Hebrew Testament, 2 English Bibles, 1 English Testament, 8,200 Portions of the New Testament in French, and 340 Portions of the New Testament in 12 other languages.

I received many letters from those two brethren, who laboured at the Paris Exhibition, of which I will now give a few extracts.

Brother L— writes from Paris on June 25th, 1867:—"I take a little corner of the building, which brother H— asked me to take, as just there a great number of the aristocracy of all nations visit; and here I sit down and pray the Lord to send me some whom He may have prepared to receive a little portion of His truth. Last week I had four distinguished visitors—the Russian Duchess —, who asked many questions as to the circulation, &c., and wished in parting, ‘Russia might soon be filled with Bibles.’ The next day the Russian Princess — came and asked me to give her a copy in Russian; and the next day the Grand Duke of — with his Duchess, asked me to give him a German portion. He noticed some little Spanish gilt-edged Testaments I had by my side and asked me what they were for. I told him. He said, ‘And do they take them?’ I gave him an account of the Spanish work which interested him; and, when parting, he said, ‘I hope you may send many thousand copies into Spain, for they indeed need them.’ I did not know any of these visitors until the officers, who were standing a distance off, told me; and of this I was the more glad. Another class of persons in whom I am much interested, are the invalids who come to the Exhibition. As they pass in their wheel chairs, many aged and many consumptive, whom kind friends are doing their best to satisfy with the world’s toys, my heart is specially drawn to them; and I am often pleased to see them regard very earnestly, the text on the portico—’Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved,’ &c. The gendarmes, now they understand they are not to interfere with this work of distributing the Scriptures, are always most anxious for copies, and each band of soldiers numbering 500, who come in turn to see the sight, receive copies every morning on their entry. I have a very happy opportunity of saying a word to the priests, many of whom come, some hoping by their wisdom to confound me, but to whom I read such Scriptures as,—‘By one offering,’ ‘it is finished,’ and other such portions to lead their minds to the only way of peace. Others stay to ask me what is the object of giving away such portions, and I read such portions as show that the word of God was generally in the possession of the ‘common people’—as the Bereans, the Eunuch, and the favourite word in John v., ‘Search the Scriptures;’ also in Rev. i., ‘Blessed are they who read,’ &c. Two young priests were with me the other night for a long time, and they admitted that I had what many men had not; and one said he was sure that ‘It is finished,’ was the only ground of peace, but thought I ought to pray to God to enlighten me on the ground of doctrines. They shook hands very friendly, and I told them I should pray to God for them, to make them satisfied with, ‘It is finished.’ Every day I meet with such. Among my Spanish friends I continue to find favour, and have every day some fresh case of the desire to know more of the pure and unadulterated Word; as they continually say, ‘They know the religion of Christ must be different to what is seen in Spain.’ One day a Portuguese gentleman, to whom I spoke, said ‘I have read many books of men, but now God’s word is my only book, and I rejoice in the work.’ I gave a copy the other day to a Professor of the Royal School of Industry in Madrid, and he recommended one of his students to go with me to get a copy. I have two young men in the Spanish department, who are very interested in the work, and frequently bring their countrymen that they may have copies. This is just an outline of my daily work, although I cannot describe the many feelings that occupy me in this work."

Again this brother writes August 1, 1867. "The whole of the Spanish Commission are interested, and always tell their countrymen. One of them said to me, ‘I was brought up as a priest, and when you spoke to me about the Bible, I thought, what business has he to speak about such things to me; but now I am interested in what you say, and read constantly the New Testament.’ He and another hold me by the hand as a brother, and ask all kinds of questions."

The same brother writes on Aug. 3, 1867:—"We have had a band of Spanish soldiers here who came to take part in the international festival. The greater part of these carry back Bibles and Testaments. It was a most interesting sight to see the interest they took in the Word given and preached. A brother in the Lord was greatly moved as he saw a company of 7 fine soldiers gathered round me listening to the truth as it is in Jesus: the emotions of their faces and the expression ‘La Verdad,’ (Truth) ‘Mira pues’ (Look at that now). Often one would say to another, ‘How our eyes have been bandaged,’ and said another, ‘I have been reading the New Testament, which you gave me, the last four days. I never read such a beautiful book in my life.’ A month ago a son who is in the Spanish Commission brought his father, to have a Bible. The old man was wonderfully interested. He writes to his son, ‘When I arrived in Madrid, they took from me all my books; I begged hard for my Bible, but they would take it. Get one of the soldiers (naming him) to bring me another.’ Many others continually bring their friends to receive copies. I have daily congregations who listen with peculiar delight as I dwell on the one theme ‘Consumatum est.’ (‘It is finished.’) Every now and then I get some from Barcelona who know one and another there, whom we are yet interested in. One of the soldiers this week said, as I was setting the truth before him and three other comrades, ‘What a happy land ours would be, if there was a spiritual revolution; how much better it would be than one by shedding one another’s blood."

On Oct. 2, 1867, this brother writes from Paris: "I find continual demand for Spanish Bibles and Testaments. I met with several yesterday who expressed themselves very gratefully for the portions I gave them, and yesterday a great number of excursionists arrived from Madrid, and I trust I shall meet with some of them. On Last Lord’s day I had an extraordinary day of service among the crowds who were here. For four hours I never moved from one spot, dealing out with both my hands to the outstretched hands, the majority of which were hands hardened by toil; by which I could see, without looking in their faces, that they were peasants."

On Oct. 15, he writes: "Since I last wrote, two or three interesting things have occurred. A young French physician said he was visiting his patients in an hospital here, and seeing one man in his bed reading a gospel which had been given away in the Parc, he asked him how he obtained it. He replied, that one of the sisters of mercy had given it him. The Doctor said, ‘I told him to go on and read it.’ A priest brought one of his peasant parishioners to the stall for the sale of Bibles and bought one for him. Two priests who went into the Gospel Hall to hear the addresses in French, were touched to the heart, it is hoped, and have become obedient to the faith. I bought three Testaments for three French Jews, who were too poor to pay for them, who yet greatly desired to have them, yesterday and today. A great many Arab soldiers have come for copies of the Word, and have received them. Oh! that they might receive Him, of whom it speaks, as gladly as they have received the Word."

After the close of the Exhibition in Paris, the same brother writes, on Nov. 6, 1867: "With this I enclose you a further account of Bibles and Testaments purchased. Some of the French ones I purchased were for a Swedish brother who is going to Austria, to a water establishment; he wished some of large type for some aged ones he knew there, and also in Paris. Others I obtained for our brother V—, some of which he wished for the Mayor of—, who was once a persecutor, but now preaches the faith he destroyed. Many of the New Testaments I gave to the Police, with whom I became acquainted. One of these, to whom I gave one last Wednesday, came about a quarter of an hour afterwards, accompanied by the page of the Empress, and asked me if I would give him one. I gave him a Bible, for which he appeared very grateful. The next day he came, asking me if I would give one to her Majesty’s coachman, which I gladly did, telling him if he knew any of the Imperial household, who would like a copy, I would gladly give them one. 14 large-type Bibles were for some poor workmen in an establishment where about 100 men are employed, as firemen and machinists in the public service. The foreman of the brigade, about two months since, received a gospel portion, which led him to buy a Bible, which he began to read in his family. Afterwards he began to speak to the men under him, and to read portions to them, which constrained twenty-nine of them to buy family Bibles, and they meet in their workshop to read them. This foreman seems in great earnest that others should possess what he says is the most precious book in the world. A brother told me he was present when, at the railway station, this man in taking leave of a companion who was going to another city to reside, handed a Bible to him, saying, "Here, friend, accept this as the most precious souvenir I can offer to you," the tears falling from each other’s eyes as they separated. Up to the very last moment I had Spaniards coming to get portions and Bibles. Seven persons from different parts of Spain came for the same object just as I was on the eve of quitting the wonderful exhibition of man’s greatness, industry and skill, and where there has been one of the most wonderful exhibitions of the love and zeal and successful efforts of the Lord’s children to spread the knowledge of the uncorrupted word of truth."

Brother D., the other Missionary, who laboured at the Paris Exhibition, writes from Paris on Aug. 12, 1867: "I feel I can by no means do justice to the glorious work of distribution of the Word at the International Exhibition. One million and a quarter have been distributed in sixteen different languages; of course the bulk was among the French. I am happily surprised to see the readiness with which they are accepted, and even with thankfulness by many. Some of the priests accept gratefully the books, but others show their hatred. The Irish seem the most bitter, I have seen few of them accept. I feel sure, if ten thousand colporteurs were sent out to distribute the same books all over France, they would not be able, in ten years, to spread so many as the Exhibition labourers are now doing in six months. Thousands of country people accept the little books at the Exhibition, who would be afraid to take one from a colporteur in his own village. I have it laid on my heart to give gospels to the omnibus conductors and drivers. These men can never leave work, therefore I feel them laid on my heart. Not one has ever refused, but in every instance the gospel has been thankfully accepted. Men and boys have been seen in the fields reading the little books. Many are seen reading the same on the benches of the Boulevards of Paris. May the dear Lord enable all these to see the disease of sin, and then the dear Physician. We have all many opportunities to speak to poor sinners of different nations."

The same brother writes on Sep. 3: "None could credit the readiness and thankfulness with which the visitors of the Exhibition accept the gospels; there are not so many refusals as there are in England. I remember two Spaniards coming and obtaining two Spanish Bibles; the same evening, when going to my lodgings, I saw them sitting on one of the benches of the Boulevards reading the precious volume. About three months ago I was passing through a street near the Notre Dame Church, when I saw a porter resting himself on his burden, with one of the gospels in his hands. I observed him reading it for a long time. A few weeks ago a brother was in the country, and saw a man and a boy reading one of the same gospels. We have reason to believe that these are only samples of what may be seen in many parts of France. We preached at Cuisse on the Lord’s day. Some came eight miles to the preaching. About forty met in a large room of the house of L—. Many present had found peace in Jesus. One poor woman came nine miles with her two daughters, of about seven and nine years of age. Her husband had threatened to kill her, if she continued to go to the meetings. One Sunday evening he had the sword ready to kill her, but the neighbours stepped in and took the weapon from him. She told her husband she could not give up Christ, she felt determined to follow Jesus; she also told him, she would rather die with Christ, than live without Him, The husband said, at all events she should not go to the meeting the following Sunday. When the day came, the wife prepared food for her husband and carried it to him to the field. He felt astonished to see this good for evil, and said "Tu es si aimable, tu peux aller à la réunion." (You are so amiable, you may go to the meeting.) The poor woman got herself ready and went to the meeting. There are some in the same meeting who have wives persecuting them, others have husbands doing the same; but they all seem so happy and willing to suffer for Jesus, and pray that their ungodly partners may be converted. After all the meetings of the day were finished, we walked about the large village and distributed the Epistle to the Romans; all accepted but three. We had several opportunities to speak of Jesus, the friend of sinners. We saw two old men talking, to whom we gave the same Epistle, one began to read and the other went into the house for his spectacles, that he also might read the little book. Many read the little book that evening. We left on the following morning (Monday) for a village at the other end of the forest, and gave gospels to every one we met. We arrived at the village at 7 o’clock. In an hour seventy people came to an old sister’s house to hear the gospel. We had as many on Tuesday evening. There are one thousand inhabitants in the village which is called Saint Sauveur. We went about distributing gospels in the village; not one was refused, and we had many opportunities to speak of Jesus. Only three adults go to the Roman Catholic Church. We went into the church on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock and found the priest saying mass with no more than two little boys of eight years of age."

Again the same brother writes from Paris on Oct. 3, 1867:—"Thousands come daily to the Stand and accept the portions of the New Testament thankfully. We all have opportunities to speak to the French and to those of other nations about God’s Exhibition on the Cross. I cannot describe either on paper or vocally the joy and thankfulness with which the country people accept the portions. On Sunday evening brother L., three other brethren, and myself were busily engaged for three hours distributing to pressing crowds, and I believe I am not mistaken, in saying, that more than half were peasants, come to see the Exhibition. Many of the priests accept cheerfully the little books; one yesterday handed a gospel to one of his parishioners. Hundreds of soldiers receive the Gospels daily. The reception is not confined to one class, but all sorts come and accept the little books. I seldom see a torn book anywhere. I am thankful to see so many Poles and Russians, chiefly men of position, come to get the gospels. An English Christian man came and asked for a Russian gospel; he has offered to distribute some of the Gospels in Russia, and he is going to put one in every parcel of goods he sends off to his correspondents. It is clearly seen that it is not the present good only, but it will open many doors for the distribution and circulation of the blessed Word that giveth Light and Life. I have it laid on my heart to visit men who cannot come to the Exhibition, viz.: the drivers and conductors of omnibuses, also the cabmen. I have been to many of the principal omnibus stations and stood waiting for the vehicles to pass, and slipped into the hands of the conductors two gospels, sometimes having only time to tell them, "Ce sont deux petits livres, l’un pour vous et l’autre pour le cocher." (Here are two little books, one for you and the other for the driver.) Out of the many I have given I have had only three refusals. I went on Monday night to Chemin de Fer du Nord, about 8 o’clock, and distributed a goodly number before 9. One Tuesday afternoon I went to an omnibus station on the Boulevard de Prince Eugene, where many different omnibuses met for passengers. I distributed half my bagful. Then the thought struck me, I can go and preach to the soldiers to whom I had to speak that evening, and afterwards I can resume this work. After the meeting one of the soldiers accompanied me; he loves the Lord, and has walked Godly for about five years. We went to the same place and distributed all the remaining ones, my companion giving one to each of the policemen, who thanked me much for them. I went yesterday afternoon to the Strasbourg railway station, and distributed the gospels to the omnibus drivers and conductors, and also to cabmen. What a pleasant sight to see all these men sitting on the coach boxes reading the little books which speak of Jesus. One day, whilst distributing the gospels near the Bastile, one coachman was so pleased with the book, that he said, ‘How kind of you to give me this little book, I shall read it and shall take it home to my family.’ I gave him another, and he thanked me repeatedly."

The same brother writes on June 3, 1868:—"During our stay in Paris I had many opportunities to preach the Gospel; several times to the soldiers, who listened most attentively to the Word. There were blessed opportunities to speak to people in cottage meetings. I visited with a brother and sister in Christ some of the most wretched parts of Paris. I spoke to every body with whom I had any conversation about the blessed gospel. I found some had found peace simply by reading the New Testament."

The last short extract I have simply inserted, to show in some small degree the fruit which has been seen from these labours in Paris.

As an encouragement for circulating the Holy Scriptures, I also mention, that one of the Bibles, which I had sent out, during the year, for circulation among the poor, was given to a young man, who had enlisted as a soldier, and who was by means of that very Bible converted. I read his own letter, in which he gives the account of the blessing bestowed upon him, through reading the Holy Scriptures.

From May 26, 1867 to May 26, 1868, there was expended on Missionary operations £5,396 10s. By this sum One Hundred and Thirty-three labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were assisted. Precious as very many of the letters were, which I received during that year, from these preachers of the Gospel, I must not give any extracts from them, but can only refer the reader to the Report of the Institution, published in 1868; yet I have to state, that again many hundreds of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, through these dear servants of Christ, during that year.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, the sum of £729 2s. 11d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions (exactly 2,121,157) of Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1868, is nearly Thirty One Millions (exactly 30,889,274).

More than One Million and a half (exactly 1,558,187) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters, received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A Home Missionary, labouring in Staffordshire, writes on April 15, 1868:—"I write to ask you if you will be so kind as to grant us another parcel of tracts, to assist us in our mission work here. I am happy to inform you that much good has resulted from the distribution of the former tracts we have received from you. One man was at our preaching last night, ‘clothed, and in his right mind,’ who, two months ago, was a most profligate character. A tract was put into his hand, entitled ‘This is the Day;’ he read it over; came to the chapel; gave himself to Jesus, and is now giving evidence of a change of heart. Praise the Lord! Other instances I could give of blessing received through this means."

A brother labouring in Scotland, whom I have supplied with tracts, writes on Dec. 19, 1867:—"The tracts you sent me have all been given away some time. I believe the Lord blessed them to many. I know one woman who was brought to rest on Jesus by reading one about two weeks ago."

Another brother, also labouring in Scotland, to whom I have for several years sent many thousands of tracts, writes from Glasgow on July 2, 1867:—"About a fortnight ago I was in the east-end of the city, where meetings are held in the open air by our dear brother, whose labours have been blessed to the conversion of about forty souls. After the preaching he told me, that he had always forgotten to tell me, that it was a Tract, which he got from me at one of the meetings in the City Hall, about three years ago, that was the means of his conversion. He is a most Godly earnest young man, and I had often heard of his work of faith and labour of love; and it is very remarkable that I was led to hear this from him at a time, when I was somewhat low-spirited in regard to the Tracts, not having heard before of any blessing having resulted to any one from the many thousands which I had distributed all over the country during the last ten years. I was sustained, however, in the work by many stimulating passages of the Word being brought to my mind from time to time, and at present by this, ‘Be ye steadfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.’ Glasgow annual fair begins next week, and it has been laid on my heart to take my holiday then, when I shall be at liberty to join the army of the Lord against the host of Satan. I shall be glad to receive as many as the Lord may dispose you to send me for that occasion."

A Christian gentleman in the Isle of Man, writes on July 20, 1867:—"I give thanks to the Lord Jesus Christ, for the packages of tracts you sent last winter. I trust they have been distributed in the best manner, and I believe they have been much used by the Holy Ghost in the blessed revival that has been going on in this island."

A brother labouring in Cheshire, writes on Oct. 21, 1867:—"I had a letter a few days ago, informing me of blessing afforded to a lady to whom I gave one of your tracts some time ago; she carries the tract about with her, as that which the Lord used in drawing her to Jesus. Is not this encouraging?"

Another brother, also labouring in Cheshire, writes on May 26, 1868:—"The Gospel tracts you kindly sent are such a help to me; I give away five or six hundred some days, to those only who seem very anxious to receive them. Several cases have already come under my notice, in which the reading of them has been much owned of the Lord in blessing to their souls."

A Christian gentleman writes from Nottingham on Oct. 11, 1867:—"Your parcel of Tracts is to hand this day. I thank you; but what is better, my young friend informs me today, of one porter at the station, who has found Christ, and there are two others who are awakened, and seeking, through the Tracts already given! Praise God!"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1867, to May 26, 1868, there were 1,150 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 149 Orphans were admitted into the three houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1868, would have been 1,299, had there been no changes; but of these 1,299, eighteen children died, 2 of whom were young infants, and 12 gave us great comfort in their end, as they had been previously brought to the knowledge of the Lord. One of those who died, Mary Brain Linthorn, who had been 9 years and 5 months under our care, without knowing the Lord, drew nearer and nearer to the close of her life, being ill in consumption. However, we continued to pray for her, and from time to time, at suitable occasions, the truth was brought before her, and at last, about 24 hours before her end, she was brought to great peace and joy in the Lord; and we had thus the joy of having our prayers answered, though so late, regarding this dear girl. One girl, with whom we had very long borne, we were at last obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to her companions, on account of her very injurious influence. We follow her, however, with our prayers, hoping that yet it may please God to convert her. Eleven of the children were returned to their relatives, who were now able to provide for them, and wished so to do. Seven Orphans were returned to their relatives, who, either on account of epilepsy, of which we had not been informed on their admission, or weakness of mind, or a totally diseased constitution, were unfit to be trained for service, or to be sent out as apprentices. Nine boys were sent out as apprentices, and One Hundred and Four Girls to service. Seven of the 9 boys, who were sent out, were believers, and 31 of the girls sent to service, which, with the 12 who died as believers, makes altogether 50 believers who passed through the Orphan Institution during the year. These 150 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,299, so that on May 26, 1868, there were only 1,149 Orphans under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1, 300; in No. 2, 400; and in No. 3, 449. There was expended during the year on the support of the 1,299 Orphans, who were under our care, £13,754 4s. 5d., besides £20,016 4s. 2d., which was expended on the building and fitting up the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and No. 5.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869.

During this year Six Day Schools, with 398 children in them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and fourteen other Day Schools were assisted. One Sunday School, with 182 children, was entirely supported, and eleven others were assisted. Two Adult Schools, with 27 scholars, were entirely supported. The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, is £686 4s. 11½d.; and during the whole time from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1869, £14,856 7s. 1d. From the beginning up to May 26, 1869, there were 16,801 souls brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in all the Schools, entirely supported by the Institution; besides the many thousands in the schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, British Guiana, the West Indies, the East Indies, China, etc., which were to a greater or less degree assisted.

During this year there were circul ated 4,115 Bibles, 6,655 New Testaments, 104 copies of the Psalms, and 9,602 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. There was expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures £635 9s. 3d., and from the beginning of the Institution, up to May 26, 1869, £10,106 12s. 2d. There were circulated from the beginning up to May 26, 1869, altogether 48,705 Bibles, 47,340 New Testaments, 1,411 copies of the Psalms, and

29,848 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During no previous year, since the formation of this Institution, were so many copies of the Holy Scriptures circulated as during this year; and during no previous year did we circulate so many copies of the Holy Scriptures in foreign languages, as during this year. The latter was chiefly owing to the fact, that two of the Missionaries, who are assisted by the funds of this Institution, were almost the whole time, while the Havre Exhibition lasted, during the summer of 1868, labouring among foreigners at Havre, preaching to them, and especially circulating the Holy Scriptures among them. One of these brethren speaks 8 modern languages, and the other three, and through their instrumentality a great number of copies of the Holy Scriptures of various languages, were circulated; and since the Exhibition at Havre, by one of these two brethren and another Missionary, also assisted by the funds of this Institution in Spain. During this year alone we circulated 94 Italian Bibles and 652 Italian Testaments, 67 French Bibles and 1,715 French Testaments, 1,112 Spanish Bibles, 756 Spanish Testaments, and 5,724 Spanish Gospels, besides Bibles and Testaments in many other foreign languages. To the above, however, I especially referred, because those copies of the Holy Scriptures made their way into those countries where so little is known of God’s Holy Word.

I received many letters from the two brethren who laboured at the Havre Exhibition for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and preached the Gospel to the many Thousands of Foreigners who were assembled there; but as their work was much the same as at the Exhibition in Paris, and as space fails me, I must refer the reader to the Report of 1869, for these deeply interesting details.

During the latter part of the Exhibition at Havre, the state of Spain gave hope to our brother L., who had laboured there before in the Gospel, that he would be able to go on with circulating the Holy Scriptures and preaching the Gospel in Spain, so dear to his heart; but which some years ago he had been obliged to quit with his fellow-labourer, our brother G., because of want of liberty. Accordingly, as the land seemed to be open, when the Exhibition at Havre was over, he set out with his family for Bayonne, that on the borders of Spain he might embrace the first moment, that appeared to him favourable, for entering Spain, to preach the Gospel, and, especially, to circulate the Holy Scriptures, for which purpose I ordered a large quantity of Bibles and New Testaments to be sent to Bayonne, to be used by our brother and his fellow-labourer, our brother G.

The next extract is taken from a letter written by Brother L., dated Bayonne, Nov. 16, 1868, which relates his impressions and experience, on first entering Spain, after the Revolution. "Yesterday I went to San Sebastian, as I wrote of my intention. I had hardly crossed the frontier and got into the midst of a Spanish speaking people, before finding a state somewhat similar to boys when holidays commence; relief from the restraints and pressure of school life, and high hopes of pleasures in store: this carried one’s heart onward to another national redemption, when Israel shall return and come to Zion, with songs and everlasting joy; and the still higher hope of the whole creation being delivered and the manifestation, with the head of all the members of His body, the Church. The farther I went into the country, the more I could discern, that everybody was speaking as if a wonderful burden had been taken from their shoulders, My first introduction on my way was to four Spaniards, one an aged man, another a young deserter who had given himself up—poor fellow, his state looked as if he had suffered from want of food and clothes; another young man from Burgos, where there are signs of disquiet among the poor; and another man of the mountains. After speaking of general matters and of the great change, I pulled out some Gospels by John, and, distributing them to my four friends, asked them if they thought the time had arrived when such portions of God’s word would have free distribution. A general answer ‘You may be sure of that, Sir.’ The next question was, what such a book cost; when I told, them they were welcome to them, I received many expressions of thankfulness and a general remark, that these were just the books wanted. Said the young man from Burgos, ‘I possess a New Testament which was given to me years ago in Santander.’ I asked the old man, as having long experience of the national mind, and having, as I supposed, shared in the national sufferings, what he thought of the present change—would it be lasting? would there be any more civil wars? He replied, ‘As to my experience, you can see its effects;’ showing me four large sword and knife cuts, which he had received at different periods of his life. ‘I have no doubt there will be a little more yet, but never as it has been. You see, friend, that it is a very difficult thing to bring people all at once from under the power of the priests, who have such hold upon the women and children. What we want and what we must have, is a good education for our children.’ Saying this, he got down from the carriage, bidding me many adieus and thanks for his little book. Then a number more, about ten persons, got into the compartment, and I began to distribute among them. Some persons, who were in a distant part, when they found what sort of books their neighbours had received, reached over eagerly to get some. A general burst of thanks and happy remarks were exchanged without exception as to the value of the portions, and a country woman who could read, when she found what class of books she had, stood at the door, and in a loud voice and significant way said ‘mil gracias cabballeri, mil gracias.’ Her manner made her companions laugh, all understanding that her approval was more than she would at one time have given. I then got into another train, so as to reach as many persons as possible. Here the same reception awaited me, and to one, who appeared to be much pleased with a portion, I gave a New Testament; and, as we got down from the train, his companion followed me, saying what a pleasure it would be, if he had just another copy like his friend had. I gave him one. Arrived at San Sebastian, which you remember was the place where our books were taken from us, you may think, dear brother, with what joy and thankfulness I entered the town. Passing the door of an aged shoemaker, to whom I offered a Gospel, at first he refused, thinking I was selling them. When I told him it was a Gospel by John, he took it and began to read, and I had a happy moment in showing him some of the glorious things it contained; and thankfully he took it, wishing me many long and happy years. The next was an old gentleman, who was looking over the sea wall. With him, after a short introduction as to its character, I left a little portion; and a quarter of an hour after, as I passed by under the wall, I saw him busily reading. I presented two Custom House Officers each with a portion; but I saw by the way one held the book upside down, he could not read. I took no notice of this, but told him of its contents, which pleased him; and then he remarked as to the darkness and corruptness of those who professed to be their guides and said, ‘If I had my way, I would not only send the Jesuits out of the country, but would destroy the whole priesthood.’ I advised moderation, and remarked that many knew no better, never having been taught to read and preach God’s Word. He admitted this, and referring to the little book, he said, about four years ago I took a couple of hundred of these little books from an Englishman. ‘Where?’ ‘Why, here in San Sebastian, but you know that was not my fault, it was the fault of those over me.’ ‘And what did you do with them?’ ‘Why I took them to the Customs’ warehouse.’ ‘Do you think they are there now?’ ‘Indeed, I don’t know.’ ‘Perhaps the officers have distributed them among their friends,’ I replied, laughingly. He said ‘That is likely enough, Sir.’ I gave some portions to some aged men, who began reading aloud. This brought about a dozen more, to whom I gave portions, and said something of the truth. This received approbation from them; and certainly it was a sight to see these hardy looking men in one of these squares, each busily trying to decipher the truth. Just then a priest passed by, and great was his surprise at seeing each with a book in hand. One of them made some remark, and the priest got out of sight. I was recognised at the station, several asking for some portions for friends. Many were the wishes of success from a number of persons collected there; and, getting back to the train, I could say, Bless the Lord, O my soul, for all that I saw in the first few hours in the land of our many prayers." The same brother writes from Madrid on Nov. 26.— "On my coming here on Monday last, a box of Bibles, Testaments, portions, hymn and little books was detained. I reasoned with the chief officer and offered to pay duties on books, but in vain. Several persons who saw the transaction advised me on my arrival in Madrid to go to the Minister of ‘Gracia & Justicia’ and explain matters, as they were sure the laws were altered. This I shall hope to do in due time. My personal luggage was examined by another class of persons, and although the box was full of Bibles, Testaments, and portions, these officers only regarded my wearing apparel, which took up very little space, and occupied them only for a moment. In comparison with what I wished to bring, they were only as the ‘little smooth stone of the brook;’ but they were safely lodged by my side in the train, and I began my journey to Madrid, with about 600 Gospels by John, 200 other Gospels, 6 Bibles, and 8 New Testaments. I was very sorrowful the first part of the journey; but presently, after prayer, I remembered many precious portions the Lord had given me and my wife before leaving her and the dear children; one especially was ‘This Gospel must be preached as a witness to all nations and then shall the end come.’ I soon began to open my mouth and to ask my fellow-passengers to accept a portion of God’s word. Never shall I forget the first moment in presenting the little book. All eyes were upon me. ‘What is it he has got?’ was the general question; and when I began to make known what I had, then there were demands from all in the train to possess one, and directly all was silence, and each began to read, one or two aloud; and I heard two or three say—this is just what we want in Spain. Just then we stopped at Vittoria, the scene of former persecutions. Here several persons got out and came up to the compartment where I was, to thank me; and one, a country woman, came and presented me with two apples, as a testimony of her gratitude. Just after this, a young man asked if he could procure anyhow, a whole Bible of which he heard me speak. I produced one for which he instantly paid a peseta. ‘Have you another,’ an aged gentleman asked, and then many hands were stretched out with the money, and very soon my stock was disposed of, and many were disappointed they could not get one. One Bible, which remained hidden under the other books, was reserved for a physician further on the journey, who also desired a Bible, and who said, ‘This I intend to read with my family every day.’ The scenes I witnessed on that and on the following day, brought prayerful tears, that God, in His great mercy, would soon visit this people with showers of blessings. I stopped one night at Valladolid and then resumed my journey. The scenes of the preceding day were repeated; and, as on former occasions, a guard of the train, much interested in this work, promised to bring to Madrid as many Bibles, &c., as we could send to Hendage. At each station he informed the people in the train, that a man was giving Gospels, and I was continually surrounded by people of the different classes, some asking, if I had no Bibles to sell. One man pulled out three pesetas for one. Being very tired I got into another carriage, and also wishing to save some portions for friends in Madrid; but I had only just laid down, when an inspector of the line came, while the train was in motion at quick speed, saying, there were some persons in the train to whom he had shown the Scriptures, and asking to give them portions." On Jan. 31, 1869, brother L. writes from Madrid:—"For the last month I have hired a glass case in one of the best streets in Madrid, and through the kindness of the man who lets it me, who has his shop inside the arcade, I have had a little table on the steps near the street, and here I have taken my post daily, from ten in the morning till seven and eight in the evening. Great has been my joy in seeing an open Bible in the streets of Madrid, and crowds coming up daily to read the portions which I had opened, such as Ps. 51, Isaiah 53rd, Luke 15, portions in Romans, Galatians, Peter, &c. I had been able to get some Bibles and Testaments; some I brought in; some from Brother G., some from a brother in Malaga; some from Brother C., who sent me 370 Testaments; and 70 Testaments from another brother here. I brought from Bayonne about 400 portions, so that I made a goodly show. They had not been long in the window, before prices were asked and some sold. To persons who appeared interested, I presented a portion. This went on for a day or so, as for two reasons I could not begin a general distribution. First, because then I had only a limited stock, and because in the excited time of revolution I feared to collect a crowd. But one day I was observed giving a couple of Gospels, and almost instantly a dozen persons came up, and this was enough to call general attention; and soon I was surrounded so, that in a couple of minutes the street was blocked up, and I saw that the enemies of the truth would make this an occasion to complain; and I said I could give no more then and went inside; but they followed. ‘Do give me one, Sir,’ was the general request. I managed to mix among them, and so for a time was unobserved, and I heard some saying, ‘Where is he?’ ‘Stop awhile and he will give us some.’ Just then a gentleman called me to come and sell a Bible, and then the demands came for portions. I contented them by saying, I had only a few and there were many applicants; that I would sell them at half a real (½d. English) each and give bread to the poor. This pleased them, and instantly they reached out their money faster than I could receive; and, as they saw the stock diminishing, many pressed to buy the Word of God, and in half an hour I had sold about 300 and also some Testaments. The day before yesterday I had the crowd for about an hour so great, that the officers had to beg me to go further in, as the thoroughfare in the street, which is a wide one, was stopped. I sold about 400 in an hour, besides distributing gratis to the military. I have sold all my Bibles, and few Testaments remain. Yesterday I sold the last of seven large family Bibles at a dollar each, and I have long ago sold all smaller editions, and now it is most painful to be asked so frequently during the day if more Bibles have arrived. Scio’s version I could have, but I do not wish to sell it; and the people will not have Scio. ‘Are you sure this is Valera’s version?’ ‘Is this a Protestant edition?‘ is daily repeated. ‘I don’t want Scio, nor his company,’ said a gentleman. Daily I have discussions with those who appear desirous of knowing the truth, and preach it to those who gather round. Many are enraged against the government, for their religious tolerance and sanction given to Protestants. I get now and again some specimens of their wrath. Some cannot contain themselves, as they see me selling God’s Word, and in their months are bitter threats, as also from the press threatenings and slaughter are daily breathed against us. One evening lately a man went to the shop opposite, seeking information as to my name and address. The man, guessing his intention, would not satisfy him. He went away saying.—’Well, I’ll find out all their names; it is a disgrace to allow such things.’ When I heard this I turned to God and his Word of grace, and my eye rested on the word, ‘no man taketh it from me.’ A very kind friend pressed me to accept his six barrel revolver. A very dear brother was quite astonished I did not arm myself: but I told him, that I should never more be happy, if I harmed another. Of course it is trying to the flesh, but my eyes are so full of God’s almightiness and the inward assurance that my hour is not yet come, that I fear not them that can kill the body. A few days ago a girl, whom we have to assist us, was sitting over the fire of her cousin; she had just stooped her head, when two shots passed over her, carrying away a piece of a table. Some wicked person, for unknown reasons, fired into their cot. This is just under our window. Every man is afraid of his fellow. A few nights ago, I received at midnight a telegram from Brother H., asking me to get stereotyped the Gospel by John; at the door stood the night watchman with his drawn sword and pistol in his girdle; the house porter with his hand upon a large knife; while the railway servant delivered his message. This is the world we live in. ‘Destruction and misery are in their ways, and the way of peace have they not known.’"

Again he writes on Feb. 8th —"The other evening I sold in about an hour and a half over 350 copies of the Word, besides during the day being able to speak words of life to many. Of course we feel our need of God’s almighty protection, knowing that the cruel assassin stalks about us. Our poor friend the hatter, who let me the Vitrine where I first exposed the Scriptures, and who was very zealous and useful, was shot in the head the day after I wrote to you. It was done by a friend, I hope, in accident—who was examining the hatter’s revolver, and it went off in his hands, the ball entering his head, but marvellous to say, not piercing his skull. I bore him to a house of succour, where the bullet was extracted, and thence to the hospital, where he goes on recovering—saved I hope in body and to be saved in soul. He has stood many evenings behind me with his pistol, ready to fire on anybody he thought would harm me; and at night would beg me to carry it to protect me home, as I had to pass some lonely spots. I have tried to set before him from time to time a better defence.—Concerning the help you have now sent, dear brother. Yesterday Brother G. mentioned in our meeting for breaking bread, that we had not been asking the Lord for temporal bread, but I told the Lord in secret that I should need that for the morning’s meal, and just after a letter came from Brother — with a little help and now today yours with full supply. Last evening in about two hours I sold, and distributed to soldiers gratis, 500 portions of the Word.—P.S. Not being able to send the enclosed by the post I wished, I just add a line as to the distribution. Last evening I sold and distributed over 700 portions, and passing home late I saw several persons reading them, among them two officers. It is the carnival time, but it is very quiet in comparison to other times. Yesterday as I was going up the widest street in Madrid, quietly meditating upon the deep necessities of the country, a band of students came dancing down the streets in their masquerade dress. Two of them came and laid hold upon me, holding out their bag—saying in English ‘A Shilling, Sir.’ I said, ‘I have a vitrine in the Passage del Iris, where every morning I give meat and bread to several widows, if you will come there too, I will give you some. They loosed my coat, and took hold of my hands, shaking them heartily and saying, ‘You are one of the right kind, good bye, dear Sir.’ In the evening several of them came for Gospels." In March he writes again from Madrid, giving an account of his journey from Madrid to Bayonne, to obtain some of the Bibles and Testaments which I had ordered to be sent to Bayonne, but which as yet could not be brought into Spain.

"The future of this poor land, while it will give increasing opportunities for bringing many sons to glory, still shows a pathway of misery and bloodshed for the sons of the people, and increasing difficulties to the servants of the Lord Jesus and the only true servants of the people which this land has; but so it must be to the end, and our joy is, that He will come and will not tarry, beyond the time appointed of the Father. ‘I will overturn, overturn,’—confusion upon confusion—but ‘for ever Thy Word is settled in heaven.’ We have received a kingdom that cannot be moved. Knowing the higher order of blessings which the God of all grace has given us, makes one feel the world’s misery the more, and inspires a stronger zeal to lead the poor miserable world to the fountain whose waters are life and peace. My late journey into France to procure whole copies of God’s Word has made me see fresh cause for diligence in our calling to work, while it is called day. On every side of the land we hear of desires to read the Word of life; and from the very first station, on thro’ the hundreds towards France, wonderful desires are manifested by those in the trains and those waiting at the stations. Among those now foremost to obtain copies, who were our former tormentors, are the civil guards. At almost every station I had only to hold up a copy of the Word, and generally these led the van, and came up, and by their example others were emboldened to come. One of these, who had been to Madrid to buy school books, was delighted with some Gospels, and insisted on paying and brought up, at the station where he descended, two of his companions in arms to get copies. Twelve persons also who got out paid for Gospels. I was delighted the other day by a sergeant of this company coming and buying a family Bible. I had also the pleasure of giving to a colonel of them a Gospel by John, and saying a few Gospel words to him, for which he thanked me, saying ‘they wanted indeed a Messiah in Spain.’ Another company of military men are the Custom Officers, who used to give us great trouble: these were now as anxious to procure portions for themselves, as once they were to take them away from us. The military generally in Spain and France, I have found desiring the better knowledge. Today I had at the shop a young captain, who staid an hour with me, whose whole soul is rejoicing in the work we are engaged in. In my late journey, at one of the stations about 100 persons were waiting to go to a feast at another village. The military and railway officials first came up and then the body of the people. Two gentlemen from Burgos, who saw the peoples’ desire and their joy when they found out what class of book they had received, took up some of my books and went to the other window to the people, awaiting the down train, and called upon them to receive them; and at the next station they got out and went with a packet to give them. This they did, not even asking my consent. They said ‘Well for you, Sir, that the priests in our town cannot get hold of you, or they would serve you and us as they just have done our poor governor.’ At the next station, after this scene, the railway guard asked me to give the Station master a Gospel by Luke. This happened to be in my box in the luggage van, and which I was reserving for the return journey. He said ‘If you will come down, I will get them to have you open it;‘—he called three officials to witness that I had opened it in their presence, and many persons came after me to get portions; and by this the train was delayed ten minutes, the station master being the cause. On my way down to France I conveyed a parcel of 500 Gospels to our friend and brother B., who has since written to me, expressing his great joy in receiving copies of God’s Word printed in Madrid. One of the gentlemen from Burgos, at one of the stations wrote his name on one of the Gospels, and threw it to a station master as the train passed that station. He was an acquaintance of his. This was about the close of the first day’s journey. Night came on, and we rolled ourselves up to get an hour’s sleep, which, through mercy I was able to get, arriving in Bayonne next day afternoon. At 5 o’clock next morning I again commenced my journey. My pockets were filled with Bibles and Testaments, also a carpet bag and box which I had for the purpose, containing altogether 46 Bibles, 6 large family Bibles, and the rest pocket ones. No one can imagine the anxious moment, when we thus come into the searching room. I was full of trust that my needed cargo would pass. As I passed the first sentries, I was directed to the counter. There I waited some time, and not getting dispatched to my liking, as I knew the hurry that afterwards comes from this delay, I passed through the midst of the watchers and deposited my bag in the train and then went to open my box. The first thing that attracted the soldier’s notice was a Gospel in French, which he passed to the chief officer, who threw it back, indignant that the man should have troubled him with such matters, as the great matter now is a search for firearms, which the Carlist party are introducing, in order to get up a civil war; so, in answer to prayer, I obtained full possession of my prize. At one of the stations, just coming out of France, a station master came up and asked if I would sell him a Bible; he was apprised of my being in the train by the guard who knew me. I sold him one, with which he was well pleased; and, in doing so, I attracted the notice of the people in the train to the number of sixteen, among them a young well dressed priest, whom, at first, I did not notice to be among the company. A young man who had travelled from London, where he had been for fifteen days, and was full of the difference between the two countries Spain and England, passed a Bible to the young priest, who, on seeing it, and hearing the demand of the station master, and seeing his readiness in paying his money for the Word, remarked rather ungraciously, ‘Oh a Protestant Bible.’ This led me to say that the Bible was neither Protestant nor Catholic, it was the Word of God. He said he was sure that that book was not the book. I asked him for the people’s benefit, if he would please to read a portion, and say what was bad in it. After some trouble I got him to read, but he opened the book so awkwardly that any one could see he had not been accustomed to the sacred text. He ventured to read 3 verses in the 1st chapter of Genesis, and, as if afraid of the voice of the Almighty as was Adam in the 3rd chapter, he closed the book, saying, that was not in his Bible. I asked him if he could read the language in which Jehovah spoke under the old covenant, and also in which the Lord Jesus spoke; he confessed he could not, which seemed to surprise the people, who by this time were greatly interested in our debate; and their surprise seemed great indeed at the way in which I dealt with the priest. I then began to read the 1st Psalm, asking them to judge if these were bad words; but the priest interrupted, insomuch that two women rebuked him for not allowing me to have my say. Their interference only made him the more angry, and he appeared to use a supposed right of silencing them by a sort of learned discourse of his priestly power. Finding I could not read, I reached out Gospels by John, and asked each to accept gratuitously a book, by which they might judge for themselves, if the books were bad books. Soon every hand was stretched out, and each began in earnest to read, which they did for more than half an hour, excepting one woman (who came from our old place of service, Bilboa) who engaged in conversation with the priest; and, by her remarks I saw she was a woman of uncommon sense, and by no means one who would spare the patent and open vices of the priests. After some time a man, a farmer of the Pyrenees, reached over and asked me what was the price of the little book. I told him it was a free gift, like the salvation it proclaimed. ‘I would rather buy it,’ he said. I replied it was selling in the streets of Madrid for two quartos; he gladly produced his money and others followed his example, which seemed greatly to confuse the priest. Three young men who were busily engaged reading a gospel, returned it, as we neared a station, at which the priest would have to get out; but before we arrived the priest called out ‘What is the price of this book?’ I told him 2 pesetas. He produced his money and holding it up said, ‘Now I will just compare this book with my Latin Bible, and see if it is correct.’ I replied with great delight in my face ‘That is just what I wish, and I will give you its weight in gold, if you can find aught contrary to the revealed will of God;’ and my joy was great in seeing the manifest simplicity of the young man, and my hope of seeing him among the blood washed company who have been made wise through the Scriptures. As he got out of the train, 3 men of the mountains of the Basque provinces entered. Two of the Bibles were in my hand, one of them noticed them, and asked to be allowed to see one. After a time he returned it, saying in a good loud voice—’Last week in our village we bought four of these Bibles, not so nicely bound, but Bibles. I have read it for years. Living near the railway station we got not less than 17 copies of the different books in our village, but which the priests always took from my friends; but now they cannot do this. That is the book we want.’ An old man by his side, who had entered the train with him said ‘Yes, but these books do not speak anything of the virgin.’ I read to him Luke 1st chapter. The old man said ‘Yes, yes, but we do not believe it like that.’ I replied, but you must believe just what the book says; it is God’s book. I told him the whole story of God’s love, his companions who entered with him listening most attentively; and the old man, not convinced, tried to keep to his point about the virgin, and began to sing a song in her honour. I said yes, yes, she is blessed indeed among women, and is now among the spirits of just men made perfect; but when she was on earth, you know she lost her son and sought Him sorrowing, but He was found doing the will of His heavenly Father.’ These words were like a general earthquake among the people who heard what I said, and the man who said he bought the Bible, dropped his head, at the same time giving such a look of joy, as much as to say, that is a terrible blow. Getting out of the train he shook my hand most affectionately and significantly, and his companions did the same; the two latter being from Vittoria. The three young men I mentioned, one of whom returned the Gospel, were listening most attentively, and when the others got out of the train, one of them reached over 2 quartos, asking to please to give him the Gospel again. These three young men then told us, that they had just returned from Rome, whither they had gone only 20 days previously from their country homes, to fight for the Pope; but having to pay so much for their board and lodging and so much for ‘las bulas,’ and finally not getting sufficient food, they determined to go home. For many miles after this I was able to point out to them the falsity of all human systems, and when they got out to go to their mountain-homes I knew I had obtained their love, and they would be sure to keep sacredly the Word, which they had at first refused. The night had far advanced when this little history finished, and I was glad to rest from conversation, and should have liked to sleep, but we were just entering the snow covered mountains, and with intense cold sleep was impossible. Next day at about 10 o’clock I arrived at Madrid, and placed our stock of 50 Bibles and Testaments on the table, which all disappeared in two days and a half, and now we wait for more; but our joy is that we go on with portions, of which I sold last Lord’s Day over 500 copies. These daily and hourly sales of God’s Word are a cause of continual joy. A few days ago a man bought a Bible. He told me he had been in the habit for years past of writing out the sayings of Luther and sending them to his friends. Many held him for a devil in his village; he rejoiced in seeing and in being able to take back to his friends the Gospels. Yesterday, another man from Catalonia, bought 50 to take to his friends. In several clubs established here, the Gospels are regularly read and are purchased by the members, to put on the tables."

On April 4th he writes again:—"The great question of the day here is, the religious one; and, no doubt, seeing the danger we are exposed to, the Government sent one of their officers and three magistrates, who came saying, they had brought an officer whose special duty was to watch over the stand, and that he had instruction to lay hold immediately, upon any person who offered the least insult by word or look, and begged of me not to hesitate in giving information immediately, as they were determined, at whatever cost, to protect us. I thanked them for their kindness, but said I hoped we should not need to call in their assistance. One of them asked me to give him the Gospel by John, which he wanted to pay for. I showed him the ticket I gave to the poor to procure meat and bread, the produce of the sale of books. He said, ‘Ha! we know all about it; you have a great deal more religion than those who oppose you.’ This state of affairs makes us hide our poor feeble heads very closely under the wing of our Almighty Jesus. We have had great comfort and direction from the Word in all these exercises."

Once more brother L. writes from Madrid, on May 22, 1869:—"Having been unwell the last two days, I could not acknowledge your kindness of £20 for personal and family need, and also £15 for portions of the New Testament. During the last seven days there has been a large pleasure fair held about two miles and a half from this, where we have had the great joy of putting into circulation many thousands of Tracts, portions of the Word, Bibles and Testaments; our sales for the latter amounting to about £10. It is called the fair of San Isidro. He was an hermit, and was chosen as the patron saint of Madrid. He was a ‘tiller of the ground,’ and while living in his hermitage a fountain was discovered or revealed to him which has the legendary virtue of taking away fever. It runs by the hermitage, and on these feast-days people pay half a real for a drink; and judging from the crowds who were standing for the turn, a goodly sum must have fallen into the saint’s treasury. But this was nothing in comparison of the sums received for kissing a finger of the saint, which is preserved inside the hermitage and presented to the kneeling devotees in a silver case; and which the attendant priest passes three times in the form of a cross over the mouth of the worshipper; and another stands with a large salver in which the offerer’s money is dropped. The grovelling idolatry of the heathen cannot compare with the superstitious reverence which is paid to the relic; and the riches collected must be great. The money used to be given to the poor, but now, according to general information, the priest has need of it all; and when I referred the many beggars to their rightful possessions, I got the reply, ‘They give? they are too egotistic for that!‘ In the vestry of the hermit’s church I made application for a tent, in which to sell Bibles, &c. Of course, under present law, I could not be refused; and the letting of the ground being the business of the civil authorities, I not only obtained permission, but was received very kindly by them, and a space given right in front of the hermitage, and by the side of the tent of the authorities. What the aged priest thought, who formed one at the table in the vestry, I cannot say. Here, in connection with Mr. — and —, and two young converted Israelites intrusted to their superintendence, with brother R., and the Frenchman of whom I last wrote, and who gives us much joy in his desire that others may share his newly found treasure, we pitched our tent, set off by Scriptural subjects and engravings, descriptive of the Lord’s parables: and on a large sheet brother G. had fixed in large letters in Spanish, ‘God is love,’ and also ‘Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners,’ which tens of thousands read, as we were just on cross roads, and in the centre of the fair. General Prim read it, as also the Lord Mayor, and also the nobles of the city, ladies and gentlemen. On a table which covered the entrance we placed piles of the Gospels, and the flag which was used at the Kiosk at Paris over the table, with the words ‘Parole de Dieu.’ We sold on the first day nearly £5 worth, chiefly in Gospels, with some Bibles and Testaments; this was the chief day. Up to today we have sold about £10 worth. As you may imagine, it caused great attraction, and many were the instances which gladdened our hearts by remarks made as to the value of our work. Many also bought for friends. One aged man, who appeared not worth a penny, bought 18 to take to the city of Toledo, where he said, he should put them in circulation among his friends. H. and B. [the writer’s children] are most useful saleswomen, going outside the crowds to persons who stood at a distance to read ‘God is love;’ and many were sold in this way to persons who would not venture near. An aged gentleman, to whom they sold one, went away crying; it so affected him to see children offering him God’s Word; and, as he said, ‘to see the difference to Spanish children.’ Our Brother H. is a great comfort to us, he is a fatherly man, and knows how to turn away wrath by a soft answer: he distributes a goodly number of portions among workmen. There is another large fair to be held here next month, and our Brother G. is designing a tent which our friend the Frenchman will make, and in which we shall contrive some things for domestic comfort, from the lack of which I am still suffering, as I could not get food at proper hours. I have made application for 500 Bibles detained, to enter under the old law, which now the Government have managed to find out; and my petition has been accepted, and the order is gone forth from the Minister of Public Works, that over 500 of any book may not enter, but the order may be renewed, so we expect a fresh supply soon of those Bibles which you sent to Bayonne."

The letters received from the other missionaries are of a similar character. As this work commenced in the year 1868, so it has been going on since. Tens of thousands of copies of the Holy Scriptures have been circulated since, by the missionaries who are aided by the funds of this Institution. Nine Day Schools for children have been established by them in Madrid and Barcelona, in which Thousands of children have been instructed, besides the Sunday Schools and Adult Schools. This blessed work has been continued now for nearly six years, at an expense of many thousand Pounds Sterling, with which the Lord has supplied me in answer to prayer.

During the year from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, was expended of the funds of the Institution for Missionary Objects, the sum of £7,330 1s. 6d. By this sum One Hundred and Forty-one labourers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

The number of letters received from these brethren during the year was so great, and they were so full of deeply interesting matter, that a profitable volume might be published from them alone. I gave very many of these letters in the Report of the Institution for 1869, which may be still obtained; but am unable to give any here. I only state that many, many hundreds of precious souls were during this year brought to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus, through the instrumentality of these 141 labourers in the Gospel.

There was laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, the sum of £1,090 7s. 7d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions and Four Hundred and Forty-eight Thousand (exactly 2,448,507) Tracts and Books.

More than One Million and Seven Hundred and Sixty Thousand (exactly 1,768,066) of the tracts and books circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

From a Christian brother engaged in an agency for female servants in London, to whom I have sent many thousands of tracts, and who is in the habit of giving a tract to every one who applies for a situation, I received on May 18, 1869, the following letter:—"Enclosed is a sweet little flower, given to me this morning, in the midst of my registering, by a most respectable person, by the name of Miss W., now residing at Messrs. —, of H., who said ‘You do not remember me.’ I said ‘No.’ ‘About twelve months ago,’ she said, ‘I called on you, and you spoke to me and gave me a tract, entitled ‘Scriptural Repentance,’ which tract has led me to the Lord, through whom I now possess joy and peace in believing. I have called, being in London, to tell you of the fruit of your labours, and to encourage you in the good work.’ For the same purpose, dear sir, I send you this, that you also may afresh take courage; for doubtless you need it as do I. I had long desired, if the Lord would, that some tangible evidence of blessing might come to light through the numbers of these precious little silent messengers of truth distributed by me. May the precious Lord pour greater blessing yet on your labours, is the prayer of yours very affectionately in Christ Jesus."

From Wales I had, on October 22, 1868, the following information from an evangelist whom I have often supplied with tracts:—"Since I wrote you last, two cases have come under my notice of God using some of the tracts I had from you. One was in Pembrokeshire. I gave a tract to a working man, the father of a family, at the fair at Narberth, as he stood with others at my Bible stand, where I was quoting the Scriptures, and seeking to speak a word in season. Meeting him and his wife the week following, he asked me to give him another of the same tract as that he received at the fair. I asked why he wished another, had he read the one I gave him. His wife smilingly said, ‘Yes, master, and he is now, what they call, converted, is quite a different man and has left off his drunkenness.’ The man said he wanted another tract, that he might keep it, as he had given the one he received from me before to one of his fellow workers. He should never, he said, forget standing at my stall and receiving the tract.—The other case is of a poor working man, who was laid all last winter on a bed of affliction. I visited him and left tracts with him, which were blessed to his soul. On his applying for fellowship with us at the Lord’s table, he mentioned, that, on his getting better, though unfit for work, having kept all the tracts that had been left with him, he took them with him when he went out, and gave them to others. He was led to visit an old bed-ridden man and spoke to him about his soul and about the things of eternity. The old man told him it was too late with him, but he persevered and read to him a tract and prayed for him. On calling a second time he found an alteration in him, and was hopeful concerning him. Again he read a tract and prayed. Calling subsequently be found the old man had departed, and was told that he had died happily in Jesus. Praise the Lord!"

At the commencement of the year, from May 26, 1868, to May 26, 1869, there were 1,149 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. During the year 467 Orphans were admitted into the four houses then in operation (as No. 4 was opened in November, 1868); so that the total number on May 26, 1869, would have been 1,616, had there been no changes; but of these 1,616 ten died during the year. Only ten! We own the hand of God in the fact, that only one out of each 161 Orphans, who were under our care, died. As in every way, so in this particular also, we have had, year after year, God’s especial blessing. Out of the ten who died, seven were believers in the Lord Jesus, and one a young infant. Three of the Orphans we were obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to the other children. Ten Orphans we had to return to the relatives, either because they had epileptic fits of which, previous to admission, we had not been informed; or because they had other incurable diseases, unsuitable for inmates of an Orphan Establishment, and only fit for a hospital; or on account of mental weakness; or because they could not for other reasons be recommended to situations or be apprenticed, when their time came to be sent out. Ten Orphans were by relatives or friends taken back, because they were now in a position to provide for them, and who considered it their duty and also desired so to do. Seven boys were apprenticed to trades, of whom five were sent out as converted lads. Seventy-eight girls were sent out for service, of whom twenty-three were converted, and some of them had been for a long time. These 118 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,616, so that on May 26, 1869, there were only 1,498 under our care, viz., in the New Orphan House, No. 1—300, in No. 2—399, in No. 3—450, and in No. 4—349.

The amount of means expended on the support of the 1,616 Orphans, who were during that year under our care was £16,657 5s. 5d. Besides this was expended on the building and fitting up of the New Orphan Houses No. 4 and 5, £11,020 10s. 7d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870. There is one point especially to be noticed with reference to this year, viz., the great enlargement of the various Objects of the Institution. I. The School Department was increased by 10 Day Schools being added to the Institution for entire support; also 6 Sunday Schools and 4 Adult Schools. Thus the School Department was more than doubled during the year. II. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures was twice an great as during any previous year, and a very considerable portion of this circulation took place in Spain. III. The Mission Field, likewise, was considerably extended, especially in Spain. There were, also, many more labourers in the Gospel in China assisted, than before, indeed their number was more than doubled—the number being 25 instead of 10 as before. IV. With regard to the circulation of Tracts, every open door, which the Lord was pleased to set before us, we were able to enter to the full, and to give always abundant supplies. Though our gratuitous circulation, as usual, was again very large, amounting to nearly two millions and a half, yet we always had an abundance of means to respond to every suitable application made to us. V. Lastly, as to the Orphan Work, it was considerably enlarged, so that we had during the year 269 Orphans more under our care than we had the year before; and this number was week by week further being added to. And for all these enlargements of the various Objects of the Institution it pleased the Lord to supply us most bountifully. Though the current expenses for the Institution were far greater during the year, than during any of the previous thirty-five years, yet we abounded more than ever. I delight to record this abounding kindness of the Lord, in order that my dear fellow-believers may be encouraged, increasingly to look to the Lord, fully and solely to trust in Him, and not in circumstances, nor in their own exertions, nor in their fellow-men. He has never failed me. I have trusted in the Living God alone now for more than forty-four years, and I joyfully record to His praise, that He has always helped me, and that I have not been confounded. The longer I go on in this way, the more blessed I find it, to have such a never-failing almighty Friend, who is ever able and ever willing to help me. It is true that sometimes I have long to wait, before the help comes; and sometimes, also, the appearance is as if God had forgotten me; but He still, in His own time and way, after faith and patience have been sufficiently exercised, helps again. And thus, I believe, it will be to the end of my pilgrimage, if God will only enable me to walk in His ways, and to continue to trust in Him.

We still, as from the beginning of the Institution, never go in debt for anything. The reason why we refrain from doing so is, because it would otherwise appear as if God were too poor to pay for His own work. If indeed our work is the work of God; and if indeed we are the individuals, to do this work for Him; and if, lastly, His time is come, when we shall do this work for Him, He will surely make it manifest, that we are not mistaken, by supplying us with the needed means. But the work we are engaged in may not be according to His mind; if so, we cannot be surprised that He does not give us the means. Or, though the work is according to His mind, we may not be the persons whom He means to use in His work; and, therefore, He may withhold from us the means. Or, lastly, though the work is the work which pleases God, and though we are also the individuals, whom He will condescend to use in doing this work, His time may not have come for our doing this work. It may please God, for the trial of our faith and patience, to withhold from us, for the time being, the means for doing the work. What, then, have we to do under such circumstances? Shall we seek, any how, to obtain the means? Shall we, by our way of acting, appear to say, that we know better than God? Verily we ought not; but rather it becomes us to wait God’s own time, which will bring blessing to our own souls; which will prove that we are true servants of the Master, because we wait on Him; and it will thus be helpful to our fellow-disciples; whilst the opposite course rather encourages others to act rashly, to run in debt for the work of God, and thus to bring trouble upon themselves and others.

There were from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, sixteen Day Schools, with 1,165 children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution: four in Bristol, one at Callington, in Cornwall, one at Kenilworth, in Warwickshire, two in London, three on the Black Down Hills, in Somersetshire, one in Liverpool, and four at Barcelona, in Spain. The reader will see from this, that, while there were at the end of the previous year six schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were now sixteen; and while we had 398 children before in those six schools we had now 1,165 under habitual instruction. In addition to this, however, I have to state, that there was during the year, the Lord’s decided blessing resting upon these Schools. In the Day Schools in London there were seventeen children, who had found peace to their souls, by believing in the Lord Jesus, regarding nine of whom the teachers felt fully satisfied, and of the other eight they had reason to believe that they were converted, though they had not yet had so much time to watch the work as with respect to the other nine. In the Schools on the Black Down Hills there was also a work of grace going on among the children, several of whom became decided for the Lord. In the School at Liverpool one girl died as a happy believer in the Lord. Two other girls, about whose conversion there is no doubt, left the School to take respectable situations. At Kenilworth, also, one of the girls in the School died during the year, of whose salvation the teacher had no doubt. In one of the Day Schools in Bristol, there were also two very hopeful cases of conversion. In addition to the 16 Day Schools, which were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were twelve other Day Schools assisted—1 in Cornwall, 1 in Dorsetshire, 2 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Worcestershire, 1 in Hampshire, 3 in Middlesex, 1 in Norfolk, and 1 in Scotland.

During the year from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there were seven Sunday Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, instead of one only formerly, viz., 1 in Bristol, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 at Callington, 1 in London, 2 on the Black Down Hills in Somersetshire, and 1 in Liverpool. These seven schools contained 776 children. There were also, besides, sixteen other Sunday Schools, in various parts of the country, assisted—2 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Monmouthshire, 1 in Dorsetshire, 2 in Hampshire, 3 in Devonshire, 2 in Middlesex, 1 in Herefordshire, 2 in Yorkshire, 1 in Staffordshire, and 1 in Suffolk. Three of the Sunday school children in the Bristol School became decided for the Lord Jesus during the year, and were united with the children of God in visible fellowship.

There were during this year six Adult Schools supported by the funds of the Institution, with 129 adult scholars in them: 1 in Bristol, 1 at Callington, 1 in London, 1 at Clayhidon on the Black Down Hills, and 2 in Barcelona in Spain. In the Adult School at Callington, there were five of the Adult Scholars brought to the knowledge of the Lord during the year.

The amount of means, which was expended in connexion with the various Schools, was £1,192 12s. 5d.

During this year there were circulated 7,867 Bibles, 13,761 New Testaments, 757 copies of the Psalms, and 37,058 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During this and the previous eight years and a half we especially availed ourselves of the openings, which the Lord was pleased to give for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Italy, so that thousands of Italian Bibles and Testaments were circulated.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during this year, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, was £1,260 8s. 2d.

During this year the circulation of the Holy Scriptures was twice as great as during any previous year, which was chiefly owing to the large openings which it pleased the Lord to give to the Missionaries, assisted by the funds of this Institution, who labour in the Gospel in Spain. During this year alone 3,517 Spanish Bibles, 5,006 Spanish Testaments, 603 Spanish Psalms, and 32,963 Spanish Gospels were circulated.

As I received many letters from Spain, with reference to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, I give extracts from some of them.

Mr. L. writes on June 8th, 1869, from Madrid:—"I have much joy in telling you that I received 2 cases of Bibles today, containing 500 copies, the majority being the cheap Bibles which you purchased and which have been so long lying at Bayonne. About 30 Reference Bibles and a good number of Family Bibles were obtained by Brother G. before leaving for Spain. I think in my last I told you I hoped to obtain them through instructions given me by one of the Clerks in the Office of the Minister of Public Works, as he knew there was an old law, which admitted books of any kind, whose number did not exceed 500; and if I addressed a petition to the Minister he would be sure to grant it. And so it proved, and today our hearts were gladdened by their arrival. We have to pay a real a copy for some, and a little more for others. Of course we would have liked, for the country’s sake, that they had come in freely; but we know they could not, under existing laws and pressing prejudices, do otherwise than they have done; and we thank the Lord daily for the liberal principles of the Government, and for the unsought protection given to us. The day for the proclamation of the New Constitution has passed without the least disturbance, contrary to the anticipations of some. I was advised, by no means to open the depot on that day, but faith did not fail; indeed I never felt less timid, and we had cause to rejoice in the manifest blessing. Great numbers of country folk came to see the doings on this great national fête, and we were able to distribute and sell about 3000 portions of God’s word, and our brethren distributed about 20,000 leaflets and tracts in one of the squares, where a statue had been erected to the memory of Mendizabal, a great religious and political reformer. It is wonderful, after such large sales, that the interest keeps up; but, instead of abating, it increases. We are having a tent constructed to go to another large fair held near this. Every prophecy that these great gatherings were not the places to sell God’s word, and that, to do so, would be certain to cause disturbances among Romanists, has failed of fulfilment; the contrary has been our experience."

Again he writes from Madrid, on June 15th, 1869:—"We have made another application to the Government, and hope to get in 1000 more Bibles in a week or so. We continue to have, almost daily, good sales of Bibles. One day 10 were sold at the shop; and in the fair held last week near this, called San Antonio, we sold 33 Bibles, 19 New Testaments and 1,760 portions; besides giving many away."

At the end of September, 1869, Mr. L. went with his family to labour at Barcelona, as there were by this time a number of labourers in the Gospel in Madrid, and as he had a desire to spread the truth and circulate the Holy Scriptures in this large mercantile town of Spain.

As I had found out by careful examination, that by far the best translation of the Greek New Testament into Spanish had been prepared at the cost of the American Bible Union, I obtained, through their kindness, at the expense of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, a set of Stereotype Plates of this excellent version of the New Testament, and sent these plates to Spain, that there an edition of this translation might be printed, as the land was still not open for the introduction of printed bound books, without great difficulty and without considerable expense. To this matter Mr. L. refers, in a letter from Barcelona, Nov. 19, 1869.

"I am happy to inform you of the safe arrival of the plates of the New Testament, which I have passed through the Customs, and that I now have them in the house. I wait your advice as to the numbers to be printed. As I see my way to remain here for a time, and as it is even a better place than Madrid in which to get work done well, I judge it would be better to print and bind here."

Since then, 2 editions of this translation of the New Testament, of 5,000 copies each, have been printed and circulated; and more, God willing, will be printed.

On Dec. 28, 1869, Mr. L. writes again from Barcelona:—"We have been in Spain just 12 months. What a year of peculiar mercies! What great things God hath done for us; preserving and protecting us in our journies; and how greatly has He honoured us in the sowing of much precious seed! Blessed public testimonies have been given to the Word which endureth for ever. But of all occasions yet under our notice, I have seen nothing like the one we have been allowed to witness during three days’ Christmas fair held in this city. The day before the fair I applied at the Town Hall for space for a tent. I was told there could be no objection, that at 9 o’clock that night the superintendent would be in the square and would find me a place, which they considered the best spot in the city for such a work. So at that hour I went, and after walking about until 11 o’clock, a place was given me at the entrance to the square, at the top of the principal street, and right under the eye of the Town Guards. Next morning the pretty tent, as it is called in one of the daily papers, drew hundreds up to it. ‘God is Love,’ What is this? asked dozens on each side, reading aloud. ‘Faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation.’ ‘God is Light.’ Jesus said, ‘I am the Light of the world, he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.’ Spreading the table with Gospels, I had no sooner announced them for sale, than they began to sell just as fast as we could deal them out—not allowing us time to arrange them. We sold a Sheet Almanac, The Old, Old Story, in Spanish verse, and a Gospel for ½d. But the night did not end without the enemy showing signs of anger. Two young students came and purchased and tore them up: this roused the anger of the bystanders, and just at that point one of the district inspectors came up, and, finding what had happened, warned the young men not to repeat such insulting conduct, telling them, they could do as they liked with the books away from the tent, but not to tear them in a person’s face. Next morning my faithful friend, Francesco, had arranged the tent by 7 o’clock, and from that hour until 3 o’clock in the afternoon, I had no time to eat. We then opened the other side of the tent, and put a table there. Fernando took to this. Then Mr. U. and his colporteur came to our help, and so each worked away with much boldness, reading portions, explaining them, and preaching the Word to the hundreds in front and at the back. Now and again the enemies would send a boy to purchase, in order to destroy; but we got to know them. A woman came up and tore them, but she soon got away, the bystanders beginning to hoot her. While I was very busy selling, a gross looking priest came up to the tent and called out in my face in Spanish, ‘Liar, liar.’ The crowd called out, ‘No no, you are the liar;’ and as I was higher than the crowd, I saw a movement towards him, and rough words began to pass. I begged the people to let the priest speak. I took off my hat and said to him, ‘Do, Sir, come forward and say anything you please, I will reply when you have done; this is the only way to convince each other.’ At this he came forward and I called for silence. The priest said ‘Tell us then when did your religion begin?’ I replied, ‘My religion, Sir, began with Abel, who was killed by his brother Cain, because he thought and acted in religious matters in a different way to his brother Cain. I was going on to say more on the point, when the priest interrupted, ‘Oh, then your religion did not begin with Luther.’ ‘No, Sir.’ Again he stopped me. The people cried out, ‘Don’t interrupt the stranger, you have had your say. At this the old man grew impatient and excused himself that he had to go and see a sick person. Some cried ‘go,’ others used to him not quite such kindly expressions. When he was gone I went into the subject, lifting up my heart to the Lord for wisdom and strength. I poured forth words of saving truth, showing the difference between Rome’s perplexing way of saving, setting forth truth, comparing the simple statement ‘God is love,’ with the expensive, tormenting and uncertain ways of Rome. When I had done, the people manifested much approbation. The last day, a man snatched a book out of Fernando’s hand, the people ran after him and delivered him up to the mayor. The under mayor stood by the whole time at evening and night. The Secretary of the Civil Governor came to learn the truth of the matter, and the Inspector of the secret police recounted to him matters, telling him how wisely, and gentlemanly, I behaved the whole time. At night he sent a sereno to accompany me home, and to carry my heavy bag of money. The last night we seemed to be on the point of another assault, but nothing happened beyond the throwing a stone and an old shoe, and the bespattering my cloak. It was a glorious testimony; we sold all our books, and having left only the Gospel by John, and no Testaments, I distributed the Gospels among the people, who received them orderly, and thankfully. Our three days’ sales amounted to £30, mostly in coppers. The next day several of the authorities went to the shop for Bibles. In parting, the Mayor said, ‘Well Sir, you have carried the palm in Barcelona.’ I left him £5 to divide among the poor; this greatly pleased him. We thank God and take courage for the future. I must add one more incident of the fair, which appears to me to show the hand of the Lord to be with us. A blind man came up to the tent, with his guitar in one hand and a flute in the other. One of the men knew him, and told me he was one of the greatest propagandists they had in Barcelona. One of the friends asked him to play some of the gospel hymns, and very sweetly did he play some of our old tunes set to Spanish words. I asked him to abide by the tent and play these hymns, and of course his doing so did not diminish the attraction; and we sold many hymns and gospels as a consequence. I invited him to come and visit us, and he came to our meeting on Sunday night. ‘Don Garcia,’ I said to him, ‘Where were you born?’ ‘In Victoria,’ he replied. ‘How long have you been here?’ ‘About 3 years; I left Madrid the night of San Daniel. I was known as an enemy to Rome, always preaching against the system, and I had to fly, dressed as a priest.’ I told him that was the very night we entered Madrid, when they were killing the people in the streets. I invited him to say something to us at our meeting, and soon he gladdened our hearts, as with animation he set forth the simple Gospel, and with a wonderful controversial power, at the same time making all to point to Jesus and His resurrection. After the meeting I said to him ‘Don Garcia, have you never wished to have some way of providing for yourself, wife and three boys?’ ‘Dear Sir, I should think so, I have said to my wife, I shall be an evangelist; she replied, ‘how can you? you cannot read.’ ‘How much might you get by playing in the week?’ I asked. ‘Some days,’ he replied, ‘I get 1s. 6d., others 2s., and others again less, but always a little to buy food.’ ‘Do you think you could manage a table, with Bibles and Tracts, and teach some of your hymns?’ ‘I should delight to do so,’ he said. So you see, dear brother, I have to offer you the services of this poor blind one, who, without doubt, can see Jesus, and has come to declare the works of God. I look forward to his being of great service in the fairs. Francesco, also, I have great comfort in. Fernando is best fitted for a shop. The printer hopes soon to have a book bound as a proof. I will write you again shortly. I have today received 65 Bibles and 300 Testaments from Seville. I could have so1d a large number of Testaments if I had more."

This blind Christian Spaniard has now been for more than four years labouring most usefully as colporteur in connexion with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, and his walk has been very consistent.

On Jan. 22, 1870, Mr. L. writes from Barcelona:—"The printing of the New Testament from the plates is so far advanced, that by the time agreed upon, the 25th of this month, we shall have books on sale. I intend sending you a copy of the Testament as soon as it is finished. I have had a sort of travelling kiosk made, which I think may be even better than a stationary one, as we can thus visit different places of resort. It is filled with Scriptures, Almanacs and books, such as ‘Andrew Dunn,’ ‘The Church in Spain,’ &c. I have intended the blind man to be with it; the more of whom I see, the more I believe him to be very faithful. I have besides made particular enquiries about him. I am also preparing a portable tent, which, in summer time, will be useful to take to village feasts and fairs. I have also my eye upon a young Frenchman, who has been 15 years in this place. I was pleased with an answer he gave me the other day, when talking about physical force, which some brethren were disposed to use. I instanced one brother using a revolver. He drawing a New Testament from his pocket, said, ‘This is my revolver, and I find it often a very powerful one.’ I want to order on your account 1,000 Psalms, 5,000 of each Gospel, and 2,000 Epistles."

Again he writes on March 14, 1870:—"Three days after the time agreed upon by the binder, we began to receive copies of the New Testament, and as you will see by the report, we have done a good sale, and I believe this edition will soon be in circulation. Shortly I shall send a box to Madrid. I took 25 with me, and the brethren say, it is the best Testament they have seen as yet in Spain. The 10,000 Gospels are those used by Brother G. in Madrid and at the fairs, for which please pay him as he has paid the printer for them. I have not yet received your 5,000 of each Gospel, but hope soon to get them from Madrid. I have been today to see about a place in which to begin a day-school, which Brother F., I believe, according to his letters, will take the direction

of. Francesco and Fernando have just returned from Figueras, where they have given excellent testimony, and sold Scriptures in one day to the amount of 600 reals. Their enemies tried to do them bodily harm, but some workmen saved them from violence. Three priests and a bookseller bought a Bible, 5 Testaments, and 12 Gospels, then dipped them in turpentine and made a bonfire in the square, just before the tent. A workman snatched the Bible out of the flames, and Francesco has brought it back in its half consumed state; it drew the tears from all our eyes, when he presented it in the house. The carriage and the blind brother attract much attention, and sales are made daily. One day a Romanist began a controversy, which soon drew a great crowd; and some tradesmen, who listened, said, the blind man made his opponent look small, and that the people showed much approbation at what the blind man said, as also at his cool manner."

Did not space forbid, many more similar extracts would be given.

From May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, was expended of the Funds of the Institution for Missions, the sum of £9,590 18s. 1d. By this sum One Hundred and Seventy-Nine labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

The reader who desires to know the particulars of the labours of these Missionaries, with reference to this year, is referred to the many letters given in the Report of 1870, from which he will see, how abundantly God helped these beloved brethren in their service. how he watched over the lives of several of them in a remarkable way, and how abundantly their labours were blessed in the conversion of many hundreds. Persons whose means are limited, may have the back Reports at half price, if they will kindly apply to me direct for them. 25 of the 179 Missionaries laboured in China, 8 in the East Indies, 2 at Singapore, 2 at Penang, 2 at Malacca, 1 in Australia, 1 at the Cape of Good Hope, 1 in Morocco, 6 in British Guiana, 1 in Trinidad, 1 in Granada, 1 in the United States, 2 in Canada, 2 in Nova Scotia, 14 in Spain, 11 in Italy, 3 in France, 1 in Belgium, 1 in Switzerland, 1 in Germany, 1 in Jersey, 4 in Ireland, 3 in Scotland, 3 in Wales, and 82 in various parts of England.

From May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there was expended for the circulation of Tracts £1,218 3s. 11d.; and there were circulated in this year more than Two Millions and Six Hundred and Eighty-three Thousand (exactly 2,683,630) Tracts and Books. More than Two Millions and Three Hundred and Eighty Thousand of the tracts and books circulated, during the year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals, to whom these tracts were sent.

A brother, labouring in the Gospel in Ireland, writes, on Oct. 1, 1869:—"The parcel of tracts, which you kindly sent, has reached me safely; accept my cordial thanks in the name of our Master. I trust in Him for a blessing on their circulation. Last week I met with one instance of blessing through the reading of a tract which I had given away: it was the means of leading a young man, who was convinced of sin, to rejoice in Jesus as his Saviour."

A Christian lady in Wales, to whom I have repeatedly sent tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Oct. 28, 1869:—"God has graciously blessed some Tracts already: one of the last instances is that of a man named G., an Englishman. Coming from the station, he received a tract from me, with the title, ‘A few words on Repentance,’ he read it going home. His words to me afterwards were ‘I had no rest after I read it, and could not sleep that night.’ Hearing about our meetings in the Hall, he came under strong convictions of sin, and without peace. He heard at the first meeting Mr. H. preach, and afterwards Mr. D. He has been a regular attendant since, his place never being empty. Three weeks ago he joined us in prayer. Yes, behold he prayeth! He has full peace now, and, if we live, he is going to break bread with us next Lord’s day, if God will."

A Christian brother in Oxfordshire writes, with reference to tracts which he had received, on Nov. 13, 1869:—"In some cases I have received the testimony of good resulting from the reading one of them; just before me is a case in point. After giving one of the tracts to a woman at S., she read it and is now converted, and she told me it was through reading the tract I gave her with the title ‘The Gospel.’"

The same Christian brother writes, on Jan. 12, 1870:—"I can give you many passages from my journal, showing the good your tracts have done. I just give one; I gave a tract to a man at a place called S.; the title of the tract was, ‘Do you love Jesus?’ He read it, and began to feel a concern for his soul. I was called to speak for Jesus in the same village, and he came there, and since then he has been a changed man. I saw him on Tuesday the 11th, and he told me he had to bless the Lord I ever gave him the tract. He once spent his nights and Sundays in a beer-house, and went home to curse and beat his wife and family; and now, seven of his household, including himself and wife, are savingly converted to the Lord I trust. Previous to his conversion he was the worst of men."

A brother in the Lord, labouring in Lancashire, writes, on Jan. 27, 1870:—"The Lord is continuing His goodness to us in the Dispensary; we have 150 persons some days, most attentive to the Word of the Lord and most anxious to receive and read Gospel tracts. I met a young man in the streets a few days since, who stopped me by saying, ‘Mr. G., have you any of those nice tracts you give us at the Dispensary? Oh! they have been such a blessing to me, and the words you speak from them. I had been a very sinful careless man till I went to the Dispensary and heard you speaking from the title of a tract ‘Are you sure you are saved?’ From that day there was a happy change in my heart and soul,’ &c. I would be very thankful for another parcel of tracts, if it would be convenient. I believe they have been much owned of the Lord in the Dispensary; and I am very nearly run out now.

A brother in the Lord, labouring among sailors at Hamburg, writes, on Jan. 7, 1870:—"The large box filled with English, German and French tracts, books, &c. which you sent me so kindly upon my coming here, is getting well nigh empty, and therefore I venture again to ask for a fresh supply of tracts at a scale of circulation: three-fourths German and one-fourth English, with about 300 of Italian tracts, for the grant of which I should feel most grateful. Since my coming to Hamburg, those tracts have been of incalculable value to me in my evangelistic labours, which I have given away when going from vessel to vessel of various nations for the purpose of speaking to single individuals or to groups of men (just as I find them disengaged or while they are taking their meals) of their soul’s salvation, and who have carried tracts to parts nigh and far; and as they have not been dispatched without prayer, and our living God saith, that whatsoever we ask in faith believing, we shall have, I can calculate with certainty, that the Lord hath clothed many of them with an irresistible power from above to the salvation of some ignorant careless sinners. And how great an encouragement it is to me to see how gratefully these tracts are often received, not only from those who have long ago learnt the value of a good tract, and, because of their containing God’s Word, have a secret feeling of reverence towards them; but to see those, who from childhood had been trained in infidelity, and to make a mock of eternal things; to see hundreds of such men, who at my first coming here were ashamed to accept a tract from my hands, to see such now, as it were, hunger and thirst after them, and with evident satisfaction if not with rejoicing, hide that which they have received like a treasure in their pockets; this is truly encouraging. At other times I have supplied emigrants with tracts, who have carried them to America or Australia; at other times again I have carried them to shops and dwelling houses. A little while ago, when for the sake of being able to pursue my work more boldly and effectually, I applied to the authorities for a license to distribute tracts, they told me, that I must first bring them a sample of the tracts, to be distributed, before they could grant me the respective license, which I seized as an excellent opportunity to bring the true Gospel before the Officials, who, being struck with the titles, instead of returning them, kept them for their own use."

From Cape Town I received in a letter, dated April 19, 1870, the following information:—"One of the little books has been made a blessing to a young man, who sees now his acceptance in Christ, and that all his sins are put away through faith in the precious blood: the title of the little book is ‘Is it well with thee?‘"

A Christian Tract Distributor, whom I have often supplied with tracts, wrote me, on May 21, 1870, in applying for a fresh grant for the Bath races, &c.:—"I had a very interesting case about three weeks ago at Cardiff races. I gave a young man a tract, title, ‘Gospel or Glad Tidings;’ he returned to the entrance of the race course, where he received the tract, and seemed thoroughly broken down with a sense of his guilt. I talked with him some time, when he besought me to say no more as I was breaking his heart; he left me bathed in tears, telling me it would be the last race-course he should see, but thanked God for the little tract put into his hands there."

In connexion with this last case I offer a few remarks. I am often asked by Tract Distributors for "Narrative Tracts," as being more likely, they say, to be read; and, on the other hand, the last tract referred to because it is no "Narrative Tract," and in other respects not of the character of many Tracts now in circulation, though full of sound and good statements of truth has not been valued by some dear Christian friends. But how does God judge? Many instances of blessing have come before me, through this very tract. May I also say, that while I do not at all object to a good "Narrative Tract;" yet, if we lay too much stress on the fact, that the tract is a "Narrative Tract," we shall find ourselves disappointed. In many instances the Narrative only may be read, and, when the practical application comes, the tract may be put aside, because the natural mind is now no longer interested. What then have we to do as Tract or Bible Distributors? 1, Never to reckon our success by the number of Bibles, or Testaments, or Tracts, which we circulate; for Millions of Bibles, Testaments and Tracts might be circulated, and little good result from our efforts. 2, We should, day by day, seek God’s blessing on our labours in this particular; and on every Tract or Copy of the Holy Scriptures which we give, we should, as much as possible, ask God’s blessing. 3, We should expect God’s blessing upon our labours, and confidently expect it; yea, look out for His blessing. 4, We should labour on in this service, prayerfully and believingly labour on, even though for a long time we should see little or no fruit; yea, we should labour on, as if everything depended on our labours, whilst in reality, we ought not to put the least confidence in our exertions, but alone in God’s ability and willingness to bless, by His Holy Spirit, our efforts for the sake of the Lord Jesus. 5, And what will be the result of labouring on patiently in such a spirit? We find the answer in the epistle to the Galatians vi, 9 "Let us not be weary in well doing; for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not." Observe, in due season. The whole of our earthly pilgrimage is a sowing time, though we may be allowed to see now and then, already in this life, fruit resulting from our sowing, to a greater or less degree; but if it were not thus, or if comparatively but little fruit were now, in this life, reaped, the due season is coming. At the appearing of our Lord Jesus all will be made manifest; our reward of grace will be given to us for our patient service then; and, in the prospect of that day, we have patiently to continue in well doing. But this patient continuing in well doing calls for much prayer, for much meditation on the word of God, and for much feeding on the work and person of our Lord Jesus, in order that thus our spiritual strength may be renewed day by day.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1869, to May 26, 1870, there were 1,498 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4. During the year 388 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1870, would have been 1,886, had there been no changes; but of these 1,886 nineteen died during the year. This number is very small if it is remembered, as I have stated before, that three-fourths of all the Orphans under our care, which we know from the official certificates, lost one or both parents in consumption. Seven out of the nineteen were very decided believers, and two were very young infants. Nineteen of the Orphans were returned to their relatives, either because they were by that time able and desirous to provide for them, or because the Orphans were in such a state physically or mentally that they were unsuitable for an Orphan Institution. Twenty-eight of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed during the year, eleven of whom had been believers for some time. Lastly, Ninety-eight of the girls were sent out to service during the year, of whom twenty-four had been believers for a longer or shorter time. 164 are therefore to be deducted from the 1,886, so that we had on May 26, 1870, only 1,722 Orphans under our care, viz. 300, in No. 1—395 in No, 2—433 in No. 3—443 in No. 4—and 151 in No. 5. There was a good and solid spiritual work going on in the hearts of not a few of the Orphans then under our care, though these cases were not so many as in the years 1859, 1860, and 1866.

The amount of means expended on the support of the Orphans, during the year, was £20,197 14s. 9½d., besides £4,171 3s. 9d. expended of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871.

During this year it pleased the Lord greatly to try us, in having several hundred Orphans ill in Scarlet Fever; but very few, comparatively, died in consequence. We had also the trial of faith in the sickness of some of the helpers; in the great want of rain, and consequent increased work, and expense in the procuring of water; in the having had often to call upon God for suitable masters for the boys, ready to be apprenticed; and in the removal by death of dear Mr. Lawford, a most valuable helper to me for 16 years; but in all these things we found that we did not call upon God in vain, and were supported and helped. This we also found, that, when teachers and other helpers were needed, the Lord always supplied us, in answer to believing and expecting prayer. Great also was His kindness, in allowing me to enlarge considerably every part of the work. The number of Schools was greatly increased. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures was during this year far greater than ever before; and we were permitted in Rome itself to circulate Thousands of copies of them. The Mission Field was considerably extended, and the number of Missionaries assisted was greater than ever, and the amount expended on this object was far greater than during any previous year. The circulation of Tracts, especially of simple Gospel Tracts, was very great during this year, and especially in the way of gratuitous circulation. The Orphan Work, which had been year after year increasing, was also during this year much increased. In looking back, therefore, upon the small beginning of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, on March 5, 1834, I exclaim with gratitude: What has God wrought! He put into my heart to begin this work; He sustained me in this work, amidst great, and many, and varied difficulties; He upheld and enlarged the work; and He condescended to increase this little work to what it is now. I therefore praise God for the past, and will yet trust in Him with regard to the future.

During this year Thirty-two Day-Schools were entirely supported by the Funds of the Institution, and nineteen were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of the Thirty-Two Schools, which were entirely supported, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington in Cornwall, one at Kenilworth in Warwickshire, two at Walham Green near London, one in Liverpool, three on the Blackdown Hills in Somersetshire, one at Burrington in Devonshire, two at Barnstaple, one in Exeter, one at Howle Hill in Herefordshire, nine in Spain, five in India, and one in British Guiana. The master of one of the Schools for Boys in Bristol, stated, that a boy of 14 years of age gave evidence of true conversion to God, and that most of the older boys appeared to enjoy the Bible readings. Another master of one of the Boys’ Schools in Bristol stated, that the moral character of the boys was greatly improved.—The mistress of a Girls’ School in Bristol reported, that two girls, who were removed by death, gave good proof of trust in the Lord Jesus for salvation; and one rejoiced in the prospect of going, to be, as she said "with Jesus for ever."—The mistress of the School at Kenilworth reported, that some of the children appeared greatly interested in the Word of God.—The report of the Liverpool School was, that there was great improvement in the character of many of the boys during the year.—In the Boys’ School at Clayhidon, Blackdown Hills, many children were exercised about their spiritual state, and one gave good proof of trust in the Lord Jesus.—In the School at Burrington, there was one instance of decided conversion to the Lord, and another child was awakened, and in a hopeful state.—There was reason to hope that four children in the School in Exeter were brought to the knowledge of the Lord.—One of the scholars of the Day Schools at Callington died in the Lord during the year.—The letters from the Missionaries in Spain were full of most interesting details as to the Lord’s most abundant and most manifest blessing resting upon the Schools in Spain.—In these Thirty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1871, altogether 2,665 children. Of the Schools, merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked. Of the nineteen Day Schools, which were assisted during the year, there were four in British Guiana, one in Scotland, one in Cornwall, five in Devonshire, one in Dorset-shire, one in Gloucestershire, one in Worcestershire, one in Herefordshire, one in Wiltshire, one in Middlesex, one in Norfolk, and one in Yorkshire.

There were ten Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these ten Sunday-schools, there were on May 26th, 1871, altogether 1,084 children. There were likewise during the year, Twenty-seven Sunday-schools, to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these twenty-seven Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise, was requested to be sent in. Of the ten Sunday Schools entirely supported, three were in Spain, one in Liverpool, one at Burrington, one at Callington, one at Clayhidon, one at Kenilworth, and one at Walham Green. Of this last School, the account sent in, is, that there was one decided case of conversion during this year; and that those, who were reported as converted during the previous year, were walking in the truth, and proved that the work was of God. Of the Bristol Sunday School, in connexion with the Institution, the account was, that there had been a considerable increase of senior boys, which was very encouraging to the teachers; and two of the elder girls had made confession of faith in the Lord Jesus.—Of the twenty-seven Sunday Schools, which were assisted by the funds of the Institution, there were four in Devonshire, one in Cornwall, two in Somersetshire, two in Gloucestershire, three in Hampshire, six in Middlesex, one in Kent, one in Norfolk, one in Oxfordshire, one in Lancashire, one in Yorkshire, two in Wales, and two in Scotland.

There were, during this year, Nine Adult Schools, with 339 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by the funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, two at Barnstaple, and one at Callington. Of the last Adult School the Report sent in was, that two of the scholars gave satisfactory evidence of having passed from death unto life.

It will, therefore, appear from the foregoing statement that there were altogether fifty-one Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (32 Day Schools, 10 Sunday Schools, 9 Adult Schools); and that during this year Forty-six schools were assisted, viz., 19 Day Schools and 27 Sunday Schools. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the fifty-one Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1871, altogether 4,088 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning to May 26, 1871, amounts to Twenty-three Thousand and Ninety-six, viz., there were 13,606 in all the Day Schools, 5,312 in all the Sunday Schools, and 4,178 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £1,908 10s. 3¼d. This does not include £683 3s. 1¼d. expended on the Mission Schools.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there were circulated 7,599 Bibles, 23,886 New Testaments, 528 Copies of the Psalms, and 30,143 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures, chiefly Gospels.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during that year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,002 3s. 6d.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, the Missionaries in Spain again circulated many Thousand Copies of the Holy Scriptures, and most deeply interesting letters were again received from them with regard to this part of their work, of which several are given in the Report for 1871. During this period also the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in the Ex-Papal State, which was now opened for their spread, we earnestly sought after, by Mr. W. labouring in Rome, who was authorised to circulate as many Bibles and Testaments, at the expense of the Institution, as he found it desirable; and by whom, since then, many thousand copies have been circulated.

Mr. W. writes from Rome on Jan. 7, 1871:—"Since I last wrote, we have passed a very remarkable period. Last Monday week I was awakened by claps of thunder; the rain fell in torrents, and a stroke of lightning fell on the palace of the Pope. It penetrated even to the Chapel, and for the time prevented the performance of Mass. This stroke of lightning, the only one, it seems, which fell on that occasion, was the beginning of our difficulties. The rains continued, the snows on the mountains began to melt, and the day following the Tiber overflowed its banks and flooded half of Rome. This disaster, which has been so ruinous to thousands, has, under the providence of our Heavenly Father, been the cause of my being furnished with a large supply of Scriptures. If I remember rightly, I told you in my last of the scruples of the agent of the Bible Society to let me have Bibles even at cost prices. Shortly after my interview with him, the shop was inundated, and two-thirds of the whole stock submerged. He was therefore willing to let me have the whole of the damaged copies. These have been transferred to a heated room, where they have been in part dried, and shortly the whole of them will be fit for circulation. When properly dried, the copies will be as good, I believe, as before. I was obliged to see in this instance the care and assistance of our blessed Saviour. Though the rain has been almost incessant, I have been able to carry on the distribution of whole copies. I go from shop to shop and house to house, and speak with the inmates, and, when I find desire on their part to possess a copy, I leave one. The day before yesterday, after conversing with a carpenter who desired to have a copy, I offered one to him. He did not for the moment believe I wished to give it, and when I repeated that it was gratis the tears came into the poor man’s eyes. I have to do this work somewhat privately, because if it were known that I dispense gratuitously, my present stock would be exhausted in a day, such is the willingness of the people to possess the Word. I have reason to believe that the copies received are generally read, and I notice that, after I have been in a street distributing, the people in many instances salute me with kindness, which indicates their thankfulness. Some of the priests are furious, but this was to be expected. I feel that in this work I shall have the presence and blessing of the Master. The meeting in my house is as large as the room; some I trust have been gathered to Jesus."

Again Mr. W. writes from Rome on Feb. 17, 1871:—"While I am limited with regard to the entire Scriptures, I am thankful to have been able to do much with the separate portions. Since I last wrote I have received 10,000 copies of Romans, and these are nearly all distributed. The people receive as willingly now as at the beginning. Of the perhaps 26,000 portions which have been distributed in Rome and its vicinity, only five or six have been torn to pieces in the streets. This proportion is smaller than it would have been, I believe, in any other part of Italy. The towns in the provinces are as ready to receive as the city. A short time since I went with the aged brother, who is labouring with me as Bibleman, to Frascati, with a large supply of portions and 50 or 60 Bibles and Testaments. We began to distribute in the centre of the city, and in about half an hour 600 Gospels and Epistles were given away. The crowd was so great, that I thought it best to retire from the city to a grove outside, some distance from the wall. Some few followed us: I sat down. and spoke to them of the precious love of Jesus. They listened, some of them with tears, and showed much desire to possess the whole Scriptures, and to hear some one speak upon the same. I gave them copies and instructed them to meet and read it together. One offered his house, and others promised to attend. This was all I could do at the time, but I trust to the Lord to be able to return. I felt at that moment, that if such visits were made on an extensive scale, many of the Lord’s hidden ones would be called out. When I returned to the city, it was soon known that I had given whole copies of the Word, and many persons gathered round the house, where I was taking food. Some came in to ask for the Testament, among them fourteen or fifteen women, several with children in their arms. I had thus the opportunity of speaking to them individually, and our conversations were most interesting. I know of no means of reaching the women of Italy like this, and, as the Lord opens my way, I hope to continue it. When I left the house, there was a crowd; but I could not give Testaments to a fourth of those who sought to obtain them. The meeting in my room has been owned by the Lord. Several have been brought to the knowledge of the truth. Here in Italy we are sending Gospels and Epistles by post. Postage is cheap; for one-fifth of a penny we can send a Gospel to any part of the country. In this way we work among the upper classes."

On March 12, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"The distribution excites great opposition on the part of the priests, and has been referred to not only in their discourses, but in their journals and proclamations. The desire of the people for the Word is greater than ever. A large portion of those I give are to persons who either come to my house, or see me after the meetings. Being limited as I am in the number, I feel I ought to do so at present. The preaching of the Word is well attended, and some already rejoice in Jesus. Next Lord’s day I open another room in a part where many Bibles have been distributed, and where several who have read them desire to hear the Gospel."

On April 18, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"Since I last wrote I have, through the goodness of our Heavenly Father, been able to continue the work here in the city and in the country round. From the accounts enclosed you will see, that I have received Scriptures nearly to the amount you kindly sent me. Many interesting facts come under my notice in connection with this blessed work, which show how deeply the people are interested, and how the Lord blesses His own Word. At Tivoli the coachman, who had received a New Testament from me, showed it to his aunt who resided in that city. She no sooner saw it, than she took the book and locked it in a strong chest, saying that she had for years desired to possess it, and that now she had it she would keep it. The coachman received another. At Albano, where we distributed many Gospels and some Testaments, a man who had received a New Testament came to Rome to see me, in the hope of inducing me to go and preach there. He had read his Testament to 14 or 15 persons, who met with him every evening to listen to the Word. I gave him other copies for this little Bible-class, and purpose returning to that city. Here in Rome we have many proofs of the willingness of the people to receive, and no proof of any weight of the contrary. I had hoped to have done much more during the past few months than has been done, but the Lord has much blessed me in the preaching of the Word, and though I have waited upon Him no one has been sent to help me. Now, however, I expect a brother who will relieve me of one meeting, and thus leave me freer for the work both in Rome and the cities round, so that I shall be able to distribute (D.V.) not only what I may obtain from the depot here, but any quantity Count G. may forward from Florence. The work of the Lord here in Rome is very encouraging. Various evangelists are preaching Christ, and the various rooms are, I believe, well attended. Many souls, I trust, are being brought to Christ. In my own meeting there are many who give evidence of the simplest trust in the precious Saviour, but their ignorance of Scriptural truth is very great; their desire, however, for instruction is very strong. There are some signs of a movement among the educated classes in favour of the Gospel; indeed there are many indications that the Lord is working in grace among this long benighted people."

On May 25, 1871, Mr. W. writes from Rome:—"The attendance at the meetings is larger now than when I wrote last, many apply for admission, and some give proof of conversion; but we find the greatest caution needful in receiving, because of the fearfully immoral state of Roman society. I still continue to receive proofs of the blessing which accompanies the distribution of the Word. This morning one, who came to my house for a Testament, told me he was sent by a shoemaker, who, some weeks since, received a copy, and who reads it continually, both in the shop and in his family. At Civita Vecchia there has been a brother for some time, but little progress seemed at first to be made. I went there with some Scriptures, and gave Testaments in the principal street. The result of this was, that the little room in which this brother lived was soon crowded with persons, who wished to have some explanation of what they read. That brother writes to me, begging me in most pressing terms to return. At Marino, a city near Albano, I thought I would begin with the authorities, both civil and military, of the place. The Sindaco received a Bible, conversed freely, and invited me to dine with him. The military officers received me with the same willingness, so did the police. In the streets some few Gospels were torn, and I was insulted by one who seemed to have the rage of Satan against the Scriptures; but the Lord defended me. At the house where we stayed, we had a meeting of 25 or 30 persons, who listened to the Gospel. The woman of the house refused to receive anything for cooking our dinner, and offered her room for a meeting, in case we would return. Several invited me to their houses, and many saluted us as we came out of the city. On the way back to Rome I passed some who were reading the Word; the next day a man came down to Rome for some copies, and a few days after a letter was sent to one of the journals of this city, stating the satisfaction of the people, and blaming the opposition of the priests. I am glad to be able to say, that I have not met with, or even heard of, a single case of the tearing or burning of a New Testament; and the opposition of the people generally against the destruction of the portions is such, that the priests will scarcely continue it without peril. In proof of this I may refer to the following fact:—A man at Genzano, a town near Rome, received a copy of John’s Gospel, and having read it with pleasure, kept it. The chief priest of the parish discovered it and tore it up. The man, on finding the priest had taken and torn the Gospel, was so enraged, that he loaded his gun and lingered for two days about the parish church, with the intention of shooting the priest. —Could you, my dear sir and brother in Christ, send, or perhaps write, a small tract for circulation with the Scriptures here on the necessity and best mode of reading them? I have received the 400 Bibles and 800 Testaments from Florence, and some few besides those mentioned in the enclosed account. I am also expecting 1,500 which have been forwarded to me at the Depot here. Please to let me have as many copies as you may think best from Florence. With many thanks, and earnestly desiring you to pray that we may be guided and defended in this city, where Satan is resisting us on every hand, I remain yours in the kingdom and patience of Jesus."

As I found that Mr. W. had difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of copies of the Bible and of the New Testament in Rome itself, I made arrangements to send to him many hundreds of Bibles and of Testaments from Florence; and this way of supplying him goes on now regularly, so that he has been able to circulate thousands of Bibles and Testaments, as well as many thousands of copies of the Gospel of John and of the Epistle to the Romans.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there was expended on Missionary Objects, the sum of £11,638 9s. 1¼d. By this sum 186 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of these 186 Missionaries, 25 laboured in China, 10 in the East Indies, 2 at Singapore, 2 at Penang, 2 in Australia, 1 at the Cape of Good Hope, 2 in Cuba, 7 in British Guiana, 1 in Trinidad, 1 in the United States, 3 in Canada, 2 in Nova Scotia, 16 in Spain, 12 in Italy, 2 in France, 1 in Belgium, 1 in Switzerland, 1 in Germany, 5 in Ireland, 3 in Scotland, 3 in Wales, and 84 in various parts of England.

I had intended to give extracts from the many hundreds of letters received from the Missionaries during this year, as they are full of the deepest interest; and I had actually begun to write out some of them; but I have given it up, as I could not possibly do justice, even in a small degree, to the labours of those beloved servants of Christ. Though in the Report issued in 1871, there are only a very small number, comparatively, of these extracts, yet they would fill at the least One Hundred pages of this Narrative. I must therefore confine myself to saying, that there is the fullest reason to believe, that by these Foreign and Home labourers in the Gospel, during that year, Thousands of souls were won for our Lord Jesus; and that the reader, who wishes to know particulars, must read the missionary letters of the Report.

From May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, the sum of £917 15s. 1d. was expended on the circulation of Tracts; and there were circulated within the year more than Two Millions and Eight Hundred and Seventy-two Thousand (exactly 2,872,301) Tracts and Books.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1871, is about Thirty-Nine Millions (exactly 38,893,712).

More than Two Millions Three Hundred and Eighty-three Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during this year, were given away gratuitously. I give now, as an encouragement for this service, the following extracts from letters received from individuals to whom these tracts were sent.

A labourer in the Gospel in Yorkshire, whom I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, wrote to me on Nov. 7, 1870, when applying for another grant:—

"I was pleased the other day to hear of a conversion through the reading of a Tract, which I put into a man’s hand in the street. He crumpled it up, and thrust it into his pocket with disgust, and the next day during the meal time at the mill, he took it from his pocket and read it, and God spoke to his heart. The next Sunday he went to a chapel in the town, and there found peace in Jesus, and has become a most active Christian in the Wesleyan denomination. I heard that he had sent for 1,000 tracts at his own expense for distribution."

An evangelist labouring at Portsmouth and the neighbourhood, whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on March 24, 1871:—

"Dear Mr. Müller, I am very grateful to you for 6,000 tracts, which came quite safe to hand last evening, carriage paid, for which please to accept my sincere thanks. I do trust the Lord will continue to follow them with His blessing. I could tell you of several cases of special blessing, either directly or indirectly through the tracts; and in a great number of houses I gain admittance, where it would be most difficult, without such an introduction, and am generally enabled to read some portions of the Word of God."

A Christian Physician in Nottinghamshire, whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on April 3, 1871:—"Will you kindly thank Mr. Müller for the Grant of the Eighteen Thousand Tracts, which are already in full play; and I am most thankful to say, that I have heard within this day or two of some decided cases of conversion from the last he sent. One came under my own notice after our evening meeting. In going out of the door, I handed one to a man. He knew but little of what was said, but, said he, ‘it was that tract that did it.’ Did what? ‘Stopped me, and brought me to Jesus, and now I am resting on the blood. The tract said, that was enough.’ May the Lord add manyfold such like, and the colporteur told me, he had known some also."

A Missionary who labours among sailors, and chiefly foreign sailors, at Sunderland, and whom also I have supplied with many Tens of Thousands of Tracts for gratuitous circulation, writes on Jan. 24, 1871:—"A large ship from Riga came to our port. Brother M. went on board to invite the sailors to our meeting. They belong to Russia, but speak the German Language. Dear Brother M. went on board first, to preach Jesus to them; afterwards I went, and several of them came to our meeting. The mate was awakened under the Word, to see his danger, as a lost sinner before God; but had not found peace in Jesus. One Monday morning dear Brother M. went on board to see this young mate, and gave him one of your German tracts. One evening, as I was sitting and thinking of the Lord’s goodness, the mate of the Riga ship came in, saying I want to speak to you alone. ‘Oh!’ said he, ‘I thank you for that beautiful tract. I never read such a tract before. I have read it over three times and carefully meditated upon it. I am now upon the Rock, I am saved, I have peace in Jesus. I see it all clearly now. I am happy, happy.’ He had found peace in reading your tract. Afterwards he came up every evening to our house. We read the scriptures together and had blessed fellowship together. He often said, ‘What a change I have experienced in passing from darkness to light. How unspeakably happy I feel. I shall never forget you.’ This dear brother is well educated and speaks five different languages of the Russian empire. He often said, ‘I long to get back to Russia, to speak to the people about Jesus,"

At the commencement of the period from May 26, 1870, to May 26, 1871, there were 1,722 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the past year 308 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1871, would have been 2,030, had there been no changes; but, of these 2,030, Twenty-nine died during the past year. We had several hundred of the Orphans ill in scarlet fever. Eight of those who died were decidedly resting upon the atoning death of the Lord Jesus for salvation, and some of them had known the Lord Jesus a good while; of a few others, besides, we were not without hope. Twenty-five out of the Two Thousand and Thirty were either returned to the relatives, as we could not train them for service or apprentice on account of their physical, mental or moral state; or relatives, whose temporal circumstances had improved since they placed them with us, desired now, or felt it their duty, to provide for them. Ninety-nine girls were sent out to service, eight of whom had known. the Lord some time before they left. Thirty-two boys were sent out to be apprenticed, seventeen of whom had been previously brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus; 185 are therefore to be deducted from the 2,030, so that we had on May 26, 1871, only 1,845 Orphans under our care, viz., 280 in No. 1, 356 in No. 2, 450 in No. 3, 450 in No. 4, and 309 in No. 5. The amount spent for the support of the 2,030 Orphans under our care, during the year, was £22,660 16s. 5d., besides £629 4s. 11d. spent of the Building Fund.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872. Before giving the statistics of the Institution, I desire to mention some of the especial blessings, which it pleased the Lord to bestow upon it, during this year.

1. For more than twenty years, previous to May 26, 1872, it had been stated to me again and again, by many different individuals, "What, Mr. Müller, will become of the Orphan Houses, when you are removed?" My reply was, invariably, "The Orphan Houses, and the land belonging to them, are vested in the hands of eleven trustees, and therefore the Institution stands on the same footing, in this particular, as other charitable Institutions." Then I heard it said, in reply, again and again, "But where will you find the man, who will carry on the work in the same spirit in which you do, trusting only in God for everything that in any way is needed in connection with the work?" My answer to this was always something like this: "When the Lord shall have been pleased to remove me from my post, He will prove, that He was not dependent on me, and that He could easily raise up another servant of His, to act on the same principles, on which I have sought to carry on this work." It was also stated to me again and again, by Christian friends, that I ought to pray that God would raise up a successor to me in the work. To this I generally replied, that I did so; and I have now the joy of announcing to the reader, that God has been pleased to give me the desire of my heart. In my son-in-law, Mr. James Wright, I have found what I had longed for, and prayed for, even a helper in assisting me in the direction of the Five Objects of the Institution, and, in the event of my removal, a successor. But lest any, who neither know me nor him should suppose, that, because Mr. Wright is my son-in-law, I have chosen him for this post, I state the following particulars. Mr. Wright was known to me 31 years, previous to May 26, 1872, as a consistent Christian. From his boyhood, when he was brought to the knowledge of the Lord, I have known him; and for above twenty years I had especially good opportunity of watching his most consistent godly deportment. During thirteen years, previous to May, 1872, he had been one of my most valuable helpers in the work of the Institution, I may say my right hand, in all the most important matters. As long as twelve years before May, 1872, my beloved departed wife and I began to pray regarding him, that God would fit him more and more to become my successor. This prayer was repeated hundreds of times during the lifetime of my late beloved wife, and both of us became more and more assured, that, in Mr. Wright, God had given to us, what we desired regarding this point. In February, 1870, my beloved wife was taken from me, and about ten days after I myself became very unwell. During this time it was, in February 1870, when the late Mrs. Wright was in her usual health, and when there was therefore not as much as a shadow of appearance, that Mr. Wright would ever become my son-in-law, I sent for him and opened my mind to him, that I considered it to be the will of God, that he should become my successor. His great humility, however, found a number of reasons, why he considered himself unfit for it, none of which I could allow to stand in the way as a hinderance, as I knew him so well with regard to his fitness. A second difficulty was this, his excellent Christian wife considered that he would be greatly burdened by accepting my proposal, and therefore sought to induce him not to accept it. After some weeks, however, her mind was altered on the subject, and she yielded her objections, if he saw it to be the will of God. Mr. Wright then, after long hesitation, came to the conclusion, that it would not be his duty any longer to refuse. It was eighteen months, after I had first spoken to him on the subject, that he asked for the hand of my daughter, a thing of which I had not had the faintest thought, though so intimate with him; and they were united in marriage in November 1871. I have been so minute in all this, that there may not remain in the mind of any of the readers the slightest thought, that the relationship, in which Mr. Wright now stands to me, has had anything to do with my uniting him with me in the direction of the Institution, and appointing him as my successor.

By the Lord’s kindness I am able to work as heretofore, I may say with little hinderance through illness; yet I cannot conceal from myself, that it is of great importance for the work that I should obtain a measure of relief. This relief, however, can be really only given to me by one who stands in a similar position to the work, and who, when I am away, or when I may feel it desirable to have real rest, could do all I ordinarily do in directing. On this account therefore, I not only appointed Mr. Wright as my successor, in the event of my death, but from May 26, 1872, associated him also with me in the direction of the Institution, which year by year increases in extent.

The reader has to remember, that, great as the Orphan Work is, yet it is only One out of the Five different Objects of the Institution, all of which Five Objects being not only connected with much work as to the direction, in their present state, but as they are becoming larger and larger with every year, will require more and more strength for direction.

From May 1872, then, Mr. Wright has shared with me the direction of the Institution, and I cannot describe my joy, in having found in him a successor, in the event of my death.

It may be well to state here, that, as formerly, I hold myself responsible to the public for the administration of the funds committed to my trust, and would therefore request, that all Bank Orders, Cheques, Post-office Orders, &c., be drawn in my name, and payable to my order, and that, with regard to Post-office Orders, which I always pay into the Bank, the most convenient way would be, to make them payable at the Head Office in Bristol.

2. The second great blessing, received at the hands of the Lord, to which I would especially direct the reader, is the mighty working of the Holy Spirit among the Orphans. We had been again and again blessed in this way, during the previous thirty-five years. Even when the Orphans lived in rented houses in Wilson Street, Bristol, we had often a number of them at once led to the Lord; and this blessing had been repeated by God again and again, since the Orphans have been on Ashley Down. In particular there were great numbers of them, almost all at once, brought to the knowledge of the Lord in the years 1859, 1860, and 1866. Now, though since 1866 we had not been without spiritual blessing among the Orphans, and though again and again some were truly converted, still, on the whole, there was little spiritual life manifested among them, considering the many hundreds under our care; and I had the deep sorrow and grief of finding one after the other leaving our care, to go out as apprentices or servants, without being born again. At last I mentioned this fact several times when assembled with the teachers and other helpers at our prayer-meeting, seeking to bring before them the importance of more earnest prayer regarding this point; and we waited not in vain on the Lord. On January 8th, 1872, the first day of the week for united prayer during the year, God the Holy Ghost began to work among the Orphans in a most marked way, without, apparently, any particular instrumentality, to make His hand the more manifest. From that time this blessed work went on, so that we have reason to believe, that hundreds among them were brought to the knowledge of the Lord during this year.

3. It pleased the Lord, to lay upon us during the year the heavy trial of allowing the Small Pox to enter among the Orphans, though every child under our care had been vaccinated. In the New Orphan House No. 5 in particular we had many cases, and also at No. 2 and at No. 3; but there was only one at No. 4, and none at No. 1. We had only few deaths, as the result of this trying disease, considering that the five Orphan Houses are inhabited by Two Thousand individuals. I desire especially to notice this among the particular blessings we received at the hand of God during the year. The Lord was pleased to bring great blessing out of this great trial, which lasted for about six months. Two godly and valuable teachers died in this disease, and three other helpers were afflicted by it, though they had the disease very lightly.

4, With the exception of the Small Pox, we were unusually free from illness, during the year, among the Orphans. All the thirty-six years that the Orphan work had been in existence, we had never had a better state of health among the children generally, than during this year. I enumerate this among the particular blessings received from the Lord.

5, During this year the Lord permitted us, in various ways, to enlarge the work, especially with regard to establishing schools, and more than ever to circulate in larger and larger numbers the Holy Scriptures and Tracts. As to the Schools, besides establishing several new ones in England, we were also in Foreign lands able to establish some, and in Italy this was likewise done, where up to that year we had none connected with the Institution. Our Schools in Spain gave to us, during this year, especial comfort. In circulating the Holy Scriptures, we were not only at home and abroad in general able to accomplish much; but in particular in Spain and Italy, and in Rome itself. The Tract circulation was so increased during the year, as that One Million more of them were given away gratuitously, than during the previous year.

6, Lastly, I mention to the praise of the Lord, that again during this year His blessing was spiritually resting upon all the different Objects of the Institution, and not on the Orphan work only.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, forty Day Schools were entirely supported by the Funds of the Institution, and thirteen were to a greater or less degree assisted. Of the Forty Schools which were entirely supported, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, two at Walham Green near London, one in Liverpool, three on the Blackdown Hills in Somersetshire, one at Burrington, two at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, one at Howle Hill in Herefordshire, one at Purton in Gloucester, eleven in Spain, four in India, three in British Guiana, and two in Italy.

The master of one of the Schools in Bristol reports, in reference to that year: "I am thankful to say, that there is a spirit of inquiry among the boys, and I hope one or two have accepted the Lord Jesus, as their Saviour."—Another teacher of one of the Bristol Schools reports: "I feel thankful, that I have again the privilege of bearing testimony to the goodness and mercy of God, through the past year. My heart has been greatly cheered and encouraged by seeing the work of the Holy Spirit amongst my dear scholars. From personal conversation with them, respecting their souls, I found several were earnestly seeking Jesus. One dear child was rejoicing that He loved her. Another little girl, about two months ago, became anxious about her soul, and wrote me a little letter shortly after, in which she expressed her hope, that God would bless to her, what she had heard from my lips, and also added, ‘I would like to love Jesus with my whole heart, because I know He loves me, and has died to save me.’ Another dear child was melted to tears by the simple story of Christ’s love, and gave evidence of a saving work of grace in her heart, before she left the School. She was 14 years old and has gone to service during the past year. There are two other little girls, who are seeking and desiring to realize their personal safety in Jesus. The earnest attention, which the dear children give to the word of God, is also a cause of much thankfulness. Many have given evidence, that they have been impressed by the truth of God. One little girl asked, whether God could not have saved the souls of men, without Jesus dying for them. When the answer to that question was given, she listened with profound attention and seemed to see more clearly than before the necessity of an atonement for sin by the spotless Lamb of God. There is an eagerness amongst the children, to know the truth of God, which I have never before seen to such a degree as during the last six mouths. I have heard from parents, that some of them have taken home the Bible Lesson, and have desired to read it over again in their hearing. May the Lord yet more and more honour His own precious word!"—The master of the School at Callington writes: "The increased veneration of the children for the Holy Scriptures is worthy of notice. There is hope that many of them will be rescued from the great enemy, and washed from every defilement in the fountain open for sins. During the past year it has pleased God to call unto Himself one of the scholars whose name has been on the books for upwards of ten years. For more than three years he witnessed a good confession for Christ, and died, sweetly resting in the Lord."—The master at Walham Green School writes: "The two monitors mentioned some time since, give proof, both at School and at home, that they have life in Christ."—The master of one of the Schools on the Blackdown Hills writes: "You may remember my mentioning a remarkably affecting scene on Break-up Day. That was the commencement of visible signs of the Lord’s blessing among us. We thought it would be very desirable to end the last year’s studies with an earnest appeal to the hearts of the children. The afternoon of Friday, previous to Christmas, was devoted to simple addresses, and the scene was most marvellous. The children were crying one over another, and I could but weep with them. The fruit was yet to be seen, and I believe is still to be manifested. Three of the dear girls in one family were a day or two after sweetly brought to Jesus, and still continue in His love. One of my boys, who was blessedly brought to Jesus on Good Friday, tells me, that for weeks the Word had been searching him and making him unhappy, though I had not known it. Often had he been late at School on purpose, to escape the Bible reading, and often he had intended never to come to School again; but somehow he could not remain away, and he can now understand the reason. God had a revelation still further to make to him. He tells me, he would not give up, what he has got by coming to School, for a house full of gold and silver. He is very bold for Jesus, and shows a Christlike spirit in School. Another, who has left me for Durham, writes very encouraging letters, bearing decided proofs of the genuineness of the work in his soul.—This morning I had a precious season with the children. Several were moved to tears, and two or three gave me to understand, that they had kept Jesus outside long enough, and would now let Him in. That they did love Him, they were sure. This is the Lord’s doing. In the letters which they write one to another in School, they gave positive proof; that their hearts receive the Word."—The master of the School at Barnstaple writes: "Six girls and one boy, we trust, have received spiritual blessing."—One of the three teachers in the Exeter Schools writes: "It is very gratifying to observe the interest which the children take in the Bible reading and exposition, morning by morning. Some seem to have given their hearts to Jesus. But we do not know that any of them have been led openly to confess and trust in Him. We wish we could see some unmistakeable signs of the working of the Spirit among them."—The master of the Howle Hill School writes "One dear boy is, I am happy in saying, converted to God, and tells me that he is very happy in the Lord. He has been very ill, and is now far from well. He tells me he found his illness greatly blessed to him, and had enjoyed the Lord’s presence. There is one girl, I hope to see brought to rest on Jesus. She melts when spoken to, but as yet is not decided."—The master of the Purton School writes: "I do not think there have been any converted to God; but the upper classes evince great interest in the Scripture lessons, especially the young women in the Sunday School, several of whom are often moved to tears under the close application of the Word of God, which we regard as strivings of the Spirit." The Schools in Spain, as will be seen, are full of the deepest interest.

Mr. and Mrs. L., after having laboured for several years in Spain, were obliged to leave for a time in May, 1872, for England, on account of their health, and Mr. L. writes on June 6, 1872, from Leominster the following deeply interesting letter, which more than anything proves the blessing of our schools in Spain:—"It is now a month since we left Barcelona, and 4 years since we left this the second time for Spain, and 10 years since I began to work directly for that land. In looking back, what cause for thankfulness have we for personal mercies and deliverances from the hands of our enemies. In contrasting our first visit with the second what cause have we to praise our God, and still, as ever, not to be ashamed of His good news concerning His Son, whom He raised from the dead. Before, caution, restraint, and the iron hand of persecution hindering us at every turn; now, what freedom to labour and what joy in the fruits! Before, it is true, we gathered a few ears; now we seem to be bringing in sheaves and these only the first fruits of a rich harvest behind. We shall reap if we faint not. Paul planted; Apollos watered; God gave the increase. What cause for praise, to remember the many thousand copies of the Word which we have been able to put into the hands which before handled only images of wood and stone; of those who before had never beheld the image of the invisible God, as seen in His word of truth; who had only handled rosaries and crosses, relics and rags and bones of the dead, but who now love and cherish the Scriptures, which are able to make wise unto salvation. What an exchange! And what cause for praise have we, that we have so many agencies in operation to do this blessed work! The shop, the only fixed place where persons can purchase copies of the Word, this is still open in that populous and largest commercial town of Spain, and the open Bible can still meet the eye of passers by. The small hand carriage, with Garcia, the blind man, who now daily takes his stand with his open Bible, while his fingers move over the raised letters, and his clear musical voice proclaims the living Word. Group after group gather round him, and he gives rise to as much discussion as did one of his predecessors mentioned in the Gospel. Often have I seen persons look close into his eyes to see if he were really blind. Some have said, ‘He must see a little;’ others, ‘He knows it by heart.’ Some would mock, but the reading of the Word of God has too much power. The day I took my leave of him, I went up and found a group round him: I prayed the Lord to give me a parting word from his lips, and I came up just as he finished the words, ‘He must increase but I must decrease.’ I knew my Master’s voice and I rejoiced in His Word, and, not wishing to stop the reader, I tapped him on the shoulder and whispered ‘farewell.’ The large coach continues its blessed work through towns, villages and hamlets, never before visited by the dispenser of the Scriptures, and many and beautiful are the incidents which reward the zeal and faith of those brethren who go with it. Just now they have been shut up in one town through the Carlist war, but are again on the way south. We too have been able to send by post many thousand Gospels to persons whose names are found in a Directory: persons who could not otherwise know anything about the Word, thus receive it from an unknown and unusual source. Again, to look back 3 years and remember that we had no schools in which the young might be trained in holy and pure principles, and now to see the numerous, joyous groups respond to Bible questions, and hear their Gospel melodies, and to see one and another giving signs of the quickening power of that Word, this is joy indeed. I shall not forget the day of parting, when the majority of these dear children came with their parents to say ‘Good bye.’ Such a scene in the town as they came along, so orderly and so nicely dressed. ‘What are the Schools?’ one woman asked of another. ‘Oh, these are the Christian Schools.’ ‘Really: how glad I am they are not the Protestant Schools.’ Then the parting. Mothers and children clinging round my wife and weeping like the rain. ‘Ah! we shall never see her again.’ Some of the bigger boys kept up to the last moment, but could refrain no longer. A couple of priests, who stood looking on, appeared confounded as they witnessed the love of these boys, and saw how they wept. And, then, how rejoiced I am that we have been able to begin a kind of training school for some of these elder boys and girls. This was absolutely needed, so as to give a finish to our school work. Many of these boys and girls were coming to such an age, that, if we could not retain them a little longer, some of them must fall back to Romish schools in order to complete their education: now we are able to do this, and with the hope that many of these young people will soon be able to become assistant teachers in our increasing schools. And now we can praise the Lord for the workers we have left behind—for their qualifications, their zeal and love. I feel that I can say, ‘Lord now lettest thou Thy servant depart in peace, for mine eyes have seen Thy salvation."

In the Forty Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 2,955 children. Of the Schools, merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked. There were, during the past year, Eight Day Schools assisted, viz.: one in Scotland, one in Norfolk, one in Middlesex, one in Worcestershire, one in Gloucestershire, one in Somersetshire, one in Dorsetshire, and one in Devonshire.

There were during this year, fourteen Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these fourteen Sunday-schools, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 1,372 scholars. There were likewise, during the year, thirteen Sunday-schools to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these thirteen Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the fourteen Sunday-schools, entirely supported, 4 were in Spain, 1 at Hyde Park, Demerara, 1 in Bristol, 1 at Burrington, 1 at Callington., 1 at Clayhidon, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 in Liverpool, 1 at Purton, 1 at Walham Green, London, and 1 at North End, Fulham. Of the thirteen Sunday-schools, which were assisted, 1 is in Wales, 3 are in Devonshire, 4 in Gloucestershire, 1 in Somersetshire, 2 in Hampshire, 1 in Kent, and 1 in Lancashire. The Lord was pleased to work decidedly in the Sunday-school in Bristol, during this year, in the way of conversion.

There were, during this year, Eleven Adult Schools, with 420 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were six in Spain, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, two at Barnstaple, and one at Callington. Of the last Adult School the Report sent in by the teacher is: "I would desire to mention, to the praise and glory of God, that one of the scholars, from the Adult School, has, during the past year, been regarded worthy to labour in the Gospel. He came at a very early age into the Day School. In reference to his education, he had none but that which he received with us. Many, who have been under our care in the School, are now engaged in different localities in various spheres of usefulness amongst the different sections of the Church." The teacher of the Adult Schools at Barnstaple states, that he considers six of the Adult Scholars to have been spiritually benefited, and that he has seen both Adult Schools greatly affected, so that there may be others who have been impressed, of whom he does not know.

It will appear, from the foregoing statement, that there were altogether Sixty-five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (40 Day Schools, 14 Sunday Schools, 11 Adult Schools); and that during the year Twenty-one Schools were assisted, viz. 8 Day Schools and 13 Sunday Schools. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the Sixty-five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1872, altogether 4,747 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning to May 26, 1872, amounts to Twenty Seven Thousand Four Hundred and Eighty-eight, viz., there were 16,455 in all the Day Schools, 6,275 in all the Sunday Schools, and 4,758 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year, in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £2,284 8s. 1½d. This does not include £1,235 8s. 4½d. expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, there were circulated 11,221 Bibles, 54,231 New Testaments, 10,909 copies of the Psalms, and 35,085 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,942 13s. 10d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during this year, as during the previous year.

Before leaving this part of the operations of the Institution, I make the following remarks: 1, To the careful readers it will be obvious, how greatly this part of the Institution, as well as the School department, has been of late years enlarged, and more particularly during this year. And yet the openings become more and more still. 2, During this year we sought, by the help of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire and Yorkshire. About thirty thousand copies of the New Testament and many Bibles were thus placed, during the year, in the hands of men, women, boys, and girls working in these factories and mills; and this work is steadily going on. This dear man goes from one mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The expense to meet this is considerable; but the importance is so great, that of late I have given still further considerable help to several Christian colporteurs to go on with this kind of work in Wales, Gloucestershire, Somersetshire, etc. The greater the efforts which are being made, to put aside the Word of God, or to do without it, the more it becomes us to spread it abroad, with earnest, believing, expecting, persevering prayer. 3, It will be interesting to the Christian reader to learn, that during this year alone, we circulated in Spain 3,105 Bibles, 7,822 Testaments, 5,674 Psalms, and 31,614 Gospels. In Italy we circulated during this year alone, in the former Papal State, 1,541 Bibles and 7,164 Testaments.

With reference to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in the former Papal State, from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, I can only give the following account, as a specimen of the letters received.

Mr. W., who labours in the Gospel in Rome, and the former Papal State, writes on August 10, 1871, from Albano:—"My dear brother in the Lord, yours of the 28th of July, containing cheque for £40, has reached me. I thankfully acknowledge the same. You will see from the enclosed account that I have been to various cities in the province, several of them at a considerable distance from Rome. At Corneto the reception given to us was most enthusiastic. At Subiaco there was quite a different state of things. The priests of Tivoli had sent a telegraphic despatch in cyphers to that city, so that, on commencing the distribution in the streets, I found four or five priests were passing from shop to shop exciting the people against me. I therefore retired for a little while to a café. A considerable crowd gathered in the piazza, and the head of the police came to speak with me. He said that there was extreme peril, and besought me not to expose myself again. After a long conversation with him, I consented to work privately. The crowd, however, continued to increase in the piazza, and when I had finished the distribution of the New Testaments, a man followed me out of the city with the intention of stabbing me. But this was providentially prevented by the Christian brother who accompanied me, and a second attempt by two policemen, who came from a bye-way just as the man was about to effect his design. Subiaco is a city of brigands: many are very sincere Catholics, but I believe the Lord is calling some to Himself there. I found on my return to Tivoli, where on a former visit I had distributed Scriptures, that the priests had arranged to shoot us on our descent through an olive-yard: but the thing failed, and now there is a weekly meeting in that city, which is well attended. I came to Albano in consequence of the great heat in Rome and the malaria, which had brought several attacks of fever to my children. Here in Albano, we have had a glorious proof of what the word of God, under the blessing of the Spirit, can accomplish apart from the preaching of the same. My time, for some weeks after coming here, was so occupied at Rome and in other parts that I did very little here, and nothing in the way of preaching. Meanwhile Mrs. W. went from shop to shop and house to house, leaving copies of the Word, and thus the whole city was stirred. The priests did all they could to obtain the Scriptures given, but, as far as we are able to judge, have not been able to get more than two or three copies. One of these was torn in pieces and strewn round my house. Another was given to a priest by a man who attends our meeting. When it was known that he had done so, some who frequent our meeting desired that he should be excluded as a traitor. About a fortnight since I opened my house for the reading of the Scriptures. Several came the first night, about 30 the second, and last night about 50 came. Ten or twelve women were present, and some seemed much impressed. Poor people! their condition. is deplorable, much worse than in Rome itself, because these mountainous districts have been long infested with brigandage. Even the children carried arms, and the most horrible crimes are frequently committed. Last week a mother, in her rage, bit pieces out of her own child, and then in a fit of rage murdered her. Popery has thus degraded the people. Mrs. W. has been much encouraged among the soldiers here. The officers desired all those who wished to possess the New Testament to add their names to a list. Sixty-nine made application in writing. One, whose time of service has expired, professes to be converted, and left for Rome this morning, in the hope of giving himself ere long to the work of the Lord. Others desire a meeting during the day, being unable to come at night. Next week I purpose (D.V.) going into the northern part of the Roman State, round about Viterbo, which is a large and important city. Mr. Rosetti will, by your direction, forward Scriptures to me there. I take the liberty of asking him to send me another thousand New Testaments to that address. I have bought a mule and a small carriage, which I propose using to visit the towns and cities round Rome. As many of the towns are on the mountains, to escape malaria, this seems the best way of visiting them. I should be thankful to have 10,000 or 12,000 copies of the Scriptures in September, and as many for the following month. The openings are great. I have now many acquaintances in many parts of the State, and I trust the Lord will raise up groups of Bible readers on every hand."

During this year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for Missions, the sum of £11,640 9s. 4½d. By this sum One Hundred and Eighty-seven labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree assisted. Their labours were again blessed, during the year, in the conversion of thousands of souls.

From May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, £1,118 11s. 7d. was expended of the Funds of the Institution on the circulation of Tracts; and there were circulated during that year more than Three Millions Six Hundred and Eighty-four Thousand (exactly 3,684,842) Tracts and Books. More than Three Millions Three Hundred and Twenty Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during that year, were given away gratuitously. During this year very many cases came before us, in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the beginning of the period from May 26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, there were 1,845 Orphans in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the year 260 Orphans were admitted into the five houses now in operation; so that the total number on May 26, 1872, would have been 2,105, had there been no changes; but, of these 2,105, Twenty-three died during the past year. This number is exceedingly small, if it is remembered, that three-fourths of all the children under our care lost one or both parents by consumption, which we know from the official certificates of the death of the parents. Of the twenty-three who died, two were infants, and fifteen died as believers, indeed most of these fifteen were in a most blessed state of soul before their removal, longing to be with the Lord Jesus. One of the girls we were obliged to expel from the Institution, on account of the evil influence which she exercised over the other children. Twenty-three of the Orphans were returned to their relatives, either because they were by that time able to provide for them, and wished to do so; or because the children were afflicted with epileptic fits, spinal disease, mental weakness, or could, for other reasons, not be trained for service or sent out as apprentices. Forty-six of the boys were sent out to be apprenticed, at the expense of the Orphan Establishment. Twenty-two of those Forty-six boys had known the Lord some time, before they were sent out. One Hundred and Nine girls were sent out to service, Twenty-seven of whom had been believers some time previously. Two Hundred and Two are therefore to be deducted from the 2,105, so that on May 26, 1872, we had only 1,903 Orphans under our care, viz.: 298 in No. 1, 362 in No. 2, 444 in No. 3, 450 in No. 4, and 349 in. No. 5. The total of the expenses, connected with the support of the 2,105 Orphans under our care during that year, amounted to £24,190 12s. 5¼d.

We enter now upon the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873.

In giving the statistics of the previous year, I referred already to the great spiritual blessing, which it pleased the Lord to grant to the Orphan Work at the end of that year and the beginning of this; but, as this is so deeply important a subject, I enter somewhat further and more fully into it here. It was stated before, that the spiritual condition of the Orphans generally gave to us great sorrow of heart, because there were so few, comparatively, among them, who were in earnest about their souls, and resting on the atoning death of the Lord Jesus for salvation. This our sorrow led us to lay it on the whole staff of assistants, matrons and teachers, to seek earnestly the Lord’s blessing on the souls of the children. This was done in our united prayer meetings, and, I have reason to believe, in secret also; and, in answer to these our secret and united prayers, in the year 1872, there were, as the result of this, more believers by far among the Orphans than ever. On. Jan. 8, 1872, the Lord began to work among them, and this work was going on more or less afterwards. In the New Orphan House No. 3, it showed itself least, till it pleased the Lord to lay His hand heavily on that house, by the small pox; and, from that time the working of the Holy Spirit was felt in that house also, particularly in one department. At the end of July, 1872, I received the statements of all the matrons and teachers in the five houses, who reported to me, that, after careful observation and conversation, they had good reason to believe that 729 of the Orphans, then under our care, were believers in the Lord Jesus. This number of believing Orphans is by far greater than we ever had, for which we adore and praise the Lord! See how the Lord overruled the great trial, occasioned by the small-pox, and turned it into a great blessing! See, also, how, after so low a state, comparatively, which led us to prayer, earnest prayer, the working of the Holy Spirit was wore manifest than ever!

I will now notice some of the especial blessings which the Lord was pleased to bestow upon us, during the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, in connexion. with the Institution.

1, During the whole of the year we were remarkably free from illness among the Orphans. It would be difficult to fix upon any one year, since the commencement of the Orphan Work, during which we were more free from disease among them, considering the vast number who were under our care.

2, I also gratefully own, that the Lord’s working by His Holy Spirit among them continued during the whole year more or less.

3, We were enabled still further greatly to enlarge the School department of the Institution, as during this year twelve more Day Schools were added to the Institution and seven Sunday Schools; so that there were then fifty-two Day Schools, 23 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools entirely supported by its funds. I gave myself particularly to the increase of this part of the work, as I consider it to be more and more important to this country, as well as to Spain, Italy, India, British Guiana, etc., to seek to bring the truth of the Holy Scriptures before the rising generation.

4, We were again permitted, during this year also, very largely to circulate the Holy Scriptures and Gospel Tracts, and that with manifest blessing.

5, During this year also the Lord’s blessing rested upon all the various Objects of the Institution, upon which hereafter I shall dwell more particularly, in giving an account of the operations in connexion with the Objects of the Institution.

6, The considerable help which I received from Mr. Wright during this year, in the direction of the Institution, as well as the valuable aid received from my other fellow-labourers, calls for particular notice among the especial blessings, which the Lord bestowed upon the work during the year.

Though during this year the price of provisions was considerably higher than usual, and the price of coal nearly twice as much as in former years; yet the Lord was pleased to give us all we needed for the 2,208 Orphans who were under our care. And though the expenses in connexion with all the Schools, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, the aiding Missionary operations at Home and Abroad, and the circulation of Gospel Tracts, called for such large sums; yet this year also we were helped. The total amount expended from May 26, 1872 to May 26, 1873, was above Forty One Thousand and Five Hundred Pounds (£41,537 16s. 10½d.).

As the statistics of the various parts of the Institution, in this volume, draw now to a close, I will, on that account, for the sake of the readers who are unacquainted with the Reports, be somewhat more minute.

The Objects of the Institution are:—

1. To assist Day-Schools, Sunday-Schools, and Adult-Schools, in which Instruction is given upon Scriptural principles, and, as far as the Lord may give the means, supply us with suitable teachers, and in other respects make our path plain, to establish Schools of this kind.

a. By Day-Schools taught upon Scriptural principles, we understand Day-Schools in which the teachers are believers,—in which the way of salvation is scripturally pointed out,—and in which no instruction is given which is opposed to the principles of the Gospel. From May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, Fifty-two such Day-Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which number twelve were added to those which were in the previous year supported. Of these Fifty-Two Schools, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, one in Liverpool, one at Howle Hill, one at Burrington, two at Walham Green, three on the Blackdown Hills, four at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, two at Purton in Gloucestershire, one at Cubitt Town, London, one at Saul, Gloucestershire, one at Yeovil, one at Otterford, one at North End near London, one at Chittlehamholt, one at Cow Cross, London, and one at Hopton. These are the Home Schools, besides which there were seven in Spain, five in India, three in Italy, and six in British Guiana. Besides these Fifty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, five other Day-Schools were assisted, two in London, one in Dorsetshire, one in Worcestershire, and one in Scotland.

By Day-Schools taught upon Scriptural principles, we understand Day-Schools in which the teachers are believers,—in which the way of salvation is scripturally pointed out,—and in which no instruction is given which is opposed to the principles of the Gospel. From May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, Fifty-two such Day-Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which number twelve were added to those which were in the previous year supported. Of these Fifty-Two Schools, there were four in Bristol, one at Callington, one at Kenilworth, one in Liverpool, one at Howle Hill, one at Burrington, two at Walham Green, three on the Blackdown Hills, four at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, two at Purton in Gloucestershire, one at Cubitt Town, London, one at Saul, Gloucestershire, one at Yeovil, one at Otterford, one at North End near London, one at Chittlehamholt, one at Cow Cross, London, and one at Hopton. These are the Home Schools, besides which there were seven in Spain, five in India, three in Italy, and six in British Guiana. Besides these Fifty-two Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, five other Day-Schools were assisted, two in London, one in Dorsetshire, one in Worcestershire, and one in Scotland.

The master of one of the Bristol Schools writes: "In answering the question, ‘Any conversions?’ I should not like to speak positively, but I have reason to believe that four of my elder boys are the subjects of Divine Grace."—Another master of one of the Bristol Day Schools writes, in reporting about his School: "One boy professes to love the Lord who died for him. His father, a Godly man, believes his son to be born again. Another boy, lately arrived in Canada, writes to me, ‘I have Jesus in my heart, and feel very happy.’ A third, who has been very ill and lost a brother, was deeply impressed and anxious about his soul, and his conduct is evidently influenced by thinking of the next world. There are a few other cases that are encouraging. I feel very thankful to God when I meet with one and another of my old scholars who believe in Jesus and have joined Christian churches. This year there has been more spiritual work among the boys than with the adults. During part of the year prayer meetings have been held after school for any boys who wanted their souls blessed. They have on the whole been well attended, and I feel the Lord has blessed them,"—A third master of one of the Bristol Schools reports thus about his School: "During the past year a weekly prayer meeting has been held by the children, myself presiding. Previous to prayer I have spoken to them of their sinful state by nature, and of the amazing love of our Lord Jesus Christ in dying to save them, and have, at the same time, earnestly entreated them to consecrate themselves at once to God. Many of the children seem to be impressed. I have been much cheered by many of the children manifesting a growing love for the Bible lessons."—The mistress of a fourth School in Bristol sends the following account about her school: "The Lord has again given great cause for praise and thanksgiving, during the past year, for His rich blessing on the dear children through the instrumentality of His own Word. Nine of them have been awakened to see their need of a Saviour, and are anxiously enquiring after the things which make for their everlasting peace. The other dear children, who were during the previous year brought to a saving knowledge of Christ Jesus, are very desirous of knowing more of Him, and are also concerned about the souls of some of their relatives and companions: thus they testify that they possess a faith which worketh by love."—Themaster of the School at Callington sends this information to the School Inspector: "One dear little boy has died, we trust he is now with the Lord. The young man to whom I called your attention, during the Inspection last year, professes to belong to the Lord Jesus, and manifests by his general conduct that his name is indeed written in the Lamb’s book of Life. The general condition of the School, I believe to be much improved through the Divine blessing."—The master of the Howle Hill school writes: "I grieve to say we have but one case of conversion to God, to report amongst the children."—The mistress of the Burrington School reports thus about her School: "There have been no conversions to God, but a thoughtful attention on the part of several of the elder ones, and a growing interest among all. They love their School, most of them, and would not be absent a day if they could help it."—The master of Walham Green Schools writes to the School Inspector: "The school is much as you saw it last, excepting that the routine for the afternoon is altered considerably (much improved I think). We admit but few now, have had to refuse about 60 children. You know we have a reading meeting for the children at Land’s End, to which are specially invited those who profess to be the Lord’s. Twenty-one gave me their names and addresses, professing to have been converted, besides eight or nine others. For the consistent walk (as far as we may judge) of six others, we have reason to praise the Lord, and in many others there is, we believe, life."—The master of the school in Silver Street, Barnstaple, reports: "As to conversions, we have three decided cases in my school, and a few hopeful ones. My chief trial is the lack in the regular attendance of the children. Nevertheless there are some things which encourage us very much, and we therefore thank God, and take courage."—The master of the Boys’ School, in Bear Street, Barnstaple, states: "As to conversions, I cannot say there have been any; but I am greatly encouraged in the boys by the attention which they give, which manifests that they are interested in hearing of those things which are necessary for their present and future welfare."—The mistress of the Girls’ School, in Bear Street, Barnstaple, writes: "One little girl we believe to be truly converted, and the interest manifested by the dear children, when reading the Scriptures, encourages us to expect greater things from the Lord."—The master of the School in Exeter writes: "As yet we are denied the joy—and it is a grief to us—of having to relate facts of conversion to God. Those children in whom we had hope are still in an undecided state. It is not well, I think, to press them much. Great care is needed also, I think, lest harm be done, by hastily recognizing a change. However it is our work—and a glad work it would be—to encourage and foster, not discourage any signs of spiritual life. Let me ask you to continue to unite with us in prayer, that the Divine blessing may accompany our endeavours to furnish the youthful mind with Bible truth."—The master of the School at Purton, in Gloucestershire, writes: "Of the spiritual state of our schools, we feel that through all eternity we shall have to praise God for having so abundantly blessed our labours. Last May we spoke of signs which we regarded as evincing the strivings of the Spirit, and, soon after, our hearts were melted at the gracious outpouring of the Spirit upon the children. In the month of October, the work of conversion began, and, we bless God, we can say, since that time has gradually gone on, so that now we have fourteen children, and one since removed to Bristol (in all fifteen), all of whom we hope are truly converted to God. Four have joined the Church, and give us great joy, as do also several of the others. Then the work of conversion has not stopped here, but has spread also to the Parents, four of whom we hope are converted, two of them have joined the Church, and one has let us a room about a mile from here, in which to preach the Gospel, and where we are looking and praying for great blessing, as many of the people, living there, never go anywhere to hear the Gospel. Thus we are lost in wonder, love and praise, when we think of all the Lord has done for us. I should also state that the children have a prayer meeting every Tuesday evening for those who are converted, and any who are seeking the Lord, after which I take them in a Bible class. There is also a prayer meeting among the children who stay to dinner, in the day school."—The master of the School at Otterford, in Somersetshire, reports thus: "I think I may confidently state one conversion to God (a girl), who some few weeks since ‘fell asleep.’ I visited her after she left the School (during her sickness); she then said that at the School she found that she was a lost sinner, but was exceedingly happy to say that she also found the lost sinner’s Saviour. She died very happy."—The mistress of the School at North End, near London, states in her report: "The Lord is blessing us at North End, and I believe there is a good work begun in some of the elder ones, manifest in their walk, and a desire to know more of Jesus. That they may soon know Him as their Saviour, is my earnest prayer. I have had great encouragement in my Sunday School Class, five of my girls have been converted, and are now on their way rejoicing. I feel very happy in my work, and that the Lord placed me here in answer to prayer."—The mistress of the School at Chittlehamholt, Devon, writes: "The children manifest great interest in the Scriptures, but I have not yet seen any decided conversions."—The master of the School at Clayhidon, Somersetshire, writes: "I believe there are quite ten if not a dozen of the boys and girls in the day school, that are really the Lord’s; they are never ashamed to confess as much, and although they need correction sometimes (children-like) yet I think they are truly lambs of Jesus’ fold. I should not forget to say that several who have during the past year left the school, have given very clear and decided proofs of their conversion to God. We are in constant communication with them, and in each letter they evidence a certain and unmistakeable manifestation of the real heart change. One young man who left me last summer for America, of whom I gave a few particulars for the last Report, and who was brought to Jesus last Good Friday twelve-months, still writes of his peace and joy in the Lord, and of the blessing he received while at the school. There are others who have left, who are now feeling the power of the truth, sown in their hearts while at school, thus proving the truth of God’s Word, ‘My word shall not return unto me void,’ and again, ‘the word of the Lord liveth and abideth for ever.’"

The schools in Spain were full of the deepest interest. In the Fifty-two Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1873, Three Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty-six pupils. Of the Schools merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked, nor other particulars.

b. Sunday-schools, in which the teachers are believers, and in which the Holy Scriptures alone are the foundation of instruction,—are such only as the Institution supports or assists; for we consider it unscriptural that any persons, who do not profess to know the Lord themselves, should be engaged in giving religious instruction.

Sunday-schools, in which the teachers are believers, and in which the Holy Scriptures alone are the foundation of instruction,—are such only as the Institution supports or assists; for we consider it unscriptural that any persons, who do not profess to know the Lord themselves, should be engaged in giving religious instruction.

There were during this year twenty-three Sunday-schools connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. In these twenty-three Sunday-schools, there were on May 26, 1873, altogether 2,452 scholars. There were likewise, during the year, eleven Sunday-schools to a greater or less degree assisted, by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these eleven Sunday-schools, which were only partly supported, no report, as to numbers or otherwise, was requested to be sent in. Of the twenty-three Sunday-schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 6 were in Spain, 1 in British Guiana, 1 in Bristol, 1 at Callington, 1 at Kenilworth, 1 at Liverpool, 1 at Burrington, 1 at Walham Green, 1 at Clayhidon, 1 at Purton, 1 at Cubitt Town, 1 at Otterford, 1 at North End, 1 at Cow Cross, 3 at Portsea, and 1 at Hopton. Of the eleven Sunday Schools which were assisted, 4 were in Gloucestershire, 1 in Worcestershire, 1 in Devonshire, 1 in Suffolk, 1 in Kent, 1 in Sussex, 1 in Yorkshire, and 1 in Ireland.

The Lord was pleased to grant again much blessing in the Sunday School in Bristol during this year also, as during the year before. The Report about the Sunday School at Burrington is: "One has been received into fellowship during the past year, and is now a teacher in the school; and we may hope there is a steady work going on in the hearts of some others." The superintendent of the North End School writes:—"I will not say much about conversions, as to number. The Lord has been working in some during the past year, and we believe has brought some to the knowledge of Himself, especially the class called the ‘Girls’ Bible Class.’ Mrs. A. has a prayer meeting with her class once a month, and she tells me that those who professed Christ pray very sweetly and earnestly for those who are unconverted in the school. There are others who are very anxious, and I trust will soon be brought to settled peace. We have been much troubled during the year with the first class of boys; they are so unruly and inattentive. It is very singular that the lad, who was the greatest trouble to me when unconverted, sometimes almost unbearable (now grown a young man), has volunteered to take this troublesome class, because he says he was like them once, and is so glad he was not turned out of school, but that the Lord met with him and saved him. I saw him the other Sunday after his class was gone, the tears in his eyes, and oh! how earnestly he prayed for them. We do hope the Lord will yet hear prayer and save those, the worst in the school, that His grace may be magnified. We are constantly changing scholars, some moving to other parts of London, others to America; but the number is steadily increasing."

c. The Institution does not support or assist any Adult School, except the teachers are believers. There were, during this year, Eight Adult Schools, with 332 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in India, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, and one at Callington. In addition to these eight Adult Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there was one at Barnstaple assisted.

The Institution does not support or assist any Adult School, except the teachers are believers. There were, during this year, Eight Adult Schools, with 332 scholars, connected with the Institution, which were entirely supported by its funds. Of these there were four in Spain, one in India, one in Bristol, one at Walham Green, and one at Callington. In addition to these eight Adult Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there was one at Barnstaple assisted.

It will appear, from the foregoing statement, that there were altogether Eighty-three Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (52 Day Schools, 23 Sunday Schools, 8 Adult Schools): and that during the year 17 Schools were assisted, viz. 5 Day Schools, 11 Sunday Schools, and 1 Adult School. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in the Eighty-three Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1873, altogether 6,620 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, up to May 26, 1873, amounts to Thirty-two Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-nine, viz., there were 19,763 in all the Day Schools, 7,796 in all the Sunday Schools, and 5,300 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the year, in connexion with the various Schools, amounts to £2,920 9s. 3¼d. This does not include £1,330 7s. 6d., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund. There was expended on the Schools from the beginning of the Institution, to May 26, 1873, £23,162 7s. 2d.

2. The second object of the Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

We sell Bibles and Testaments to poor persons at reduced prices, or, if the cases be found suitable, give them altogether gratuitously. In cases of needy schools, carried on in the fear of God, it would be joy in the Lord to us, to supply them with as many copies of the Holy Scriptures as they may require. This applies especially to all missionary efforts in foreign lands, or to any Scriptural means which are used to spread the truth of God in the dark places of our own land.

Our particular aim, in circulating the Holy Scriptures, is, to seek out the very poorest of the poor, through visits from house to house, in order to find out the need of the Holy Scriptures, and to supply persons either entirely gratis or on the payment of a small amount. With this we especially combine the furnishing aged persons with copies in large type, a point of great moment, as the smallness of the type, even where a copy of the Bible is possessed, would keep many aged persons from reading it; and, also, because it is well known that Bibles, printed in large type, are, up to this present day, expensive, considering the means of the poor. We have been greatly assisted in these efforts of searching out the most needy persons, destitute of the Holy Scriptures, by many servants of Christ, who, in England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Nova Scotia, Canada, British Guiana, the East Indies, Australia, Africa, China, &c., have sought to circulate God’s Holy Word.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the holy Scriptures, which were circulated from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, is as follows:

5,439 Bibles were sold.

879 Bibles were given away.

22,574 New Testaments were sold.

12,852 New Testaments were given away.

453 Copies of the Psalms were sold.

213 Copies of the Psalms were given away.

4,153 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures were sold.

18,328 ditto were given away.

There were circulated from March 5, 1 834, to May 26, 1873, through the medium of this Institution, 81,710 Bibles, 174,644 New Testaments, 14,271 copies of the Psalms, and 150,939 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

Bibles, New Testaments, and smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures may at any time be procured at the Bible and Tract Warehouse of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 34, Park Street, Bristol. There are kept in stock, 180 different sorts of English Bibles, each varying from the other in type or binding, or by being with or without marginal references. Their prices range from 6d. to £4 18s. The large assortment of Pocket Bibles, from 6d. to £1 6s. 6d. furnishes the public with a great variety for choice. There may be had also 28 different kinds of New Testaments. By personal application, or by writing to Mr. James L. Stanley, the manager of the Depository, 34, Park Street, Bristol, a catalogue of the whole Stock of Bibles, Testaments, and other portions of the Holy Scriptures, with their prices, may be obtained.

During the past thirteen years and a half we have especially availed ourselves of the openings which the Lord has been pleased to give for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Italy, so that many thousands of Italian Bibles and Testaments have been circulated.

Mr. W., labouring in Rome and the ex-papal state generally, writes in June, 1872:—"Notes of a Bible tour in the Cioceria or in the valley of the Sacco, on the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th of June, 1872. The Cioceria is one of the least civilized parts of Italy. It is separated from Rome by the uncultivated and pestiferous Campagna. Physically the people are the finest in Italy. Many of them come to Rome in the winter and gain their livelihood by hiring themselves out as models to the painters and sculptors of the world, who flock to the city during that season. The children seemed to me lovely, and I could not but feel sad at what the second fall, the pagan system of Rome, has prepared for them. The old people seem to have lost all traces of amiability, to be stripped of everything like light, and to be clothed with degradation and sin. In these parts crime of every kind is rife, ignorance and abject superstition hold sway, and brigandage infests all parts of the province. Though the soil is mostly fertile, great poverty is visible; and though the district is situated between Rome and Naples, the people, for shoes, wrap pieces of hide about their feet, plough their ground with pieces of wood, and the women sit grinding at the mills, while the water passes unutilized to the plains below. Tuesday, 11th. Left Rome by the Via Appia. Gave copies of the New Testaments or Gospels to all we met. At a cottage door near Albano, I saw a boy sat down reading a New Testament, which he had received from me some time before. The people in Albano were surprised to see me, the priests having circulated the rumour that I had been swallowed up in the recent eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Went to salute the brethren, who prayed us very tenderly to come or send some one to preach to them. Continued the journey to Velletri. Distributed by the way. Met two men who had the Word, and several who had received it from me. My companion offered a Gospel to a friar, and, when the latter was about to tear it in pieces, snatched it from his hands. Much difficulty in finding beds at Velletri. Passed the night in a wretchedly small room, where we suffered much from the lack of cleanliness and ventilation (27 miles the first day). Wednesday. Started early in the morning and went to Cisterna, where we sold 140 New Testaments and gave away tracts and Gospels. The people received us with the greatest expressions of kindness. Conversations very interesting. I made an effort to go to Cori, a place where the Word was torn on my former visit, but did not succeed. The mule started aside and threw one of my companions with violence to the ground, bruising his face in such a manner, that I was obliged to send for a surgeon from Cisterna. Returned to Velletri (today travelled about 25 miles). Thursday. Velletri to Montefortino, a town on the slope of a mountain. Went into many houses, sold 30 New Testaments, gave tracts, &c. Went on fifteen miles farther to Segni, a city far up among the mountains. This city, like many others in this province, is scarcely ever visited by strangers. The people, cut off as they are from the great centres of Italian life, remain in the state they were under the Pope. They are often greatly prejudiced against the present government, and in this city against the Gospel. As most of the men descend at this time of year from the city to the vineyards and fields on the plain, we arose at 4 a.m. and took our stand at the gate of the city, sold 32 New Testaments, and distributed. Friday. Left Segni at half-past six a.m. and proceeded to Anagni, a large city on a hill on the other side of the valley. Here I visited a large number of prisoners in the public prison; they received the Scriptures with joy. Most of them were brigands. The people received us with enthusiasm. In a very short time we distributed tracts, gospels, and sold more than 200 New Testaments. I was obliged to go away from this city, or I should not have kept a copy for the next place. (Note. Since my visit, some who received and read the Scriptures have invited my companion in labour at Rome to go and preach. Not being able to do so, the Wesleyans have accepted, and now there is a numerous meeting in that city.) Arrived at Ferentino at 4.30 p.m. Having but 66 New Testaments with us, we sold them very soon. A priest, to whom I offered a New Testament, said he would soon have one. Thinking he meant some of the copies distributed would soon be brought to him; I said, our Lord was permitted to be slain and guarded in the tomb by His enemies, but He was raised with glory; and that the same power kept the word of Scripture. The priest said, you mistake me. I mean to take the Gospel, and preach it soon to this poor people. We conversed with him for some time, and when we left he publicly kissed one of my companions, and expressed great thankfulness to me. As we were descending from Ferentino towards Frosinone, thanking the Lord, and being almost overcome with joy, a carriage came behind us, driven furiously. As it passed us by, we saw from the back, that it belonged to the bishop, and contained a priest with three gentlemen, who looked ferociously at us as they passed. When we arrived near Frosinone we met the same carriage, descending from the city, and encountered the same menacing glances. When we had entered Frosinone, and taken some refreshment, two gens d’armes came to us, and desired us to accompany them to the guard house. As I had not my passport with me, and as it was not possible to find a magistrate, or official of any influence, we were rudely searched and then conducted to the inner prison, a small room, without ventilation, unwholesome and unclean, in which there were two bags of straw for three of us, and a bottle of water. We spent some time in reading the precious Word of the Master and were greatly cheered; then sang praises, and, after blessing His holy name that we were counted worthy to work and suffer for Him, slept as best we could. The next morning there was quite a stir in the place, and we appeared before various authorities, and had much conversation. Several came to ask for Scriptures. In the prison I found one soldier had a Gospel, and another a New Testament, which I had given to him at Tivoli. The Lord gave us several proofs of His presence here, but we thought it well to defer the distribution of the Scriptures in that city; so we drove to the station and had the boxes waiting for us returned. Then we drove 36 miles, after which I took train to be in Rome for the Sunday services. I desire to remark: I. That the new field, open to us here, is evidently ripe unto the harvest. Though there is much opposition, and much brigandage, there is scarcely any Atheism. II. I sold New Testaments at 1d. the copy, and this commends itself to my mind. III. I am trusting to the Lord to furnish me with 100,000 Scriptures for the thickly populated district between Rome and Naples. IV. I have no one to whom I could entrust this work, which seems to need a special call and much grace; so that at present I must look to the Lord to enable me to do it myself. V. As the cities are among the mountains (some of them 4,000 feet high) and the railway is in the plain, while I can make use of the latter for the transfer of boxes, I shall need a strong horse for visiting the cities on the mountains."

For some years past, we have also circulated many Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Swedish, Danish, Welsh, and Dutch Bibles and Testaments; likewise Testaments in Russian.

There are kept for sale at the Depository, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol, cheap Bibles and Testaments in the following languages: Welsh, Danish, Dutch, French, German., Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Also the New Testament only in Russian, Swedish, Ancient Greek and Greek and English. Likewise the Old Testament and Psalms in Hebrew.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,281 4s.

The total amount spent from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1873, is £15,593 1s. 8d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain, was continued by the Missionary brethren labouring in that land, during this year, as during the previous years; but for all the deeply interesting letters received from Spain, with regard to the circulation of the Word of God, as well as with reference to the Schools, which were established by them in that country, the reader is referred to the Report for 1873.

Before leaving this part of the operations of the Institution, and writing about Missions, I make the following remarks: 1. To the careful reader it will be obvious, how greatly this part of the Institution, as well as the School department, has been of late years enlarged; and yet the openings become more and more still.

2. During the year from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, we continued, by the help of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Many thousands of copies of the New Testament and many Bibles were thus placed again in the hands of men, women, boys, and girls working in these factories and mills; and this work steadily is going on. This dear man goes from one mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The expense to meet this is considerable; but the importance is very great.

3. The third Object of the Institution is, to aid missionary efforts. During this year was expended of the funds of the Institution, for this Object, the sum of £10,737 14s. 0d. By this sum One Hundred and Eighty-seven labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

The Reader will have observed, how greatly the Missionary Object of this Institution has been of late years enlarged; and, by the help of the Lord, our intention is, to enlarge it yet further and further.—With regard to these 187 labourers in the Gospel, in various parts of the world, whom we sought to assist during this year, I repeat, that they are not the Missionaries of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, nor do we bind ourselves to give them a stated salary, for this would lead them out of the position of simple dependence upon God for their temporal supplies; but when we hear of any man of God labouring for the Lord in the Word, whether in a more public or private way, whether at Home or Abroad, who is not connected with any society, nor in the way of receiving a regular salary, and who seems to us to stand in need of help, and is working in such a spirit, as that, with a good conscience, acting in the fear of God, we could help him with the means, with which Christian donors entrust us; we are glad to assist such an one. Moreover, as the number of these brethren, who have been brought to our knowledge by the Lord’s ordering, has more and more increased, and a large sum has been required to help them even in a small degree, we have laboured in prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to intrust us with means for this purpose; and, accordingly, He has given us larger and larger sums.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which was spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1873, is £127,075 10s. 5½d.

4. The fourth object of the Institution is, the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers. As it respects tracts for unbelievers, we especially aim after the diffusion of such, as contain the truths of the Gospel clearly and simply expressed; and as it respects publications for believers, we desire to circulate such as may be instrumental in directing their minds to those truths which, in these last days, are more especially needed, or which have been particularly lost sight of, and may lead believers to return to the written Word of God.

There was laid out for this object, from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, the sum of £1,254 19s. 8d.; and there were circulated within the year more than Three Millions Six Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand (exactly 3,625,203) Tracts and Books. The sum total which was expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1873, amounts to £22,211 10s. 3½d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which were circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1873, is above Forty-six Millions and Two Hundred Thousand (exactly 46,203,757).

More than Three Millions and Sixty Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. During this year many cases came before us, in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

Tract distributors who can afford to pay for publications, and who desire to procure them from us, may obtain Tracts for this purpose with a discount of one-half, or 50 per cent. from the retail price, and Books with a discount of 25 per cent. or one-fourth from the retail price. We state this, as many believers may not like to give away what does not cost them anything, and yet may, at the same time, wish to obtain as much as possible, for their money. Applications for this would need to be made verbally or in writing to Mr. James L. Stanley, at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol. To him, also, application may be made for specimen packets, containing an assortment of the Tracts and small Books which are kept. By sending 3s., 5s., 7s., or 10s., in postages to Mr. Stanley, packets will be sent to any part of England, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Jersey, Guernsey, &c., containing specimens to the amount of the postages which are sent.

A Catalogue of the various Books and Tracts sold at the above Warehouse of the Institution, with their prices, may be had there, by applying either personally or by letter to Mr. Stanley. There are kept on sale 1,032 different books, large and small; and 809 different Tracts, which number is continually added to.

5. The fifth object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and Scripturally educate destitute children who have lost both parents by death.

At the commencement of the period, from May 26, 1872, to May 26, 1873, there were 1,903 Orphans in the new Orphan. Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the year 305 Orphans were admitted into the five houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1873, would have been Two Thousand Two Hundred and Eight, had there been no changes. But of these 2,208 Twenty-five died during the year, 15 of whom fell asleep in Jesus as decided believers, and four were young infants. Three we were obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to the other children, whom they sought to corrupt. After all means had been tried to benefit them, this measure, as the last, was resorted to. We follow them with our prayers. Six of the Orphans we were obliged to return to their friends or relatives, on account of incurable diseases, which made them suitable inmates for an hospital, but not for a training institution for domestic servants or apprentices for trades. Fourteen girls were returned to their relatives or friends, because they could not be recommended for service, either on account of moral or physical defects. Twelve Orphans were given up to relatives, who were then able to provide for them and desired to do so. One of these was a believer, as was also one of those who were returned on account of incurable diseases. Forty-six of the boys were apprenticed to trades or businesses. Out of these 46 boys, 24 left the Institution as believers in the Lord Jesus. One Hundred and Nine girls were sent out as servants, Seventy-three of whom had been believers in the Lord Jesus, before they left. During no previous year, since the work has been in existence, have we had the joy of sending out so many believers to service or as apprentices, as during this year. Two Hundred and Fifteen are therefore to be deducted from the 2,208, so that on May 26, 1873, we had actually only 1,993 Orphans under our care, viz., 291 in No. 1, 378 in No. 2, 435 in No. 3, 450 in. No. 4, and 439 in No. 5. The total number of orphans under our care, from April 11, 1836, to May 26, 1873, is 4,140.

The amount of means expended during the year, on the support of the 2,208 who were under our care, was £25,292 14s. 9d.

I notice further the following points respecting the Orphan work:

1. The girls, who are received into the establishment, are kept till they are able to go to service. Our aim is to keep them till they shall have been sufficiently qualified for a situation, and, especially also, till their constitution is sufficiently established, as far as we are able to judge. We uniformly prefer fitting the girls for domestic service, instead of apprenticing them to a business, as being, generally, far better for their bodies and souls. Only in a few instances have female Orphans been apprenticed to businesses, when their health would not allow them to go to service. If the girls give us satisfaction, while under our care, so that we can recommend them to a situation, they are fitted out at the expense of the establishment. The girls, generally, remain under our care till they are about 17 years old. They very rarely leave sooner; and, as we receive children from their earliest days, we have often had girls 13, 14, yea, above 17 years, under our care. They are instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, geography, English history, a little of universal history, all kinds of useful needlework, and household work. They make their clothes and keep them in repair; they work in the kitchens, sculleries, wash-houses and laundries; and, in a word, we aim after this, that, if any of them do not do well temporally or spiritually, and do not turn out useful members of society, it shall at least not be our fault.—The boys are, generally, apprenticed when they are between 14 and 15 years old. But in each case we consider the welfare of the individual Orphan, without having any fixed rule respecting these matters. The boys have a free choice of the trade they like to learn; but, having once chosen, and being apprenticed: we do not allow them to alter. The boys, as well as the girls, have an outfit provided for them; and any other expenses, that may be connected with their apprenticeship, are also met by the funds of the Orphan Establishment. It may be interesting to the reader to know the kind of trades to which we generally apprentice the boys, and I therefore say, that during the last twenty- five years, all the boys who were apprenticed, were bound to carpenters, or carpenters and joiners, cabinet makers, basket makers, boot and shoe makers, tailors and drapers, plumbers, painters and glaziers, linen drapers, printers, bakers, grocers, hairdressers, ironmongers, tin-plate workers, confectioners, hosiers, builders, millers, gas-fitters, smiths, outfitters, provision dealers, sail-makers, upholsterers, wholesale grocers, chemists, seed merchants, umbrella makers, or electro plate manufacturers. Some have been sent out to become post-office and telegraph clerks. A few were also sent out as clerks to offices. The boys have the same kind of mental cultivation as the girls, and they learn to knit and mend their stockings. They also make their beds, clean their shoes, scrub their rooms, go errands, and work in the garden ground round the Orphan Establishment, in the way of digging, planting, weeding, &c.

2. Without any sectarian distinction whatever, and without favour or partiality, the Orphans are received in the order in which application is made for them. There is no interest whatever required to get a child admitted, nor is it expected that any money should be paid with the Orphans. Three things only are requisite: a, that the children should have been lawfully begotten; b, that they should be bereaved of both parents by death; and c, that they should be in needy circumstances. Respecting these three points, strict investigation is made, and it is expected that each of them be proved by proper documents; but that being done, children may be admitted from any place, provided that there is nothing peculiar in the case that would make them unsuitable inmates for such establishments as the New Orphan Houses. I state here again, that no sectarian views prompt us, nor even in the least influence us in the reception of children. We do not belong to any sect, and we are not, therefore, influenced in the admission of orphans, by Sectarianism; but from wheresoever they come; and to whatsoever religious denomination the parents may have belonged; or with whatever religious body the persons, making application, may be connected; it makes no difference in the admission of the children. The new Orphan houses on Ashley Down, Bristol, are not our Orphan Houses, nor the Orphan Houses of any party or sect; but they are God’s Orphan Houses, and the Orphan Houses for any or every destitute Orphan who has lost both parents, provided, of course, there be room in them.—We particularly request that persons would kindly refrain from applying for children who only virtually are Orphans, but who have not lost both parents by death, as we shall be obliged to refuse them admission, without exception; since this Orphan-work has been from the beginning only for destitute children who have neither father nor mother.

3. The New Orphan House No. 1 is fitted up for the accommodation of 140 Orphan Girls above eight years of age, 80 Orphan Boys above eight years, and 80 male Orphans from their earliest days, till they are about eight years of age. The infants, after having passed the age of eight years, are removed into the department for older boys. The New Orphan House No. 2 is fitted up for 200 Infant Female Orphans, and for 200 older female Orphans. The New Orphan House No. 3 is fitted up for 450 older female Orphans. The New Orphan House No. 4 is fitted up for 210 Boys of eight years old and upwards, 208 Infant Boys under eight years of age, and 32 older girls, to do the household work—450 in all. The New Orphan House No. 5 is fitted up for 210 Infant female Orphans, and for 240 older female Orphans.

4. The New Orphan House No. 1 is open to visitors every Wednesday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 2 every Tuesday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 3 every Thursday afternoon, the New Orphan House No. 4 every Friday afternoon, and the New Orphan House No. 5 every Saturday afternoon; but the arrangements of the establishments make it needful, that they should be shown at those times only. No exceptions can be made.—The first party of visitors will be shown through the Houses at half-past two o’clock, God permitting; the second at three o’clock; and should there be need for it, the third and last party at half-past three o’clock.—As it takes at least one hour and half to see the whole of each establishment, it is requested that the visitors will be pleased to make their arrangements accordingly before they come, as it would be inconvenient should one or the other leave, before the whole party has seen the House.—From March 1st to Nov. 1st there may be three parties shown through the Houses, every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoon; but from Nov. 1st to March 1st two parties only, at half-past two and three o’clock, can be accommodated, on account of the shortness of the days.

5. Persons who desire to make application for the admission of orphans, are requested to write to me and address the letter to the New Orphan House, No. 3, Ashley Down, Bristol.

6. I again state, as regards the funds, that the income for the Orphans has been kept distinct from that for the other Objects, and I purpose to keep it so for the future. Donors may therefore contribute to one or other of the objects exclusively, or have their donations equally divided among all, just as it may appear best to themselves. If any of the donors would wish to leave the application of their donations to my discretion, as the work of God in my hands more especially may call for at the time, they are requested kindly to say so, when sending their donations.

It now only remains, to refer very briefly to the last nine months of the fortieth year of the existence of the Institution, from May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874.

Up to the last, as from its commencement, the Institution is growing still. During this period, we established 6 more Day-Schools, so that now there are altogether 58 Day-Schools entirely supported by the Institution. And there are 23 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools connected with it, making 89 Schools in all, entirely supported by its funds, besides the very many Schools, which more or less, year after year, are assisted. These 89 schools contain more than Seven Thousand pupils. The number who have frequented the schools of the Institution, from the beginning up to March 5, 1874, is 37,230. The total amount expended on the Home Schools, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1870, amounts to £25,688 18s. 6d. The Mission Schools are charged to the Mission Fund, to which they more properly belong.

From May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, we circulated 5,041 Bibles, 24,626 New Testaments, 718 copies of the Psalms, and 5,636 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. From the beginning of the Institution to March 5, 1874, there were circulated altogether 86,751 Bibles, 199,270 New Testaments, 14,989 copies of the Psalms, and 156,575 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The total amount expended on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874, is £16,393 1s. 8d. The circulation of the Holy Scriptures is carried on at Home and Abroad, as in previous years.

From May 26, 1873 to March 5, 1874, there were 190 Missionaries assisted by the Funds of the Institution. The total amount of means, expended on Missions, from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874, is £134,075 10s. 5½d.

From May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, there were circulated above Two Millions Six Hundred and Eighty-one Thousand Tracts and Books (exactly 2,681,183); and from Nov. 19, 1840, to March 5, 1874, nearly Forty-Nine Millions (exactly 48,884,940). The total amount expended on this Object, from the beginning, is £23,011 10s. 3½d.

From May 26,1873, to March 5, 1874, we had altogether 2,186 Orphans under our care. There were, during that time, 193 Orphans received and 199 were sent out. The total number of orphans, who were under our care from April 11, 1836, to March 5, 1874, is 4,333. The amount expended on the Orphan Work, from May 26, 1873, to March 5, 1874, is £18,856 9s. 1½d. The total amount, which it pleased the Lord to send in for the support of the Orphans and for the building of the Orphan Houses, from December, 1835, to March 5, 1874, is Four Hundred and Nine Thousand, Eight Hundred and Seventy-Nine Pounds (£409,879 18s. 6¼d.) The donations for the first four Objects of the Institution amounted to One Hundred Seventy-nine Thousand Four Hundred and Seventy-six Pounds (£179,476 12s. 3d.), from March 5, 1834, to March 5, 1874; and that which came in by the sale of the Holy Scriptures, from the commencement, amounts to £6,346 12s. 9d.; by the sale of Tracts and Books £11,472 8s. 8d. and by the payments of the children in the Day Schools, £4,850 7s. 5d. The total amount which it pleased the Lord to give me, therefore, from the beginning of the Institution to March 5, 1874, is Six Hundred and Twelve Thousand Pounds (exactly £612,025 19s. 0d.). Now, esteemed Christian Reader, admire the Lord with me! Exclaim with me, from your inmost soul, What has God wrought! Remember the small, yea, most insignificant beginning of the Institution, as to outward appearance; but couple with this, at the same time, that we set up our banners in the name of the Lord, and that we purposed, that the Living God should be our only Patron. And in this way I have continued to carry on the Institution. Weak, erring and failing, I have been in numberless ways; but, by God’s grace, I have truly sought to carry on this work to His honour and glory; and thus it is, that the Institution has become what it is now in 1874, after its existence for 40 years. Faith in the Living God, and in Him alone, coupled with prayer, has been my way from March, 1834, to March, 1874; and thus it came, that such numberless blessings were obtained; and thus we were carried through the numberless difficulties and trials which befell the work, during these forty years; and, in this way, by the grace of God, I purpose to go on to the end of my course; for so far from being tired of this way, I delight more and more to walk therein.

I proceed now to the last chapter.