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Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 6.1 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER I.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from March 5, 1874, to May 26, 1885. Practical remarks, Letters from Donors, &c.

5, 1874, to May 26, 1885. Practical remarks, Letters from Donors, &c.

In the third volume of this Narrative, the account regarding the income for the first four Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad was carried on up to March 5th, 1874, as that date finishes its history, in this particular, for the first forty years of its existence; and we now go on with the narrative in what follows.

March 7, 1874. From Ireland, for Missions, £150.

April 1. £100. from a shipowner, instead of insuring his vessels.— £100. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—From Wales £100., with £36. for the support of the Orphans, being the receipt on New Year’s Day in a house of business, carried on on the ready money system.

May 4. From "Needy," £6. 4s. ld. This donor gives month by month similar amounts, as God prospers him. About eight years ago he sent a few shillings, I think 4 or 5, but continued to send, under the name of "Needy," these small amounts. After some time they were somewhat enlarged, and after a year or two they became much larger. Now he sends about £60. a year, in monthly instalments, always varying; no doubt as God prospers him.—May 6. £100. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 9. £33. with the following letter: "My Dear Sir, Please to accept the enclosed cheque for £33. as from the Lord. I had a very handsome bracelet, and years ago I made up my mind, that, if a certain person died, I would sell it, and send the money to you. Pray make what use of it you please, keeping £5. for yourself. I always read your Reports every year, and my faith gets greatly strengthened, and I generally give several away. Sometimes I used to fear that I should never be able to sell my beautiful bracelet and send you the money. Being almost poor, compared with what I once was, to have sent you the money, was entirely out of my power. However, now when I am upwards of seventy years of age, my Heavenly Father has answered my prayer. That the Lord may greatly bless you, is the fervent prayer of your sincere sister in the Lord * * * *." I have given this letter as another instance of the remarkable way in which it pleases the Lord to supply us with means, but all comes in answer to prayer; we only speak to Him about our need. And this we have continually to do. Whilst I am writing this for the press, we have scarcely anything left for these first four Objects of the Institution, as the income has been exceedingly little for many days, and the outgoings have been exceedingly large. But I hope in God, and doubt not, that long ere this is out of the press, and before the eye of the public, He will again send in the means more bountifully, which He now, for the trial of our faith, for a while is pleased to withhold from us.—May 13. The following letter, containing ten shillings, is from one of the Orphans now in service, who has been long a believer, and who left our care more than twenty years since: "Dear Mr. Muller, Please to accept the enclosed trifle, towards the support of the great work you have in hand. The sum is very small, but it is given in the earnest desire to lay up treasure in heaven, and also to discharge the duty I think is laid upon every one, to help forward the work of. God, in spreading the gospel all over the world. Take my mite for the purpose which requires it most, and may it bring down a blessing, both to the receiver and to the giver. With the hope that you are well and strong in the Lord, I am, your unworthy Orphan, * * * *."—May 18. From Worcestershire £90. for Missions, with £10. for myself.—May 21. £100. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 23. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £8. 10s. in eight donations.—From the neighbourhood of Bridgend £9. 6s. from donors who give as the Lord prospers them.—May 26. £980. 9s. 7d. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

Supplies for the School—, Bible,— Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1874, to May 26, 1875. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

At the commencement of the last period, from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, the balance in hand, for these Objects of the Institution, was £167. 1s. 3½d. We were thankful to have even this small balance in hand, though it was very little indeed, considering that during the previous year the expenses for these Objects alone had amounted to £16518. 5s. 5d. Yet, little as the balance was, we were not in debt, and looked out now for help to our infinitely rich Treasurer, the Living God, and were not confounded. Again and again, when either all, or almost all was gone, for these Objects, He was pleased to send us fresh supplies. I refer now to some of the ways, in which it pleased Him to help us.

July 10, 1874. £149. 19s. 9d. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—July 13. From one of the former Orphans, a Christian, now in service, 10s., "instead of buying herself a new bonnet."—July 28. From Scotland £37. 10s., £10. for Missions to the Jews, £20. for the Orphans, £1. 7s. for books, and £5. for myself.

August 1. From Scotland £150., with £10. for myself.—August 8. From Ireland £100. for Missions in Spain, £100. for Missions in Italy, £100. for Missions in China, and £200. for the Orphans.—Aug. 25. From India £87. 16s. 0d.—Aug. 27. When the new year for this Institution commenced, three months since, we began the operations of these four Objects with the balance of £167. 1s. 3½d. Since then we have expended £2526. 6s. 6d., and yet this day we have £553. 7s. 2d. left. Thus the Lord has again helped us, during these three months also, in answer to believing and expecting prayer.

Sept. 2. From Sale £66. 4s., with £50. for the Orphans.—Sept. 7. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Sept. 21. From Cardiff £125.—Sept. 27. Within the past four months we have expended for these Objects £4193. 15s. 11d., and yet the balance of £167. 1s. 3½d. which we had, when we began this period, is increased to £207. 5s.—Sept. 30. From one of the Midland Counties £450. for Missions, with £50. for myself.—From London £50., with £50. for the Orphans.

Oct. 13. From Slapton £5., "as a thank-offering for an abundant harvest."

Nov. 2. From Ireland £I00.—£200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven—Nov. 14. £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 20. From Yorkshire £200. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and £100. for the Orphans.—Nov. 26. From Sale £40., with £100. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—Nov. 27. From Cambridge, for Missions, £31. 15s. 8d.—We had now expended £7360. 18s. 6d., though we commenced only with the balance of £167. 1s. 3½d. on May 27th, and had £128. 14s. 6¼d. left, as the result of waiting upon God in believing prayer.

Dec. 16. From the neighbourhood of Henley-on-Thames £100.—From Bedfordshire £5., with £5. for the Orphans’ treat and 6d. for a Report, from a small shopkeeper, who many times has sent £5. as the Lord is pleased to prosper him.—Dec. 23. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Dec. 27. During the past seven months we have been enabled to expend for these Objects £8687. 13s. 1½d., though, when this period began, we had only £167. 1s. 3½d. in hand. Now, however, all our means are gone. We have nothing at all left.—Dec. 28. See how soon the Lord has again sent us means, in answer to prayer, for these Objects. Received from a Christian Gentleman £181. 18s. 1d., with £50. for the Orphans, being the entire proceeds of a field, set apart for the benefit of this Institution.—Received also £10. from Menton in France for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and ten other donations besides, amounting altogether to £9. 8s. 1d. Thus above £200. came in at once, when all our means were completely expended, for these first four Objects of the Institution.

Jan. 1, 1875. With the new year, the Lord was pleased to send us, as the result of many prayers, many donations. I only mention, as specimens, the following:—From Ireland £50.—From Scotland £110.—Jan. 4. From Cork £50.—Jan. 5. An aged Christian near Spilsby, who, being too aged to continue his ordinary work, having yet a desire to do something for this Institution, and having some strength left, made 40 beehives during the past year, for its benefit, which be sold for £4. and sent the money. This affords another proof, how all, who really have it in their heart, may do something for the work of God.—Jan. 12. Received 15s. from one of the former Orphans, who went to service about 24 years since, and who has been for many years a believer. The donation was sent with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I have the pleasure of once more giving you my mite towards carrying on the great works in your hands. I send fifteen shillings for that part which requires it most; and may the dear Lord bless you in receiving, and me in giving the same. The thought crossed my mind the other day, that it was a great privilege to be used in the smallest degree as an instrument in answer to prayer, that is, I know that you pray earnestly every day for means to work with, and if I am inclined to send a small portion of my means, then I look upon it, that I ought to esteem it a great honour to be allowed in that way to be a co-worker with you. I desire your prayers on my behalf, that I may be preserved faithful unto the great day of the Lord, or the end of time allotted for me to live in this world. I am, dear Sir, your affectionate Orphan * * * *."—Jan. 18. From Algiers £10.—Jan. 22. From one of the former Orphans £6. 10s. The donor has been a Christian for many years, is now in business on his own account, and had taken one of our Christian Orphan Boys as an apprentice. When the one half of the premium was sent to him, he returned it, with a grateful letter for the benefit he had himself received at the Orphan Houses.—Jan. 23. Anonymously from Birmingham £400.—From Hampshire £100. for Foreign Missions, £75. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £300. for the support of the Orphans, and £25. for myself.—Jan. 27. Today it was found, that we had expended for these Objects within the past eight months £10349. 8s. 10½d., though we had at the beginning of the period less than One Hundred and Seventy Pounds in hand, and today we have £322. 15s. 11½d. left, whilst a month since we had nothing at all; but more than this, we have been able to meet the monthly expenses, amounting to nearly Seventeen Hundred Pounds.

Feb. 6. By sale of gold and silver articles, given to be sold, £50.—Feb. 12. From one of the Midland Counties £450. for Home Missions, with £50. for myself.—Feb. 16. Received £250. with the following letter: "My dear Brother in Christ, After 54 years of natural life, and nearly as long since my ‘birth from above,’ during which interval the earth has, mostly, brought forth unto me plenty of thorns and thistles (of results painful and results dry and barren) I have now for the first time received what is to me an important supply of earthly riches; but without my own labour, and from a totally unexpected source, and after equally unexpected losses, risks and delays, during four years in receiving it. Therefore I desire to take the earliest appropriate day to express recognition of my Heavenly Father’s bounty, in having, according to my petitions, protected this from again wholly vanishing: and more especially for having preceded it with equal bounty of various spiritual riches for which I had been petitioning. I beg you to accept, therefore, the enclosed cheque for £250., being £120. for the important faithful and scriptural Missionary work; £70. for the Bible Fund, SCHOOLS and Tracts on correct Scriptural principles, greatly needed by the rising generation in these evil days, before Christ’s Church is translated to meet Him. £50. for the Orphans, that great work which shows the blessing and reality of "walking" truly and Scripturally by Faith. £10. for the personal use of yourself, as having been set forth by God as an instructive example of a believer "having Christ’s words abiding m him," and of the practical fulfilment of the promises attached thereto. Various other Christian works are pressed on me in God’s providence, to which to apply other portions of what God has entrusted to me; but, as my faith (besides knowledge of God’s will in worship and walk) has been greatly strengthened and helped (as could not be done by any mere words) during the last 25 years, by the Holy Spirit through your Autobiography and Orphan work, I feel it a privilege thus to testify this first (having specially prayed for wisdom) in beginning to employ this Divine bounty, while as yet the blessed powers of natural life are continued to you and to me. In former years I have gladly sent you a pound or a few pounds, from time to time, as I have felt able, without expecting, at all, that I should ever be so well enabled to send this. May our Father’s blessing continue on yourself and, on your works; and be on the expenditure, by you, of this comparatively small item toward your great works so graciously sustained in the Lord. Ever yours sincerely in Christ, * * * *." This donation, as unexpectedly received by me from the kind donor, as the money was unexpectedly received by him, which enabled him, to send it, was one of the various means, whereby the Lord was pleased to carry us through the expenses of the past year.— £12. from Glasgow, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I think it but right you should have the first fruits of the tenth of my business, which plan has been adopted by me within the last few weeks, solely from reading your publications (The Lord’s Dealings with George Muller.) I prayed fervently that the Lord would incline my heart also to give systematically to Him, as others did. I say fervently, as I had to contend with a grasping, money loving disposition, which, I am glad to say, has been so far conquered victoriously, that I can now put on one side the Lord’s Tenth after the close of each day’s transactions, without any feelings of regret. I ask an interest in your prayers, that I may become one of the Lord’s stewards, and give still more largely to Him "who daily loadeth me with benefits." From this amount, £12., you will greatly oblige me by retaining £5. for yourself; the remainder apply as you think best. Trusting the Lord in His infinite goodness will spare you for many years to come, not only as a father to poor Orphans, but as a shining light to bring those out of darkness as once was yours sincerely and affectionately * * * *."—£200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven. —Feb. 27. Saturday. Up to this day we had been enabled, by the help of God, as the result of prayer and faith, to expend within the past nine months, for these Objects alone, £12237. 12s. 1d., though we began the year with so small a balance, and we had now £52. 4s. 10½d. left for these Objects, which this very day was entirely expended, and we had now nothing at all in hand; but our infinitely rich Treasurer, the Living God, remained, and in Him we trusted, and to Him we made known our requests.

March 1. Monday. Since Saturday, when we had nothing at all left for these Objects, the Lord has graciously been pleased to give us, in answer to prayer, altogether £333. The donors who kindly helped us, will feel interested in knowing how God used them as His instruments to send, us help when we had nothing left, which I did not tell them, when I sent their receipts, as otherwise it would have been like an indirect request for further help. I never speak of the state of the funds to any one, not connected with the Institution, except when the yearly Report is issued.—I received this day £160. from London with the following letter: "My dear Sir and Brother, For the past nine years I have not been giving systematically of my income to the Lord’s work, as He has prospered me, though never thoughtlessly, I trust, disregarding any call, which came under my notice. On examining my books I find, that, after deducting my entire drawings from the business, which I started in my own name in 1866, a considerable sum has accumulated, and of this I have put aside Ten per Cent. to be more especially devoted to the Lord’s work, and desire to acknowledge that all I have and myself also are His, whilst I gratefully remember that what He has, and He Himself is mine. It was through reading the third Volume of your Narrative that I have been led to do this, and therefore send you the first payment out of this fund, say £160. herein, of which please retain £10. for yourself, and appropriate the £150. to any one or amongst all or any of the Objects of the Lord’s work in your hands. Etc."—Besides this donation, I received from Scotland £100., with £10. for myself.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £74. 19s. 11d.—From Budleigh Salterton £2.—From Grogan, Ireland, £3. 3s. 0d.—From L. C. J. £1. 0s. 6d.—From Leicester 10s.—From Attelborough £l.—From Edinburgh £1.— Through the chapel boxes 15s. 6d.—The Lord be praised for this precious help, received thus today in answer to prayer, when we had nothing at all left in hand for these Objects!—March 2. The Lord has still more abundantly helped us. I received from Yorkshire One Thousand Pounds. £13. 9s. 11d. came in besides.—How soon is God able to help us, and to replenish our stores! May all the readers be increasingly led to trust unreservedly in God. I have joyfully dedicated my whole life to the object of exemplifying how much may be accomplished by prayer and faith.—Received from London a diamond ring and 2 silver coins for the Bible and Tract Fund, with these words : "The engaged ring of my wife, for whom to die was gain, to be sold for the benefit of the Bible and Tract Fund."—March 19. £100. from Wick, for Missions to the heathen.—March 23. From Sale £100.

May 12. From New Zealand £25. for China Missions, £20. for the Orphans, and £5. for myself.—May 19. £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 21. From Plympton for the School Fund £20.—May 26. £280. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

I have thus given specimens as to the way in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means, during the past year, for the operations of the first four Objects of the Institution. Though we began the year with only £167. 1s. 3½d. in hand, yet God so helped us by prayer and faith, without asking any one but Himself, that we were able to expend for these Objects during the year £16,895. 4s. 7d., and had a balance of £18. 14s. 4½d. left on May 26, 1875. Only very few of the donations have been here referred to.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1875, to May 26, 1876. Letters from Donors, Practical Remarks, &c.

26, 1875, to May 26, 1876. Letters from Donors, Practical Remarks, &c.

When we began the period, we had, on May 26, 1875, the balance of £18. 14s. 4¼d. left for these Objects. When it is considered, that we had expended for them, during the previous year £16895. 4s. 7d., and that during the year from May 26th, 1875 to May 26th, 1876 our expenses for these Objects were £17643. 15s. 0½d., the reader sees, how small our balance was, to begin the year with, especially as we do not go in debt; yet, small as it was, it was a balance in hand. Our hope was now again in the Living God, who for more than forty-one years had never failed us. We trusted in Him, and in Him alone; and He graciously was pleased to supply us during the past year also with what we needed. I give now some instances as to the way, which God was pleased to use for our supply, in answer to our daily prayers. On May 28, 1875 we received from Nova Scotia 7 dollars, 4 dollars, and 4 dollars.

June 5. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £1., £3., £1., £1., £1., 10s. 6d. and 10s.—June 16. From Ireland £100.

July 17th. Received from Ireland £30., with the following letter: "My dear sir, I enclose herewith first half notes for £30., the premium on insurance against losses in trade and on stock, which insurance I effect in the office of the Living God, in whose service I hold my stewardship; and I believe I am acting in accordance with His will in remitting it to you, to use it in His service. Please apply £5. of this sum to your own use, and remaining £25. as you think fit, according to His guidance. With my best wishes for the success of the undertaking committed to your charge, accept my regards and esteem. Yours sincerely ****."—L200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven. —July 19. Received £250. with the following letter: "Dear Brother in Christ, only 5 months have passed, since I wrote to you, mentioning our Heavenly Father’s most unexpected earthly bounty, the first (of any material amount pecuniarily) in 54 years of varied and continual discipline. Out of that I begged you to use £250. in recognition by me of the Giver, and of the great spiritual benefit to me (for faith and walk) wrought by means of the history of the Orphanage and through the principles taught in your book "The Lord’s Dealings with you." Yet more unexpectedly, if that were, possible, God has, again so soon, showered upon me yet further, though smaller, supplies of money, unsought by me, from a source which, I had always reckoned, must flow to others, and not, by human possibility, to myself. Therefore,— with deep sense of the Giver, and with prayer that these gifts may be accompanied with the personal blessings to me of fitness for His service and the needed health, to turn the attention of very many fellow-Christians correctly to Scriptural teachings much neglected, and with the power and demonstration of the Spirit therewith,—I again enclose a cheque for £250. to be applied as before, by you, in the service of Him whom we are awaiting from heaven, even Him who is our Great God and Saviour, Christ Jesus. Namely £120. for that large, important, faithful and Scriptural Missionary work, which is under your hand. £70. for your Bible Fund, Schools and Tracts, greatly needed by the rising generation, in these evil days, before Christians are to be translated to meet Him. £50. for the Orphanage, that great work on which God’s blessing shows the reality of the promises to him in whom Christ’s words abide. £10. for yourself, as having been the instrument eminently owned of God, to teach to your fellow-Christians precious truths of faith and walk, for growing "strong in the Lord" and for acceptableness to Christ in the soon coining day. 2 Cor. v., 9, etc." This donation was one of the various ways, coming as unexpectedly to us, as the means came to the donor, whereby it pleased the Lord to carry us through the heavy expenses of the year; it also shows, how abundantly the Lord had been pleased to repay the donor for his former kindess.—July 21. By sale of gold and silver articles £125.—July 24. £12. 10s. "instead of insuring 500 acres against hail-storms."

Aug. 2. From Scotland £150.—Aug. 4. From New Zealand £40.—From India £5. for Missions with £5. for the Orphans.—Aug. 11. £500 for Missions and the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain and Italy. The donor of this amount sent me a few years since his first donation, being Five Shillings. From that time he began to give, as the Lord prospered him. In this way not only his own soul has been greatly benefited, but the Lord from that time has so prospered him, that he has again and again been able to send me £500. as also £100. or £200. at a time.

Sep. 2. Received 10s., with the following letter, from one of the former Orphans under our care. "Dear and Honoured Sir, May I be allowed the privilege of writing to you, after so many years have passed, to thank you for the kind and fatherly care you showed me, while in the dear Orphan House, and to ask your forgiveness, for not doing so before. It is now seven years, since I left, and I can never think of it, without a bitter pang, at the remembrance of my ingratitude. I can never thank God enough for placing me there, and oh! if I had my time to spend over again, how different it would be. I know, dear sir, that we all have your prayers, and also the prayers of the dear teachers and helpers, although we have been away some time, and I know also what joy it will give you and them, to know that there is one more lost sheep found. It is some time, since I began to realize what a sinner I am, and also before I could find peace; but I rejoice to say, that at last I am able to put my whole trust in Jesus, and know what a precious Friend He is. I can now see the loving care He has shown me, ever since I was left an Orphan, which is now 18 years ago; and I can say, truly the promise has been fulfilled to me, "When my father and my mother forsake me, then the Lord will take me up." Since I left your fatherly care, I have been in 3 situations, and I am now living in a clergyman’s family as head-nurse, and have been here two years and six months. May I ask your prayers on my behalf, that my feet may not slip, but that I may go steadily on, and be able to show by my life, that I belong to Christ’s fold, and help others on the way; and may I also ask your acceptance of this trifle enclosed, as a very small token of my gratitude, and please use it in whatever way you think best. I know it is impossible ever to repay you, but one day you will be repaid. Oh! how I hope to meet you all again, where we never more shall part; and it is my hope now, that in this world I may be permitted to see the dear Orphan Houses once more. I do not know, whether there are any of the teachers in No. 1 that remember me; but if so, I know how pleased they will be, to see this. May I so far intrude on your valuable time as to tell them how very sorry I am for all the trouble I gave them, and to ask their forgiveness for me, and please give my kind duty to them. Believe me to be your very grateful but unworthy Orphan ****." This letter has been given to show, how, though sometimes the appearance may be, as if our labours were in vain, yet in the end it is made manifest, that they were not; and also, that, though it seems, as if our prayers were not answered, yet, in the Lord’s own time, they are answered. May parents, and guardians, and teachers be greatly encouraged by this letter! On Sep. 16th a gentleman called at the Orphan Houses, who up to that time had been unknown to me, and left, with valuable documents, the following paper: "I **** hereby present to the Orphanage and the other Institutions, conducted by Mr. G. Muller of Bristol £3,000 **** 5 per cent. Railway Stock and 25 shares of the same Company, £10 per share paid, to be disposed of as Mr. Muller shall think best." These documents were sold in the London market and produced £3734. 7s. 6d., of which four-fifths were taken for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, being £2987. 10s. and one-fifth (£746. 17s. 6d.) for the support of the Orphans. See, esteemed Reader, how able and how willing God is, to help those who seek to honour Him, by depending on Him alone. To the Living God, and to Him alone we look for all the means we require for this great work, and these means He supplies us with, simply in answer to prayer, year by year, and has done so now for more than forty-two years, though we need now about Forty Four Thousand Pounds yearly. But not only with regard to means, but for everything else we may require, we look to our Heavenly Father, making known our requests to Him, and He ever helps us, though sometimes we have had many times to repeat our requests to Him, before the answer has come. And what He condescends to do for us, in connection with this Institution, which is now so extensive, He is willing to do for all His children in their particular necessities as to their families, their business, their labour and service for Him, and as to every other way in which they may stand in need of His help. This large donation, just referred to, so kindly given by that donor, helped us to a considerable degree over the heavy expenses connected with these first four Objects of the Institution, during the past year.

Nov. 15. From India £77. 16s. 0d.— £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—Nov. 20. Received the following letter with £150. "Dear sir,— I have great pleasure in again forwarding my mite to be used by you, in carrying on the Lord’s work in your hands. Enclosed is £150., £120. of which is to be used in the work as you think best, the remainder is for your own private use. I would beg to add my testimony to many others, which you have received, as to the blessedness of giving systematically. I have been a farmer for about 20 years, and for about half that time did not act on that principle; and while giving my business as much care and more concern than now, still it was all I could do to make ends meet. About that time I had the subject of ‘giving as the Lord prospered’ brought under my notice, when I there and then vowed to the Lord, that I would give one-tenth of the profits of the farm to His cause, should He be pleased to give me any. From that time I have been prospered in my business far beyond what I ever could have anticipated; I have truly experienced the fulfilment of the promise contained in Luke vi, 38. I continued for a short time giving a tenth, but was gradually constrained to give more and more, until for some years I have been giving one-half, and can truly say, that the longer experience I have in this way, the more blessed do I find it to be. I heard you in Glasgow lately, and beg to thank you for your address on prayer. I trust many of us will have good cause to bless God for your visit. Please unite with me in asking God to give me more and more of His Holy Spirit’s influence, so that I may be enabled to live more by faith and less by sight, continually realising my relation to Him in Christ, and therefore be constrained to live more for His glory. That the Lord may long spare you, to be a testimony to the world of the power of faith, and that you may see much fruit from your tour at this time, is the earnest prayer of yours most sincerely, ****." I make the following remarks on this most instructive and profitable letter. The writer says: "I would beg to add my testimony to many others, which you have received, as to the blessedness of giving systematically." The reader may say, What is meant by giving systematically It means, Not to leave the giving to a certain impulse, to feeling, to powerful emotions under a charity sermon; but to give according to a certain order, or system, viz., "as God prospers us." This order we find laid down by the Holy Ghost through the Apostle Paul in I Cor. xvi, 2. It is true, that this commandment was given with reference to a particular circumstance, but it is most profitably applied to our times, and holds good with regard to ourselves. There is not only no reason, why we may not apply this to ourselves, but rather ought to do so, and upon the first day of the week "lay by in store, as God has prospered us." The following points are particularly to be noticed: 1, "As God has prospered us." If God has been pleased to give unto us much during the week, it is suitable that, constrained by gratitude and love, we should give much back to him in return, for His work or His poor. 2, If it be asked, How much should I give of what God is pleased to give to me? The reply is, no rule can be laid down. According to the grace and the knowledge the individual believers have, it is left to them. The Lord desires willing, cheerful givers; and therefore no law is given, under the present dispensation, regarding this point; yet, let it be remembered, that if the Israelites after the flesh were commanded to give the tenth, we, the Israel of God, the believers in the Lord Jesus, whose calling is a heavenly calling, not only may give the same, but should seek to give considerably more. 3, They were to attend to this every Lord’s day, every first day of week. Regularly, orderly, they were to attend to this. In most cases it can be known, how much the Lord has been pleased to give to us, during the previous week; but, suppose that, through particular circumstances, we could not fully ascertain this, then we should act according to the best of our judgment in the matter; and, should it afterwards be clearly seen, that we had not given enough, we may add to what we did give. But perhaps one may reply: If I acted thus, how are my bad debts to be covered; how shall I make up for other losses: how for flat and dull times in my business, etc.? Have you weighed before God, dear reader, that often God allows "bad debts," "losses in other respects," and "flat and dull times in business" to befall His children, because they withhold more than is meet; and that they would escape these things were they to act more as stewards and not as owners? 4, Notice especially that this commandment was not only given to one class of the believers, but to the rich, the middle class, and the poor; for though, at certain times, those who are poor, might have nothing to give, yet, at some time or other they might be particularly prospered, and have something to give. No class therefore was exempted. 5, Should it be said, How should I lay by in store? the reply is, that we may actually lay aside what we set apart for the Lord (and that in most cases may be the best); or we may keep a memorandum book, entering, how much we have put aside, for the Lord’s work and the poor; and how much, out of this, we have expended, and from time to time make up the account.—The writer of the letter goes on: "I have been a farmer for about 20 years, and for about half that time did not act on that principle; and while giving my business as much care and more concern than now, still it was all I could do to make ends meet." The writer attended with carefulness to His business; as he was a Christian, we have also reason to believe that he sought God’s blessing, but he practically forgot to look upon himself as a steward; and so it came, that he did not prosper as was the case afterwards. He goes on to write: "About that time I had the subject of ‘giving as the Lord prospered’ brought under my notice, when I there and then vowed to the Lord, that I would give one-tenth of the profits of the farm to His cause, should He be pleased to give me any. From that time I have been prospered in my business far beyond what I ever could have anticipated; I have truly experienced the fulfilment of the promise, contained in Luke vi, 38." Notice, how the prosperity in business was brought about. The writer had not previously neglected it, and only now paid attention to it; but previously he did not carry on his business as a steward for the Lord, but for himself as owner thereof. He now altered his course, and became the Lord’s steward, and thus acting according to the mind of the Lord, the Lord needed no longer to withhold prosperity from him; but could intrust him with more.—Have all my readers weighed the passage, to which the writer of the letter refers: "Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosoms"? Luke vi, 38. The word was spoken by the Lord Jesus. It refers evidently to the present dispensation. This word will be fulfilled in the case of those who act according to this verse. The writer of the letter found it thus. I have found it thus, thousands and tens of thousands of the children of God have found it thus. Of course, if any one from vanity or other unholy motives were to give, God could not fulfil this word.—Lastly the writer says: "I continued for a short time giving a tenth, but was gradually constrained to give more and more, until for some years I have been giving one-half, and can truly say, that the longer experience I have in this way, the more blessed do I find it to be." Notice 1, He gives after a short time more than a tenth. So great is the blessedness of giving, both temporarily and spiritually, that, if we do give from right motives, we are blessed in our souls and so blessed in our basket and store, that we shall give more and more, even as the writer gave only for a short time a tenth. The very blessing he received led him to give more than a tenth. He did not miss the tenth; he was not a loser on account of giving a tenth, but a gainer, both temporally and spiritually. And it was this which led him to give a fifth, a fourth, a third of his profits, yea soon one half. How is it in this respect with the Reader? How much, dear Reader, do you give back to the Lord? 2, The writer says: "I can truly say, that the longer experience I have in this way, the more blessed do 1 find it to be." Notice this particularly. Here is no acting under excitement. More than ten years have passed, during which the writer of this letter has acted on these principles, and the more hundreds and thousands he spends for the Lord, the more blessed does he find it. Now, esteemed Reader, whether you belong to the wealthy, the middle class, or the poor, if you have not previously acted on these principles, I beseech you to do so. I have done so for forty-seven years, and can assure you that both temporally and Spiritually, I have been abundantly blessed in doing so.

Dec. 23. Anonymously left at my house £25. for Missions, and £25. for the Orphans.—Dec. 30. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Dec. 31. Great as our expenses have been, during this year, the Lord has habitually helped us, and brought us now to the close of it; and, in the full assurance of faith, that He, in His faithful love, will help us during the coming year also, we go forward to it.

March 9, 1876. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—March 15. From Wales £6. 15s. 6d. for Missions in Italy and Spain, with £10. for the support of the Orphans. The kind donor has often sent a similar donation.

May 1. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—May 8. From Bengal, India, £10.—From Adelaide, South Australia, £20.—May 12. Received £1. 5s. 6d. from one of the former Orphans, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, It is with feelings of deep gratitude, that I now write again, to thank you for all the kindness I received when under your paternal care; for it was there that I first learned to love my Saviour, in whose footsteps I have been trying to walk ever since. I feel very grateful for having been put in so comfortable a situation as that in which I have just completed my five years’ apprenticeship, and I have now great pleasure in sending you 5s. 6d., my first week’s wages [besides board and lodging]. My master very kindly gave me £5., on completing my apprenticeship, one pound of which I beg also to enclose for disposal as you may think proper. I have engaged to live with my master for another year, and I hope that this year may be as happy a one as each of the five that I have already served him. I thank you for the Report you so kindly sent me, the reading of which afforded me much pleasure. I thank you also for the kindness manifested towards my sister, who I suppose is still under your care. Praying that God may still spare your life many more years to be the Orphans’ friend, I remain your grateful Orphan, ****."—May 16. From Otago, New Zealand, £l0.—May 23. From Oxfordshire £100. for Foreign Missions.—May 26. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1876, to May 26, 1877. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1876, to May 26, 1877. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

When we began the period, we had, on May 26, 1876, the balance of £356. l9s. 4¼d. left for these Objects. When it is considered, that during the year from May 26th, 1875 to May 26th, 1876 our expenses for these Objects were £17643. 15s. 0½d., the reader sees, how small our balance was, to begin the year with, especially as we do not go in debt. Our hope was now again in the Living God, who for more than forty-two years had never failed us. We trusted in Him, and in Him alone; and He graciously was pleased to supply us during the past year also with what we needed. I give now some instances as to the way, which God was pleased to use for our supply, in answer to our daily prayers.

June 6, 1876, From Pennsylvania, United States of America, £10.—June 8. From ten donors in Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £15. 8s. 6d.—June 13. From Victoria, Australia, £5. 5s.— From Adelaide, South Australia, £5.—June 21. From Ireland for Missions, £100.

July 5. Received £500. from a donor, whose first donation to the Institution was 5s. He had long been undecided, as to whether he could afford to give anything at all to the Lord’s work, as he considered that he ought first to be more prosperous in his business before he began to give; but at last he came to the decision, that he would wait no longer for greater prosperity, and give, according to his means. Since then the Lord began to prosper this donor so, as that he was able to send me much larger sums, and shortly hundreds of pounds, and repeatedly since £500. at once; having stated to me, that since he began to act as a steward for the Lord, he could send me with greater ease £500., than the first donation of 5s.—July 19. From New Zealand £4., with £4. for the Orphans.—July 22. From Jersey £50. for Missions.—July 24. £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—By sale of gold and silver articles, dentist gold and diamonds, given for the benefit of the Institution, £161. 13s. 6d. See Christian reader, how much may be obtained, by putting aside for the work of the Lord such superfluities. Were we all more in earnest, to see how much we can do for the spread of the Gospel, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and evangelical Tracts, for the instruction of poor children, for the support of the poor, etc., it would be found that there is in the church of God an abundance of pecuniary means to accomplish ten times as much as is accomplished now, in so far as regards means. We should say to ourselves individually, What can I do? How much can I spare? What needless articles have I to give? How can I practice self-denial, that I may have more to give? And thus could not only far more be accomplished than is now accomplished, but our own souls would thus be greatly blessed, whilst, by withholding more than is meet, we not only hinder the progress of the work of God, but injure our own souls.—July 27. Received 5s. from one of the former Orphans, who for more than twenty years has known the Lord, and walked in the ways of the Lord, with the following letter: "Much loved and honoured Sir, I write to ask your acceptance of the enclosed trifle, to be used as most needed. I am thankful, that I can send even so small a sum, to be used for God, as it is my earnest desire by my life and conversation to speak to others of a Saviour’s love, and tell how great things He hath done for me.—I have, indeed, much cause to praise Him for having directed your steps to Liverpool, as it was there our Heavenly Father was pleased to bless the preached Word through you, to the salvation of my beloved brother; and I most earnestly pray, you may still have strength to continue your work and labour of love for many years to come, together with all your faithful helpers in the work. Please to excuse this intrusion on your precious time, and believe me to remain, dear Sir, Your ever grateful Orphan, ****." The brother to whom the former Orphan refers, was also once an Orphan under our care, but did not, as his sister, leave the Orphan Institution as a believer in the Lord Jesus. He was, however, followed by our prayers; and, there is reason to believe, that many hundreds of prayers ascended to the Lord from the heart of his Christian sister. While I was preaching in January and February, 1876, in the immense Victoria Hall in Liverpool, erected for the dear American brethren, Moody and Sankey, the brother of the Orphan who writes this letter, and who is now commander of a merchant ship, came to hear me, and was, the very first time that I preached there, converted. Thus the Lord answered our prayers, and the prayers of his Christian sister for him, though only after many years. May through this the Christian reader be encouraged to continue to pray for his unconverted relatives!

Aug. 1. From the Bengal Presidency, India, £90. for these Objects, with £10. for myse1f.—Aug. 8. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200,—Aug. 21. From Ireland for Missions, £l00.—Aug. 29. From London £160. with £10. for myself.—From Berlin £34. 15s. 5d. This donation comes from a disciple of the Lord Jesus, who considers it a privilege to give to the work of the Lord a little capital, which he had saved, but which he now considers better spent for the Lord than to be kept. Since this donation was received, I have had the opportunity of becoming personally acquainted with the donor, and to hear from him, how greatly the Lord has been pleased to bless his soul through this act.

Sep. 5. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £24. 5s. 3d. for Missions, £100. for the support of the Orphans, and £5. for myself.—From a donor, who repeatedly has thus helped us, 19 Interest Warrants for these Objects, amounting to £74. 1s. 3d., deducting the Income Tax; and 10 Interest Warrants, amounting to £25. 7s. 10d., for the Orphans.—Sep. 19. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.

Oct. 7. £500. from two children of God, who, through the sale of some property, which had been left to them, were able to give this sum.—Oct. 9. From Christian Friends in Berne, 300 francs for the Schools in Spain, and 500 francs for the support of the Orphans.—From Heinrichsbad, Switzerland, £5. 18s. 5d.—From St. Gallen, Switzerland, 83 francs.—Oct. 11. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £56. 7s. 6d.—Oct. 13. From Switzerland 1,000 francs.—Oct. 14. From San Francisco, California, £1. L0s. 0d. The reader will have observed from what a variety of places not only, but also countries, the donations are received; yet all, without application to any individuals, only in answer to prayer. Not one out of fifty of the donors we know personally, and by far the greater part not even by name, till we receive their donations. Thus the Lord works for us, and helps us with means to carry on this Institution, and has done so for forty-three years now.

Nov. 2. £500. from two children of God, who, through the sale of some property, which had been left to them, were able to give this sum.—Nov. 11. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Nov. 17. From Cambridgeshire £81. 1s. 8d.—Nov. 18. From the neighbourhood of Stirling £100. with £10. for my own personal necessities.—Nov. 21. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £25. for Missions, £70. for the Orphans, and £5. for myself.—Nov. 27. From Jersey £50. for Missions in China, India, and Spain.

Dec. 15. From Reutlingen in Wurtemberg 220 Mark and 2s.—From Ober-Urbach in Wurtemberg 135 Mark and 60 German Pence.—Dec. 29. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Dec. 31, 1876. We have, in connection with this Institution also, abundant reason for praise and thanksgiving, at the close of another year. Since this new period commenced, on May 26, 1876, the Lord has in every way, as He is wont to do, helped and blessed the labour of our hands; and during these seven months and five days the total income for the various Objects of the Institution has been above £23,000., as the result of prayer and faith. Truly we do not wait upon Him in vain! May the Christian reader thereby be encouraged, in all his various necessities, of whatever kind they may be, to come with them to God, and he will find, as we do, that it is not in vain to wait upon God; but that He is now the Living God, ready to listen to the supplications of His children, as in the days of the prophets and apostles of old. These remarks are not made, as if I meant to convey thereby, that all the children of God should establish schools, or found Orphan Institutions, and trust in God for the needed funds: for such work an especial call is needed; but I mean to say, that in all our family matters, in our earthly occupation, in our labour in general for the Lord, in our spiritual conflict, in our trials and afflictions, we should thus be encouraged to come to the Lord and expect help and support from Him through prayer and faith, which I have found for 48 years my universal remedy for all my difficulties and necessities. When in the year 1835 I began the Orphan work, I had, in doing so, particularly in view, through this work to prove to the world at large, and to the church at large, that the Living God is now, as thousands of years since, the Living God, and that we may reckon on Him, as those did who really knew Him thousands of years ago. That end has been particularly answered by this Institution. Tens of thousands of souls have indeed been converted through the operations of the various Objects of the Institution, for which I adore and magnify the Lord; but the greatest blessing, which I have reason to believe, which has resulted from it, is, that thereby hundreds of thousands of children of God, in very many parts of the world, have been encouraged, in all simplicity to trust in God. While I am writing this, at Nimwegen in Holland, another precious proof of this kind has just been brought under my own eyes, of which I have had, I might almost say numberless instances, it is this: A Christian evangelist, simply through reading about the Orphan work in Bristol, had it laid on his heart to care about Orphans, and was encouraged by my example, solely in dependence on the Lord, to take them up. He began in the year 1863 with three at Nimwegen in Holland, and he has at present 453 in an Institution, near Nimwegen, through which I and my dear wife went, and which we saw with our own eyes with the deepest interest.

In the same way that I began to work, and have gone on in for more than 42 years, he has now worked about fourteen years, trusting alone in God, never going in debt; and year after year the Lord has enlarged the work and given him everything that he has needed. Very many Orphan Institutions similarly have been begun in various parts of the world, the founders being encouraged through what God has done for us in Bristol. His name be magnified for it!

Jan. 1, 1877. As the old year has closed with blessing, so the new year began in the same way. Many donations, and some considerable ones, were received this very day.—Jan. 5. From Hampshire £75. for Foreign Missions, £75. for the Bible Fund, £300. for the Orphans, and £50. for myself. The kind donor wrote, with regard for the donation for myself, that it was especially sent, on account of my considerable expenses in moving about on the Continent from town to town, and from country to country.—From Heidelberg 120 Mark. Also on Jan. 1st were received 20 Mark, and on the 3rd 40 Mark from Heidelberg.—Jan. 15. From Bonn £4. 12s. 6d., with £4. l2s. 6d. for myself.— Jan. 16. From Bonn 16s.—Jan. 26. £200. from two children of God, who, through the sale of some property, which had been left to them, were able to give this sum.—From Cologne 40 Mark for Missions.

Feb. 6. From Wesel 3 Mark, ditto 3 Mark, ditto 227 1/5 Mark.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £250.—Feb. 8. From Ireland £250. for Missions.—Feb. 9. Legacy of the late Mrs. Mc. M. £30., with £10. for the Orphans—Feb. 12. From Ireland for Missions £102. 18s. 4d.—Feb. 21. From Norway £6. The reader cannot but observe from what a variety of countries our donations come. The Lord, in many parts of the earth, in answer to our prayers, inclines the hearts of His children, to remember our need.—Feb. 26. £300. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

April 2. £200. from two children of God, who, through the sale of some property, which had been left to them, were able to give this sum.—April 3. From a small shopkeeper in Bedfordshire £5. The donor sends us help, as the Lord prospers him in his business, and has sent to us very many times a similar sum.—April 10. £200. from two children of God, to whom this sum had been left as a legacy, and who thus had the privilege of being able to give this amount.—April 23. Legacy of the late Miss B. £19. l9s. for circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and £19. 19s. for the support of the Orphans. April 25. From Kent £151. l7s. 10d.

May 2. From Lubeck 40 Mark for Missions in China, and 20 Mark and 5 Mark for the Orphans.—May 5. From Hanover 20 Mark and 40 Mark.—May 14. From Yorkshire for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in foreign lands £150., and for the support of the Orphans £150.—May 16. £5. 11s., with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I enclose a cheque, value £5. 11s., for your good work, being a penny for every pound’s worth of goods, sold since the 1st of January. Use it as you think best. Since I have given systematically to God’s cause, I have had many times my faith severely tried. I have had losses in business, losses in health, etc., and I have been sometimes tempted almost to give it up. But I thank God I have been brought through thus far; and I feel assured, if I continue to trust in Him, I shall be brought through. Last year was a bad year for business men generally. I continued to give to God’s cause much the same, as I had been accustomed. A few days before I made up my yearly accounts, I received a letter from a gentleman, an acquaintance, saying that he bad just been balancing up his accounts for the year, and knowing I had been afflicted, etc., he hoped I would accept the enclosed cheque for £50. for my own private use. How kind of my Heavenly Father, to remember me in such a noble manner! Yours sincerely, ****." The reader has to notice, how this present of £50. repays what would be given on the receipt of £12,000. at one penny per pound.—May 21. From a farmer in South Africa £50.—May 23. From North Wales I received the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose you in Post Office Orders the sum of £11. 6s. 7d., which I leave to your best judgment. Since I received your last Report in September last, I have put by threepence on every pound that I have received in business, for your Institution; and although the times are become so poor, I am happy to say, we do meet our bills continually. I believe circumstances are nothing in the Lord’s way, if we trust in Him, etc."—May 26. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, from eight donors £14. 3s. 6d.— £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

The Lord has helped us through one more year, to meet the expenses connected with the school—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund; but again and again all our means for these first four Objects of the Institution were gone, completely gone. Under these circumstances our Universal Remedy, prayer and faith, was used, and only this. My helpers in Bristol, I and my dear wife in Switzerland, Germany, or Holland, waited upon God, and He helped, without our appealing to any one, without making even known our need to any one, except speaking about it, in believing prayer, to our Heavenly Father. We had His ear and His heart, for Jesus’ sake, and were helped; and thus it has been, that we have been able to accomplish what we have, in connection with these first four Objects of the Institution, and are even able, with a small balance in hand for them, to close the year. It is unspeakably blessed so to know God, as to be able fully to confide in Him, at all times and under all circumstances, even the most trying; and in order that my younger brethren in Christ may be helped so to do, therefore do I write as I do, and therefore I seek now also, as far as my position in Bristol allows of it, to go from city to city, and from country to country, to spend the evening of my life, to testify to the blessedness of truly knowing God in Christ, as He has revealed Himself in the Holy Scriptures.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878. Letters from Donors, Practical Remarks, &c.

26, 1877 to May 26, 1878. Letters from Donors, Practical Remarks, &c.

At the beginning of the last year, we had only the small balance of £71. 19s. 2½d. in hand. Our expenses for these Objects had been £16,430. during the year before; therefore our balance was not enough for the fourth part of the requirements of one single week, according to our average expenses. But, poor as we were, our infinitely rich Heavenly Father remained to us; to Him we betook ourselves in prayer, and, as He had done many thousands of times before, during the previous forty-three years, so He helped us during the forty-fourth year also, though not once, nor twice, but again and again all our money, to the last shilling, for these Objects, was gone. I particularly mention this, because some of our Readers suppose, that we had trials of faith, with reference to pecumary supplies, only many years since, and think that at present we continually abound. I refer now to some of the means, which the Lord was pleased to use in supplying our wants.

June 27. We entered today upon the second month of this new period of the Institution, without a penny in hand for these Objects, when in the course of the day came in from Redland, from a most unexpected donor, to make the hand of God the more manifest, £50.; and from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200. Also from Rotterdam 40 florins=£3. 2s. 8d.—June 28. From a small tradesman in Bedfordshire, who contributes as the Lord prospers him, £5. Received also from Belgium, £20. On June 30th, when again all money was gone for these Objects, I received from Scotland £500. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, It has been in my mind for some days to send you the enclosed for the work of the Lord in your hands, believing it His will for me so to do. He has bid us lay up treasure in heaven. I am glad to see you are going to America. The Lord bless you and your dear wife, and manifest Himself to you more and more, Yours very truly ****." By these and other donations, though repeatedly during the past month all was expended, we were carried to the beginning of July, having, in answer to much prayer, been able to meet all our expenses.

July 9. A servant of the Lord Jesus Christ, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, having most unexpectedly received £56. 4s. 11d., gladly gave it for these Objects.—July 11. From Ireland £500. for missions. The donor will now have joy in being informed, which, when the money came to hand, was purposely not written to him, that, when his kind donation was received, all our money was gone for this Object, and the donation was the fruit of many prayers.—July 14. From Greenock £100., with £20. for my own personal expenses.—July 25. By sale of gold and silver articles, diamonds, dentist gold, &c., £190. 19s.—From Sussex £93. 18s. ld.—July 28, From Wales £100., with £39. for the Orphans and £30. for my own personal expenses.—July 30. Received £10. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Herewith is Banker’s Draft for Ten Pounds, which please apply as you shall judge best, on behalf of the several or either of the Objects under your charge, and kindly acknowledge as above. The amount should have been sent in instalments previously, the writer having some years since resolved, before God, to discontinue a habit of doubtful character, and send the cost of it to your Institution. The resolution formed in time of trouble was not adhered to, but God has recently brought my sin to my remembrance, by again sending distress; and not only so, but through the ministry of His Word some months since ("Grieve not the Spirit of God") gave me victory over the habit referred to. I calculate, the practice costs something like 26s. per annum, and the enclosed covers a period from seven to eight years to about this time. I shall be a debtor to your Institution in that sum as long as I am spared, or the Lord come, and hope to send it annually. I do not wish my name to appear—my position is a very humble one—but shall be obliged by an interest in your prayers, especially as being now placed in perplexing circumstances, that I maybe able to rely upon God, when circumstances are mysterious and perplexing, and that I may grow in conformity to our dear Lord. With Christian love I remain, Dear Sir, yours truly ****."—From Tobago £5.—July 31. From the neighbourhood of Chippenham £100. for Foreign Missions.—On the same day we received from London, £25. for Home Missions, £25. for Foreign Missions, and £20. for the Orphans. And yet further from Kensington £30. for Missions, £20. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, £30. for the Orphans and £20. for myself. These, and other donations, not referred to, carried us through the month of July, in which we had been again reduced to great poverty, but in which, as in thousands of times before, we were helped, not by exposing our need to our fellowmen, and asking them for help, but by taking it in confiding prayer to our Heavenly Father.

Aug. 2. From Wales £1. for Foreign Missions, "instead of insuring cows."—Aug. 9. From Brazil £8.— Aug. 13. From China £2. 10s. with £2. 10s. for the Orphans.—Aug. 14. From Scotland £100.— From Clifton from a poor Christian 1s. for Missions to the Jews.— Aug. 18. From a servant of the Lord Jesus Christ, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Aug. 20. From Somersetshire £97.—Aug. 23. From Scotland £50. for Foreign Missions, £90. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself. During the past three years and three months, whilst almost constantly moving about from city to city and country to country, in connection with my preaching tours, the Lord was pleased, as during the 45 years previously, to supply all my need; so that while I was travelling about for l4½ months in England, Scotland and Ireland, with my dear wife, at a very heavy expense, God helped us. Afterwards I was 10½ months labouring in the Word in Switzerland, the German Empire and the Kingdom of Holland, when the expenses were still greater; yet again God bountifully supplied me. Now on the day on which this last mentioned present for myself arrived, I went with my dear wife on board a steamer to sail for America. The passage money and extra preparations for that country, took a considerable sum: but God supplied all. Then, on our arrival in the United States, we had to travel many thousands of miles and to live at Hotels at a very heavy expense; but God supplied all our need; and after all was accomplished, though our return to Europe required the expenditure of a considerable sum, yet we lacked nothing. And thus, with the prospect before me, of spending the evening of my life in going from country to country, and of having to meet all the heavy expenses connected with this mode of life, which are three times greater than our former housekeeping, I find it unspeakably blessed to have my Father in Heaven to go to for the supply of all my wants; for I am sure, that He will never leave me nor forsake me.

Sep. 22. From Berkshire forty-two coupons, amounting to £147. 6s. 5d.—Sep. 24. From Greenock £50.—From Ireland £50. for labourers in the Gospel in India, and £50. for Foreign Missions generally—Sep. 25. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, to whom had been left a legacy, £500.—Sep. 27. Received 1s. 6d. from one of the former Orphans, with the following letter: "Dear and Respected Sir, I am very pleased to be able to send you my letter on your birthday. May it please our Heavenly Father to spare you to see many more. Please to accept my best wishes, both for yourself and dear Mrs. Muller. I hope you are both well. I must thank you very much indeed for the Report you so kindly sent me. I have read it through with very great pleasure. It seems glorious to read of all God’s work and the dear missionaries far away. Please to accept my mite for them; it will buy some poor heathen a Bible. I have been very poorly, but, thanks to our kind Father in Heaven, I am a little better, When I was ill, I felt such a longing to go home to glory; but it is sweet to be able to work a little longer. Praying that God may be with us all, I remain, your affectionate and grateful Orphan ****."

Oct. 6. From the neighbourhood of Orkney £3., with this statement: " Since I began to devote a regular proportion of my earnings to the cause of God, He has, I rejoice to say, greatly increased both my ability and my desire to do so."—On Oct. 16th we received the following letter, with £2. 2s. 6d. for Foreign Missions and £8. 10s. for the Orphans: "Dear Sir, I enclose £10. 12s. 6d. with the following remarks. On 19th June 1871 I commenced to pray in regard to a financial loss, which I suffered in India; and at different times I marked down ten per cent, for your Orphans and two and a half per cent, for your Foreign Missions, besides something else to the Lord; and now I have got a settlement for £85. as a compromise. This is a gracious answer to prayer, as the people offered me only £14., which I refused, and still prayed on. Several times lately I rose before daylight, and was on my knees for three hours, praying about this and other matters, this being No. 1 on the list of business, which I laid before the Lord. Glory to His name, He has now answered me! I am yours truly, ****." May this letter greatly encourage the reader yet further and further, and more earnestly than ever, to bring his necessities in prayer before God, and it will be seen in the end, though it may be after a long time only, that we do not do so in vain.—Oct. 25. A lady in Clifton, near Bristol, gave an American Railroad Company’s Bond for One Thousand Dollars.—Oct. 26. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £80., with £100. for the Orphans and £20. for myself.—This last mentioned donation came in most seasonably, for we had nothing at all in hand for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, and it was thus the fruit of many prayers.—

Nov. 3. Received 11s. 8d. for Foreign Missions and 5s. for Tracts, with the following statement: "Last month I was in need of certain articles, which I could not afford. Satan suggested, that I was acting very foolishly in sending money for the cause of the Lord, when I was in such need myself. Malachi iii, 8—12, stopped his mouth. A few days after this, the articles I needed were given to me by a brother, after asking the Lord to let me prove His faithfulness." A very profitable paragraph.—Nov. 5. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and who had a legacy left to him, £500.— Nov. 29. Though we have been helped now through one half of the present year, yet we have to begin the seventh month of this present period, without any means whatever for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund; but our eyes are upon the Lord, believing that He, who is sustaining this work in the forty-fourth year, will yet help us, and not suffer us to be confounded.—Nov. 30. From Cambridge, for Missions in India, £67. 12s. 3d.

Dec. 1. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and to whom had been left a legacy, £500.— Dec. 5. From Paisley, £2, with the following statement: "This is sent you as a thank-offering to the Lord for hearing and answering prayer on behalf of a sick horse. The veterinary surgeon had given him up for lost. So I arranged, when laying the case before the Lord, that, if the horse got well, I would send you two pounds. The horse is now as well as ever, and I herewith gladly send you the two pounds." This case should be a further encouragement to the reader, to commit all matters into the hands of our Heavenly Father, even when all natural prospects of help have completely vanished.—Dec. 10. From Scotland, £l00.—Dec 12. Legacy of the late Mrs. C. W. £50., with £50. for the Orphans.—Dec. 26. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and who had a legacy left to him, £500.—Dec. 27. The seventh month we began with nothing in hand, but in the course of it the Lord was pleased to give to us, in answer to much prayer, £1,890., so that we were able, not only to meet the many demands for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund, but are able to begin the eighth month of this period with £259. 19s. 9d. in hand.—From the neighbourhood of Manchester, £30. for the Bible—, Tract— and Mission-Fund, £60. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—Dec. 31, 1877. We are brought to the close of another year regarding our School—, Bible—, Missionary—, and Book and Tract Operations, and have again abundant reason to praise the Lord for His goodness to us. In every way, as usual, He has helped us during the past year, and though our difficulties have not been few, especially in reference to the schools at Home and Abroad; yet the Lord has always, in the end, supplied us with teachers and everything else we required; and, as to pecuniary means, though we have been again and again without a pound in hand for the first four objects of the Institution, we are brought to the close of it with a balance of about £200. in hand. And now, in the full assurance of faith, that we shall be helped during the coming year also, we joyfully enter upon the year 1878.

Jan. 1, 1878. On this first day of the new year we received various donations, of which I only refer to the following. From Scotland £100. From Weston-super-Mare £20. for Missions and £20. for the Orphans. From a Bristol donor, £13. for Home and Foreign Missions.— Jan. 2. £1., with this statement: "I have declined insuring my goods and stock against fire this year, and send you the money it costs, instead."—Jan. 3. From one of the former Orphans, £3.—Jan. 14. From Berlin, £3.—Jan. 16. From Hampshire, £150. for the Bible and Mission Fund, £300. for the support of the Orphans, and £50. for myself. The last amount was especially sent by the kind donor on account of my heavy expenses in going about from city to city and country to country in the service of the Gospel.—Jan. 21. From Madras, £37. 16s. 0d.—Jan. 27. Through the eighth month, also, we have been helped, by means of prayer and faith, have been able to meet again all the many demands for these four Objects, and enter with a balance of £51. 13s. 8½d. upon the ninth month.—Jan. 28. From Paris, £10.—Jan. 31. From Cork, £50.

Feb. 1. From Berkshire in railway and other coupons, £157. 5s. 3d.—Feb. 25. Received from a former Orphan £1. with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, It is with much pleasure ask your acceptance of the enclosed small sum, which please to appropriate for the object most needed.—It is with feelings of deep gratitude that I now write, to thank you for the kind parental care bestowed upon me, while in the dear Orphan House, and upon my younger brother; who, I am happy to say, is at present progressing favourably under a firm of nursery gardeners.—It is now three months since I completed the term of my apprenticeship, and am at present working for a master builder in London, where I hope to improve myself, as it is a first class shop. Dear Sir, if it is convenient, will you please to let me have my Indentures, as I may be required to produce them at some future time. I hope the Lord may still spare you for many years, to carry on your great and good work of feeding, clothing and educating poor Orphan children. Please remember me to Mr. Wright and Mr. French, and, dear Sir, please to accept the grateful love of an Orphan boy, who has, through your instrumentality, found a good place on earth, and I hope a resting place in heaven. I remain, dear Sir, your grateful Orphan,****."—Feb. 26. From Norway as the legacy of the late Miss H. P. £5. for Missions to the Jews, and £5. for Missions to the heathen.—Feb. 27. The heavy expenses of the ninth month also the Lord has enabled us to meet through prayer and faith, and we are able to enter upon the tenth month of this period with a balance of £90. 12s. l½d. in hand for these four objects.

March 4. From Ireland £100. for Missions.—March 9. The only income today for the School—, Bible—, Missionary_ and Tract Fund was 10s. from King’s College Hospital, London. The reader may place himself in our position, considering how our eyes, under such circumstances, need to be directed to the Lord.—-March 11. £200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, and to whom had been left a legacy.—March 12. Only 8s. was received today, for the expenses of these four Objects.—March 16. Today nothing at all has come in for these four Objects; but our eyes are up to the Lord.—March 18. From a lady in Clifton, £15. for Missions.—March 23. From Darmstadt 19s. 6d., with 19s. 6d. for myself. This was the only donation received for these four Objects today.—March 26. From Norwich £2. 8s. for the Orphans and £1. 10s. for Missions, with the following letter: "Sir, I have much pleasure in sending £2. 8s. for the use of the Orphans, being the dividend up to February last on six shares, which I have in a Temperance Hotel Company in Manchester, and which sum I have devoted annually, and whilst I live (D.V.) intend to do, for the use of the Orphans. But in addition I send for the labourers in Mission Work, either at Home or Abroad, as under. Monday, February 18 last, I met with an accident, by which I broke my left arm and had other injuries, but am indeed thankful, it was not my right arm. I give 10s. as a thank-offering to a loving Father for that mercy. How grateful that it was not my neck or head. I offer as a feeble expression of praise to that gracious Being, who watches our every step, £1. for such a remarkable providence, and feel the preciousness of I Chronicles, xxix, 14. May the Good Lord still greatly bless you, and all the noble staff of workers, and all your work. I am, dear Sir, yours respectfully in the best of bonds, ****."—March 27. During the month from Feb. 27 to this day our faith has been greatly tried, in reference to means for these four Objects, as again and again nothing at all has been in hand. Under these circumstances we encouraged ourselves in God, and seek to rely upon His faithful word of promise. We also are mindful of the fact, that for forty-four years the Lord has upheld this work, and that He will not now suffer us to be confounded, though our expenses for all the various departments are so great. We have to enter upon the eleventh month of this period, without any thing in hand for these Objects.—March 29. From believers at Cork, for Missions, £4. 5s. 6d.—From Weston-super-Mare £10. for the Bible Fund, £20. for Missions, and £10. for the Tract Fund. Also from the same place £5. for Missions, and £5. for the Orphans.

April 2. From a Christian servant £5.—April 3. £25. with "Thanks be unto God for His unspeakable gift."— April 12. £50. (less legacy duty) as the legacy of the late Miss M. A. R. for Missions.—April 15. From Stuttgart £4., with £1. for the Orplaans.—April 26. £15., with "Thanks be unto God for His unspeakable gift."—April 27. The eleventh month was like the tenth, constant trial of faith; and we have again to enter in poverty upon the twelfth month, yet are expecting larger sums from our Heavenly Father and His faithful help, which we have enjoyed for so many years.

May 2. £600. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—May 21. From believers near Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, for China and other Foreign Missions, £8.—May 25. From Graham’s Town, Cape of Good Hope, £1., £10., £5., £5., £1., £1., £1., £1. and 10s. 6d.

We were brought to the close of the year in which our faith had been so greatly and so many times tried in reference to means, as well as in other respects; yet we were helped through all. Poor as we had been so many times, still we saw it close with the small balance of £41. 17s. 8d. in band. Delighted we should have been, to have done far more for the dear missionary brethren, both at Home and Abroad, had we possessed the means; but, as we had them not, we bowed under the hand of God with patient submission rather than contract debt, and expect that the Lord, in His own time, will again give to us the joy of doing more in this particular also, even as He has been pleased to honour us in accomplishing as much as we have in the School—, Bible— and Tract operations.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880 Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1879 to May 26, 1880 Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

With a balance in hand of £41. 17s. 8d. for these Objects, we began the last year. This sum is not the average expense for one day in the year, for these Objects. But we had to provide the average expenses for 365 days, in order to be carried through the year; and every shilling of the total was only to be obtained by prayer and faith, as no one is asked directly or indirectly for anything. Therefore there was again abundant room for the exercise of faith and for much prayer. I state this, because many are entirely mistaken in supposing that, whilst several years ago our faith was tried, this is not the case now. The truth, however, is this, that, whilst formerly our faith was exercised about little things, comparatively, it is exercised about great things now, so that for the hundreds of pounds we needed then we require now Tens of Thousands; and for the six Schools we had to provide for at that time, we have now twenty times as many; for the hundreds of copies of the word of God we circulated then, we circulate now tens of thousands; for the few missionaries we sought to aid then, we gladly seek to assist now above 150; for the few tens of thousands of books, pamphlets and tracts we circulated then, we circulate now Millions, through the condescension of the Lord. But all this makes prayer and faith more than ever needful; and we find, at the same time, how blessed it is, to have an infinitely rich and loving Friend in heaven, to whom we can unbosom ourselves, and who is ready to help. I give now some of the ways, in which it pleased the Lord, during the past year again, to give us help to accomplish, regarding these first four Objects of the Institution, what we have been able to do.

July 9. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the Love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £117. 2s. 2d.—July 11. From Scotland £100. This £100 came in when we had nothing at all left.—July 17. From Redland we received £30., when all our means for these Objects were gone.—July 22. The total income of today and yesterday was £3. 7s. 7d. The Lord allowed us to be brought thus low, before He was graciously pleased to send us means, and more means than we have ever received, within the same time, during all the 45 years that the Institution had been in existence.—There is now nothing at all in hand for these Objects.—July 27. Received by sale of gold and silver articles, dentist gold, gold and silver watches, gold and silver coins, diamonds, etc., £243. 10s.—From Scotland, £130., with. £20. for my own personal expenses.—July 30. From H. B. £100., as a thankoffering, for Missions. Most gratefully was this donation received for Missions, because it is greatly in our hearts to aid missionary brethren.

Aug. 5. From Adelaide, South Australia, £20., £1., and £1.—Aug. 14. From Sussex £250.—Aug. 19. The total of the Income for these Objects, from May 26th up to this day, has been £3326. 11s. 2½d. The total of the expenditure, for them, has been £3057. 11s. 9d., so that, while we began the year with £41. 17s. 8d. in hand, we had, after being able to meet the expenses of nearly three months, £268. 19s. 4d. left.—Aug. 22. Received £22. with the following letter; "Dear Mr. Muller, I have much pleasure in sending you the enclosed cheque for £22., the price realized for a cow. It was given to me as a calf, after which, to all human appearance, it would have died; but the gracious Lord spared its life, I believe, in answer to prayer. It was thus laid on my mind, that the price realized, whenever sold, I should send to you, for the Lord’s work under your care. Please place it for what purpose you think best. May the Lord’s blessing still rest on you and your labours, is my humble prayer. I remain, Dear Sir, yours truly, ****."—Aug. 31. From India £100., with £20. for my own personal expenses.

Sept. 3. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £20., with £90. for the Orphans, and £8. 14s. 9d. for myself.—Sept. 4. £9. from the students of Wellesley College, United States of America.—From Coonoor, India, £10.—£200. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven. Up to this day we have been enabled to pay out for these Objects £3564. 16s. 3¼d., yet have £988. 3s. 8¼d. left in hand for them, though we began the year with so small a balance in hand.—Sept. 7. £100. from Dundee for Foreign Missions.—Sept. 18. From Somersetshire £100. for Home and Foreign Missions.—From Yorkshire £172. 10s. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, chiefly in Foreign lands, £172. 10s. for the support of the Orphans, and £5. for myself. On Sept. 19 was received another donation from the same donor of £350., for the same Objects.—On Sept. 19 was also received £175. 19s. 4d. in 53 coupons.—Sept. 20. From Edinburgh £50.—Sept. 21. From Linton £3., "Instead of insuring premises."— From Newcastle-on-Tyne £5., "Instead of insuring business and furniture against fire."—Sept. 24. From Gloucestershire £50.— Received £2. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Please to accept the enclosed towards the work of the Lord in your hands, and appropriate it as you think best; and may God bless you in your good work! Perhaps you would like to know, that some years ago, when in a situation, I was led, through reading your books, to devote a regular part of my salary to God’s work, and I rejoice that I have been able to do so till now. Although I am only in a small way of business, yet I have always something to give to a good work, and I find the amount to increase each year; and I believe I shall do so still. With kind Christian regards, I am yours sincerely, ****."

Oct. 2. From New Zealand £10.—Oct. 3. Received £10. 7s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, As usual I send you my cheque, being 1s. each on an article of my make, the sale for which has steadily increased, ever since it was put in my heart, to give the 1s. each to the Lord’s cause. Wishing you every prosperity and blessing in your noble efforts, and also for you to appropriate this as you think best, Yours very truly, ****,"—Oct. 7. £500. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven. He had some cottages left to him, which he sold, and thus was able to give this amount.—Oct. 16. Received £5. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have sent you the first half of a Five Pound Note for Foreign Missions, to help to send the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the poor heathen, who have not yet heard of His blessed name. I send it, instead of keeping a dog for the house. From your humble servant, ****." Will the reader observe the variety of ways, which the Lord is pleased to use, in supplying us with means? May I also ask the Christian reader, Do you practically take an interest in spreading the truth as it is in Jesus? Do you care for the salvation of the souls of the heathen? Do you pray for them? Do you do what you can to send the Gospel of the grace of God to them? How much do you think, you have given in your whole life for missionary purposes? How much during the past year? What act of self-denial have you practised for this purpose? Do you think you give even the thirtieth part of all God intrusts you with, for this Object? Remember, dear Reader, there are about a Thousand Millions of souls, who have not yet had the Gospel preached to them, and be henceforth in earnest, if this has not been the case hitherto, to do what you can, to send the Gospel to them. It is also on my heart to press upon my Readers the certainty of the personal return of the Lord Jesus Christ, who says, "Behold I come quickly and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be." Rev. xxii. 12. How will it be with you, dear Reader, in the day of Christ’s appearing?—Oct. 28. The following letter, with 11s., was received from one of the former Orphans: "Dear and honoured Sir, Your welcome and deeply interesting Report was forwarded to me, coming, it would seem, like a messenger from heaven. Tears of sympathy with the dear Orphans’ letters and other details, mingled with loving remembrance of our revered earthly father, makes the reading of it no easy matter. Precious it is to mark the continued favour and goodness of our God to you and your noble work. How much I sympathize with the pleasure those Orphans must have experienced in listening to your preaching, and the after privilege of shaking hands with one so enshrined in our hearts’ affection. I feel I cannot renew my thanks once too often for the loving care experienced by my two sisters and self, whilst in that dear home of our childhood. One of my sisters is comfortably married, and the other sister is in the same situation. When we meet, it is our delight to sing our old school songs and talk over the old time, especially the happy Christmas time, which was rendered even more happy by the eagerly looked for visit of beloved Mrs. Muller and yourself, to witness our festivities and rather magnificent decorations. Many an Orphan, scattered far and wide, will acknowledge with me, that those were the happiest days in our life.—I have now a comfortable situation as lady’s maid, and as we are constantly travelling, I shall probably have left England ere this reaches you. Praying and believing that the Lord Jehovah will still hold you and your work, and all connected with it and benefited by it, in the hollow of His Almighty Hand, I beg to remain, Dear Sir, another grateful Orphan in your large family, ****. P.S. Please accept the enclosed mite, being 8s. for the Orphans and 3s. for Mission work."

Nov. 8. Received £10., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I thank you for the Report you so kindly sent. It cheers one’s drooping spirit, and strengthens my faith in the Living God: for He does all things well. This year has been one of great trial to me. I have lost about half of my means; but I do not look upon what I possess as mine. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, blessed be His name! I bow submissive to His will. I enclose a Post Office Order for £10., five of which I promised to send as a thank-offering to Him for helping me through thus far, although I do not know how things will end. But I am quite calm, for I know that all things will work together for good. I was glad to hear of your safe return from America. I hope your precious life will be spared to carry on the Lord’s work. I remain, Dear Sir, your obedient Servant, ****."—Nov. 13th. Received £1., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose you a Post Office Order for £1., which I will thank you to use as the Lord may direct you, for His work in your hands. I have many times been blessed and helped from reading your Reports and Narrative. I thank God for them. I am a draper by trade, and adopted some time since the plan of laying by threepence in the pound of my cash takings to be given away to the Lord’s service and work, as occasion may be presented; so, every week, or monthly, this amount is taken and added to the Lord’s bag, and I am glad to say, ever since I did that, I have never been short of supplies to give away to help on God’s work." Etc.—Nov. 15. From S. S. for Missions, £50.—Nov. 22. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £800. Some cottages had been left to him as a legacy, and, having sold them, he was enabled to give this amount for Missions.—Nov. 29. From Cambridgeshire £95. 18s. 4d. As the Lord prospers the donor, so he gives. His first donation was about the twentieth part of this amount.

Dec. 11. For labourers in the Gospel, at Home and Abroad, £100. from Ireland.—From Clifton £3., "instead of insuring a house."—Dec. 20. Received £1. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I thank you for the Annual Report of your various charities, which arrived very seasonably, and proved very refreshing to my faith. It came to hand just after the receipt of very bad news, which told of the loss of a large proportion of my income. Knowing how marvellously your wants have been provided for, during so many years, I could only receive your Report as a lesson, to faint not. The enclosed cheque for One Pound please to place to any object you please. I hope soon to be able to send you a larger donation, as I am sure, in the present state of things in the country, you will want all the help that can be given. Wishing you God speed in your undertaking, I remain, Yours truly, ****."—Dec. 23. From Clifton for Missions, £20.—Dec. 26. Again we have nothing at all in hand for these first four Objects of the Institution; but our eyes are unto the Lord for help.

Jan. 9, 1879. From the neighbourhood of Swansea £1. 6s. 6d. for Foreign Missions, as "All the money taken in my shop on New Year’s Day."—Jan. 10. From S. S. £50, for Missions.—Jan. 11. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in Heaven, £77.—Jan. 14. From Stuttgart 15 Mark, as "A little thank-offering to God for preservation from a perilous railway accident."—Jan. 17. From a considerable distance £150. for the Bible and Mission Fund, £300. for the Orphans and £50. for myself. Jan. 20. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £55. —Jan. 21. From M. C. £50.—Jan. 30. Received £1., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, several years ago the Lord showed me the duty and the privilege of systematic giving. I was earning but little at the time, but commenced, so doing, to the extent I conscientiously felt able. I have carefully and regularly ever since kept to my resolve, and I may also say, I have been encouraged in so doing; for since I so commenced dealing faithfully with Him, the Lord has prospered me greatly, so that now I am able, inter alia, to send you, out of the money so set apart for the Lord’s work, a Post Office Order for £1., to be used as to you may seem best. I thank the Lord He ever showed me His will on this point, and I would not discontinue systematic giving for very much. Trusting the Lord will continue to bless you, and the work under your charge, I remain, yours in Christ Jesus, ****."—Jan 26. We have now again a balance of £243. 2s. 5¼d. for these objects.

Feb. 17. From Malta £50.—Feb. 24. £2. 10s. as a thank-offering "From one whose life was spared when he met with an accident, which might have been fatal."

March 11. From the neighbourhood of Manchester. £90. for Missions, £158. for the Orphans, and £10. 8s. 2d. for myself.—By 47 coupons £165. 14s. 1d. from a donor who has kindly helped us in this way again and again, and whose donation this time especially came in most seasonably, as we were greatly in need of means. Of the amount, £135. 14s. 1d. was for these first four objects, and £30. for the Orphans. Most seasonable likewise was the donation from the neighbourhood of Manchester, on account of our low state of funds for these objects.—March 14. From Clifton Down £15. for Missions.—A young Christian gardener, who resides at a distance of about 160 miles from Bristol, brought this day to the Orphan Houses thirty sovereigns, ten for Foreign Missions, ten for Home Missions, and ten for the support of the Orphans. The donor had thought of leaving this sum as a bequest, but decided on giving it at once.— £100. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.—March 16. £1. as "A thank-offering for the recovery to health of a valuable horse."—March 29. From Weston-super-Mare £20. for Missions with £20. for the Orphans.

April 7. Received £5. for Foreign Missions, "Instead of keeping a dog, in the hope that some poor heathen may be brought to the knowledge of the Saviour."—From Glasgow 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I send you enclosed an order for 10s., which please take for what you think best. My husband, like so many others in Glasgow, lost all his means this winter. I had this money laid aside for you, since November; but as there are now ten of us, and I feared for our daily bread, my faith was not strong enough to send it. But in whatever strait we were, I found I could not use it. It was only this week I told my husband I had it, and he said to send it at once. God give me more faith! Trusting you keep well and strong, and that you may be long spared to cheer us by your example, and with every good wish for the noble work, you and your fellow workers are doing, I am, very truly yours, ****."—April 9. Received £200. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a cheque for £200. in your favour, of which sum I wish £125. to be applied to the use of the Orphans under your care, £20. for yourself, and the remainder to be applied as you may deem best, or for such of the other objects of your Institution, as may at present be most in want of assistance. I intended leaving this sum of £200. by Will, to be paid to you at my decease, but now prefer paying it myself. I am aware of your absence at present, but direct this according to instructions in your last Report, as no doubt you have deputed some one to sign and act for you, and that I shall get an acknowledgment in due course; and trusting that your works in the service of the Lord may be abundantly blessed as heretofore, I am yours sincerely ****."—April 15. From H. B., for the Bible and Mission Fund £50. and £50. for the support of the Orphans.—April 16. Received £3. with the following letter: "My dear Brother in Christ, I enclose a Post Office Order for £3., £2. of which for the Orphans and the other £1. to be appropriated according to your discretion. For the glory of God I must tell you the circumstances. This amount (£3.) has been owing to me over six years, and I have applied again and again for the money, but in vain. About three years since I decided to apply no more, and give it up as a bad debt; but a few months ago I thought of the dear children at Bristol, and laid the case before my Heavenly Father, asking Him, if it was His holy will, to incline the heart of my debtor to send me the amount, without my having to ask for it. Last week he called (after much difficulty in ascertaining my new address), and left the money, with six years interest, and apologized for the delay. Is not this a proof that the Lord is gracious. In fact, my prayer is more than answered; for not only can I send you the £3., but with the interest I am enabled to meet a claim that will fall due in a few days. Yours faithfully in Him ****."—April 22. £100. from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven.

May 5. From a servant of the Lord Jesus who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £77. 2s. 9d.—From Ireland £100. for Missionaries and Mission work.—May 7. From Swansea £5. as "A thank-offering for signal mercy."—May 13. Received £130. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, It is with pleasure I send you the enclosed cheque for £130., which please apply to the good work in your hands as follows, £60. for the Orphans, £60. for Missions, etc., and please accept £10. for your own personal use. It was my intention to leave the above as a legacy, but I have lately had it laid upon my heart to see it paid. ‘Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift!’ I remain, Dear Sir, Yours faithfully, ****."—May 21. £1,000. as the legacy of the late Miss J. R.—It was very graciously so ordered of the Lord, that this legacy was now paid, a little before the legal time had expired for its payment, as we were almost entirely without means, and as we particularly desired to be able to send more help to the labourers in the Gospel.—May 22. Received £24, 10s, 6d. being nine donations from Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope.— £5. from Constantinople.—I have thus referred to a few out of the hundreds of donations, by means of which the Lord enabled us to meet the expenses connected with the first four objects of the Institution during another year. Though our average expenses for one day for this part of the work were forty-six pounds during the past year, and we began the year with only £41. 17s. 8d., therefore not enough for one single day; yet God helped us not only to meet all the expenses, but through the large income just at the close of the year to leave a larger balance than usual in hand. His holy name be magnified!

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary—and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1879 to May 26, 1880. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

May 27, 1879. We began our new period with the balance of £519. 4s. 7d. in hand; a balance so great as this we had not had for many years. But great as, comparatively, this balance was, it was only a very small portion of what we needed in the course of the year. It therefore was very soon expended, and we had to look to the Lord for further supplies, as had been the case during the previous forty-five years of the existence of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution; and we found (as always before) that we bad not to wait upon Him in vain. I mention now some of the ways, in which it pleased God to supply us with means.—May 31. From Geneva, £15.

June 4. From Greenock £110., with £20. for myself.—June 26. Notwithstanding the considerable balance, with which we began our year, and the income of £739. 0s. 11d. during the past month, we are now reduced to £140. 11s. 0½d. for these Objects, viz.: we have not enough for the average expenses of four days; but we have the Living God as our Friend and Helper.

July 8. From Scotland £100, with £10. for myself.—July 10. From Scotland, £100.—July 12. From French Switzerland 600 francs with 200 francs for myself.—July 18. From Yorkshire £150. for Foreign Missions with £150. for the Orphans.—July 24. From the pupils of a ladies’ school £l0.—July 26. Our balance in hand, for these Objects of the Institution, is now reduced to £25. 10s. 8d., viz. to about one half of what we require, on an average, for one day for them. Our eyes are directed to our Heavenly Helper, who in the forty-sixth year of the work is now upholding it, being fully assured, that, as He has helped us hitherto, He will do so yet. Many of our friends suppose, that in the early years only of the history of this Institution, we had exercises of faith, but that these trials have now long been over. Such friends are entirely mistaken; for our trials of faith have continued, in every respect, as they were 34, 38, 40 and 43 years ago, even as to pecuniary supplies, but with this difference, that, whereas then the work was comparatively small, our trials of faith were about small matters, whilst now, as the work is large, our faith is tried regarding great things. However, as God helped us from 1838 to 1849 whilst our difficulties were almost constant, from day to day, so He has helped us in 1879 and 1880 also. His name be magnified!

Aug. 5. From Adelaide, Australia, £20. £5. £1. £1.—Aug. 9. From Malta £50.—Aug. 12. From Natal £50.—Aug. 16. From San Francisco £2.—From Saxony £4.—By sale of gold and silver articles, &c. £147. 18s. 0d.—Aug. 22. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £300. 4s.—Aug. 25. From the same donor for Missions £45.—Aug. 26. Our balance, which a month ago was £25. 10s. 8d., the Lord has been pleased so to increase, that we have today £491. 3s. 0½d. in hand, although we have expended many hundred pounds during the month. We have thus again proved the readiness of our Heavenly Father to listen to the supplications of His children, who trust in Him.

Sep. 2. £10. from the neighbourhood of Wakefield. "Five pounds from the sale of boots, ½d. on every pair sold during the year, and £5. instead of insuring stock, &c. against fire."—Sep. 5. From Newcastle-on-Tyne £2. 10s. for Missions, and £2. 10s. for the Orphans with the following statement: "Annual thank-offering for protection from fire, and instead of insurance. A great fire was a short time ago on my left, next door but one. House and shop gutted next door to me. My shop free. A few years ago a fire next door on my right. Two smouldering fires, at different times, discovered on the premises, fires all around; but the Lord Himself a wall of fire round about me. Blessed be the name of the Lord!"—Received also £3. from Sunderland "As a thank-offering for past mercies, and instead of insuring against accidents."—From the mother of a pupil in one of our Day Schools in Cardiff 10s., with the following statement: "Please to accept 5s., a widow’s mite, for Missions, and 5s. from my little boy’s money, which he has saved. He wishes to give it for the Orphans as an offering to God for His goodness to him, in saving his soul. He is one of those who have been brought to the Lord in Tredegerville School."—Sep. 9. Received from the neighbourhood of Manchester £90., with £153. 18s. 1d. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—Sep. 12. Received £5. from Glasgow, with the following words: "Miss —— encloses a Post Office Order for the sum of £5. to Mr. Muller, for Missionary purposes. She may state, that it was owing to reading the short paragraph at the head of page 13, of the last Report, which moved her to give, and to this special object." The paragraph alluded to is as follows, which I repeat here, because I judge that the Church of God at large needs to have the subject again and again brought before her. "May I ask the Christian reader, Do you practically take an interest in spreading the truth as it is in Jesus? Do you care for the salvation of the souls of the heathen? Do you pray for them? Do you do what you can, to send the Gospel of the grace of God to them? How much do you think, you have given in your whole life for Missionary purposes? How much during the past year? What act of self-denial have you practised for this purpose? Do you think you give even the thirtieth part of all God intrusts you with, for this Object? Remember, dear Reader, there are about a Thousand Millions of souls, who have not yet had the Gospel preached to them, therefore be henceforth in earnest, if this has not been the case hitherto, to do what you can, to send the Gospel to them. It is also on my heart to press upon my Readers, the certainty of the personal return of the Lord Jesus, who says, ‘Behold I come quickly and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be,’ Rev. xxii, 12. How will it be with you, dear Reader, in the day of Christ’s appearing?" I affectionately commend this paragraph to the prayerful consideration of the Christian Reader.—Sep. 19. £100. with the words: "Thine own."—Sep. 24. Received £12. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I received your last Report, and have again the pleasure of handing you cheque for £12. for Foreign Missions, thanking the Lord for His goodness to you in all your labours for Him, and praying that you may long be spared to build up His Church through your various preachings and writings. I am thankful to be able to help you a little, from time to time. I too, through your work, first began to put by 1s. a week for the Lord’s work, and since then He has given me mach increase; and, as long as I live, I hope to continue to give, as the Lord may prosper me. Yours faithfully, ****."—Sep 24. Received from a Christian gentleman, who has often helped us in a similar way, 13 Queensland coupons (£68. 10s. 10d.), 20 United States (£50.), 1 Colombo (£l7. 2s. 9d.), 8 Russian (£14. l3s. 9d.), and 5 City of Ottawa (£14. 13s. 9d.).—Sep. 30. From A. P., £10. as "A thank-offering for an unexpected legacy."—.£25. for Foreign Missions, given on the return of the donor’s wedding day._Received from one of the former Orphans, who very many years since left the Orphan Houses, £1., with the following letter, dated Sep. 27: "Dear and Honored Sir, Please accept the enclosed Post Office Order for £1., and use it as you think best in the good work. I have lately been told by some Christian friends, that the practice, which I have observed for more than nine years, of devoting one-tenth of my income to the cause of God, unduly impoverishes me, and that it is my first duty to make the very best provision I could for those dependent on me, giving, of what was left, some portion to the Lord. I am thankful to say, that I have not yielded to such persuasions, but that I have found my faith more than ever strengthened by reading over again two or three of your previous Reports. I believe that God is more pleased to receive of the first fruits of our store, than of what is left, after our own wants are satisfied. I still feel that the portion that I give back to the Lord is a small one, compared with His gifts to me, and that, when we have done our all (which we seldom do) we must say, ‘We are unprofitable servants; we have done that, which it was our duty to do.’ Although my present income is not by any means too much, yet I have abundant cause, when I review the past, to admire the loving kindness of the Lord to me and mine. I do not forget, that this day is the anniversary of your birthday, and I pray God that He will in mercy spare you yet many years to work in the vineyard, and to build up in the faith those who love our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ in sincerity and truth. I am, dear Sir, yours very respectfully, ****."

Oct. 11. From Worcestershire £100. for Home and Foreign Missions.—Oct. 15.—From Somersetshire £101.—Oct. 20. From Zeist, in Holland, £4., with £1 for the Orphans.—Oct. 24. With the following letter from the Isle of Wight, 3s. 4d.: "Dear Sir, Many thanks for the Report. Will you kindly accept the enclosed 3s. 4d. in stamps for the China Mission? I fully believe that, if Christians would put by every week a small part of their income, the Lord would bless them more. When we first began, we could only give one shilling, then one and sixpence, and so on. Now, by the Lord’s help, we give ten Pounds or more yearly to different objects, and the poor in our neighbourhood. Yours in the coming Lord Jesus, ****."—Oct. 28. Received from a Christian Merchant, £200., with the following instructive letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, I would just mention for your encouragement, and to the praise of our Heavenly Father, that I have followed the good advice, so repeatedly given in your Reports, of systematic and proportioned giving, for many years; and the last half year is the best we have had, although trade generally has been so depressed. I therefore have the pleasure of handing you cheque for £200., £100. towards the Orphans, £10. for your own use, and balance as you may consider most required. With kind regards, yours sincerely, ****."

Nov. 7. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Nov. 10. From the Punjaub, India, £9. 18s. 6d.—Nov. 13. £19. 19s. for Missions, as the legacy of the late Mrs. K.—Nov. 22. For Missions, 10s., with this statement: "What I send you, I have earned by doing a gentleman’s washing for one month."—Nov. 24. From a Christian Cook, at a Sheep Station in New Zealand, who seeks to honour the Lord with his means, £20.—Nov. 25. "From a friend at Burnley," £50.

Dec. 1. From Wales, £100.—Dec. 9. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Dec. 15. From Ireland £200. for Missionaries and Evangelists. Our hearts rejoiced in this donation, as it afforded to us (in answer to prayer, much prayer) further means to help brethren who labour in word and doctrine.—Dec. 16. Received £1. from one of the former Orphans, now an apprentice, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed is a Post Office Order for £1., for disposal as you may think best. I send it as a thank-offering to the Lord for my recovery from a short, but severe illness. Allow me also to thank you for the Reports you have so kindly sent me through my master, the reading of which has given me much pleasure. That God may spare your life many more years, to be a father to the Orphans, and a messenger to bear the glad tidings of the ever blessed Gospel to distant isles, is the prayer of your ever grateful Orphan, ****."—Dec 19. From Bedfordshire £5., with £5. for the Orphans, from a Christian man in a small business, who for many years has sent, as God may have prospered him in his business.—From London £64., with £16. for the Orphans,—Dec. 23. From a Christian family, £5. 5s., for Missions and £11. for the Orphans. Father, mother and children had, during the year, occupied some of their time in earning this amount.—Dec. 26. This day we have no money at all left for these Objects, but are looking, by God’s grace, to our Heavenly Father for help, who has never left us, and who has already again carried us through the first seven months of this new period.—Dec. 27. Today we received for Missions from Weston-super-Mare, £40., when we had nothing at all in hand.—Dec. 29. Received from a London donor, then at Ryde, £13. for missions in Italy, £4. for missions in China, and £13. for the support of one Orphan for one year. —There was given anonymously at Bethesda, £6.—Dec. 30. From Liverpool £5., from New Brunswick £2.—From Downend £1., "Instead of insuring my cottages."—From Hereford £10.—Frorn Thame £1., for the circulation of the Scriptures in Spain, with £2. 18s. for the Orphans and 2s. for Reports.—From Redland £1., for Missions in Demerara, with 10s. for the Orphans.—From Chagford 10s. for Foreign Missions, and 10s. and 13 silver coins for the Orphans.—Dec. 31, From Kent £10.—From Paddington £50., with £50. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—From Sunderland 5s.

Jan. 1, 1880. From a Bristol donor, £14., with £2. 10s. for Reports; and through ditto also £2., with £2. for the Orphans.—From Scotland £l00.—From Uplyme £5. All these donations, and £8. 7s. besides, were received after all our funds for these Objects were gone, and we were in the greatest need.—Jan. 3. £5. was received with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Wright, A dear sister in the Lord, J. A., who has for many years sent all she could to dear Mr. Muller, departed to be with Christ a few weeks since. Her sister, G. E., has found a little spare money, left by her sister, and knowing what her wish would be, sends the £5. for the Lord’s work in Mr. Muller’s hands. To see J. A., you would never think she had 1s. to give to any one. She never spent more than was absolutely necessary on herself. She was formerly a servant, saved a little money, built a few cottages, lived in one, and lived on the rent of the others. She is now gone beyond the power of helping, or doing anything for the Lord; but she being dead, yet speaketh. Her works follow her. ‘She has done what she could,’ may truly be applied to her. Her life was so consistent. Etc."—Jan. 14. From Ireland £50.—Jan. 21. From Hampshire £150., with £300. for the Orphans and £50. for myself.—Jan. 26. During the past month the Lord has been pleased to send us for these first four Objects of the Institution about Twelve Hundred Pounds, so that we have been enabled to meet all demands upon us, and have £28. 13s. 8d. left.—Jan. 27. Received £47. 3s. 10d. with the following letter from Scotland: "Dear Brother, Enclosed is Bank Draft for £47. 3s. 10d., £10. of that sum is from Messrs.——, to whom please acknowledge receipt, to be applied same way as before. The balance, £37. 3s. 10d. is from us. To Orphans £15., Missions £15., yourself £7. 3s. 10d.—To the praise and glory of God my Saviour, I would like to inform you, that about eight years ago I was, through the reading of your Reports, led to devote one penny per Pound of tea, I sold, to the Lord’s work under your care. I had for some years previously given £1. yearly, and when I did on my knees before the Lord engage to continue to give that small donation, with what might come out of the tea engagement, I have to say with a heart moved by a sense of His love and grace ‘Hallelujah! Praise His name for the results, which I subjoin—1872, £8. 14s. 9d.; 1873, £11. 7s. 5d.; 1874, £11. 19s. 1d.; 1875, £12. 7s. 9d.; 1876, £11. 6s.; 1877, £14. 9s. 9d.; 1878, £25. 19s. 10d.; 1879, £36. 3s. 10d.—Yours in the Lord, ****."— Jan. 29. Legacy of the late Miss M. R. £100.

Feb. 5. At a time of the greatest need, we received, as the result of many prayers, £500. from Ireland for these Objeots.—Feb. 10. From a servant of the Lord Jesus £300. He having had a house left to him, constrained by the love of Christ, and seeking to lay up treasure in heaven, sold it.—From Penang £5.—Feb. 11. From Edinburgh £40. for Home and Foreign Missions, with £10. for the Orphans, —From Spain £2.

March 11. From Yorkshire £190. for Foreign Missions, with £10. for myse1f.—From
Malta, from one of the former Orphans, £2.—March 15. From Ireland £100. for Missions.—March 16. From South Australia £10. 2s. ld., with £10, 2s, for the Orphans.—March 18. From a Christian gentleman who has repeatedly helped us in a similar way, and whose donation this time arrived at a time of great need, 47 coupons, value £157. 10s. 3d.— March 23. From the neighbourhood of Plymouth £100.—From Java 50 florins.—March 26. Our balance in hand for these four Objects of the Institution is again reduced to £19. 18s. 3¼d.—March 27. The Lord, in the riches of His grace, has immediately, in answer to our daily supplications, sent help. There came in today from Edinburgh £1. From Bedfordshire £5. From Liverpool £3. 0s. 6d. and 3s. From Weston-super-Mare £40. for Home and Foreign Missions. From Amersham £5. From Edinburgh £10. for Missions, with £10. for the Orphans. From Asbburton 10s.

April 22. "Five Pound Note (instead of insuring my cows)" for Foreign Missions.—" With the grateful love of two former Orphans," 10s. for Foreign Missions and £1. for the Orphans.—April 23. £15. from Clifton Down, for Missions.—April 26. At the close of the eleventh month of this period, we have nothing at all in hand for these Objects.—April 30. Within the last three days, the Lord has been pleased to send us £164. 10s. 11d.; for besides various smaller donations we received in our great need from the neighbourhood of Manchester £100. for these Objects, with £200. for the Orphans and £10. for myself.

May 17. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £400.—May 18. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £1. 10s., £5., £1., £1., £1., £1., £1., and 10s. 6d.—May 21. From Tananda, South Australia, £13.

Thus we have been carried through another year, and, though we have been several times without anything in hand for these first four Objects of the Institution, we have been brought to its close with a balance of £61. 5s. 8½d. in hand. All the demands, connected with the 117 Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, we have been able to meet. With regard to the circulation of the Holy Scriptures we have been enabled to accomplish far more than at any time during the 45 years. The circulation of books and tracts also has been very large. But in reference to Missionary Work we have been able to accomplish far less than we have desired.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1880 to May 26, 1881. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, etc.

When our new year commenced, on May 27, 1880, we had at hand for these Objects, £61. 5s. 8½d., viz. a sum which was a little more than would suffice for the current expenses of a single day. The reader will see, therefore, that we were during the past year, as 30, 40, and 47 years ago, entirely dependent upon God for help; for in all our necessities we look to Him alone. Thus it came, and only thus, that during the past year also we were helped with means. I will now very briefly give some specimens of the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply our need.

June 5, 1880. The income, up to this day, had been so small that our balance in hand was still further reduced, when, today, we received £150. from Ireland for Missions, for which we had no money at all left. Thus the Lord has very graciously again appeared on our behalf in answer to prayer.—June 9. From an English donor staying at.Lausanne, Switzerland, £12. 10s. for the Bible Fund, and £12. 10s. for the support of the Orphans.—June 10. From Southgate, London, £10.—June 11. From Scotland, £120.—June 15. From Sussex, £46. 1s. 1d.—June 25. From Clifton £40. for Missions. June, 27. At the beginning of the second month of the new year, we had no money at all in hand for these Objects; and for our 119 Schools, the extensive circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and our missionary operations were needing help. What did we do under these circumstances? only what we have done during the past forty-seven years. We made known our requests unto God; this was all we did. Thus we have gone on year after year, in order to encourage our fellow believers, by our example, increasingly to trust in God and commit all their matters to Him, in believing prayer. And now see, dear reader, how God was pleased to help us again, as He had done thousands of times before.—On June 29, we received from Colchester £10. and from P. 3s.—On June 30 from Torquay £50. From Cardiff £90., with £10. for myself. From Newport, Monmouthshire, £2.

On July 1 from the neighbourhood of Ampthill £5.—July 5, received £5. from New Zealand, with the following letter "Dear Sir, it is with much pleasure I enclose you a Post Office Order to be used as you think best. For a long time now I have given away, as God has directed me, one tenth of what money I have received. I cannot tell you the pleasure it gives me to do so, or how thankful I feel to our Heavenly Father who put it into our hearts and has given us grace to continue to do so, even when brought very low as it regards money. Last year we lived in Bristol, in sight of your Orphan Houses, and the very sight of them was a constant renewal of our faith. At one time I was for eight months out of work, and I only received seven shillings per week to support myself and family. Yet God never suffered us to want anything. When things looked their very blackest, the sight of all those windows lit up at night was, what my wife called, "a thousand promises," and, I may add, "a thousand fulfilments."—We have only been in New Zealand three weeks, but our trust is in the same God who never Left us, and never will forsake us. He has promised so, and I take His promises always as fulfilments. He found work for me the first day I came. May He guide me in the way that I should walk, and give me grace to continue in His way! I am, Sir, thankfully yours, ****." This donation, coming as it does from New Zealand, many thousands of miles distant, was one of the means whereby, in July, 1880, we were helped in our great need, in answer to many prayers.—From "H. G.," of Constantinople, £5.—From Halifax, 14s.—From Dawlish, £5., with £5. for the Orphans.—July 6. From Glasgow, £21.—July 8. From "A. C. W.," £10.— July 9. From Derbyshire, for the Bible Fund, L100.— July 12. From Clifton, £50.—From Southgate, £10.— From Chicago, £5. 2s. 8d.—From Dayton, £4.—From the neighbourhood of Stockport, £100. for Missions. July 13. From the neighbourhood of Stonehouse £5. for China Missions.—July 17. By sale of gold and silver articles, diamonds, coins, etc., £220. Together with £90. by sale of dentist gold, plate, etc. for the support of the Orphans. From Sussex, £51, 19s. 9d. for Missions, with £13. for the Orphans.—From Scotland £100.—From Clifton, about two years ago, a Railway Debenture was received for 1000 dollars, without coupons, up to this time. Therefore we could not sell the debenture. But now, in this our great need, it became negotiable; and, as it bore six per cent. interest, I obtained the high price of £261. for it. In like manner, about four years before, while preaching in Dublin, I received a Victoria Government Debenture for £100., intended one half for Missions, one-fourth for the Schools, and one-fourth for the Orphans. This debenture I now sold, in this our great need, for £105., whereby £52. 10s. came for Missions, £26. 5s. for the School Fund, and £26. 5s. for the Orphans.—July 24. From Middlesex, £15.—From India, £100., with £20. for myself.—July 26. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in Heaven, £200. July 27. As stated before, on June 27 we had no money at all in hand for the first four Objects of the Institution, but in the course of this one month the Lord was pleased to send us, in answer to much prayer, £1936. 4s. 11d. for these Objects, besides £1415. 18s. 8d. for the support of the Orphans. It is an unspeakably blessed thing to have in God an Almighty Friend, ever willing to listen to the supplications we offer in our time of need. Thus we were able to meet all the current expenses of the month, and had £711. 3s. left for these Objects.

Sept. 1. From Wales, £5. instead of insuring cows.—Sept. 9. From the neighbourhood of Manchester, £100. for these Objects, with £150. for the Orphans, and £9. 7s. 11d. for myself.—From the neighbourhood of Lismore, Ireland, £5. as "The first fruits of the harvest."—From Ireland, £200. for Missions.—Sept. 13. From the neighbourhood of Witney, £50. for Missions.—Received £150. with the following letter "My dear Mr. Muller, I have read over your Report for 1879-80 with much pleasure, and with much spiritual benefit. I notice you purpose making another visit to America. My earnest prayer will be that your preaching may be blessed to the conversion of sinners and the edifying of believers. I have just been delivered, without injury, from a very serious railway accident, by which three persons were killed, and about twenty more or less very much hurt; and I beg to enclose you £150. as a thank-offering to my Heavenly Father for protecting me in such perilous circumstances Will you kindly apply £30. towards your travelling expenses as you see most needed? Wishing you a prosperous voyage, a safe return, and much blessing, I am, Yours very sincerely, ****." For about fifty-one years I have had no salary in connection with my pastoral labours, and the ministry of the Word, nor as Founder and Director of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution; nor have I any property whatever of my own; but for more than half a century I have relied entirely upon God for the supply of all my own temporal necessities, and those of my family, and have received from Him, by prayer and faith, all that I have needed. He has put it into the hearts of His children, in various parts of the world, to supply my wants. The last-mentioned donation, coming a distance of several hundred miles from a Christian gentleman I have never seen, is one out of many instances of the way in which it has pleased God to supply us with money for our travelling expenses, during six years and upwards. With reference to all these heavy expenses the Lord has continually been mindful of us, and we have never been obliged to cease labouring in this way for want of means.—Sept. 21. Received 5s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose 5s. in postage stamps for whatever purpose you deem most needful. I am now reduced to one room, and the recipient myself of charity; but I lay aside weekly for the Lord a portion of whatever I am able to earn. This year it has been less than usual, which will account for the smallness of my donation. That God may prosper you in all your works done for His Glory, is the prayer of, Dear Sir, with Christian love, yours respectfully, ****." P.S. "I had the pleasure of hearing you preach in Rome last year." This instance shows how the Lord supplies us with money through those also who are in very limited circumstances; and, at the same time, gives another illustration of how we may yet have the privilege of giving, though comparatively poor, if we do it systematically.—Sept. 27. Four months of the new year have now elapsed; we have been helped hitherto, and expect to be helped further. On Aug. 27, we had a balance left for these Objects of £425. 2s. 3½d. and, today, a month later, we have £578. 9s. 4½d. in hand, though thousands of pounds have been needed for the current expenses. Sept. 29. From two believers, £25. for Missions, "given on their wedding day."—Sept. 30. Received 13 Queensland coupons, 20 United States coupons, 1 Colombo coupon, 8 Russian coupons, 5 City of Ottawa coupons, 4 Portuguese coupons, and 3 Auckland coupons, all of them amounting together to £177. 19s. 7d. Again and again this donor has kindly sent us similar donations, which invariably have come in most seasonably.

Oct. 1. Received from Scotland £100.—Oct. 2. From Yorkshire £1. "Instead of insuring the glass of the shop windows."—Oct 7. "From H. B. a thank-offering" £100.—Oct. 12. From Scotland £50. for Foreign Missions.—Oct. 15. £4. as "A thank-offering to the Lord for sparing me for the last eighty-five years this month."—Oct. 21. From a former Orphan and his wife, who have now three Orphan boys as apprentices in their house, £4., with the following letter; "Dear and honoured Sir, I desire to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the second half of premium on account of C. B. You will be pleased to hear he is getting on very nicely with his trade, and his behaviour is all we could desire. The same can be said of J. D. He confesses his faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, in whom also J. D. is rejoicing. As regards ourselves, we daily continue to pray, as we have done for many years, for blessing on the dear Orphan Work, and those engaged in it. We greatly rejoice in its continued prosperity, as well becomes us, who have received such inestimable spiritual and temporal blessings through its instrumentality. Will you please use £3. 10s. of the enclosed for the support of one Orphan for three months, and the remaining 10s. for Foreign Missions? and accept with it the grateful love of two former Orphans, ****."—Oct. 23. From Clifton Down £15.—From Somersetshire £102.—18s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I now take pleasure in sending you five shillings and also thirteen shillings from my wife, as a thank-offering to God, because I have not been discharged, whilst others have been, where I work. The above amount has been put aside threepence per week for some time. I am happy to say that many times, when work has been very slack, work has come in, in answer to our prayers, and I hope God will answer our prayers still. Please to use this money for sending Missionaries abroad. I hope you will accept this trifle from us, as we are desirous of laying up treasure in heaven, where I hope we shall meet at last, to enjoy a happy eternity with Christ our Saviour. I remain, yours truly, ****."—Oct. 25. From Naples £5.—Oct. 26. Received £318. 7s., being the payment of a legacy, consisting of eight Russian Bonds, less legacy duty. The testatrix not only was entirely unknown to me, but I had never even heard her name; yet the Lord inclined her heart, in answer to our daily supplications for help, to leave to me this legacy.

Nov. 1. From Malta, £5.—Nov. 5. From India, £37. 16s.—Nov. 15. From a Christian gentleman in Ireland, £2. 10s., being 1s. "For each sheep sold during this year."—Nov. 23. Received as legacy, left by the late Miss A. C., the sum of £72. 16s. 9d. for Missions, and £72. l6s. 9d. for the Orphans.—Nov. 25. From Cambridgeshire, £55. l7s. 2d.

Dec. 1. From S. S., £50. for Missions.—Dec. 11. From Ireland, £200. for Missions. A very seasonable help, as scarcely anything is left for this Object.— Dec. 13. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.—From Ireland, £3. with the following letter: "Dear Sir,—Enclosed is a cheque for £3 (towards Foreign Missions) as a thank-offering for disturbance averted, by the hand of God, on this property. Pray for the Christians in Ireland, that they may have wisdom to act in these seriously difficult times. Yours in Christ, ****."—From Queensland, £2.—Dec. 16. From the Neilgherries, East Indies, £10.—From Ivy Lane, London, £84., with £21. for the Orphans. How seasonably this donation came in, will be seen under the 27th of this month.—Dec. 20. From a Widow in Liverpool, £2. 5s. 3d., who puts aside from her business, as the Lord prospers her, with £4. 10s. 6d. for the Orphans—Dec. 21. "From a Mother and her Three Children, the result of their united work through the year, £2. 14s. 1d. for Missions, and £5. for the Orphans."—Dec. 22. From Edinburgh, £40., with £10. for the Orphans.—Dec. 27. On October 27th the balance in hand for these Objects was £451. 14s. 0¼d., and on Nov. 27th, £811. 0s. 6d.; so that, notwithstanding our heavy outgoings, we were able comfortably to meet all the demands upon us. Thus it has been also during this month (December); but today, 27th, we have only £10. 6s. 11d. left for these Objects. The donors who have given during this month, and especially during the latter half of it, will see how seasonably their donations came in. Thus we prove continually the power of prayer, and are helped. Now observe, dear reader, how the Lord again appeared on our behalf on December 27, 1880, when our balance in hand for these four Objects— the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund— was reduced to £ 10. 6s. 11d. On the same day we received from the neighbourhood of Newton, Mearns, Scotland, £12., with £3. for the Orphans.—From Dalkeith, £1. 10s., with 10s. for the Orphans.—From a Bristol donor, £l.—From Exeter, 10s., and from Clifton, 4s., with 8s. for the Orphans.—From London, £20. for Missions in Italy, £10. for Missions in China, and £10. for Missions in Spain.—On the next day, Dec. 28, we received £20. from Hereford for Foreign Missions.— From an Edinburgh donor, then at Ilfracombe, £80., with £20. for the Orphans.—From Redland, 15s. for Missions in China, and 15s. for the Orphans.—On Dec. 29, £2. came in from Totterdown for Missions; also, £6. and a locket for the Orphans, with 2s. for Reports.—From Devonshire, £50., with 2s. for Reports.—From Newton Abbot, £5. ; also, £1. 4s. for Missions, and l2s. for the Orphans.—From Canada, £5.—Dec. 30. From Eday, Orkney, for Missions, £1.—From Abbey Wood, £10.—From S. S., £50.—From Hull, £5., with 5s. for myself.—From Shaw, Scotland, £10. From Kirkdale, £2. 8s. 4d.—From Morristown, for Spanish Missions, £10. and £l5.—From Cotham, 10s., with 10s. for Orphans and 10s. for myself.—Dec. 31. From Sutton, £2. 2s.—From Clifton, £10.—From Paddington, £30. for Missions, £20, for the School Fund, £10. for the Bible and Tract Fund, £50. for the Orphans, and £10, for myself.—From one of the former Orphans in the neighbourhood of Exeter, 10s.—From the neighbourhood of Newton Stewart, £3. 4s.—I have referred to all these donations, which came in from the morning of December 27 to the evening of December 31, to show how the Lord, in answer to our supplications, helped us, and also what varied instrumentality, in different places and countries, He was pleased to use. Thus the year 1880 ended with help from the Lord, even as year after year He has cared for us.

Jan. 1, 1881. The new year began with blessings. We received from Kent £12. 10s. for Missions and £12. 10s, for the Orphans.—From Scotland, £100.—From Cotham, £4., with £2. for myself.—Jan. 6. £5. as "A thank-offering for answer to prayer in reference to my little girl, in the removal of a gathering, which threatened to destroy the sight of one of her eyes."—From Kent, £50. The donor, who sent £25. on the 1st of January, writes: "I did not expect to send anything again so quickly; but it is our Lord’s doing." Truly it was the Lord’s doing, and this help came in answer to our daily prayers. The money was taken for Missions, as directions were given that it might be used as most required.—Jan. 6. From. the neighbourhood of Henley-on-Thames, £100.—From Greenock, £100.— From Plymouth, £10.—Jan. 13. From Birmingham, £5., as "A thank-offering to our Heavenly Father for the recovery of a little boy from sickness."—Jan. 17. From Hampshire, £150., with £300. for the Orphans and £50. for myself.—Jan. 21. From one of the former Orphans, 10s. for Foreign Missions, with £3. 10s. for the support of an Orphan for 3 months.

Feb. 21. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100.—Feb. 23. Received the following letter from an Orphan formerly under our care: "Dear and respected Sir,—Enclosed is a cheque for £26. 13s. 4d. from my brother-in-law, also a Post Office order for 16s. from myself, which we have much pleasure in sending. Please use the money for whichever part of the work it is most required. Eleven years ago today I left the dear Home, which had sheltered me for so many years. I often think of the happy hours spent there, and shall be ever thankful for the great kindness I received while under your care," etc.

March 1. Received 13 Queensland coupons, 20 United States coupons, 8 Russian coupons, 5 City of Ottawa coupons, 4 Portuguese coupons, 1 Colombo coupon, and 3 City of Auckland coupons, amounting altogether to £177. 15s. 2d. This donation came in again most seasonably to help us with means for the first four Objects of the Institution.—March 7. From a Student of the University of Tubingen, Wurtemberg, £1.—March 16. When the funds for the first four Objects were almost entirely expended, and we were in great need of money for them, on account of expenses to be met in a few days, we received today from Sussex, for Missions, £165. 10s.—From Edinburgh, £10. for Missions, £10. for the Orphans, and £5. for myself.—From Manchester, £100.—March 17. From Dunbar, £10., and £6. 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I herewith enclose £6. 10s., which I have laid by weekly, as I have done for some time (a stated sum). Although the depression in trade is very great, and the future, humanly speaking, dark, yet I have not discontinued my practice, believing that the Lord can and will make all things straight," etc.—We received further, on March 18th, from Kingstown, Ireland, £1.; from Liverpool, £10.; and From Farnborough, £5.—On March 19th. From the neighbourhood of Lismore, £5.—March 21. From Halifax, 10s. for Missions, and 10s. for the Orphans.—March 22. From Stourbridge, £4. 0s. 3d., with £5. for myself.—From Ireland, for Missions, £200.—March 23. From Bedminster, £7. 7s.—March 24th. From Banbridge, 5s.—March 25th. From Kilbarchan, £l.—From Calne, £5.—From Ilkely, £12. 2s. 6d., with £3. for myself. Thus we were able to meet the heavy expenses which we had before us, regarding the Home and Foreign Schools, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and to aid Missionary Operations; but the money was only enough to do this, and we have nothing left this day, March 27, Two months since, January 27th, we had in hand for these Objects £527. 3s. 1½d. On February 27th we had a balance of £274. 14s. 8d. Today, March 27, though we have £42. 10s. 2d. still in hand, as a few accounts have not yet been presented for payment, we must consider that nothing at all remains, and have therefore to wait further upon God. The expenditure for the first four Objects of the Institution, during the past month, has been nearly £1,400. What was now to be done, dear reader, under these circumstances, when all the money for the above Objects was again gone? I reply, we did what we have done for 47 years, that is, we waited continually upon God. My dear fellow-labourers in Bristol, and my dear wife and myself in America, brought our necessities again and again before the Lord. Here in the United States, besides our habitual daily prayer for help, we had especial seasons 4, 5, and 6 times a day additionally, for pouring out our hearts before our Heavenly Father, and making known our requests unto Him, being assured that help would come; and we have not waited upon the Lord in vain. This plan may be despised by some, ridiculed by others, and considered insufficient by a third class of persons; but, under every trial and every difficulty, we find prayer and faith to be our universal remedy; and, after having experienced for half a century their efficacy, we purpose, by God’s help, to continue waiting upon Him, in order to shew to an ungodly world, and to a doubting Church, that the Living God is still able and willing to answer prayer, and that it is the joy of His heart to listen to the supplications of His children. In Psalm ix. 10, the Divine testimony regarding Jehovah is, "They that know Thy name will put their trust in Thee." WE know Him, by His grace, and do therefore put our trust in Him. I now continue the account. On March 29th, 30th, and 31st, £37. came in in various donations, besides £50., with II Cor. ix. 15.

On April 1st, £1. 10s. was received, as "Price of the first calf this season." We also had £100. from Scotland, and 10s. from Ridgeway. April 2. Received £5., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a cheque for £5., ‘instead of insuring stock-in-trade,’ which please use as the Lord may direct you. I have done so for several years, and can rest assured that the Lord will preserve me and mine, when put into the hand of the Almighty God, who never slumbers nor sleeps. I am, dear Sir, yours in Jesus, ****."—The following letter, with 10s.: "Dear Sir, Please to accept the enclosed half-sovereign, as a trifle towards the spread of the Gospel. I send it as a thank-offering to God for His mercies towards me and my family during the past six months, while out of a situation. I am pleased to say that He has opened up to me another situation, and what I have sent to you is a part of my first week’s wages. I am, dear Sir, yours faithfully, ****."—April 11, £10., as "A. Census thank-offering."—April 20. Two bonds (£100. each) of the Association of Land Financiers.—April 21. £50., with II Corinthians ix. 15.—April 23. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100. April 25. From Durdham Down, £100.—April 27. On March 27th we had no means at all in hand for these Objects, as stated under that date. We have now been helped through one more month, in answer to prayer, and have been supplied with all we needed, though that amounted to nearly £1,000., and have £23. 8s. 6¼d. left. With this small sum we enter upon the last month of this present period, during which we shall yet need many hundred pounds, being assured that our Heavenly Friend, who has helped us for more than 47 years, will not forsake us.—April 29. A servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, having received a legacy of £532. 14s. 5d., gave £500. of it for these Objects.

May 2. From Scotland, £100.—May 20. From Plymouth, £10.—May 25. From Swansea, £15.—May 26. The Lord has, in the riches of His grace, so helped us, as that during this month also we have been enabled to meet the necessary expenses, though a month ago we had only £23. 8s. 6¼d. left, and we are thus brought to the close of the year, and have a small balance left in hand.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1881, to May 26, 1882. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

26, 1881, to May 26, 1882. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

At the commencement of our new year, on May 27, 1881, we had in hand for these Objects, £124. 6s. 2½d. viz., a sum which would only supply the average expenses of three days. To the balance in hand we could not therefore look, and, by God’s grace, had no desire so to do; but to Him, and to Him alone were our eyes directed, and He helped us many times, when all the money in hand was entirely expended, in answer to our believing, expecting supplications. In the following pages I will now give some instances as to the manner in which the Lord was pleased to help us.

June 7, 1881. From a Scotch Lady, then at Perth, £80. for these Objects, with £20. for the Orphans.—On June 8th we received £3. 5s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Cheque £3. 5s. for the Lord’s work. Use the money for what you like. It is a thank-offering. My two houses in B—— H—— were preserved from damage last Saturday week, while some very near were injured during the storm. With sincere respect, ****."—June 16th. From Yorkshire £190. for Foreign Missions, with £10. for my own personal expenses.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £300.—June 17. From Scotland £270., with £30. for my own personal expenses.—8s. 7½d. "Saved during 23 weeks, by using ¼ lb. butter less per week."—June 21. From Ireland £200. for Missions.—Do you see, dear reader, that we do not wait upon the Lord in vain? He helps us, in answer to prayer. To Him alone we look, and we do not do so without being helped.—June 22. From Australia £5.—June 24. From Batavia 50 florins, with 50 florins for the Orphans.

July 5. All our money for these Objects was gone, though 8 days since £189. 17s. 6d. was in hand, and many donations had come in since. Under these circumstances I received this morning the following letter from a distance of several hundred miles, containing a cheque for £250. "My dear brother, it has pleased the Lord so to prosper me, that from time to time I have been able to take out of our business sums of money, which I have tried to use for His glory. The last I took out was two or three months ago. I have from time to time been asking the Lord what I am to do with it, and (I hope guided by Him) have resolved to send part to some brethren who may be in need in Ireland, and the rest to you, which kindly use as you think best. I should be pleased that a portion, more or less, go for missions. Yours very truly in Jesus, ****," I took of the amount £150. for Missions and £100. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund. Thus the Lord was pleased to help us, when we had nothing at all left for these Objects.—July 13th. By sale of dentist gold, gold and silver articles, pearls, diamonds, etc. for the Bible, Missionary and Tract Fund, £44. 5s., with £120. for the Orphans.—July 16. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—July 28, 1881. "The income has been for some time past only about the third part of the expenses. Consequently, all we have for the support of the Orphans is nearly gone; and for the first four Objects of the Institution we have nothing at all in hand. The natural appearance now is, that the work cannot be carried on. But I BELIEVE, that the Lord will help, both with means for the Orphans and also for the other Objects of the Institution, and that we shall not be confounded; also, that the work shall not need to be given up. I am fully expecting help, and have written this to the glory of God, that it may be recorded hereafter for the encouragement of His children. The result will be seen. The foregoing was written at 7 A.M. July 28, 1881. In the course of the day there came in altogether for the various Objects £69. 11s. 10½d. I am looking for further answers to prayer.—July 29. The total income today has been £27. 4s. 11¼d., and the expenses have been £230. But my hope is in God. As yet we have the means to meet our expenses, and I expect that we shall not be confounded, though for seven years we have not been so poor. July 30. Saturday. Today £33. 15s. has come in."

Aug. 1. "Monday. The total income today has been £134. 17s. Six, seven, eight times daily I am praying with my dear wife for means; we are looking out for answers, and we do not wait on the Lord in vain.—Aug. 2nd, The total income today £130. 4s.—Aug. 3rd, £61. 18s. 2d.—Aug. 4th. £91. 4s. 6d.—Aug. 5th. £204. 16s. 5d. has come in for all the various Objects today. Of late the outgoings have been about £200., sometimes nearly £300 per day; therefore the kindness of the Lord in giving us this day’s income is very great. We still pray daily, six, seven, eight times or more for means.—Aug. 6th, Saturday. Total income £33.—Aug. 8th, Monday. Total income £27. Above £300. was expended today.—Aug. 9th. £20. has come in.—Aug. 10
th. £36. 13s. 6½d. was received today.—Aug. 11th. In all £260.—Aug. 12th. £46. 15s. 7¼d., and a large silver teapot and cream jug have been received today.—Aug. 13th. £22. 5s. 8d. has been received today. This is Saturday. The outgoings of this week have been about £l,500.—Aug. 15th, 1881. The balance for the Orphans is now reduced to £332. 12s. 7d., lower than it has been for more than twenty-five years. This sum we have in hand to meet the daily expenses in connection with 2,100 persons. It is only enough for the average outgoings of 4½ days. But our eyes are upon the Lord. I look to my heavenly Provider. The total income of today has been £28. 5s, 2½d.—Aug. 16th. The income today, after constant waiting upon God, has been for the Orphans £106. 8s. 8d., and for the other Objects £39. l3s. 10d., in all £146. 2s. 6d.— Aug. 17th. The income for the first four Objects has been £73. 2s., for the support of the Orphans £77. 19s. 8d., in all £151. 1s. 8d.—Aug. 18th. £5. 8s. 10½d. for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, and for the Orphans £124. 6s. 9d., in all £129. 15s. 7½d.— Aug. 19th. For the first four Objects £6. 17s. 3d.; for the Orphans £57. 9s. 7d., in all £64. 6s. 10d.—Aug. 20th, Saturday. The total income about £60.—Aug. 22nd, Monday. £17. has come in for the first four Objects, and for the support of the Orphans £1,036.; part of a legacy, left years ago, £1,000, was paid, as the answer to many prayers."

What I have recorded here, with reference to July 28th, 1881, up to Aug. 22nd, I wrote down at the time, as here copied out, and I now add a few practical remarks:— 1. During all this time we did not make known our circumstances to our friends, whether wealthy or otherwise; but to God alone. 2. Far less had we a desire to ask them for help, from which we refrained, not, because we considered it sinful; but in order that, by waiting upon God alone, we might show to the Church of God at large, how much, at the latter part of the Nineteenth Century, can still be obtained by prayer and faith, that thus other children of God may be encouraged to wait unceasingly upon Him, and that their faith may be strengthened. We did it also that an unbelieving world might see the reality of the things of God. 3. Those readers, who are acquainted with the early part of the history of the Institution, will remember, that, what I have just now stated under No. 2, was the especial reason, why I founded the Orphan Institution; and I have to mention to the praise of God, that in the day of Christ it will be seen how vast the number of His disciples will than be who will have received blessings through these records, which have been published yearly. 4. I only add, that on the next day to the one last spoken about, Aug. 23rd, my dear wife and myself left for the Continent of Europe, that, as I had arranged before, I might enter upon my eighth long preaching tour; and I had now to leave the whole responsibility of the Institution in the hands of my son-in-law, Mr. Wright, and his numerous efficient helpers, the value of whose assistance I had long experienced. My dear wife and I could wait upon God in distant lands, and trust in Him for help regarding the work at home, quite as well as we could in Bristol, and this we did habitually. The following record will show how greatly the faith of Mr. Wright, and of our fellow helpers was exercised, but also how our united waiting upon God, they at home, and we thousands of miles off, was recompensed, and how day by day the wants of the Institution were supplied, and it remained in existence to enter upon the new period from May 26th, 1882, to May 26th, 1883.

I now refer further to donations received after July 28th, 1881.

Aug. 11th. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, constrained by the love of Christ, £100.—Aug. 17th. From the same donor £50. for these Objects, and £50. for the Orphans.

Sept. 1st. Received £9. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I enclose cheque, value £9., which please use as you think best. May God spare your life for many years, to be the Orphans’ friend. About £5. of this sum is the result of putting by a halfpenny for every pair of boots sold during the year. I wish I could do more. I shall be glad if you will send a Report when the yearly account has been published. I am, your humble servant, ****."—Sept. 7th. Today the income for these Objects has been £17. 8s. 4d., and the expenses have been £167. 6s. 4d. The income for the Orphans has been £40. 2s. 4d., but the expenses have been £288. 7s. 7d. Under these circumstances ALL we do is, to wait upon God; to Him alone we look, and we are helped.—The next day, September 8, the income for the Orphans was £73. 15s. 1½d., and the expenses were £242. 16s. 3d.—Sept. 12. From Edinburgh, in a Bank Order, £10. for Missions, £10. for the Orphans, and £5. for my own personal expenses.—Sept. 26th. £2. 10s. for Missions, and £2. 10s. for the support of the Orphans, "Instead of insuring the donor’s cows."

Oct. 1st. From the neighbourhood of Oxford, from a donor who has often helped us, when we were in great need, £153. 14s. 3d.—Oct. 4th. From the neighbourhood of Adelaide, South Australia, an Australian £5. Note; and from Adelaide £20.—Oct. 11th. The total of the income for the various Objects of the Institution has been today £71. 18s. 7d., and the total of the expenses £513. 0s. 3d. Again and again it is thus, so it is necessary that the eye of faith be steadily fixed upon the Lord and His precious promises, in order that the heart be kept in peace. Read, in connection with this last sentence, the following letter, written on Oct. 12th, and sent from a considerable distance: "My dear Sir, Please receive cheque for One Hundred Pounds, to assist you in your good work in connection with your Orphan Homes, which the Spirit has moved me to send, in answer to your prayers; and may God abundantly bless all your efforts! I am, yours truly, **** ." Notice, that the donor writes: "which the Spirit has moved me, to send in answer to your prayers." This was truly the case. The donation came in answer to our many prayers.—Oct. 19th. We have nothing at all in hand for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund.—Oct. 20th. Admire the Lord’s kindness, dear Christian reader. In this our poverty, having not a single penny in hand for the first four Objects of this Institution, we received £400. for them, £90. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself, from the neighbourhood of Manchester.

Nov. 10th. Received £1. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, since I began to subscribe a pound each year to the Lord’s work under your charge, He has been pleased to bless me in my undertakings, instead of being poor in consequence. I am astonished to find that the more He lays it on my heart to give to His cause, the more I increase in means even here, so that I lose nothing, by giving, even now, and then the joy of knowing, that it will be all credited, when we are taken to be for ever with Himself, Matt. xxv. 40. Since last year I have been in rather ill health, but the Lord has restored me again, for which, as a small thank-offering, I increase my subscription to £1. 10s., to be used as the Lord may guide you. I know His grace has qualified you to be a faithful steward. Yours in Him to the praise of His grace, ****."—Nov. 14th. Received from Ireland, for Missions, £200. Nov. 22nd. Received £10 with the following letter: "Dear Sir, About twelve months since, my only son, 19 years of age, was very ill. I had placed him with a chemist to learn his business. I fetched him home, and was told by my doctor that the only thing that would do him good was a warm climate; it was the only means for him, all his vitals were so weak. I could not see my way clear to send him abroad, but believed the Lord would do as much for him here. So, in my distress, I waited upon the Lord and He has heard me. My son has improved greatly in health. I now enclose a cheque for £10., one pound for foreign missions; the other nine pounds as a thank-offering for the Lord’s kindness to me and my dear child. Please use this as you see best. I remain, Dear Sir, yours truly, ****."—Nov. 26th. From the neighbourhood of Hurstpierpoint £100. for the first four Objects of the Institution, £70. for the support of the Orphans, and £30. for my own personal expenses. This donation was received by afternoon mail, when the balance in hand for the first four Objects was only £8. 0s. 8d. Admire, dear Christian reader, with us the Lord’s kindness and faithfulness, who thus continually, for the sake of our Lord Jesus, in answer to our believing, expecting prayers is pleased to help us. Will not you also, if you have never acted in like manner, confide in God in all your various trials, difficulties and necessities; and will you not also look out for answers to your prayers? Make but trial of this way, and you will find out in your own happy experience, how precious it is, thus to walk in fellowship with God.

Dec. 5th. We have again nothing at all in hand for the first four Objects of the Institution.

Under these circumstances, the following donations were received, whereby the Lord again was graciously pleased to help us. Dec. 5th. From Madrid £5. for the Schools.—Dec. 6th. From Wellington Park, Clifton, 15s. with 5s. for myself.—Dec. 7th. From Westbourne Place, Clifton, £10.—From Toppesfield £5.—Dec. 8th. From Hammersmith 9s. 10d. for Missions.—Dec. 9th. Legacy of the late Mr. T. S. F. £19. 19s.—Dec. 12th. From Teddington £5.—From Glenburne £10. with £5. for the Orphans.—Dec. 13th. Left anonymously at 34, Park Street, Bristol, £5.—Dec. 14th. From London £15. for Missions in Italy, £10. for Missions in Spain, and £5. for Missions in China.—Dec, 15th. Received £200., of which £90. was for these Objects, £75. for the support of the Orphans, £25. for my own expenses and £10. for Tracts, in various languages, Gospels, etc. The donor writes: "Your last Report, like the former ones, has much gratified me, especially your remarks on giving systematically, a fixed portion to the Lord. About 25 years ago I commenced with a tenth; and, as the Lord increased my gains, so I increased my proportion, and can say with much joy, ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’" Again and again this donor has kindly helped us; and again and again his donations have come to hand, when we were low in funds. So, as the foregoing account shows, it was this time in particular; for, when the donation came to hand, all that had come in between Dec. 5th and 14th was again spent, and we had nothing at all remaining for these Objects, but were thus helped for the moment.—There came in also, on the same day, from the neighbourhood of Stourbridge £12. 2s. 6d.; and from Kells for Missions £1. 8s., £1. l7s. 6d., £2. and £l.—Dec. 19th. £12. 12s. 6d. with the following statement: "The united work of a father, mother and their three children, and given with great pleasure for the work, £5. For Missions and £7. 12s. 6d. for the Orphans."—Dec. 21st. £50. for the first four Objects with £50. for the Orphans. The donor of this £100. is 82 years of age, and has been a believer 62 years. He had left £100. as a legacy, by his will, for this Institution, but decided to pay it in his lifetime, and thus to save the legacy duty.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, constrained by the love of Christ, £50.—Dec. 26th. There is again not a penny in hand for the first four Objects of the Institution. Under these circumstances we received from Calcutta £1. on Dec. 27th.—Dec. 29th. £4. from Kircaldy.—On Dec. 30th, from Hereford £20. for Missions and from Dalkeith £5. From Newark, New Jersey, £10. 5s. 4d.—Dec. 31st. On the last day of the year we received for these Objects from believers near Tretherne £6. for Missions.—From Paddington £30. for Missions, £30. for the School—, Bible and Tract Fund, with £50. for the Orphans and £10. for myself.—Also £5. from Kingsdown Parade, Bristol. Thus the year, during which we had had again and again nothing at all in hand, closed with mercies. We had a little remaining.

Jan. 2nd, 1882. The year began with fresh manifestations of the kindness of our Lord, in granting to us answers to our prayers. We received from Scotland £100. with £10. for myself.—From Clifton £2. for Missions, £1. for the Schools, £3. for the Orphans, and £5. for myself.

—From Horningsham, 10s.—From Cotham, £4. 10s.—From Clifton 5s.; also 5s. for Bible and Tract Fund, 10s. for Missions and Orphans, and 5s. for myself.—£2. from Cape of Good Hope, with the following deeply important letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, Herewith I send a Post Office Order for £2. to be used as you think best. Believe me, my dear Mr. Muller, yours faithfully, ****." P.S. My last contribution was made in lieu of insuring my house against fire. Soon after, it was burnt with most of its contents. This I believe was permitted to try my faith. It has been tried, and, I trust, strengthened. I have been enabled to rebuild my house on a smaller scale, but have no intention to insure it, except as before, by trusting in the Lord. With Christ Jesus He gives us all blessings, and if He sees good to take away some of them, it ill becomes His children to murmur or to doubt His word, that "all things work together for good to them that love God."

—May I beg the Christian reader again and again to ponder this last sentence, and indeed the whole of this postscript. I have now been for 56 years and 9 months a believer in the Lord Jesus; many scores have been my trials, difficulties and losses; but regarding EVERY ONE OF THEM, without a single exception, I have found already in this life, that they have worked for my good, and I have had to praise God for them all.—From Redland 10s. for the Bible Fund, 10s. for Missions, £1. for the Orphans, and £1. for myself. From a donor in St. Paul’s, Bristol, £12. with £4. for the Orphans, and £2. 10s. for Reports.—Through ditto £2., with £2. for the Orphans.—Received also £20. with the following letter: "Dear Brother, I enclose you one hundred dollars for your excellent work for the Lord. Please divide it equally among the different Objects of the Institution, and send a few of your Reports for circulation, so that our people may know what good the Lord is doing, when His people are willing to come back to His plan of collecting funds and carrying on Missions. Yours in Christ, ****."—From Eltham £25.—From Austria 10 Florins.—From S. S. £50. for Missions.—From the neighbourhood of Wick, £1.—From Gloucester £2.—Jan. 10. From Scotland £120. with £30. for myself.—Jan. 11.—A very aged believer, past his ordinary occupation, but desirous of doing a little yet for the Lord, makes bee-hives and sends for the Institution the money thus obtained, £2. 0s. 6d. and 1s. 6d. for Reports.

—Jan. 12. From Havre £1. 3s. 9d.—Jan. 16. From a widow in business, who gives twopence in the pound of her takings, £6. 8s. 11d. for the Orphans, with £2. l7s. 7d. for the first four Objects.—Jan. 18. A lady sent £250. for Home and Foreign Missions and £250. for the support of the Orphans, as "A thank-offering to my Heavenly Father, in grateful remembrance of His many mercies, patience and long-suffering with one so undeserving."—The lady had intended to leave this £500. by will to the Institution, but now prefers to pay the money in her lifetime, whereby £50. are saved for the Institution, as no legacy duty is to be paid. The £250. for Home and Foreign Missions came in very seasonably, as the funds for these Objects were almost entirely exhausted.—From the neighbourhood of Ledbury £5. "instead of insuring premises."—Jan. 24, From Hampshire £50. for the Bible—, Missionary and School Fund, £100. for the Orphans, and £50. for my own expenses. The last sum the kind donor particularly sent in consideration of our heavy travelling expenses in the Lord’s service.—Jan. 27. From S. S. £50. for Missions.—Jan. 31. From India £16. 15s. 5d.

Feb. 2. Ten shillings with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I purpose, the Lord helping me, to lay aside, specially for His work in your hands, ninepence on every empty Petroleum Barrel I sell. The enclosed is the first 10s. Please use it as you most need; and may it be to His praise! From yours most sincerely, ****."—All our money for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund is again completely gone. Nothing at all is left.—Under these circumstances we received on Feb. 3, from Aberdeen £5. for Missions and Schools.—From San Remo, Italy, £2. 10s. for Bibles and £2. 10s. for the Orphans.—From Teignmouth on Feb. 4, from A. R. £5.—From Kent £15.—Feb. 7. From one of the former Orphans £6.—From London on Feb. 8, £8., with £4. for the Orphans.—Feb. 9. From Eltham £50. for Missions.—Received £20. 5s. 5d. with the following letter from Canada: "My dear Sir, Kindly allow me to state to you, my beloved wife departed this life Jan. 7, 1882. Before her departure she instructed me to send to you one hundred dollars to help forward the work of the Lord in which you are engaged. I feel pleasure in enclosing the cheque for this amount, hoping it will reach you safely. I remain, lovingly yours, ****."—Thus, with the addition of the income in connection with the sale of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts and School Receipts, we have been able to meet the expenses for these Objects since Feb. 2, and have a balance of £69. 15s. 2d.— Feb. 14. £2. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, enclosed I beg to send £2. for the Orphan Houses or for other purposes, at your discretion. Your work is an incentive to thousands of Christians to complete trust in God. Yours truly, ****." Regarding the last sentence I can only add, may it be so more and more! I joyfully dedicated my life to this, to show to the Church of God and to the world that the Living God is precisely what He was 3000 and 4000 years ago; and that we may still obtain vast blessings from Him by prayer and faith, as the first disciples obtained them in the days of the Apostles.—Feb 17. From H. H. £1. 18s. 7d. for the Bible Fund, £5. for Missions, and £27. 2s. 8d. for the support of two Orphans for one year.—Feb. 18. With II Cor. ix, 15, £10.; also £1. 5s. 9d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Please accept enclosed as a thank-offering for blessing on business during the past year, and for being allowed to suffer loss in it for Christ’s sake, which I esteem an honour. The money may be used for any branch of the Lord’s work under your care you may think proper. Yours in Him, ****."—Feb. 23. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100., with £100. for the Orphans.—Feb. 26. The funds for the first four Objects of the Institution are again reduced to nothing. There is not one penny in hand for them.

March 2. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £150., and £50. for the Orphans.—March 15. There is not one penny in hand, either for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, or the support of the Orphans. We look to God for help.—March 16. Only £35. 18s. 7d. has come in for all the various Objects this day.—March 17. Received today, in this our great need, from a lady who had received some money through the death of a relative, £10. for Missions to China, £10. for Missions to India, £5. for Missions to the Jews, £5. for Missions to Italy, Spain and Germany, £4. for the Bible Fund, £1. for the Tract Fund, £5. for Day Schools in Bristol, £10. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—March 20. From Blackfriars Road, London, £10. for Missions.— £5. from Clifton.— £5. from Hopton.—March 21. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.—From India £5. for Foreign Missions, with £5. for the Orphans.— "£1. from an increase of salary, and 10s. as the result of small weekly savings, with praise to God for the opportunity and privilege of giving."— £50. with II Cor. ix, 15.—March 22. From the neighbourhood of Newton Stewart, £l.—Received also, in this our poverty, 41 coupons, amounting to £157., and a dividend warrant for £21. 10s. 10d. from a donor whom the Lord has often used to help us, when in great need. Thus we were, for the moment, again delivered out of our difficulties.—March 29. From Melbourne, Australia, £2. for Missions,—March 31, From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £100., with £50. for the Orphans.

April 1. From Ireland £200., for labourers in the Gospel.—April 5. From Ayrshire £30., with £30. for the Orphans.—April 12. From Perth £5., as "A thank-offering for recovery from sickness."—April 13. £3. "For special mercies in the conversion of our three children."

May 1. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £50.—With II Cor. ix, 15, £80.—£3. as "A thank-offering for letting a house, without a house-agent."—May 12. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £189. 5s.—May 17. From India £37. 16s.— May 26. From readers of "The Christian," per Messrs. Morgan and Scott, £6. for Missions and £58. 18s. 6d. for the support of the Orphans.—From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £217.

After having been many times during the past year without one penny for these Objects, we were brought to the close of this period with the small balance of l3s. 7¼d. in hand.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1882 to May 26, 1883. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

26, 1882 to May 26, 1883. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

We began the year with the balance of 13s. 7¼d. in hand, for these first four Objects of the Institution. There was now, looking at things naturally, not only this exceedingly small balance as a cause for discouragement, but also the great trial of faith, we had had with reference to means, during the whole of the previous year. Yet, notwithstanding these natural appearances, we were not cast down, but in peace, because we truly sought the honour of God in connection with this Institution, and really continued to trust in Him. The new period, therefore, was begun with the fullest expectation, that God would help us, though we knew not how; and the following pages will now show, in what manner help came.

On May 29th, 1882, we received from Manchester £50, for these Objects, with £50. for the Orphans. On May 30, £5. came from Bedfordshire, with £5. for the Orphans, from a Christian tradesman, who, for many years past, has sent us from time to time, as the Lord prospers him, a similar donation.

On June 3rd, £10. was received from a Bristol donor, who has often also sent us a similar donation; and on June 5th, £70. came in from Bath, with £20. for the Orphans, and £10. for my own personal expenses. On the 6th and 7th, £12. 15s. was given by various helpers at the Orphan Houses. On June 8th, £40. was sent from Edinburgh with £10. for the Orphans; and £10. from another Scotch donor near Auchterarder, with £10. 0s. 6d. for the Orphans.

Thus, within the first few days of the new period, God was pleased, by giving these and some other smaller donations, to refresh and comfort us, and afterwards sent other amounts for these Objects, which were larger still.

On June 17th, £150. was received from Scotland for these first four Objects, with £150. for the support of the Orphans, and £50. for my own personal expenses. On the same day £50. arrived from another Scotch donor for these Objects, with £50. for the Orphans. From Batavia, on June 19th, 75 florins (£5. 18s. 9d.) came in, with the same amount for the Orphans. From L. N. W. £25., with £25. for the Orphans; and from C. H. G. Esq., £6., with £6. for the Orphans. On June 20th, £15. arrived from Ireland for the Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, and £5. for the Orphans; and on the 22nd, £200. was received from Ireland for Missions. On June 23rd, we obtained £8. 16s. 7d. from Swanton, Ohio; and thus, before one month of the new period had passed, had received about £1,800. for these Objects, as the result of waiting upon God, and of speaking to Him only, in childlike simplicity about our wants.

July 2nd. From Christchurch, New Zealand, £5., with £11. 10s. for the Orphans, and £3. for my own personal expenses.—July 25th. A Bristol donor gave £50. for these Objects, and £50. for the Orphans, instead of leaving this amount in his Will.—On July 26th, £25. was received from Doctors Commons, London, for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, £25. for Missions, £25. for the Orphans and £25. for my own personal expenses.

Aug. 2nd. Legacy of the late Miss L. for Missions, £100.—Aug. 5th, £5. 5s. for the Bible Fund, with £25. 7s. for the support of 4 Orphans for six months, from the neighbourhood of Norwich.—Aug. 8th. From Essex £3., with £2. for the Orphans, as "a Thankoffering to the Lord for the first fruits of harvest gathered in."—From believers at Cork for Missions, £15.—Aug. 10. From Blairgowrie £70., with £20. for the Orphans and £10. for myself.— Aug. 21st. From S. M. T. £25. for the Bible Fund, £25. for Missions, and £50. for the Orphans.

Sep. 1st. Received £10., with the following letter: "Many months ago I was led to devote to the Lord a natural history collection of some value, intending, if it should realize its price, to send the money to a Foreign Mission in which I felt a deep interest. Month after month passed away, and I sometimes wondered why no purchaser came forward. I believe now, it was that, instead of sending it, as I intended, it should be sent to you for use as you may require, either for the Orphans or for any other object of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. I have now pleasure in handing you cheque for £10." £5. of this money was taken for Foreign Missions and £5. for the Orphans.—Sep. 6th. From Essex £3., with £2. for the Orphans. "A thank-offering for harvest, through much mercy, gathered in first class condition." It gives joy to the heart of the believer, to see God’s hand owned in these things.—Sep. 9th. From London £2. for the Bible Fund, £26. 10s. for the support of two Orphans for one year, and £1. 10s. for myself.—Sep. 15th. From the neighbourhood of Fairford £30., with £20. for the Orphans.—Sep. 18th. From Kent £50. for Missions.—From Naples £5.—Sep. 20th. From "Trust" £5.—Sep. 21st. From South Toledo £10.—From Charfield £7. 6s. 8d., with £12. l3s. 4d. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—Sep. 22nd. From New Orleans £2. 5s. 2d.—Sep. 26th. Received £5. 5s., with the following letter from a physician: "My dear Mr. Muller, Yesterday a Christian friend put one of your Reports into my hand. I am simply astounded at the blessed results of prayer and faith. God grant, in future I may go to my knees in a very different spirit! I consider your ‘Brief Narrative’ the most wonderful and complete refutation of scepticism it has ever been my lot to meet with. I enclose a cheque for £5. 5s.; use it as you like, you know best. Yours in the Lord Jesus, ****." The money was taken for the first four Objects of the Institution. To produce such results, I began nearly half a century ago to labour as I did, and, God be praised! I have not laboured in vain. Thousands of such testimonies I have had while yet in the body; but Hundreds of Thousands I expect to have in the glory.—Sep. 27th. From India £10. for Missions, with £10. for the Orphans.—Sep. 30. Received 41 coupons and 1 dividend warrant from a donor in Berkshire, amounting altogether to £175. 2s. 1d. This kind Christian gentleman has often been the Lord’s instrument in helping us, and often when in great need; thus it was also when this donation was received. We had nothing at all in hand for these Objects.

Oct. 4th. From H. B. £40., with £10. for the Orphans.—Oct. 13th. From Albrighton £5., as "A thank-offering for restoration to health, and for spiritual blessing."

Nov. 8
th. From Haverstock Hill, London, £50. for Foreign Missions.—From an East India donor £100., with £20. for myself.—Nov. 10th. From Scotland £100.—From Shrewsbury £18. 14s. 6d.—From Ale County, United States, £10., with the following letter: "Dear Brother, It has been three months since you have received from this quarter, though I have been labouring hard and preparing a harvest for the poor under your care; and now, for the winter season, the Lord willing, it will be forwarded to you, as it comes in. Enclosed find 50 dollars; one half for Missions, the remainder where most needed. Your Brother in Christ, ****." The second half was taken for the Orphans.—Nov. 11th. Received from Yorkshire £150. for Foreign Missions, with £150. for the Orphans.—On the same day £2. came in with the following letter from the neighbourhood of Edinburgh: "Dear Sir, My dear wife departed this life on the 24th October. She was in the habit of laying aside one half penny each day for the Mission in Spain. The last she sent was in August last year. She requested me to make it up to the day of her death, and send it to you. I now enclose £1. for the Mission in Spain, and £1. for the Orphans; and that God may bless the work in your hands, is my earnest prayer! I have felt this affliction a sore trial, and yet God has wonderfully supported me under it. I praise His holy name, I am not called to mourn, as those that have no hope; for if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also, which sleep in Jesus, will God bring with Him. I desire to thank the Lord for the resignation to His holy will, which He granted unto His handmaid. She was enabled to leave everything in His hands, and to rejoice in Jesus as all her salvation and all her desire. She has left seven children. The eldest is only eleven years of age, and the youngest eight months. She died of consumption. I remain, Dear Sir, Yours in Jesus ****." Here, dear Reader, you see one halfpenny daily put aside for the Lord’s work. Thus we receive help from wealthy donors, and also from those who have no large sums at their command; but whether the help comes through the one channel or through the other, it is equally the Lord who sends it to us, in answer to our daily prayers; for we have Him only to go to, and we do verily trust in Him. Thus, and thus alone it has come, that the work, though apparently like the burning bush which was not consumed, has existed for so many years, and I have now been permitted to enter upon the Fiftieth year of my service in connection with this Institution. You also see from the above letter, how the heart can be at peace; even under such circumstances, as this dear Christian mother was in, because she knew the Lord Jesus.—Nov. 16th. Legacy of the late Miss L., £150. for Missions and £150. for the Orphans. Of late I have been asking the Lord again and again to grant, that legacies may not only be left for the support of the Orphans, but for Missions also, and the other objects of the Institution. During the last twelve months, this prayer has in several instances been answered, and will be answered yet further, I doubt not.—Nov. 16th. From X. Y. Z. £50., with £27. 19s. for the Orphans.—Nov. 22nd. From a friend at Burnley £50.

Dec. 2nd, From a Bristol donor £80., with £20. for the Orphans. "This Christian donor decided to give this amount in his life time, instead of bequeathing it by Will."—Again £16. with £4. for the Orphans from a donor who resides in the outskirts of Bristol.—Dec. 4th. The donor in Ale County, United States, sent another £10.—From Ireland, a gold ring set with a Ceylon sapphire, for the Bible and Mission Fund.—Dec. 6th. From Bedfordshire £5., with £5. for the Orphans’ Christmas treat.—Dec 7th. From Cookbury £1. as a "Thank-offering for a good harvest."—Dec. 15th. Again from Ale County £5. for Missions and £5. for the Orphans.

Should one or the other of the readers of this Report not know the blessedness of this way of living, from experience, I would affectionately entreat him to seek to know it for himself; but, in order to confide in God as a father and a friend, it is first of all needful to be reconciled to Him, by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; to have guilt removed from the conscience, by knowing experimentally the power of His blood, who, as our Substitute, died for our sins. This faith is obtained, by looking to God for it in earnest prayer; and, when received, a good conscience is retained by not doing anything which we know to be hateful to God, and by seeking to walk in His ways. Should we at any time err, and the Holy Spirit admonish us of our transgressions, we should at once humble ourselves before God, by confessing our sin, and exercise faith in the power of the blood of Christ afresh, in order to obtain forgiveness from our Heavenly Father. Real confidence in God, at all times and under all circumstances, in temporal as well as in spiritual things, gives the peace of God which passes all understanding, and makes even life on earth, before we reach our Heavenly Home, and while yet in a body of humiliation, a most blessed one. For more than half a century I have known this blessedness, and therefore earnestly long that all my fellow-believers may partake of it. To seek to do what I can in this particular, is one of the many objects I have in view, during my long Missionary tours.—Dec. 16. £5. as "Profits on a small stone quarry, with 11s. from a box for the Orphans.—Dec. 18th. From London £15. for Missions in Italy, £5. for Missions in China, £7. for Missions in Spain, and £13. for the Orphans.—Dec. 20th, £6. 16s. for Missions, with £12. for the Orphans, as "The proceeds of the united work of a father, mother and their children."—Dec. 22nd. From "Trust" £5.—Dec. 30th. From S. S. £50. for Foreign Missions.—From Hereford £25. for Missions.—From London £30. for Missions, £30. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund, £50. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself. Thus, to the end of the year 1882, we were helped, the Lord enabling us to meet the demands connected with the first four Objects of the Institution, and about £100. was left in hand on Saturday evening, Dec. 30th, 1882.

Jan. 1st, 1883. On the first day of the new year the Lord sent us further supplies, of which I only mention £100. from Scotland.— £3.
10s. from Cotham.—From a Bristol donor, living in the outskirts of Bristol, £10.— From Bootle, £5.—From London £25.—From Brighton £2. for the Bible Fund, £2. for Missions, with £4. for the Orphans, and £2. for myself.—From M. L. M. £5.

—From "Needy" £5.—Jan. 3rd. From Williamstown, South Australia, £5., £1. 18s. and £1.—From Bath 5s. 6d., being a penny a week, saved for the Lord’s work."—From Devonshire 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I herewith enclose a Post Office Order for 10s., which please to apply as best suits your purpose. With the same I wish you a very happy and prosperous New Year. Each, as it passes, brings us nearer to the gates of the golden city, and to Him who is the light thereof, our glorious Redeemer, to see Him face to face, and dwell in His presence for ever. Every change we see appears to whisper His near approach, and that the time is short. The busy world little dreams how near the end is, and are eagerly looking for better times, forgetting Him to whom time belongs, and who has measured it out to the day of trouble fast approaching. May the Lord bless and prosper you greatly, with showers of heavenly peace and love from Him who first loved us, together with all your household and the dear ones He has placed under your fatherly care, and all your work and labour of love in promoting His glory. Faithfully yours ****."—Jan. 5th. £1. 6s. 6d. as "One penny for every third order I have received during 1882."— Jan. 11th. £15. 6s. 9d. from a Solicitor in London for fees received for "affidavits from March to December l882."—Jan. 12th. "In memory of a mother" £20., with £5. for the Orphans.—Legacy of the late Miss S. M., 4 sixths of the residue of her estate = £636. 0s. 8d. for the Bible,—Missionary—and Tract Fund; with 6 tenths = £954. 1s. 1d. for the Orphans.—The lady who kindly left these two sums, I never saw nor knew any thing of her until we were informed about the legacy. The reader, I trust, will see the hand of God in this, to whom we look for help, and who is pleased for the sake of the Lord Jesus to listen to the supplication of His children.—From a widow in Liverpool, who contributes as the Lord is pleased to prosper her, £3. 6s. 11½d. for these Objects and £7. 19s. 3½d. for the Orphans.—Jan. 15th. From Scotland £120., with £30. for the Orphans and £20. for myself.—Jan. 17th. From Sussex £58. 18s. 11d., with £13. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—Jan. 18th. From Sussex £50. for Missions, £50. for Missions to the Jews, £70. for the Orphans, and £30. for myself.—From "Hants" £100. for the Bible and Mission Fund, £200. for the Orphans and £50. for myself. The £50. for myself was sent by the kind donor especially in consideration of my long, expensive missionary tours. —Jan 19th. From believers at Braunton £5. for Missions.—Jan. 20th. From believers at Purton £1. 1s. 7d. for Missions.—Jan. 24th. £100. as "a Thanksgiving from Essex."—Jan. 29th. From believers at Exeter £10. for the School Fund.

Feb. 6th. £2. 4s. for Missions, "Our first taking for milk, since we came to this farm."—Feb. 9th, From H. B. £100.—Feb. 10th. From Paris £25., with £75. for the Orphans.—Feb. 12th. From New Zealand £8., with £10. for the Orphans, and £3. for myself.

March 19th. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—March 26th. From St. Gallen, Switzerland, £7. 18s. 8d.—March 27th. From believers at Cork for Missions £10.—From St. Petersburg, 2 gold rings, (one set with diamonds and rubies,) for Missions.

April 9th. From Paris £100., with £50. for the Orphans.—April 10th. From Wales £100., with £80. for the Orphans and £20. for myself—From Dublin £50.—April 23rd. From a Bristol donor £80., with £20. for the Orphans.—April 24th. From Sussex £80. 15s. 8d.—April 27th. Eleven months of the new period have passed. The Lord has enabled us to meet all our expenses during this time, and we have for the Orphans in hand £4052. 5s. 3d. and for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund £817. 0s. 9¼d. The reader will see by this, how kind the Lord has been to us; how he has answered our prayers; and how important it is to carry out the light which He is pleased to give to His children. We did so, at the beginning of this period, and have been helped.—April 30th. From the late Mr. J. G. £10. for Missions.

May 2nd. From "Trust" £5.—May 3rd. From Berkshire 41 coupons and 2 dividend warrants, value £194. 14s. 10d.—From a donor residing in the outskirts of Bristol £15.—May 16th. £7. 10s. with II Cor. ix., 15.—From Swansea £10., with £5. for the Orphans.—May 18th. From Haverstock Hill £30., with £4. for Missions to China and £20. for the Orphans.—May 22nd. From readers of "The Christian," per Messrs. Morgan and Scott, 10s., with £6. for Missions, and £163. 15s. for the Orphans.—May 26th. From a servant of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seeks to lay up treasure in heaven, £300.

The previous donations, which have been noticed, form only a very small part of the whole; these are merely given as specimens.

At the close of the year we had in hand for these Objects a balance of £610. 18s. 10d., though we had begun with 13s. 7¼d. only, and had to meet all the expenses for the Schools, the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, and the Mission Department.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, sent in answer to prayer, from May 26, 1883 to May 26, 1884. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1883 to May 26, 1884. Letters from Donors, Practical remarks, &c.

We began our new period with £610. 18s. 10d. in hand, for these objects, a balance larger than we have had for several years past, yet so small, that, unless a considerable increase of the funds had come in, soon after May 27th, 1883, nothing would have remained to meet the regular expenses. We expected help, however, from God, and were not disappointed. I give some specimens now as to the way in which He supplied us.

June 2nd. A donor, residing in the outskirts of Bristol, sent for these objects £10., with £5. for the support of the Orphans. We received £20. also from a lady residing near Ipswich. On June 5th £8. arrived from New Zealand, with £10. for the Orphans, and £3. for my own personal expenses. June 7th. Received from H. C. J. £40. with £10. for the Orphans. June 8th. From Swanton Ohio, £8. 12s. 4d. June 18th. From New York, £20. for Missions, £10. 17s. 8d. for the School—, Bible—, and Tract Fund, and £10. for the Orphans.—From Scotland £200., with £50. for the Orphans, and £25. for myself.

July 7th. From Scotland £100. July 16th. This day the following letter was left at the Orphan Houses, with some strawberries, some cream, and 5s. for ourselves. Though asked for, no name could be obtained. "Dear and honoured Sir, Will you and dear Mrs. Muller please to accept this small trifle from one who has had the privilege of being one of the Orphans? Words cannot express the gratitude and love I feel towards you for all the kindness and love I received whilst under your fatherly care; but I am sure you will be fully rewarded, when you enter into that everlasting joy you so sweetly speak about. I love to think, dear Sir, of the welcome home you will receive, first of all from our blessed Lord Jesus, and then from the dear children who are gone home before. It makes me wish I may be there to be one of them; but if our dear Lord has not come and taken us all home before then, you will have the pleasure of seeing your Orphans coming through those pearly gates one by one. Trusting, dear Sir, that our heavenly Father will spare you for many years to be the Orphans’ friend is the earnest prayer of one who has the pleasure of being one of the former happy Orphans. Dear Sir, will you please to excuse my name?—July 19th. £1. as a "thank-offering on sale of heifers."—July 21st. From Mr. and Mrs. ——, former Orphans, £1. 10s. for Foreign Missions, and £3. 10s. for the support of one Orphan for 3 months. Every three months the same amount is sent by these donors for the same objects.—July 28th. From Essex, £50.—From Oregon, £7. for Foreign Missions.—July 31st. From Manchester, £100. for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, with £100. for Foreign Missions.

Aug. 1st. From the neighbourhood of Newcastle-on-Tyne £100., with £100. for the Orphans.—Aug. 29th. From "a mother" £25. for the Bible Fund and Missions, and £25. for the support of the Orphans.

Sept. 3rd. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, and who had a legacy left to them, £250., with £250. for the Orphans.—Sept. 6th. From Scotland £30., with £30. for the Orphans, and £40. for my own personal expenses.—Sept. 12th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, having had a legacy left to them, and constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £250., with £250. for the support of the Orphans.—Sept. 15th. With II. Cor. ix. 15, £3. 10s., with £3. 10s. for the Orphans.—Sept. 18th. From Illinois, £15. for Foreign Missions, with £15. for myself.—From the Isle of Wight £50., with £50. for the Orphans.—Sept. 26th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £250., with £250. for the Orphans.

Oct. 11th. From Essex £20., with £70. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—Oct. 12th. From Yorkshire £150. for Foreign Missions, with £150. for the Orphans.—Oct. 23rd. From Gloucester £25., with £25. for the Orphans.—Oct. 29th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £10. for Missions.—Oct. 30th. £1. as "A thankoffering for prayer answered."

Nov. 2nd. £21. 10s. 10d. as a Dividend Warrant, with coupons for £153. 14s. 7d. for the support of the Orphans, from a kind Christian donor, who has repeatedly helped us in a similar way.—Nov. 6th. From a former resident in India £20., with £80. for the Orphans, and £20. for myself.—Nov. 12th. £2. for Missions, "From a bereaved mother, in loving remembrance of her departed daughter."

Dec. 7th. Balance of the legacy of the late Miss S. A. W. L., £82. 13s. 4d. for Missions, and £82. 13s. 4d. for the Orphans.—Dec. 18th. From London, £7. for Missions in China, £10. for Missions in Italy, and £13. for the Orphans.—Dec. 20th. £7. 9s. 6d. for Missions, and £12. for the Orphans, as "The result of the united work, through one year, of a father, mother, their three children and a servant, herself a former orphan."—Dcc, 21st. From St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia, £10. for Missions.—Dec. 24
th. £149. 9s. 11d., with £150. for the Orphans, from two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven.—Dec. 27th. From the same donors, £100.—Dec. 29th, From the neighbourhood of Swindon, £3., "Instead of insuring stock," for Missions in Ireland,—Dec. 31st. From a Christian widow in Liverpool, £3. 14s, 10d., being one penny in the pound of all her takings in the year, in memory of her departed mother; and £7. 9s. 7d. for the Orphans, being two pence in the pound, together with £2. 5s., the total of her receipts on the anniversary day of the opening of her business." This widow has trusted in God from the time she became a widow, and has been helped.

Thus we were brought, by the help of the Lord, to the close of another year, enjoying His blessing; and, peacefully, trusting in God, we entered upon the new year.

Jan. 1st. 1884. From Pembrokeshire, £5. for Missions, "Instead of insuring cows."—From Paddington, £10. for the School-Fund, £50. for Missions, £50. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.—Jan. 4th. From Sussex, £5. for Missions, with £36. 4s. 4d. for the Orphans.—Jan. 7th. From Kansas, £10., with £10. for the Orphans.—Jan. 17th. From Java, 50 florins, with 50 florins for the Orphans.—Jan. 24th. From Hampshire, £100. for the Bible and Mission Fund, £200. for the Orphans, and £50. for my own expenses.—From Sussex, £50. for Missions and £100. for the Orphans.—Jan. 25th. From Hereford, £20. for Missions.

Feb. 5th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £5., with £5. for the Orphans.—Feb. 20th. From Christchruch, New Zealand, £1. 17s. 6d., and 2s. 6d. for Missions in China.—From New Zealand £10., with £24. 7s. 6d. for the Orphans.—Feb. 22nd. From H. H. £3. 9s. for the Bible Fund, £7. for Missions, and £27. 5s. 8d. for the support of two Orphans for one year.

March 4th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who had a legacy left to them, and who, constrained by the love of Christ, lay up treasure in heaven, £500., with £500. for the Orphans.—From Paris £25., with £100. for the Orphans.—Today, March 5th, it is fifty years, since, by the help of God, I founded this Institution. Since that I have received for it, in answer to prayer, a Million and Ten Thousand Pounds sterlings.—March 8th. From Scotland £60., with £50. for the Orphans. March 11th. From Haverstock Hill, for Missions in China, £50.—In 41 coupons, £153. 14s. 7d. from a donor who has repeatedly helped us in a similar way, and when we were in need, so that his donations were obtained as marked answers to our prayers.—March 12th, From the neighbourhood of Manchester, £150., with £50. for the Orphans. This kind Christian gentleman also the Lord has again and again used, in answer to our prayers, to help us in time of need.—March 17th. From one of the former Orphans, now in service, the following letter, with £3. 5s.: "Dear and respected Sir, Will you use the enclosed £3. 5s. for whichever part of the work you think best? As it is a larger amount than I have been able to contribute before, I should tell you, that it is the sum I obtained by disposing of some jewellery that had been given to me some months ago, belonging to a relative now with Jesus, and which I have been in the habit of wearing until very recently, when I was led by the word of God (I. Peter iii. 3) to put from me that which was not in accordance with its teaching, and desiring ever to keep in mind that He would have me to be a doer and not a hearer only of His word, have sought to honour Him, though in so small a way, who has redeemed me by His most precious blood. Etc."

April 1st. From Glenely, South Australia, £7. 10s., with £7. 10s. for the Orphans.—April 15th. From Ale County, U.S.A., for Missions, £10.

May 3rd. From Haverstock Hill, £25., with £26. 12s. for the Orphans.—May 5th, II. Cor. ix. 15, £25., with £25. for the Orphans.—May 7th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £100., with £100. for the Orphans.—May 9th. From Redland, £20. for Missions.—May 13th. From Haverstock Hill, £10. 10s. for Missions.—May 16th, From Readers of "The Christian," per Messrs. Morgan and Scott, £13. for Missions, and £65. 12s. 6d. for the Orphans.—May 17th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £10. for Missions.—May 20th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, having had legacies left to them, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £750., with £750. for the Orphans.—From Worcester, £69. 6s. 2d. for Missions, with £15. for myself.—May 22nd. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who desire to lay up treasure in heaven, £312. 3s. 1d., with £312. 3s. 2d. for the Orphans.— May 26
th. From Norfolk, £25. for Missions, with £25. for the Orphans.

Thus the Lord brought us to the last day of the financial year of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, and enabled us to do a little in connection with its various departments. We confess we are not worthy to be allowed to help more abundantly in bringing up the rising generation in the fear of the Lord, by setting the truth of the Gospel before them in the various Schools, which are supported by the Funds of the Institution; nor are we worthy to be honoured by circulating the Holy Scriptures and Tracts, in order thus to spread the truth; nor by aiding Missionary operations, however great the need of labourers amongst idolaters, Mahometans, the various fallen Churches, or amongst nominal Protestant Christians; nor are we the least worthy in ourselves to help in caring for destitute Orphans; but we hide ourselves in Jesus. We say to God, our Heavenly Father, "Look upon the face of thy Anointed." We trust alone in His blood and Righteousness, and therefore expect, unworthy though we are in ourselves, yet further, for Christ’s sake, to be used, and supplied with means to carry on this Institution.

In the previous pages a very small portion only of the donations for the first four Objects has been referred to.

Supplies for the School—, Bible—, Missionary— and Tract Fund, from May 26, 1884 to May 26, 1885, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

26, 1884 to May 26, 1885, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors, practical remarks, etc.

We commenced the financial year of the Institution with a balance of £523. 0s. 6d. in hand. Much, however, as this may appear to some of my readers, it would last a short time only if no further income were added. This the Lord graciously gave. I will now give specimens as to the mode in which He was pleased to supply us:—

June 6th, 1884. From Christian friends at Swanton, Ohio, 56 dollars = £11. 4s. for Missions.—June 16th. From Ale County, U.S.A., for Missions £10.—June 23rd. From Enniscorthy, £9. 10s. for the Bible Fund.—June 26
th. From Scotland £130.

July 11th. From Sussex, £46. 3s. 2d. for Missions in India, with £15. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—July 18th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £10.—From Perpignan, France, 16s. and £2.—July 21st. From two former Orphans, £1. 10s. for Foreign Missions and £3. 10s. for the support of one Orphan for three months. July 25th. From Maryland, U.S.A., £31. 17s. 10d.— July 26th. From Dundee, £50.—July 29th. Received £5., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose £5., which please apply to the Lord’s work under your care as most needed. It is now 12 years since I sent you my first donation of £2. 11s. (i.e. in July, 1872). I have always been thankful to the Lord that I was led to adopt the Scriptural plan of systematic giving. It may interest you to know that my income has continued to increase, so that now it is nearly three times as much as it was then, and that I have increased the amount of my donations accordingly, so that, instead of about £10. per year given to the Lord, as at first, I find it has increased to about £30., and the year before last it amounted to £35. 15s. I recognize also the loving care of God over me and mine by preserving us from illness, losses, etc. I remain, dear sir, yours sincerely, ****."—July 30th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, and who had a legacy left to them, £300.—From the Punjaub, £10.

Aug. 8th. From Radlett, for Indian Missions, £50.—Aug. 11th. From Crawford County, U.S.A., £40. 17s. 3d. and 50 dollars.—From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, and to whom a legacy had been left, £300.—Aug. 12th. From Mauritius, £6.—From Yorkshire, £150. for Foreign Missions, with £150. for the Orphans and £10. for myself.—Aug. 14th. From Ceylon, £2. for Missions in Italy and Spain, £3. for the Orphans, and £2. for myself.—Aug. 15th. From Fairford, £50.—From Ale County, U.S.A., £10.—Aug. 18th. From Plymouth, £10.—Aug. 22nd. £2. 0s. 6d., with £53. for the support of four Orphans for one year, and £2. for myself, from London.—Aug. 23rd. £7., with II. Cor. ix. 15.—Aug. 30th. From Manchester, £100. for the Bible Fund, £100. for Missions, and £100. for the support of the Orphans.

Sept. 6th. Received 13 Queensland Coupons, 8 Russian, 5 City of Ottawa, 3 City of London, 4 City of Wellington, 4 Portuguese, 1 Colombo, and 3 Auckland, all of them amounting to £153. 14s. 7d. for these Objects, together with a New Zealand warrant for £21. 10s. 10d. for the Orphans.—Sept. 20th. Received from a Christian gentleman in business the following letter, with £20: "Dear Sir, I enclose cheque, which I hope will arrive safely, £15 for the Orphans and £5. for Foreign Missions. This makes the 34th year since I first read your Narrative, which decided me to give a certain portion of my income every year, and God has prospered me, and returned it to me in many ways, which I never could have expected. Since I read your Narrative, I think I must have given away about £3,000. to various objects, and I know I am only the richer for it. My example has been followed by several of my friends. Yours truly, ****."—Sept. 23rd. Received froth Devonshire £3., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I enclose a cheque for £3., which a brother in Christ desires me to send you, to use as you consider best. This same brother sent you, through me, £1. in January and £1. in April, and now £3. I mention this, as he is only a labouring man, and desires that a few pounds that he has managed to save from his hard earnings should be used for the service of God. He cannot write himself so asks me to send it for him. Hoping that the Lord may continue to bless you in your work of faith and labour of love, believe me, yours very truly, ****."

Oct. 3rd. From Baltimore, £4.—Received from Westmoreland £2., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I beg to forward Two Pounds—£1. as a thank-offering for the safe delivery of a valued servant and a sow from an enraged bull, and the other as a sincere thank-offering for a good season for gathering in our crops, which is a great blessing in this part, having had a succession of rainy seasons, which has caused great distress at times. That God may abundantly bless and prosper you in all your undertakings, is the earnest wish and prayer of yours very sincerely, ****."—From Ohio, £2. 11s. 4d. for Missions, £1. 5s. 8d. for the Orphans, and £1. 5s. 8d. for myself.—From Berlin, 20 mark.—Oct. 4th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £300.—Oct. 6th. From Holborn, £11. 10s.—Oct. 7
th. From Madras £10., with £10., for the Orphans.—Oct. 9th. Received from Vienna, Austria, the following letter, with £1. 1s.: "Dear Mr. Muller, beloved brother in the Lord, enclosed I send you my small annual donation (£1. 1s.) for whatever object you may think best. A few days ago I received your last Report, which is more faith-strengthening and soul-refreshing than many a sermon. It was so particularly to me, after I had just had to wade through the speech of some French infidel, who boldly affirms that of all the millions of prayers uttered every day not one is answered. I wish I could have sent him your plain but wonderful statement of facts.—Respected brother, the following, which was told me only two days ago, on the best authority, may be encouraging to you if you or your helpers ever need such support. There is a child in this city, 10 years, of age, belonging to Protestant parents, not in any sense believers. Through one of our friends, the boy got one of your Biographies or Reports, and after reading a portion he has ever since been occasionally heard to pray, ‘God, teach me to pray like George Muller, and hear me as Thou dost dear George Muller.’ The child has expressed a wish to become a preacher. The mother, now a widow, would not listen to anything of the kind; and objected, among other reasons, that the boy had not learned enough to enter a grammar school, which is here the necessary preparatory step to further studies. The boy rejoined, ‘I will learn and pray, and God will help me through, as He has done George Muller.’ And the fact now is that, to the surprise of all concerned, the boy has successfully passed his examination, and is now actually received at the school. ‘Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings God is perfecting praise.’ Oh for the simple faith of the little child! Yours in the love of Jesus, ****."—Oct. 10th. From Enniscorthy, £12. 15s.—Oct. 14th. From Scotland, £100.— From the neighbourhood of Mancheser, £160., with £40. for the Orphans.—From Southport £40., with £10. for the Orphans.—Oct. 16th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £10.—Oct. 21st. From Leamington, £20.—Received today £1. 10s. for Missions, and £3. 10s. or the support of one Orphan for three months, with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, I have to form you that C. B. completes today the term of his apprenticeship. Will you kindly send his indentures when convenient. We have found it a happy work to train the four orphan boys we have had, because of their general good conduct, and because the Lord’s blessing has rested on our endeavours. The three who have served their time are doing well as it regards their trade, and are each one in Church fellowship with us. I should have asked you to let me have another lad, only having one son learning the trade and another about to commence, prevents me having a vacancy just yet. My dear wife joins me in sending you the enclosed sum, with our grateful love. Please use it as at other times. We remain, dear sir, your grateful orphans, ****." The donors, husband and wife, who were both former orphans under our care, send quarterly £5. for the same objects. They left the Orphan Houses about twenty years since, and have both walked as consistent believers for about twenty-five years. They have had, as the letter states, four orphan boys as apprentices. We have many such cases in which former orphans now have orphan boys apprenticed to them.—Oct. 25th. From the neighbourhood of Bedford, £40. for Foreign Missions.

On Nov. 18th I received from Ale County, U.S.A., £10.—Nov. 22nd. £7., with II. Cor. ix. 15.—Nov. 26th. £40. by sale of plate, etc., left for Missions by the late Miss F——.

Dec. 11th. Received £80. from an entire stranger in Worcestershire. Observe, esteemed reader, the way in which God is pleased to supply our need in answer to prayer. In like manner we have been helped from most unexpected quarters many thousands of times during these 51 years.—Dec. 22nd. "From a father, mother, their three children, and their servant (herself a former orphan), the fruit of one year’s work," £9. 12s. 4d. for Missions, and £12. 17s. 8d. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—Dec. 26th. From South Australia, £4. 8s., being 2s. for every swarm of bees."—Dec. 29th. From Ale County, U.S.A., £10.—Dec. 30th. "From a widow who trusts in God," £3. 16s. 7d., with £9. 18s. 8d. for the Orphans.—From Edinburgh £70., with £30. for the Orphans.—Dec. 31st. Received £20., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I herewith enclose cheque value £20., viz., £5. in memory of G. O., £5. in memory of J. C., £5. instead of insuring crops, and £5. as a thank-offering for a fine harvest, which please to apply as most needed. Yours truly, ****."—From Paddington, £10. for the Schools, £50. for Missions, £50. for the Orphans, and £10. for myself.

Jan. 1st, 1885. As the old year had been closed with mercies, so the new year brought fresh blessings. Twenty-one donations came in this day for these objects, amounting altogether to £162. 4s. 6d.—Jan. 2nd. Received £5. from one of the former Orphans, now in service, with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, Once again I am privileged to contribute my mite towards the great work in which you are engaged for the glory of God and for the lasting benefit of the Orphans. Kindly use the enclosed £5. for whichever part of the work you think best. Having myself received so much from the dear Home in which I was an inmate ten years, together with my three elder sisters and younger brother, I feel it indeed a most blessed privilege to be able to show my gratitude to my Heavenly Father for all He has bestowed upon me; especially do I desire to thank Him for the mercies of the past year. As I look back upon it, how marked have been His care and watchfulness over me, in making things that seemed dark at the time work together for my good, and in drawing me, I trust, nearer to Himself. Oh, that in the year we have entered upon I may live more to His glory, and realize increasingly His life and power within me! One pound of the enclosed was given me for the Orphans by a friend and sister in the Lord, after reading the Report which I sent to her. She was deeply interested in it, and desirous to help as far as she was able. The family with whom I live are so far restored to health that we hope to return to Bristol some time this month, and thus again I hope to be present with the brethren, and able to attend the meetings which in the past have been blessed to my soul. I was rejoiced to meet with a small company of the Lord’s people here. May the Lord’s richest blessings rest upon your work and labour of love among the Orphans, and may you indeed have your desire that none of those instructed in that privileged Home may be missing when we meet in heaven! Remember me gratefully to dear Mrs. Muller and dear Mr. and Mrs. Wright. Trusting you and Mrs. Muller are in your usual health, I remain, dear Sir, yours gratefully, ****." The writer of the letter states that she and three other sisters and a brother of hers were together in the Orphan Houses. As it has been in this case, so it occurs frequently that three, four, or five Orphans of the same family are received, for we delight in being able to take in as many as possible of the same family, so that the bereaved Orphans may not be separated from each other. The writer of the letter also states that she had been ten years in the Orphan Houses, but very frequently we have had Orphans not only ten, but twelve, thirteen, or fifteen years under our care, and have even had them with us for seventeen years, as we receive children again and again who are only a few weeks old.—Jan. 10th. From Ontario, Canada, £10.—Jan. 12th. Received from Scotland £100., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed find bank order for £100., ten of which please to take for your own use, the remainder to be applied to which ever department of the Lord’s work, in which you are engaged, you think best. I trust you will long be spared to 1abour for the Master, in whose work you have so long and faithfully laboured, and that at last you may have many souls for a crown of rejoicing. I owe you many thanks for leading me to see the Christian duty of giving, and that systematically, to the Lord’s cause. It is blessed to do so, and I have felt it. I began with giving a tenth, but gradually increased until for some years I have given half of all the profits from my business; and this year, as a thank-offering to the Lord for restored health, I am giving Him all the profits, which accounts for the sum being larger than formerly. Yours faithfully, ****." Are all the Christian readers giving systematically to the Lord’s work, or are they leaving it to feeling, to impression made upon them through particular circumstances, or to striking appeals? If we do not give from principle systematically, we shall find that our one brief life is gone before we are aware of it, and that, in return, we have done little for that adorable One who bought us with His precious blood, and to whom belongs all we have and are. As the Lord is pleased to entrust us with means by the labour of our hands, or in our business or profession, or even through presents, legacies, or in any other way we may be supplied by Him with means, we should consider that we are His stewards, and that He would have us to use our money for Him. By this I do not mean, that ordinarily we should give away all that we possess as fast as we receive anything from the Lord; but, after considering our duty to our families and other particular obligations, we should ask ourselves, "How much can I now spare for the poor or the work of God? As the Lord prospers us, as He entrusts us with means, we should give, or lay aside for giving till calls are made upon us. The princaple of thus acting is plainly set forth in I Cor. xvi. 2—"Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store as God has prospered him." This passage, it is well known, refers as to its literal application to a collection to be made for the poor Jewish believers in Palestine who were in need at the time this letter was written to the Church at Corinth; but, though this is the case, the principle laid down in it holds good now. 1. Not 3 nor 4 times in the year those believers were to consider how God had prospered them, but weekly, and accordingly were to set aside regularly a portion out of this amount. Thus we too may not only act now, but should find it profitable, both temporally and spiritually, to do so. Generally speaking, there will be no difficulty in carrying out this principle, but should hindrances arise, God will enable us to overcome them if we really desire His help. 2. This exhortation is given to all classes of believers—to the rich, the middle classes, and even to the very poor, for the very poorest persons also may at some time be particularly prospered by God, and thus have a little to give away, and that little God delights to accept if it be willingly and cheerfully laid down at His feet, as it becomes all to do who "know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, for though He was rich, yet for our sakes He became poor that we through His poverty might be rich." 3. it may be asked, How much shall I give; what proportion of my prosperity shall I set aside for the poor or the Lord’s work? The answer is, No command is given regarding this. It is left to the measure of knowledge and grace which we have. God loves a cheerful giver, and therefore gives no command to us under the present dispensation. But if as yet the reader has not grace enough to stand before the Lord with everything that he possesses, let him fix upon a certain proportion of his income, however small, rather than leave what he gives to feeling and impression; only, what little he has determined on, that let him give, habitually, faithfully, and under all circumstances, and he will find himself so blessed spiritually and even temporally, that he will soon desire to give in larger proportion. Thus have thousands of systematic givers found it to be, and thus the writer of the letter before us has found. He writes: "I began with giving a tenth, but gradually increased until for some years I have given half of all the profits from my business, and this year, as a thankoffering to the Lord for restored health, I am giving Him all the profits." Why did the writer go from the tenth to the eighth, the fifth, the third, the half of all his profits? Evidently because he was so blessed, both spiritually and temporally, that he joyfully increased the proportion that he gave away. There is a length, and breadth and height and depth of blessedness contained in that word of our Lord, "It is more blessed to give than to receive," of which the great majority of believers, I fear, know but very little. In a goodly measure, through God’s wonderful grace, I have experienced its preciousness myself for fifty-six years, and for that reason am led to say that, from what I have known of Christians during my extensive travels, my full conviction is that, if believers were to enter into what is contained in that word, at least twenty times more would be done by the Church of God for Missions, for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and tracts for the spread of the truth throughout the world, for all kinds of Christian work, and for the poor, than is now accomplished. I say this advisedly, having, through providential circumstances, seen so much of many tens of thousands of believers. Beloved reader, will you not seek to know for yourself the blessedness of thus giving? It may be late with one or the other of my readers, but it is not too late. Begin at once. The writer of this letter, which I have given, began to do so at once after he, through my writings, had been instructed on the subject, and God began to bless him immediately. This he wrote me in another letter some years ago.

Jan. 12th. From Philadelphia £10.—Jan. 19th. From Sussex £31. 16s. 9d. for Missions, and £12. for the Orphans.—Jan. 22nd. From Surrey £50. for Missions.—Jan. 23rd. From Hampshire £50. for the Bible and Mission Fund, £200. for the Orphans, and £50. for myse1f.—From Hurstpierpoint £50. for Missions, and £50. for the Orphans.—From Washington County 25 dollars.—Jan. 29th. From Ale County £10. for Missions.

Feb. 7th. Received from a former Orphan £5., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please to accept the enclosed £5. for whatever part of your work you may see fit to use it? I thank you for the Report that you so kindly sent me. I read it with interest and pleasure, as for twelve years I was an Orphan under your care. It is now ten years since I left, and I thank God that I have been safely carried through the twenty-four years since I lost my father and mother. My two sisters join me in thanking you for all the care we received while in the Orphan House, our great wish being to visit it again. I remain your grateful Orphan, ****."—Feb. 10
th. From Victoria Camp, Egypt, £1. 10s.—From Greenoch, £7. 5s.—Feb. 12th. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £200.—Feb. 16th. From Bangor, from a donor who has repeatedly sent donations of late, £10.—Feb. 19th. From Scotland £125., with £15. For myself.—Feb. 20th. From Bangor, from a donor who gives as the Lord prospers him, £5.—Feb. 21st. £7. with II Cor. ix, 15.—Feb. 25th. From one of the former Orphans £1. 5s., with the following letter: "Dear and beloved Sir, I put by a little every week last year for my dear Saviour out of my own earnings, independently of what my husband gave me for housekeeping, as I do a little needlework when I can get it. For every piece of work under a shilling, I put by a halfpenny; and a penny for every piece of work above a shilling. At the end of September I was taken very ill, and had to keep my bed five weeks, and for some time after was quite unable to do anything for myself; but God in His love has given me back my health. My doctor says, I shall never be strong again; but still I feel well, for which I am very thankful. I have sent one pound of what I put by. It is my birthday today, and my sister in London has sent me five shillings as a present. It will give me far more pleasure to give the money back to my dear Saviour, as a thank-offering for all He has done for me; so will you, dear sir, please to accept the sum of £1. 5s., and use it for whatever you think best. You will be pleased to hear that my dear Saviour is still very precious to me, and I try to keep very close to Him. I hope yourself and dear Mrs. Muller, also dear Mr. and Mrs. Wright, are quite well. My husband has promised me that I shall go to Bristol this summer, all being well. It will be such a pleasure to me to see my dear Orphan Home, as it is 16 years since I was there. I hope, dear Sir, you will be at home, that I may have the pleasure of seeing your dear face once again. Please forgive me for writing so much. With many kind regards and Christian love to your dear self, Mrs. Muller, dear Mr. and Mrs. Wright, and the teachers of No. 2, I remain, dear Sir, your grateful Orphan, ****."—From Paris £25., with £100. for the Orphans.—Feb. 27th. From Ale County £10.—Feb. 26th. From S. S. £30. for Foreign Missions.

March 5th. From a Berkshire donor 41 coupons and a New Zealand warrant, amounting altogether to £173. 19s. 3d.—March 10th. From Croydon £50.—March 13th. From H. B. £100.—March 24th. From Ale County £10.—March 30th. £2. 11s. as "A thank-offering for 51 years’ mercies."—March 31st. From Christian friends at St. Gallen, Switzerland, 200 francs.

April 2nd. From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £138. 13s. 1d.—April 15th. Legacy of the late Miss E. R. £4. 10s. for Foreign Missions, £4. 10s. for the Bible Fund, and £9. for the Orphans.—April 16th. Day after day, for about six weeks (with rare exceptions), the income has been comparatively little. During the past week, from April 8th to April 15th, the total income was £268. 10s. 5d., instead of about £800. required. What was to be done under these circumstances? More prayer, more patience, and the continuation of the exercise of faith, our universal remedy under all difficulties, was all we did. We encouraged ourselves in God. We continued to look to Him for help. And now, today, He has again appeared on our behalf; altogether about £140. has come in.—April 17th. From Peckham £15.—April 24th. From Ale County £10.—April 29th. Legacy of the late Miss R. P. £5. for Missions.

May 2nd. From London £50. for Foreign Missions, and £45. 3s. for the School—, Bible— and Tract Fund.—From a former Orphan £5.—May 6th. From the outskirts of Bristol £15., with £10. for Missions.—May 18th. Legacy of the late D. B., Esq. £144. 5s., with £36. 1s. 4d. for the Orphans.—May 26th. With II Cor. ix. 15, £7.—From two servants of the Lord Jesus, who, constrained by the love of Christ, seek to lay up treasure in heaven, £126. 8s. 2½d.—I have thus referred to some of the ways, which God was pleased to use in answer to our habitual daily waiting on Him, to supply us with means for the first Four Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. From the beginning of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, on March 5th, 1834, I have received altogether, in answer to prayer, up to May 26th, 1885, One Million Fifty-four Thousand Three Hundred and Twenty-eight Pounds,