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Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 6.2 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER II.

 

The Lord’s way of providing for the thousands of Orphans, who were in the New Orphan Houses, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, on Ashley Down, Bristol, from March 5, 1874, to May 26, 1885. Practical remarks, Letters from donors and Orphans, etc. 

 

In giving the account as to the way in which it pleased God to provide me with the means to support the Orphans under my care, we came in the third volume of this Narrative to March 5th, 1874, from whence now the account will be continued.

March 7, 1874. From the neighbourhood of Thetford £12. 10s. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—March 10. From a Bristol donor £25. 18s. for the support of two Orphans for one year.— £10. from the Neilgherry Hills, India.—March 17. For about 8 days the income for the Orphan Work had been very little, in comparison with the outgoings, which generally of late had been about £100. per day. I therefore gave myself especially to prayer with my dear wife, praying 2 or 3 times a-day together, besides our usual season for prayer, that the Lord would be pleased to send us more means. Yesterday morning, however, came but very little, only about £10. by the first delivery, and nothing at all by the next three deliveries. Now this morning we prayed again, before opening the letters of the first delivery, and the first letter contained a cheque for £300. from London, from a kind donor whom I have never seen, but who has several times sent £200. or £300. at a time. There came in that day £11. 2s. 8d. besides for the Orphans. The next day, March 18, came in altogether for the Orphans, in 18 donations, £25. 16s. 4½d.—On March 19th the total of the income was £268. 13s. 3½d. Of this amount £200. was from "W," with £50. for myself. £28. was sent with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed you have 14 days draft, value Twenty Eight Pounds, for the support of Two Orphans, in grateful acknowledgment of God’s goodness in restoring two of my children to health, who had been brought to the gates of death. Please acknowledge. Yours respectfully, ****."—£20. was sent from Stoke Bishop. Thus the Lord manifestly answered prayer at that time.

April 11. Legacy of the late Miss M. B. £60. 11s. 1d. The testatrix had left £200., but her personal effects not having been properly considered, and certain defects found in the will as expressed, only £60. 11s. 1d. came to the Institution. If kind friends to the Orphan Work wish to leave legacies, it is needful that the will should be properly drawn up, and the money be left out of that, which is applicable to legacies for charitable purposes, as otherwise the legacy may either not at all, or only in part come to the Institution. For this purpose I had a proper form drawn up for legacies by an experienced legal practitioner, which is found on the last page of each Report.—April 20. From Norwich £1. 5s. 9d., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have the pleasure to enclose you a Post Office Order for £1. 5s. 9d. It is the mite of a poor widow in this neighbourhood, dependant for her maintenance on the parish allowance of 2s. 6d. a-week. About 3 years since she read a Report of the Orphan School at Bristol, and purposed in her mind to give to it one penny from each pair of stockings that she knitted. This, at the time of her death, amounted to 5s. 9d., and was all she expected to give. A few days before her death, she said to the friend who was appointed to manage her funeral, and pay the exrpenses from a sum she had deposited in a burial society, "If anything should be left, after paying every one their due, let it go for the dear little boys, in the Orphan Asylum." One pound was left, which I now send with the 5s. 9d., assured that you will find in it another cause of thanksgiving to God, who has stirred up so many hearts to bountifulness through your labours of faith and love. I remain, dear Sir, with sincere Christian regard, Yours truly, ****."—April 21. Legacy of the late T. W. H. Esq. £100.—From one of the Midland Counties £60.—From the neighbourhood of Manchester £50.—From the neighbourhood of Weymouth £50.—April 24. Five tons of potatoes.—From Maidstone £43. 9s. 5d.—Received 10s. from one of the former Orphans now in service, with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, You will, I know, rejoice to hear, that another of your Orphan children has found the Lord; and it is as a small expression of gratitude to God for His unspeakable gift, that moves me to forward this small donation, to be used as you see fit.—The older I grow, the more sensible, and, I hope, more thankful to God, I am for the great benefits I received, whilst under your care; for I cannot but notice the difference in education of those, with whom I come in contact. And more especially, since I found peace in Jesus, do I value the excellent Bible teaching, which we all received. Many sweet lessons and addresses come back to my mind, with the speakers as well. So carefully were we taught the plan of salvation, that, while I was yet unchanged in heart, I was the instrument in God’s hand of leading one of my fellow-servants, who had long been seeking peace, to the Saviour, where she found peace and joy in believing, by just merely telling her the same, as I had been told over and over again. I shudder to think of the justly deserved punishment in store for me, had I still continued in the neglect of so great salvation. And now my heart is full of love to Him, and my chief ambition to do something for Him.—Dear Sir, I must thank you for your "Narrative," which I find such a help to me in my Christian walk. Although it was in my possession so long, I never read it quite through; but I can thoroughly enjoy it now.—I hope this will find you enjoying good health, and that God will still continue to bless you and your family, together with the great work you are engaged in, shall be the earnest prayer of your grateful Orphan,****."

May 26. From Dorsetshire £50.—From "Prodigal," Philadelphia, £1.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Sixty-One Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, etc.

care from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, etc.

Instead of having at the beginning of the new period £14726. 2s. 5d. in hand, as was the case three years previously, we began the new year with £4057. 12s. 9½d., which, though a considerable sum, was yet only sufficient for about seven or eight weeks for our Orphan work. However, as I have stated before, I trusted in God, the infinitely rich Treasurer of the Institution; and I have now to record to His praise, that, as He had helped me in this service for nearly forty years, so he helped me this year also. My heart was assured, that, as He had unmistakeably called me to this work, sustained me in it for so many years, enlarged it almost year by year, so He would do still, as I was enabled, with unshaken confidence to confide in Him. Moreover, I depended on the Lord Jesus, in whose name I sought the help of God. And lastly, the Object itself, for which I sought God’s help, provision for poor destitute Orphans, bereaved of both parents by death, encouraged me, to expect help from God, "the Father of the Fatherless," and therefore especially the One who would care for those who have been bereaved of both parents.

It may be, not all the readers of this Report have solemnly considered, either how much good maybe done, by caring for poor destitute Orphans, or how, on the other hand, if they are left to themselves, and arc thus neglected, they may not only be ruined themselves, but bring untold misery upon scores or hundreds, if not thousands of others. Some time since I read a most affecting account in an excellent Christian paper, published in America, which was sent to me, regarding a neglected child, which affected me so much that I have thought it profitable for the reader to reprint here the article referred to.

ONE NEGLECTED CHILD.—The power for good or evil that resides in a little child is great beyond all human caleulation. A child rightly trained may be a worldwide blessing, with an influence reaching onward to eternal years. But, a neglected, or misdirected child, may live to blight and blast mankind, and leave influences of evil which shall roll on in increasing volume till they plunge into the gulf of eternal perdition.

"A remarkable instance was related by Dr. Harris, of New York, at a recent meeting of the State Charities Aid Association. In a small village in a county on the Upper Hudson, some seventy years ago, a young girl named ‘Margaret’ was sent adrift on the casual charity of the inhabitants. She became the mother of a long race of criminals and paupers, and her progeny has cursed the county ever since. The county records show two hundred of her descendants who have been criminals. In one single generation of her unhappy line there were twenty children; of these, three died in infancy, and seventeen survived to maturity. Of the seventeen, nine served in the State Prison for high crimes an aggregate term of fifty years, while the others were frequent inmates of jails and penitentiaries and almshouses. Of the nine hundred descendants, through six generations, from this unhappy girl who was left on the village streets and abandoned in her childhood, a great number have been idiots, imbeciles, drunkards, lunatics, paupers, and prostitutes: but two hundred of the more vigorous are on record as criminals. This neglected little child has thus cost the county authorities, in the effects she has transmitted, hundreds of thousands of dollars, in the expense and care of criminals and paupers, besides the untold damage she has inflicted on property and public morals."

Who can tell how many of the descendants of those people who saw this helpless child sent adrift on the world, have been wronged, robbed, contaminated, or ruined by her descendants? The sceptic who finds fault with the God of the Bible for "visiting the iniquities of the fathers upon the children, to the third and fourth generation," will please explain how his God, the God of Nature, is any better, in view of ten thousand such instances of transmitted depravity which abound on every hand. And those respectable people who neglect the poor and helpless, and make no effect to reclaim the vicious and train the wayward, but wrap themselves up in comfort, with the Cain-like plea, "Am I my brother’s keeper ?" will do well to consider what a harvest of murderers, thieves, incendiaries, and harlots they are allowing to grow around them to plague themselves and ruin their offspring. None of us liveth to himself. The interests and destinies of humanity are interlinked. We must save the lost, or, as they go down to wretchedness and ruin, they may drag after them those that are nearest and dearest to our hearts.

There, go now, and try and save one neglected child. Seal up a fountain of grief, and woe, and cursing, and open a fountain of joy, and peace and blessing, and "know that he that converteth a sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and HIDE A MIULTITUDE OF SINS."

This is the article. I trust it will make on the reader the same impression, which it made on my own heart, and lead him, gladly to embrace the opportunity, which God may give to him, to seek to rescue neglected children.

I now refer to some of the ways by which it pleased the Lord to supply me with means for the support of the Orphans, during the year, simply as specimens.

May 30, 1874. From Burnham, Somersetshire, £50.

June 15. From Norfolk £20., "instead of insuring against hailstorms."—From a former Orphan £2.—June 17. From Blackheath £20.—June 19. From Cornwall, from a house of business, £1. 18s., being one penny in the pound of the receipts for one month. Similar amounts have been sent monthly for a considerable time. Other houses of business have done the same. This shows how much may be done, even on the smallest scale of giving systematically.—June 27. By sale of gold and silver articles and dentist gold, £93.

July 18. From Oxfordshire £14. 5s. instead of insuring against hail storms—July 22. From Kent £100.—July 24. A diamond ring.

Aug. 10. £50. as the legacy of the late Mrs. B.—Aug. 21. From Torquay £40., "as God’s Tenth."—Aug. 25. By sale of gold and silver articles, £53. 10s.—Aug. 26. Received from a Bath donor £100.—From "F. M," anonymously, £500. See, dear reader, the blessedness of waiting upon God. "F. M." is not personally known to me. I do not even know his name. But day by day I wait upon God, and I do this not only myself, but with some of my dear fellow labourers. We call upon God for help, and He hears us, and again and again proves to us, that our waiting upon Him is not in vain. See how much work, and how much expense is thus saved by not having to call on individuals for help. Moreover, in this way we are sure, that every donation is given spontaneously, as otherwise it might have been withheld. My chief object, however, why I began this work on the principles on which I did, was, to prove, "How much may be accomplished by prayer and faith." From Cardiff £25.—Aug. 27. Though yesterday alone had come in for the benefit of the Orphans £650., our balance is now reduced to £2378. 18s. 10¼d., which is only enough for about four weeks and a half, to supply the average expenses for the Orphan work. But my trust is in the Living God, that He will help further—the reader will see from what follows, how God helped.—Aug. 31. Anonymously from Otago, New Zealand, £15.

Sept. 1. From Herefordshire £90.—Sept. 3. £100. from a clergyman in the neighbourhood of Bristol.—£50. from the neighbourhood of Fairford.—From Hull £50.—Sept. 8. £100. as the legacy of the late Mrs. B.—From the neighbourhood of Leeds £10. 10s. as "A thank-offering for being free from fatal accidents for several years at the colliery, which I had the charge of."—Sept. 18. Today we received, as the legacy of the late T. B. Esq., £1800. I had never seen this gentleman, nor did I even know him by name; but he was constrained thus to help us, in answer to our daily waiting upon God. This was a considerable help to us. Sept. 21. From Christian friends at Little Tew £17. 3s. 9d., and at Cleavly £1. 7s. as "thanksgivings for the harvest."—Sept. 23. Received in one donation £5327. 7s. 6d. This donor I never saw, though he had five or six times previously contributed £200. or £300. at a time.—About two months afterwards he died. I have every reason to believe, that he gave this money, (which would have come to us by his will), during his lifetime, in order that he might save the Institution the heavy legacy duty. Thus the Lord most abundantly helped us in our low state of funds.—Sept. 25. From Glasgow £60.—Sept. 26. From the neighbourhood of Hurstpierpoint £20. "In lieu of the first fruits of the harvest."—Sept. 27. This day a month ago, our balance in hand for the Orphans was £2378. 18s. 10¼d.; today it is £9623. 17s. 1d., though we have expended during the month for the Orphans £1949. 16s. 5d. The total income for the various objects of the Institution, during this one month, was £11,309. 4s. 5¼d. See, dear reader, what God can do! All this was the result, not of an extraordinary effort made on our part, but simply the result of prayer and faith. When the appearance was, a month ago, that soon everything would be expended, then God made it again manifest, how able He is to help us. For more than twelve years our funds had not been nearly so low, though the number of the Orphans had been in the meantime more than doubled. However, I had in the darkest times been assured, that all this comparatively little income was not to break up the Institution, but to make it afresh apparent, what can be obtained through prayer and the exercise of faith. The Lord be magnified for His kind help!—Sept. 29. Received £5. from a former Orphan with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please to accept a small present from me? I was 21 years old on the 15th of September, and I have received the little legacy which my parents left me. I enclose a Post Office Order for Five Pounds, as a token of gratitude for what you have done for me, Sir. I am quite well and in a comfortable situation. I have been nearly three years in it and am doing well, and also glad to inform you, that my sister is in good health, and doing well; she has also entered on her third year in her place. I remain, Dear Sir, ever your grateful Orphan, ****."

Oct. 17. £500. (less legacy duty and expenses) as the legacy of the late L. H. S. Esquire.—£5. from Nottingham as "A thank-offering for being unhurt after having been thrown from a horse."—Oct. 19. From Tunbridge Wells £89. 7s. 11d. for the support of seven Orphans. The kind donor sent about six years since the average expenses for the support of three Orphans, according to the number of his own children. After some time the Lord gave to him a fourth child, then a fifth, a sixth and a seventh child, and, as the number of his own children increased, so he added, with each child, the average expenses for an additional Orphan, acting thus in the opposite way from the principles of the world. I state here, that out of the 2261 Orphans, who were under our care from May 27, 1874 to May 26, 1875, eighty-six Orphans have been provided for, by donors sending to me the average expenses for one year for one, two, three, four, five, six, seven or even eleven Orphans. The reader may see, that the amount sent is not always the same, which arises from the fact, that the donors did not take their information, given on the last page of each Report, from the same Report, or sometimes a few shillings were sent more, to make it a round sum.—Oct. 22. From a Bristol donor £46. 7s. 6d.—Oct. 28. From Tobago £10.—Oct. 30. From Newcastle-on-Tyne £100.—Oct. 31. £5. as "A thank-offering from a mother for the recovery of her eldest child from inflammation of the lungs."

Nov. 7. From Rosshire £l00.—Nov. 7. Anonymously by post seven sets of artificial teeth, set in gold. Nov. 10. By sale of gold and silver articles £105. 16s. 3d.

Dec. 8. From a Bristol wholesale house, 40 half boxes of raisins and 5 boxes of oranges for the Orphans.—From another Bristol donor, one barrel of currants, 15 half boxes of raisins and 7 barrels of flour, for the Orphans’ Christmas puddings.—Dec. 10. From Leamington £100.—Dec. 12. From the neighbourhood of Harlow £50. and £25.—Dec. 16. Legacy of the late Miss M. K. £45.—Dec. 18. From Scotland 2189 yards of Winsey cloth and 302 yards of linen ditto.—Received 10s. from a former Orphan, now in service, with the following letter: "Dear and respected Sir, I received the Report you so kindly sent me last week. I enjoyed reading it very much, and was thankful to see how the Lord was still blessing you in your work for Him. I feel I must again thank you for all your kindness to me, while under your fatherly care in that Happy Home, and for the situation in which you placed me. I have left now seven years, and am still in the same place. Trusting that the Lord will spare you, the Orphan’s friend, for many years to come, with kind love and best respects to yourself, the teachers in No. 2, and all the dear helpers in the work, I remain your grateful Orphan, ****. P.S. I have sent you a Post Office Order for 10s. Please accept of it for the Orphans."—Dec. 21. £10. 10s. from one of the pupils in the first Day School for Boys of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution.—Dec. 22. From near London £290. with £10. for myself.—Dec. 23. £10. with the following letter: "Sir, Enclosed I have sent you a cheque for £10. for the Orphans, as a thank-offering to the Almighty for the recovery of a stolen horse. After all worldly means seemed to have failed, I made a promise to the Almighty, that if I got the horse, I would give £10. to Mr. Muller’s Orphans, and I am pleased to say, very shortly the horse came back to me. Yours respectfully, ****."—From Berkshire £75. for the support of 6 Orphans for one year.—Dec. 24. Received £5. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed find cheque £5. towards the support of the Orphans. In reading one of your Reports it advises to lay aside weekly a portion as the Lord prospers you. For the past few months I have done so, and I trust I may always do so, and others, that have not done so, I would urge them to do the same. I would just say, as it regards this world’s goods, God has abundantly blessed me; for during the past few months, since I commenced laying aside weekly, God has given me more than during the same length of time, since I have been in business. I am, Dear Sir, yours sincerely, ****."—From Leeds £40. for the support of three Orphans for one year, according to the number of the donor’s children.—Dec. 29. £5. from "A soldier of Christ in India."—Dec. 31. From Clifton £150.

Jan. 1, 1875. The past year, during which the Lord bad graciously helped us so manifestly with means for the Orphan work, ended with further considerable help on the last day, as £300. came in yesterday. This day the Lord has again sent us very many donations, like an earnest that He will during this year also be mindful of us. Jan. 2. From Calcutta, India, £7. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have the pleasure to hand you herewith a draft for £7., which kindly accept for the Orphans. The Lord put it into my heart to devote one day’s earnings to them. I usually earn about £2. a day, but having asked the Lord, especially to bless that day’s work, that I set apart for the Orphans, he answered that prayer, as you see, by sending £7. that day. This is indeed a special indication to me, that the Lord is hearing my prayers." Etc.—Received also this day, £11. 8s. 7d. from India, with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have the pleasure of enclosing first of exchange for £11. 8s. 7d., the amount of an offertory in Christ Church, Simla, for the Ashley Down Orphanage, to be applied as you think best. I am sorry that the amount is so small. I wish that Professor H. and others, who think that prayer is mere waste of breath, would try how long they can support Two Thousand Orphans without asking any one—GOD OR MAN—for help. The Lord bless you and yours, and your holy work, with sufficient means and abundant success. Yours sincerely, ****." These two donations from India belong to the Thousands of proofs, which the Lord has given to me for about forty years, that He is mindful of the Orphan work.—Jan. 12. From believers meeting at Wilmcote £13. 6s. 2d.—From Christians meeting at the Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £36. 11s. 8d.—From Watford 17s. "Instead of insuring plate glass windows."—Jan. 16. From Buckfastleigh £62. 6s. 4d.—Jan. 18. A gold bracelet made of 3 guinea pieces, 4 half guinea pieces, a seven shilling piece, and an American gold dollar.—Jan. 19. £4. 7s. 1d. from Limerick, from a mercantile firm, instead of insuring goods, coming by water.—Jan. 29. From London, for the support of one Orphan for one year £13.—From Newcastle-on-Tyne £100.—Jan. 30. Received 4 old five shilling pieces with the following letter: "Sir, I send you a box, containing 4 old five shilling pieces. Their history is this. Many years ago there was a wedding at a village church in Kent. After the party had returned home, the bridegroom gave the bride a handful of five shilling pieces. She said, as they were her husband’s first gift, she would not spend them. She kept them and gave one to each of her grandchildren. My mother was her granddaughter and these four descended to her. We naturally prize them very much; but if we kept them, they would do no one any good, and we think they will, perhaps, be more acceptable to God, because they are dear to us. Please accept them for the benefit of the Orphans. I remain, yours sincerely ****." When the bridegroom gave these crown pieces, and the bride determined not to spend them, neither of them thought, that a hundred years or more after, four of them would come forth, in answer to our prayers, to help providing for the Orphans. Numberless old coins, both of gold and silver, have we received within the last forty years for the benefit of the Orphans, which had long been hoarded up for some reason or other; also the greatest variety of jewellery, gold and silver watches, clothes, and numberless other artic1es for which year after year a considerable sum has been obtained. During the past year alone we realised, by the sale of articles, sent for that purpose, £856. 17s. 5d.

Feb. 1. Legacy of the late W. T., Esq., £500. less legacy duty.—Feb. 4. £50. as the legacy of the late Mrs. F.—Feb. 6. £45. 9s. 3d. by sale of gold and silver articles.—Feb. 10. £13. 12s. 4d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed is a cheque for £13. 12s. 4d., which I have much pleasure in forwarding, being profits on an agency, taken up for the benefit of your Orphans. Yours very truly, ****." See how the Lord cares for the Orphans! Observe, dear reader, how God is pleased to answer our prayers! The donor is an entire stranger to me. He lives far from Bristol; but God, in answer to our prayers, leads him to undertake an agency for the benefit of the Orphans, and this amount sent is the result. Did all my dear fellow-believers know the power of prayer, and the mighty results of trust in the Lord, many of them would in greater simplicity and with more earnestness give themselves to the exercise of prayer and faith.—Feb. 15. From British Honduras £1. This dear servant of Christ, though very poor as to this world, has sent me many times within the last fifteen years a similar donation.—Feb. 19. From Newcastle-on-Tyne £75.

March 2. From the neighbourhood of Weybridge £50.—This day also was sent to me as a gift the scrip for 200 Ten Pound Shares in a Limited Liability Company, fully paid up, of which the kind donor intends One Hundred and Fifty for the benefit of the Orphans or the other Objects of the Institution, as the need may be, and Fifty for my own personal expenses. The kind donor is personally unknown to me. This is another striking proof of the willingness of the Lord, to provide both for the work and my own requirements, simply in answer to prayer.—March 4. From Glasgow £51. 0s. 3d. The donor of this amount sends me once a fortnight one penny in the Pound of all his receipts, and sent now £50. extra.—March 24. From Victoria, Australia, £40.—Contents of an Orphan Box at Majorca, in Australia, £4. 5s. 6d.

April 5. From Kidderminster £53. 15s. 6d.—From Buxton 5 pieces of artificial teeth (4 of them set in gold).—April 28. Some young ladies, from sale of canaries, for the benefit of the Orphans, £3. 10s.

May 8. £18. 3s. "Proceeds of a tea-service which had been bequeathed."—May 12. From Basle, Switzerland, £8. 13s. 6d.—May 13. Legacy of the late Mr. T. £200., less duty.—May 25. Legacy of the late Mr. P. £150., less duty.—May 26. £64., as "proceeds of sale of work from young ladies in a school."

I have thus given some specimens as to the way in which it pleased God to provide, in answer to our prayers, the means for the support of the 2261 Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875. The Lord has carried me through another year, in supplying bountifully the means for the Orphan Work. Though the expenses, for this part of the Institution alone, amounted to £25,043. 17s. 3¼d., and though at the beginning of the year not only, but for three months after the last period had commenced, we became poorer and poorer; so that the appearance was, that shortly we should have nothing at all left.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Seventy Orphans, who were under our care, from May 26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, &c.

Though our faith had been exercised so greatly, during the previous year, in that at one time there was so little in hand for the support of the Orphans, as that the natural appearance was, that in a short time all the means for them would be gone; yet the Lord so abundantly helped us, as the result of prayer and faith, that we had more than twice as much at the end of the year, than when the year began. Our balance in hand on May 26, 1875, was £8406. 13s. 11d., whilst on May 26, 1874, it had been only £4057. 12s. 9½d. Thus is God willing to answer prayer and to honour faith in Him. But great as this balance may appear to those who are not accustomed to great expenditure, it was only enough to meet the expenses of about four months, for our large family. We had, therefore, to do, what, by God’s grace, we had been enabled to do in connection with this Institution for forty-two years before, viz.,—not to look to the amount in hand, nor to former donors, nor to any probabilities, but to the Living God, who had never failed us. Nor did we trust in Reports; for were we to do so, God would soon show to us, that we were leaning on a broken reed.

I refer now, as specimens, to a few of the donations given during the year for the support of the Orphans.

June 3. Legacy of the late W. G. S., Esq., £1342. 7s. 3d.—June 4. A legacy of £200. had been left by Miss M. B.; but of this amount, through circumstances, only £60. 11s. 1d., when the legacy became due, could be paid. Now this day £139. 8s. 11d. was paid to the Institution by G. S., Esq., to make up the full amount of £200. Thus the kind stranger acted towards the work, without being under the least obligation so to do.—June 14. £100. as the legacy of Lady H.—June 28. £10. 10s. from an old scholar of the first Boys’ Day School of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, who has repeatedly sent the same amount—From Ireland, a diamond ring.

July 3. From Ceylon £12.—July 6. From Christian friends at Basle, Switzerland, £18. 15s.—July 15. From Wales £70., with £6. 16s. for myself.—July 19. £60. from one of the Midland Counties.—July 21. From a clergyman of the Church of England £18., with the following letter: "My dear Sir, The enclosed mite as a thank-offering for mercies during a voyage, kindly place to credit of your Orphan Fund, and oblige yours faithfully, ****."—Received the following letter from one of the former Orphans, now in service: "Dear and honoured Sir, It is a very great pleasure and privilege to be able to write to you, and thank you for all you have done for me, during the four years I was under your kind care in the dear, dear Orphan House, which I have now left for nearly five months. How can I sufficiently thank you, next to my Heavenly Father, for the blessings of that dear Home, and also for that in which I am now; it is such a comfortable, happy one, with such a kind master and mistress! How kind and gracious is my Heavenly Father, who, with all He has given me of the blessings of this life, has, more than all, brought me to know the dear Lord Jesus as my Saviour and Friend. May I ever be kept close to His side, seeking to live only for Him! I sincerely hope dear Mrs. Muller is quite well and yourself too. Will you please give my love to dear Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright, and accept the same yourself, with my grateful thanks for all you have done for me? I remain, dear Sir, your respectful and grateful Orphan, ****."—July 22. One of the former Orphans, who has been for a number of years a believer in the Lord Jesus, and who is now in business on his own account, has one of the Orphan lads apprenticed to him. When we sent the half-yearly premium of £6. 10s., the Christian master and former Orphan returned the amount, as he had done the half-year before, with the following letter: "Dear and respected Sir, I have pleasure in returning the enclosed cheque. Please use the amount for the benefit of the Orphans. You will be pleased to know that—[here the name of his Orphan apprentice is given]—is well, and that he is a consistent Christian lad, and is doing nicely in his business. Please to give my respects to Messrs. Wright, Brown, Short, and any other friends that knew me in the Orphan House. Tendering thanks for all kind benevolence shown to me in years gone by, and with respectful and kind regards, I remain, dear Sir, yours faithfully, ****."—July 23. From Reading, two sets of artificial teeth and some gold springs.—July 24. Left at my house four pieces of artificial teeth, three of them set in gold.—July 26. From Dulwich, two sets of artificial teeth, set in gold. During the past year again a considerable amount has been obtained by the sale of the gold, in which the artificial teeth were set.—July 28. Received £1. from one of the former Orphans, in a situation in Ireland, with the following letter: "Beloved and respected Sir, May I be permitted the privilege of sending you this small trifle for the dear Orphans? I thank Almighty God that I have so great a pleasure as to be able to send it to you; for His holy Word says, "The Lord loveth a cheerful giver," and day by day I see His Almighty arm guiding and guarding me from many dangers. When I see so many flocking Sunday after Sunday to the Roman Catholic chapel, kneeling and worshipping the Virgin Mary, it is then that I think most of the happy Home that I myself and so many besides were brought up in, where we were taught to believe the blessed Bible, that Jesus is the only Mediator between God and man. Often do I sit and think over the many happy years I spent under your fatherly care. I shall never be able to thank you enough for the kindness shown me there; but may God ever prosper and bless you, is the prayer of your grateful Orphan! And may you long be spared to be the Orphans’ friend; and when your blessed work is finished in this life, may you see one and all gathered around the throne of God, where we shall meet to part no more! Please to remember me gratefully and respectfully to dear Mrs. Muller and Mr. and Mrs. Wright. Hoping you are enjoying the great blessing of health, believe me, beloved Sir, your ever grateful Orphan,****."—July 30. £10. as a birthday thank-offering.—July 31. From a Bristol donor, who sets apart a certain part of his business for the Orphans, and has done so for many years, £65. 18s.

Aug. 2. From a lady who had already kindly sent us £500. in the early part of the year, £175., with £25. for myself, sent especially on account of the great additional expenses, occasioned by much sickness among the Orphans.—Aug. 12. £200. as a legacy of the late Miss M.—Aug. 13. £34. by sale of gold and silver articles.—Aug. 18. From a Christian brother in business in Glasgow £51. 2s. 7d. He sends a donation every two weeks, as the Lord prospers him; but this time he sent £50. additionally.—Aug. 23. From Nelson, New Zealand £5. 15s., ditto 5s., ditto £1., ditto £1.—From Wellington, New Zealand, £1. 0s. 4d.—Aug. 25. Received from the Royal Hospital, Putney, 5s., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, It is more than twenty-three years since I first wrote to you, and now I do it, that you may have it, when I have entered into rest. I enclose 5s. as my last donation, feeling truly thankful to our dear Lord for having enabled me to do some little for the dear Orphans. You need not acknowledge this, as there will be no one to receive the letter. Farewell, till we meet in glory, ****." This poor woman was habitually an invalid and sufferer, but for more than twenty years worked little things for the benefit of the Orphans, and, according to her means, being herself supported by the love of Christians, sent little donations. At last she was received for life into the Royal Hospital, Putney, and sent even from thence now and then small donations, till this came, which we received after her having fallen asleep in the Lord. Thus the Lord is pleased to lay this work even on the hearts of the very poor, and to send to us help through them.—Aug. 26. Legacy of the late Mr. T. C. £90.

Sep. 1. Anonymously £100.—Sep. 2. £100. as a legacy of the late Miss S. W.—Sep. 10. £3. 4s. 6d. from a mercantile firm in Ireland, instead of insuring their goods sent by sea.—Received Sep. 11 from a considerable distance three valuable rings, three sets of gold buttons, a diamond cross, a cameo brooch, a brooch and earrings, a pair of gold earrings, a gold locket, two pairs of earrings, and a brooch and bracelet. Altogether a very valuable donation.—Sep. 16. "From a poor labourer, who has worked through the harvest, in his 77th year" 2s. 6d.—Sep. 20. £90. 7s. 3d. from a military officer in India.—Sep. 21. £2. 2s. 8d. from Italian evangelists.—From the pupils of our school at Torano, Italy, 6s. 9d.—Sep. 25. £40. as "God’s Tenth."—£22. 5s. 4d. from Friends at Little Tew, and £2. 19s. from friends at Clevely, as "Thankoffering for the harvest."

Oct. 9. Legacy of the late W. A. R., Esq., £332. 16s. 3d. The kind testator was an entire stranger to me, which gives another proof, how the Lord is pleased to help us in answer to prayer. Not one out of twenty donors have I ever seen, far less am I intimate with them. But we give ourselves to prayer for means, and so the Lord is pleased, in answer to prayer, to influence the hearts of His stewards to help us. Thus this work has now been upheld for forty-two years, and though generally year by year it has been enlarged in one or more of its departments, God has never failed us, but always supplied us with the needed pecuniary necessities. How could this be wanting, if the work in which we are engaged is His work; if we are the persons to do this His work; if the time is come when we should be honored to do this His work; and if, at the same time, we trust in His power and willingness to help us? But all these four different points need carefully to be attended to. We have then, in the first place, to be sure that the work in which we are engaged is really the work of the Lord, and fully so. I lay stress on this, because I have seen, how, in order to keep persons from certain evil things, there have been substituted other evil things, which, though in the sight of some they may be less objectionable, yet are of such a character, as that they are unworthy of the name of God’s work. How then could help be expected from God under such circumstances? Next we have to ascertain, that we are the persons to be engaged in that work, which is really God’s work; for we are not our own, but we are bought with a price, the precious blood of the Lord Jesus. We therefore may not spend our time, our talents, our bodily, mental and spiritual strength as we please; but we have to seek to know, whether the Lord would have us to be engaged in such and such a way or not. But even this is not enough. We have still further to seek to ascertain, by patient waiting upon God, watching His hand, whether His time is come, that we should do this His work. How important these last two points are, we have clearly shown to us in the building of the temple. The work was a good work, and quite according to the mind of Jehovah; but His time was not yet come, that this work was to be done, when David desired to build the temple; nor was he to be the man to do it, but his son Solomon. Suppose now lastly, that the work is not only God’s work, but that we also are the persons to be engaged in that work, and that His own time is come, when we are to be engaged in this His work, we have lastly to trust in Him for all the help we need. If we do not do so, how could we expect to go on well? And here I state, that the pecuniary necessities for which we have to wait upon the Lord, great though they are, amounting to about forty-four thousand pounds yearly, are very far from all we need. We have constantly to look to the Lord for counsel and guidance in our difficulties; and but for His constant guidance, we should make only mistakes and take wrong steps. We have further continually almost to ask the Lord for the needed helpers either for the Orphan Houses or the very many schools, or other branches of the Institution. And this is not a little matter, to obtain not only truly godly helpers, but, at the same time, persons who in other respects also are fitted for such service. Further, we have to wait upon the Lord not a little, to know how, in certain circumstances, to deal with regard to the children; for it is not of rare occurrence, that our circumstances, in this respect, are of a most perplexing character. Further, the Orphans are to be placed out, whether the boys as indoor apprentices, or the girls to be sent to service. Here we are entirely thrown upon God, to find masters and mistresses, who not only are Christians indeed, and not in name only, but who also in other respects, as far as we are able to judge, are suitable to have the care of these Orphans, when they leave us. Then we have the difficulty of grave illness on the part of the helpers in the work or the children under our care, and this sometimes of a very alarming character, in such epidemics as scarlet fever, small pox, &c. But God, to whom we seek to look continually for help, at all times and under all circumstances, helps us, and we have never been confounded. A number of other things might be referred to, to show, that money is not the only thing which we need, and for which we trust in the Lord. I mention here, just by the way, that it is a mistake to suppose that persons, who have real trust in God, because they know Him, could only depend upon Him regarding one or the other thing, such as their health, their daily supplies, or something else. He who knows God, truly knows Him as He has revealed Himself in the Holy Scriptures, is able to trust a Him generally, according to Psalm ix. 10, "They that now Thy name, will put their trust in Thee; for Thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek Thee.—Oct. 15. From Burnham £50.— £500. as the legacy of the late Mrs. J.—Oct. 19. £50. from the neighbourhood of Abingdon.—From London £63. 0s. 10d. for the support of five Orphans for one year.—Oct. 30. £5. 10s. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, to my surprise £5. 10s. has just been brought to me for your Orphanage from a servant, who has recently lost an only child. Her husband and herself wish it to be given in remembrance of her. Kindly enter it ‘From R. V. and M. V. in remembrance of their beloved and only child Lizzie,’" &c.—From Aldershot 10s. "From a soldier who, having passed a successful examination, his pay is increased 1s. per diem."

Nov. 8. Received 10s. from one of the former Orphans, who was apprenticed from the Orphan House as a Christian lad, and who is now in an honourable way able to support himself: "Dear and Honored Sir, I have enclosed a Post Office Order for ten shillings, which please take towards the support of the Orphans.—It is now more than ten years since I left the Orphan House; but I shall never forget the happy days I spent at Bristol, nor the good of which I was the recipient, whilst under your care.—Please accept my repeated expressions of thankfulness for all the kindness I received at the Orphan House, and remember me to the dear masters, who, I trust, are still spared to help you in the work. My wife joins me in best wishes and regards. I am, Dear and Honored Sir, your obedient servant, ****."— Nov. 12. From Yorkshire, for the support of four Orphans, for one year, £49. 8s. 8d.— £100. as the legacy of the late Mr. E. C.—Nov. 13. Legacy of the late Mrs. L. £1756. 4s. 4d. The kind testatrix was an entire stranger to me. I had not even heard of her name, until I received information from the solicitors of the Principal Probate Court about the legacy.—Legacy of the late Miss E. W. £19. 19s. Likewise an entire stranger to me.—Nov. 30. From Tobago £6. The reader will observe that the means for the support of the Orphans do not come merely from various parts of England, nor even merely from parts of the United Kingdom; but almost from every part of the earth. There are few countries, from which we have not at some time or other received donations. Our Heavenly Father has the hearts of all men at His disposal, and we give ourselves to prayer to Him, and He, in answer to our prayers, lays the necessities of this work on the hearts of his stewards; and thus it has come to pass, that we have now received from Him, in answer to prayer, more than Seven Hundred Thousand Pounds. Should anyone question this statement, we reply, whom did we ask for anything? Let the individuals come forward to prove that it is otherwise. But if this cannot be done, as it cannot, then, will not the reader see, how much power there is in believing prayer, and how much may be obtained through the exercise of faith? Though the real power of prayer is by certain individuals denied, yet the Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, erected at a cost of about One Hundred and Fifteen Thousand Pounds, without anyone being asked for anything, but God only; and more than Two Thousand Orphans being yearly provided for at an expense of Twenty-five Thousand Pounds or upwards, besides all the other departments of the Institution being provided for at the cost of Seventeen or Eighteen Thousand pounds, without going to anyone for help but to God; plainly shows that even in the latter part of the Nineteenth Century much may be obtained from our Heavenly Father, simply through prayer and faith. And thus the Scriptural Knowledge Institution has now been carried on not for some months or even a year or two, but for more than forty-two years, whilst we become more and more convinced of the blessedness of depending upon the Living God alone.

Dec. 6. From friends in South Africa £35.—Dec. 11. From London £100. 17s. 4d. for the support of eight Orphans for one year.—Dec. 15. Received £6. 6s. from one of the former Orphans with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I am anxious to redeem a vow made some years since by my dear departed wife, that she would give a certain proportion of some earnings for the support of the Orphans.—I can scarcely express my gratitude to you, dear Sir, for the fatherly interest you took in the matter of her personal salvation, as the wife of one of your Orphan boys. She never forgot the firm kindness with which you pressed home the one important question, ‘Did she love the Saviour?’ and, her having to respond to that, was a means of grace of which the influence was never lost. We saw many sorrows afterwards, but our God was more to us than our fears, and He has now enabled me to redeem her vow for the Orphans.—I would desire again to thank you, dear Sir, for the great interest you took in me, while under your care; and I often reflect on happy days, spent in New Orphan House No. 1.—You will be glad to know, that the Lord has been pleased to use me in His service. For nearly fourteen years I have been employed in preaching the Gospel in dark villages in this neighbourhood; and for about seven years have been deacon of the Congregational Church here; and I have too the happiness of knowing, that, by His blessing upon my labours, some have been added to the Lord. This I say, as desiring alone to glorify His name, and because I feel it is right you should know, that He thus owns and crowns your labours for Him, by enabling those, whom you have rescued, to be the means of hastening His kingdom.—I have also to thank Him for a second help-meet, who also is devoted to His service, and whose constant endeavour it is, to bring up my three little girls as her own children, and as in trust for the Lord.—Feeling sure, dear Sir, of your fatherly interest and sympathy, I shall not add any apology for thus writing of my family affairs.—Please accept my respectful Christian love, and give the same to Messrs. Brown and Short, should they be still labouring with you; and trusting this will find you and Mrs. Muller in good health, I remain ever faithfully and respectfully yours, ****." The writer of this letter, and his brother, were the first two Orphans received in the New Orphan House No. 1. His brother was brought to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ, and, after having walked very consistently for a considerable time whilst under our care, was sent out. He has been a decided follower of the Lord Jesus Christ ever since, has been engaged for about eighteen years in the ministry of the Word, has been the instrument of leading not a few to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ, and is now a clergyman in the Church of England. The writer, as has been seen, labours in a different sphere for the Lord, but has also been used by Him, in the winning of souls. These first fruits of the removal of the Orphans to Ashley Down, and the building of the five large houses for 2050 Orphans, have been followed by the conversion of many hundreds of Orphans, yea by hundreds who have been already safely removed into the presence of the Lord. Thus, in the midst of difficulties, trials of faith and patience, and sometimes also disappointment with regard to some of the Orphans, we reap already abundantly even now; but the chief part of the harvest is yet awaiting us.—On this day, Dec. 15th, 1875, we also received from a Bristol wholesale house 8 barrels of flour, 16 half boxes of raisins and a barrel of currants, for the Christmas puddings of the Orphans. From Oporto £l.—Dec. 21. From Denmark £l.—Dec, 22. From the neighbourhood of London £290., with £10. for myself.—Dec. 24. From a wholesale house in Bristol, 40 half boxes of raisins, for the children.—Dec. 29. From Pupils of the High School, Dundee, £58., with £10. for myself.—Dec. 31. Received 10s. from one of the former Orphans, now in a situation, with the following letter: "Dear and Respected Sir, Once more I have the great pleasure of writing to you, and thank you for your kind fatherly care of me whilst in the dear Orphan Home. And now I wish to rejoice your heart, by telling you, that, during the past year I have been led to trust in the dear Saviour. May I ask your prayers, dear Sir, that I may be kept day by day near to Him, who gave Himself for me. I desire not only to bear the name of a child of God, but to walk before the world as one. Dear Sir, I was indeed much cheered by the addresses you gave at the Conference Hall, Mildmay Park, London, where I have the privilege of attending, and where I found peace in Jesus. I sincerely hope your valuable life may be yet spared much longer, to be the Orphan’s friend, and to help and cheer younger Christians on their journey. May I ask to be remembered very kindly to dear Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright and all the dear helpers in the Orphan work. Will you kindly accept the enclosed 10s. for the Orphans. With grateful love, I remain, yours respectfully, ****."

We were now helped to the close of another year, during which our expenses for the Orphans alone had been above Twenty Five Thousand Pounds, and the expenses for the other Objects of the Institution about Eighteen Thousand Pounds, having before us expenses for the coming year, not only as great but rather greater, as generally year by year they have been increased. But our hope was in God, looking with the full assurance of faith to His inexhaustible treasures and His loving heart; and we were not confounded. He helped us in the new year, as He had done in the old one. I give now a few other particulars, as to the way in which it pleased Him to supply us, though only about one out of a hundred donations can be referred to.

Jan. 11. "From a person in Yorkshire, who desires to be a faithful steward of the Lord’s possessions," £500. When this donation came to hand, I did not in the least degree know the kind donor. This furnishes another proof, of how much may be obtained simply by waiting upon God, as day by day we do.—Received from Westmorland £3. 5s. 9d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I inclose Post Office Order for £3. 5s. 9d., which is the amount found in the money box of a dear little boy, who died at the age of three years. We, his earthly parents, cannot devote the savings of the one, who is now glorifying God in heaven, to a better purpose than trying to promote His glory on earth in the way pointed out by yourself—that of helping the poor Orphans. Please to accept it with our best wishes for the success of your great Christian work, and believe us, yours truly ****."—Jan 12. From believers, meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £35. 1s. 3d.— £100. as the legacy of the late Mr. J. W. C.—Jan. 13. From a Clifton donor, then at a considerable distance from thence, £150., with £10. for myself. This kind donor, who for nearly twenty years took a great interest in the Orphans, and who often sent a similar donation, has since entered upon his rest. Thus the Lord again and again, yea many scores of times, has taken away donors who for a shorter or longer time helped us considerably. For the trial of our faith these kind donors, one after the other, have been removed, but He, the Living God, our Helper and Friend, remained to us; and because we depended upon Him, trusted in Him, and not in these kind munificent donors, though some of them had given altogether thousands of pounds, we were helped; for the Lord, in one way or other, supplied us still. And thus have we gone on now for forty-two years. Oh, the blessedness of such a life of trust in the Living God! Did all my dear brethren in Christ, who in any way labour for the Lord, and who require means, know the blessedness of this way, they would certainly trust in God alone, and look to Him alone for their supplies; and not only for the supply of their pecuniary necessities, but for everything else which they may need.—Jan. 26. From Warwickshire £200.—Jan. 31. From Tobago £10.

Feb. 2. From Yorkshire £126. 1s. 8d., for the support of ten Orphans for one year.—From Paris £20.—Feb. 3. There was sent £2. 10s. with these words: "I send this to you, instead of buying a gold brooch." Will the Christian reader consider this. How much may be accomplished, not only, by exercising a little self-denial, but how great a blessing may thus also be obtained for the spiritual life of the believer in the Lord Jesus! We have but one brief life to spend on earth, and how soon, dear Christian reader, may it be run out! Therefore let us seek to make the best use of the opportunity given to us, to live and labour for the Lord! Let every child of God with earnestness aim at this, that the remainder of his life may be the best of all his pilgrimage!—Feb. 4. From Helensburgh £40. for the support of 3 Orphans for one year.—Feb. 7. From Basle, Switzerland, £19. 17s.—Feb. 11. £5. as "A thank-offering for being safely preserved in a railway accident."—Feb. 16. From Torquay £40. a "God’s Tenth."—Legacy of the late Mrs. H. £80. 10s.

March 9. Received £1. 11s. with the following letter from a Christian gentleman: "My dear brother, It occurred to me a few weeks ago, that, when God calls Himself the Father of the fatherless, He makes Orphans as truly the objects of His children’s care as their own households. I had not thought of this before nearly so much as I ought. At mealtimes, when the wants of my family were being abundantly supplied, I had not sufficiently thought of those who have neither father nor mother to provide a meal for them, and who must starve, unless fed by those to whom God has given bread enough and to spare. Since that time, I have put a box on my table at our meals, with your Orphans’ name on it. It makes us feel as if we had some of them at the table with us, and were giving them the share our Father meant for them. Each puts in what he believes he can and ought. Last evening we opened it after tea, and found the enclosed £1.11s. in it, which I now send you with much love, &c."—March 20. Received 10s. with the following letter from one of the former Orphans: "Beloved Sir, Once more it is the privilege of one of your former Orphans to write you a few lines and ask your acceptance of this small offering of thanksgiving to God for all His loving kindness to me and mine.—I need hardly say, that, as each year passes away, my veneration for you, dear Sir, and love for the dear place, where I spent the best part of my childhood, increases, so also do I hope my gratitude to the Father of the fatherless, who put it in the heart of you, His honoured and beloved servant, to carry out such a noble scheme to the glory of God.—How often, when tempted to indulge in the sin of unbelief, has the thought of my six years’ sojourn on Ashley Down come across my mind like a gleam of sunshine. There, the clothes I wore, the food I ate, the bed I slept on, and the walls around me, were all in answer to believing prayer. What better prescription for any infidel, than to go to Ashley Down Orphan House and enquire into its working! Ay, and what better prescription for the doubting, wavering child of God! I pray, none of us Orphans, who have been sheltered there, will be found wanting in that great day, when we shall all stand around the throne of God, and you, dear Sir, will receive the reward of all your labours of love. May we all be there to thank you, as we have never, done on earth!—I hope your health is good and that of your family, together with your fellow-helpers in the Lord. May the Lord Jehovah strengthen you still further, and fill you with all joy and comfort in our Savionr Jesus Christ, is ever the loving prayer of one of your unworthy Orphans ****."

April 18. From a former Orphan, now in Australia, £3. 16s. 6d. The donor has been for about 25 years a believer.—April 22. From the neighbourhood of Weybridge, £45., with £5. for my own expenses.—April 24. Legacy of the late Mr. W. S. £90.

May 16. From one of the former male Orphans, with a grateful letter, £6.—May 18. For the support of twenty-five Orphans for one year £315. 4s. 2d.—May 25. From a lady in Warwickshire £200. This is not the first time, that the same kind donor, though an entire stranger to me, has sent me a similar large donation, thus proving that we do not wait on the Lord in vain, when day by day we ask Him that He would graciously be pleased to supply us with the means needed for this great work.—May 26. Legacy of the late Mrs. S. B. S. £45. During this year we have received the payment of many legacies, which God has been pleased to use, as one of the various means, whereby our large expenses have been met. In almost all these cases, of legacies being left to this Institution, the kind testators or testratrixes were entire strangers to me.—There were also again, during this year, received many hundreds of articles, either for use or sale for the benefit of the Orphans. Scarcely any of these articles have been referred to. Christian friends have not only considered what jewellery, coins, and other needless articles they might send to us for sale, but also how they might furnish us with useful articles or provisions for the benefit of the Orphans. In several cases Christian ladies also meet, at stated times, to work for the benefit of the Orphans. By the sale of articles, sent for sale, we have from the beginning up to May 26, 1876, obtained £18,384. 2s. 9d. The total of the expenses for the Orphans alone, during the year, was £25,874. 15s. 1¼d.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Forty Two Orphans, who were under our care during the year, from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans. Practical remarks, etc.

During the past year also, the Lord was pleased to supply us again bountifully, in the riches of His grace, with all we needed for the support of the Orphans, though we require now for this one branch of the Institution alone about Twenty-Six Thousand Pounds sterling yearly. As the days come, so we make, in child-like simplicity, our supplications to Him, for all we need, not only with reference to money, but regarding all our other requirements; and He is graciously pleased to prove to us day by day, that He listens to our supplications, and sends to us accordingly what we need. To Him we look for the helpers in this work, and He sends them to us, though sometimes we have long to call upon Him, before the answer comes; for to our profit and the glory of His own name, He is sometimes pleased to try our faith and patience. When we need suitable masters for the boys, who are to be apprenticed, we give ourselves to prayer; and He answers our prayers. For suitable Christian families, to whom we wish to send the girls, when they are fit for situations, we also wait upon the Lord in prayer; and thus also, in many hundreds of instances, have we found, that we have not waited upon Him in vain. We do not think ourselves sufficient in ourselves, as to wisdom to meet all the numberless difficult cases, connected with such a large Institution, and we therefore go to our Heavenly Father for wisdom and grace to meet all the many exigencies connected with this service; and even as to this, we have to state to the praise and honour of His name, that we have received help from Him as the result of prayer. Often we have also been greatly exercised by sickness among the children, sickness of some of the helpers, and other afflictions, which the Lord has been pleased to allow to befall the Institution; but in all these various positions and circumstances, however painful and trying, our universal remedy of prayer and the exercise of faith in God has been sufficient; and so it comes, that this Institution not only still exists, but as much as ever, if not more than ever, enjoys the Lord’s help and blessing. I will here now only refer to a few of the ways in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means for the support of the Orphans who were under our care, but give only about one out of every hundred donations, simply as specimens.

June 3. From the neighbourhood of Sherborne, a diamond ring.—June 5. From Ireland, a set of artificial teeth, set in gold, and two pieces ditto.—During the past year also, as for many years before, artificial teeth, set in gold, have been sent, and thus again a considerable sum has been obtained by the sale of the dentist gold.—June 10. From West Hartlepool £45.—June 21. From Elberfeld 110 Mark, 15 Mark, 3 Mark and 3 Mark.—June 23. From Neuchatel, Switzerland, £16.—June 30. From Westbury-on-Trym £50.

July 1. On account of the residue of the estate of Mr. T. M. left by his will to the Orphans, £1500.—July 5. Legacy of the late Miss P. £1000, less duty.—July 7. £10. 10s. from one of the former pupils of the first boys’ school of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, who has repeatedly sent a similar donation.—July 7. From Wolverhampton, 4 large cheeses. July 10. From London £100.—July 17. Legacy of the late Miss C. R. B. £306. 4s.—Legacy of the late T. P., Esq. £150.—July 18. From Liverpool, a ton of soap.—July 19. £100. from the late Mrs. A. H. D.—July 22. From Devonshire £103. 7s.—July 24. From Maidstone £77. 6s. 4d.—By sale of gold and silver articles, dentist gold and diamonds, £120.—From Birmingham, 4 dozen table spoons, 4 dozen dessert spoons, 6 dozen tea spoons, 1 dozen gravy spoons, all of Nickel silver,—July 28, £12. 10s. "instead of insuring 500 acres against hailstorms."

Aug. 12. By sale of gold and silver articles £39. 10s.—Aug. 16. As the remainder of the legacy of the late Mr. T. M. £594. 6s. 10d. I never saw Mr. T. M., yet received from him through his will and by donations in his lifetime, for the benefit of the Orphans, altogether about £8000. This is the way, in which we are helped; but all as the result of prayer and trust in the living God. Did all the dear children of God enter into the blessedness of committing all their matters to Him in prayer, and exercise faith in His power and willingness to help them, they would walk more happily and more easily through this world.—Aug. 18. From China £15.—Aug. 22. From London £100.—Aug. 29. £5. with the following letter: "At the annual meeting of the workmen employed at E—, W.— and H. Collieries, it was resolved to send Five Pounds to the Orphan Asylum on Ashley Down, as a thank-offering, there having been no fatal accident at one of these works for the last two years."

Sep. 5. £50. as the legacy of the late Miss E. H.—Sep. 6. From Ireland from a commercial house £5. "Saved by non-insurance of goods from sea risk for the months of July and August."—Sep. 23. From Zurich 50 Francs, 20 Francs, 20 Francs and 10 Francs.—Sep. 27. Received the following letter from one of the former Orphans, now in service: "Dear and respected Sir, As the anniversary of your birthday has returned once more, may I beg to take the liberty of wishing you very many happy returns of the day, and I hope your valuable life may be spared for many years, to carry on that great work. It is now a little over two years since I left that Happy Home. I often look back on the many happy hours I spent within those walls, and the many Christian privileges I there enjoyed. There are many temptations which beset my path, but I am thankful I have found a Friend in Jesus who is able to help me through them all. I am glad to tell you I am in a comfortable situation, and have a very kind master and mistress; and my prayer is, that I may study to obey them, in return for their kindness. I can never thank you enough for your kindness to me whilst I was under your fatherly care, and also my dear sisters and brothers, who are stilt in that Happy Home; but I hope the time will come, when we shall all gather around the throne of God, with all the dear Orphans, where you will receive your happy reward. May I ask you to give my love to dear Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright and all the dear teachers and matrons of No. V. Hoping you are enjoying good health, I remain your grateful Orphan, ****." I received very many such letters from Orphans on this day.—Sep. 28. From Canton Zurich 40 Francs and from Mannedorf 10 Francs.—Sep. 29. From Zurich 15 Francs—Sep. 30. From C. E., Zurich, 20 Francs.

Oct. 2. £40 as "God’s Tenth" from Torquay.—Oct. 16. From the neighbourhood of Stoneham as a "Harvest thank-offering" £8. 5s.—Oct. 19. From "Nemo" £50.—Oct. 21. From the neighbourhood of Barnstaple 10 barrels of apples.—Oct. 23. From young Christians at Dundee £26. 8s. 1d.—Oct. 28. Received £5., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Some time ago we marked off our books a very old debt of £11. 12s. 6d., which we had every reason to believe we should never receive. We had tried our utmost to get the debt paid, without success. It so happened that a few weeks ago I bought your last Report, and have been much refreshed by the perusal; and a week ago, on turning over the pages of one of the ledgers, I came across the name of the above debtor. I at once thought, I will ask the Lord to send that in, and, if it comes, £5. shall go to Mr. Muller’s Orphans. I therefore wrote a letter to the man in the most simple terms, asking him to remit the amount, and posted it with an earnest prayer to the Lord. This morning, to the utmost amazement of our cashier, a cheque has come to hand. Be good enough to accept £5. of it for the Lord’s direct service in your hands. I cannot say, how much this has encouraged me. I remain yours faithfully, ****."

Nov. 6. Received £1. with the following letter "Honoured Sir, Will you kindly accept the inclosed £1., as a thank-offering for recovery from deafness. I had been deaf for six weeks and was going today to see a surgeon about it. Thank God! I awoke this morning as if in another world, after the silence I had been living in. How thankful I felt to the giver of all good for so many mercies to me! Please to accept my grateful thanks for receiving my little nieces into your Orphan Houses. I hope to be able, if health continues, to send my mite every year, and will ever pray God, to bless the Orphan’s friend and the work. I am, sir, your grateful and humble servant, ****." Received £303. 14s. 5d. as the legacy of the late B. A. D., Esq.—Nov. 7. Received £1. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I herewith enclose a Post Office Order for £1. It is a thank-offering to Almighty God for His great goodness in relieving my dear daughter of a violent face-ache. Believe me, dear sir, your humble servant, ****."—Legacy of the late J. T., Esq., £194. 14s. less duty.—Nov. 10. From twenty-seven donors at Largs and the neighbourhood, £25. 7s. 6d.—Nov. 11. From various donors at Schaffhausen 100 Francs.—Nov. 14. From Scotland 4 bales of cloth.—Nov. 15. Received 15s. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, Twenty-eight years ago, while at school in Devonshire, another boy and I took some money out of a box, into which we were required to put fines for certain misdemeanors. This money was to have been forwarded to you for the work among the Orphans. Since then many and varied have been my experiences, temporal and spiritual: the latter including even the extremes of Ritualism, confession to a priest (so-called), &c. During the course of this latter, I had occasion to confess the above sin, and was told by the priest to make restitution by sending you the money. My object in writing to you now is, to tell you, that what the voice of man failed to do, the voice of God (speaking by His servant) has done. In other words, having now been brought to trust in the Precious Saviour (and not in His pardon handed down through a fellow-sinner), I have been led to see, that it is right to send you this money. I may just say, that the means God has used, to bring me to a decision on this matter, is a sermon I heard this morning from Mr. A., who is now holding a Mission in this city. He preached powerfully from the case of Zaccheus, and spoke strongly of the necessity of reparation for any wrong done before conversion to God. The wrong I had done you (or rather the poor little Orphans) became powerfully impressed upon my mind, and although the amount is but a small one, that does not of course affect the principle of the thing. Be kind enough, therefore, beloved brother in Jesus, to accept this exceedingly tardy but genuine reparation for wrong done so long ago.—I was much delighted to hear of your interesting work in St. Gallen, Switzerland. May God abundantly bless you in your work in building up the saints, in preaching the Word to sinners, and in training the dear Orphans! Such is the heart-felt prayer of your affectionate brother in Christ, ****." The matter referred to in the previous letter is of deep importance. To the utmost of our power reparation is to be made. Should the persons, whom we have wronged, not be living, their heirs are to be sought; and should they not to be found, to God’s poor or His work the money is to be given. Should the transgressor not have strength enough to do it, giving his name, it would be better to do it anonymously than not at all, or to use a friend, to act on his behalf.—Nov. 18. From Basel 500 Francs and 230 Francs.—Nov. 29. From Tobago £5.—Nov. 23. From the neighbourhood of London a diamond ring.

Dec. 9. From a Bristol Wholesale House, sent for the children’s Christmas treat, 60 half boxes of raisins.—From a Bristol donor, for the children’s Christmas puddings, 1 barrel of currants, 16 half boxes of raisins, and 8 barrels of flour.—Dec. 13. From Cheltenham £60.—Dec. 16. Received £114. 9s. for the support of nine Orphans for one year, with £10. 10s. for myself.—Legacy of the late Mrs. T. £373. 19s. 2d.—Dec. 21. The first annual instalment on account of the legacy of the late G. W., Esq., £200.—Dec. 28. From Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope, £55. 4s.—Dec. 30. From various friends at Durdham Down, a large quantity of useful articles, as Christmas presents for the Orphans.

Jan. 1, 1877. Legacy of the late Miss P., of Ireland, £2000 new 3 per cent. Government Stock, less legacy duty. I had not even heard the name of this lady, till I received the information about this legacy being left.—Jan. 9. From believers meeting at the Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £32. 2s. 3d.—Jan. 11. From Carmarthenshire £100.—Jan. 17. From Cornwall £1. 18s. "Instead of insuring against fire or sea-damages in any Company."—Jan. 19. From London, a gold watch and chain, half for Missions and half for the Orphans.—Jan. 20. From Denmark £1.—Jan. 22. £12. 14s. 4d. with these words: "From believers, whose abstinence from intoxicating drink and tobacco enables them to defray the costs of an Orphan’s support, without prejudice to other obligations."—From Havre, France, £4.—Jan. 24. From Leamington £100.

Feb. 6. £300 (less duty) as the legacy of the late Miss H. E. C.—Feb. 7. From Yorkshire £200.—Feb. 9. From Brighton £5. as "A thank-offering for being raised from a bed of severe sickness."—Feb. 10. Legacy of the late Mr. T. F. of Beverley, Canada, 200 dollars.—Feb. 13. From Basle £25.—Feb. 14. From Basle, four rings, a broach, two pairs of earrings, a single earring, and a part of a ring.—Feb. 15. From Dusseldorf 100 Mark.

March 1. Received from Ireland from a house of business £5. 12s. 6d. as "Marine Insurance for January."—March 5. From eleven donors in Taronaki, New Zealand, £11. 19s. 6d.—March 9. From one of the former Orphans, now in service, 6s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, May I be allowed the great privilege of writing to you, hoping it will find you and dear Mrs. Muller quite well, and all the teachers. It is thirteen years, since I left that dear House, and I can tools back with pleasure to the happy time I spent there; for it I was there I learnt to know Jesus as my Saviour, and I can still rejoice in Him. Will you please, dear sir, to accept of the inclosed five shillings, to be used as you think best, also one shilling for two Reports, for which I desire to thank you. Please to remember me gratefully to Mrs. Muller. Allow me, dear sir, to remain your grateful Orphan ****."—I have given this and the other letters, received from former Orphans, as the best illustration of the blessing of God, resting upon the Orphan work; and also, because they show, in what a position we stand towards them, even after they have left the Orphan Houses. Only a few such letters have been here referred to, out of the many, which we received during the year; also only a few of the donations, received from former Orphans, have been mentioned, out of the many, which we received during the year.—March 10. Received £3. 3s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, enclosed is a Post Office Order for £3. 3s. for support of Orphans, wishing you the Lord’s continued blessing. The above is from a fund laid by in proportion to my weekly returns. I can say with regard to lending to the Lord, none gives such interest as He. Yours sincerely, ****." I make a few remarks on this letter.

1. I again commend to such of the Christian readers, who are not already in the habit of giving to the poor or the Lord’s work, in proportion as the Lord is pleased to give to them, through their business or profession, through presents, through legacies, etc., to do so. That is the way of obtaining blessing to our souls, because we act according to the principle laid down in I Cor. xvi, 2. "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God has prospered him." In this way we find that double, if not tenfold, is the blessing which we receive from God, when he prospers us in temporal things; and it is one of the ways in which we honour Him with our temporal things; whilst, if this is not done, and we keep all, or almost all, to ourselves, then the very prosperity in temporal things will be found to be injurious to the inner man. It is just this, why Christians should be in such earnestness on this point, and be habitually returning to the Lord for His work or His poor as He may prosper them. Should it, however, be said, How much shall I give of that which I receive? The answer is, the Holy Scriptures of the New Testament lay down no rule. It is left to the children of God, to act according to the measure of knowledge and grace they have received. The appreciation of what God has done for them in Christ should guide them. We have, however, not to lose sight of this, that, if the Israelite was commanded to give the tenth of all he received, and that the Israelite, in addition to this, had many other expenses, in connection with his being a worshipper of the true and Living God, such as the not sowing the seventh year, the going three times a year to the Lord’s Tabernacle or Temple, etc.; the believer in the Lord Jesus, who knows the power of His precious blood, shed for the remission of his sins; who has the whole revealed will of God in his hands; and who has received the Holy Ghost, and who is partaker of the heavenly calling, should certainly not do less than the Israelite. We should not say, that because we are not Jews, and because no commandment is given, that therefore we may do less than the Jews. Far be this from him, who knows the power of the precious blood of Christ! My advice is this: If the reader has as yet but little knowledge and little grace, let him accordingly begin with a small percentage, yea, though it were ever so small a percentage, only let him be true to God, and put aside for Him habitually as He may be pleased to prosper him. In this way blessing for the soul will be reaped, will be abundantly reaped, and soon will the desire spring up in the heart, to increase the proportion of returns to the Lord. This way will more and more lead the heart to such a state, to be only a steward for the Lord, and to be willing to stand with all we have and are before the Lord as His stewards. The great spiritual blessing, which I have received in my soul, from acting on these principles for more than forty-seven years, leads me to write as I do. Notice, 2. What the writer above says "The above is from a fund laid by in proportion to my weekly returns." The money thus set apart for the Lord, should be put aside, and out of that, which is thus put aside, when calls come upon us, to give to the poor or to the Lord’s work, we should then take. How different will it be, to take from such a store (provided we have not yet grace, to give all to the Lord if it were necessary) from what it would be, if there is the anxious reckoning, whether the gift can be afforded or not. 3. The writer further says: "I can say, with regard to lending to the Lord, none gives such interest as He." That will be found true, by all who act on these principles. The blessedness of this statement I have known for more than forty-seven years. We should not give, for the sake of receiving, but only to please the Lord; yet this is God’s way of acting, and according to the plain teaching of the New Testament, which states; "Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom." Luke vi, 38.

April 5. From Christian friends at Frankfurt-on-the-Maine 180 Mark or £9.—April 9. £2. as "A thank-offering to Almighty God for an increase of salary."—April 14. From Nottinghamshire 10s. with this letter: "Dear Sir, Will you kindly accept the enclosed 10s. for the Orphanage. I have been induced, through the reading of one of your Reports, to increase that portion of my earnings, which I usually give unto the Lord, that I might thus occasionally visit the Orphans at Bristol in their affliction. I am, Dear Sir, yours truly, ****,"—April 19. From Rio de Janeiro £3. 1s. 7d.—April 21. From Warminster £1. 1s. 6d. "By sale of flowers, cultivated for the Orphans."—April 27. From Yorkshire £200.

May 1. "From a Christian Mariner" £32. 10s.—May 5. From Ireland £100.—May 16. From the neighbourhood of Weybridge £100.—£1. instead of paying it "For insuring of plate glass."—May 19. £300. as the legacy of the late Miss M. D.—May 21. From Nymwegen, Holland, 10 florins, 10 florins and 86 florins and 11 cents., in all £8. 17s.—May 24. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £l00.—May 26. From S. S. £100.

There were also again, during the past year, received many hundreds of articles, either for use or sale for the benefit of the Orphans. Scarcely any of these articles have been referred to, but for those, which were for sale, we realized £597. 11s. Christian friends have not only considered what jewellery, coins, and other needless articles they might send to us for sale, but also how they might furnish us with useful articles or provisions for the benefit of the Orphans. The total of the expenses for the Orphans alone, during the past year, was £25,714. 0s. 6½d.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand One Hundred and Ninety Three Orphans who were under our care from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

Year after year God is pleased to help us in the Orphan work also, as well as with regard to the other objects of the Institution; and, in some respects, the help may appear even the more manifest, as the requirements are so large; for we require now for the support of the Orphans and the keeping the large buildings in repair the yearly sum of Twenty-Six Thousand Five Hundred Pounds and upwards, all of which we have to look for alone from our Heavenly Father, who invariably has helped us. But He not only provides us with money, in answer to prayer, but He finds the assistants also, who are needed to take care of the Orphans; and various answers to prayer we have had in this respect during the past year, as several helpers had to leave on account of sick relatives, who required their help, or were ill themselves, or were married, or had to give up their situations for other reasons. We are also, every year, entirely dependent upon God when infantine diseases break out among the children. Just now, while I am writing this, many children are ill in the measles; but God helps, in answer to prayer. And thus it is in scarlet fever, so common to children, whooping cough, etc. I refer to this, because many of our friends may suppose, that money is almost all we want. We also need yearly very many suitable situations that both boys and girls may be placed out, as we only send them to Christian families. This often brings us in prayer to God, and has not a little exercised our faith. The training, however, of the Orphans, above all, needs much prayer and much exercise of faith, and makes it continually necessary to go to the Lord for the needed wisdom; for, "who is sufficient for these things?"

June 6, 1877. Received for the painting, etc., of the Five Orphan Houses, the valuable donation of 14 cwt. and 66 lbs. of white lead, 2 cwt. and 53 lbs. of driers, 132 lbs. of ochre, 7 lbs. of venetian red, 28 lbs. of black paint, 28 lbs. of putty, and 28 lbs. of umber.—June 7. From a servant of the Lord Jesus in Ireland £1. 14s. 7d. While he dines with his family, a box is handed round, each time, in which each member of the family places something according to ability, as a token of gratitude to God for the present meal, and in sympathy with the Orphans who need to be provided for. From time to time these contributions have now been sent us for about two years.—Received from New Zealand, a gold watch, a gold chain, a ring set with stones, a collar stud, a mourning ring, a diamond pin, and a pin set with a stone.—June 12. From Staffordshire, 46 pairs of boots.—June 14. A gold repeater.—From a former pupil of the first Boys’ School of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, £10. 10s.—June 21. A wagon load of firewood.— £10. with the following letter, from a considerable distance: "Dear Sir,—Four years since I sent you a trifle for your Orphanage. Since then I have been in various situations and have not been able to send you more; but owing to a severe illness last Christmas I have been obliged to sell a little property I had. I told the Lord, if it realised a certain amount, I would send you ten pounds. To the surprise of all who knew it, I succeeded in getting the sum, so I have great pleasure in forwarding you that amount. Trusting you may be long spared to continue the great work you have undertaken for His glory, believe me, yours in the love of Jesus, ****."—Here, esteemed readers, you have another proof, how God cares for us, in answer to our daily supplications; and what He does for us, He is ready to do for all His children who confide in Him.

July 9. £7. 10s. "Instead of insuring 300 acres against hailstorms."—July 11. From Berkshire, 2 sets of artificial teeth set in gold.—July 14. From Liverpool 15 half boxes of yellow soap, and 5 half boxes of mottled ditto.—July 18. A large box of drapery.—July 23. From Limerick £7. 10s., "Instead of marine insurance for April, May and June."—July 25. From a mariner a diamond and ruby ring.—July 31. Legacy of the late G. H. Esq., £500. This gentleman, who kindly left the legacy, was an entire stranger to me.—Legacy of the late Mr. H. J. O., £206. 6s. 6d.

From Dundee, 6 pieces of material.—Aug. 7. From School-children at Danielstown, Essequibo, £1. 0s. 10d.—Aug. 8. Five casks of vinegar. The same donors have for several years very kindly supplied the Orphan Houses gratuitously with all the vinegar needed in the five houses.—Aug. 14. The following letter was received from a young man, one of the former Orphans: "Dear and Honoured Sir,—Another Orphan, who has known the happiness of being an inmate of one of the dear Orphan Houses, committed to your care, would desire the privilege of writing to thank you for your kind care while I was there, and for all the comforts and enjoyments, which I shared with my companions. I would also express my heartfelt gratitude to you, for the comfortable situation in which I was placed, and for the very nice outfit I was provided with. I trust the instruction that I received whilst in that Happy Home will never be forgotten by me. I often look back with pleasure to my schoolboy days; for it was the happiest time of my life; and I trust I shall be enabled to repay you in a small measure for all your love and kindness toward me, whilst under your paternal care, for I was very happy there, and often regret leaving that Happy Home; but I know it is right for me to get my living now.—Dear Sir, I have served my five years’ apprenticeship, and I am out of my time, and I shall feel very thankful to you, if you would be so kind as to send my indentures. May the Lord abundantly bless you, dear Sir, and still spare you to be the Orphans’ friend, and crown your untiring efforts with great success in the conversion of souls.—Will you please to accept my kind love and sincere regards for all you have done for me, and remember me to Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright, Mr. French, and to all the kind teachers connected with the great work. I am, dear sir, your grateful Orphan ****."—Aug. 16. Legacy of the late Mrs. E. M. £50.—Legacy of the late Mrs. P. £100.—Aug. 22. From Brush Manufacturers, 12 bass brooms, 11 flat ditto, 2 hair brooms, 6 scrubbers, 18 whisk brooms, 100 shoe brushes, 12 black lead ditto, 4 dandy ditto, 12 bannister ditto, 216 scrubbing ditto, some slate pencils, 1 bucket, 1 tub, 4 toy buckets, 1 housemaid’s box, and 3 mats of damaged clogs and pattens.—Aug. 24. Legacy of the late A. H. Esq., £100.—Aug. 25. From Maidstone £73. 7s. 4d.—Aug. 28. Received £1. with the following letter, from one of the former Orphan Boys who many years since was apprenticed, and who several years ago finished his apprenticeship: "Dear and honoured Sir,—I beg to thank you very much for a copy of this year’s Report, which I received a day or two since. Please accept the enclosed P.O.O. for £1., which is made payable to your order, and apply it to the Object for which it is most needed.—I thankfully take another opportunity of acknowledging the goodness of God to me in the past, first by placing me in the Orphan Home, afterwards by leading me to Himself, and then in His guidance ever since I left the Home. I have, indeed, special cause for gratitude to Him, and I trust I may be enabled to live to His praise in my future life. Please accept my kindest wishes for the prosperity of the Institution, and for the spiritual welfare of you and yours. I am, dear Sir, your obedient Orphan ****." "P.S. Please remember me to the masters in No. 1."

Sept. 11. From labourers in the Gospel in Italy £2. 11s. 5d.—Sept. 12. £5. from the workmen employed at Easton, Whitehall and Hanham Collieries, as a thank-offering for being preserved from fatal accidents during the past twelve months.—Sept. 19. From Leicester £2. with the following letter: "Dear Sir,—I feel great pleasure in being able again to send you a little towards the support of the Orphans under your care. It appears to me like putting a drop in the ocean; but I pray, the Lord will help many to do likewise. After I sent to you last, I felt very anxious to help you, if it were but a little at a time; so I asked the Lord to provide something for me to do; and He has provided just the work He knew would suit me best in Leicester; and I often feel surprised, that I get on so well, and get as much as I can do. But I know I am working for a good Master, who has promised to help all who ask Him. I will enclose you a Post Office Order for £2., being sixpence out of every dozen pairs of slippers I bind. We get many different prices, according to the size and quality; but I thought whether I get little or much, the Lord has a right to what I have sent, and hope He will help me to keep on working for Him, as He knows it gives me great pleasure to help you. I was not able to get any of the work until last Easter, and from that time I have had 80 dozen to bind. Etc." Here we again see what a variety of ways the Lord is pleased to use for our help, and how even poor and hard working persons, in answer to our prayers, are led to assist us by their earnings. His name be magnified for all His kindness to us! While I am writing this, I am labouring in the Word in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. Here I do what I have done for 44 years for the Institution, and this is all I ever did do, ever would do, viz., I wait upon God for help, together with my dear wife, entreating Him that He wou1d be pleased to send means for the Work. Forty-four years God has been pleased to help with pecuniary means and in every other way, and I fully believe He will help us to the end, and not suffer us to be confounded. In Him we trust, to Him alone we look, and to Him we make known our requests with thanksgiving. Our expenses are exceedingly great; but I tell our Heavenly Father about it. One donor after the other, who once helped us much, has been removed by the Lord, or has lost the ability to help us, or his means are directed into other channels; but God remains who has never failed us, though we have times without number had no means at all.—From Southport £1. 11s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, On behalf of my husband and myself, I forward, with sincere pleasure, our yearly donation of a penny a day for your Orphan Houses, and sixpence for the Report, which we received a few days since. We are glad to find by it, that your great Work is still being upheld and prospered by God in whom you have so long and so fully trusted; and that you have been so much blessed in, and refreshed by, your own special work of preaching in different countries. So may it continue, that for many years to come there may be such a living unanswerable witness to the truth, that there is a God who answers prayer and honours faith. We are, Dear Sir, yours most sincerely, ****." £1. as a thank-offering from a Christian gentleman’s servant, who had received £50. as a present for faithful service.—Sept. 22. Legacy of the late Miss A. E. J. £50.—Sept. 26. From Liverpool, a diamond ring.—Sept. 29. Received £11. 12s. 6d., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I send for the Orphans a cheque for £11. 12s. 6d. It is the amount of a claim which I could not recover by legal process, and had repeatedly made application for, without success. Seeing in your last Report, under date Oct. 28, 1876 (page 19), the account of the recovery of £11. 12s. 6d., I resolved to apply for the amount of my claim (as above) with the secret intention of sending it, if recovered, to the Orphans. Accordingly I sent the particulars in writing under an envelope, addressed ‘private,’ and without a word of application; and by the very next post I received a cheque for the amount, with the debtor’s compliments and a stamped envelope for my acknowledgment in return; so that the whole amount came without the loss of a single penny. The coincidence of the same amount (£11. 12s. 6d.) in each case appears most extraordinary, but I vouch for the precise accuracy of this statement. I remain, Yours faithfully and respectfully, ****."—The following letter is from one of the former Orphan Boys articled to a branch postmaster, as a telegraph clerk: "Dear and Honoured Sir, It is a very great pleasure to be able to write a few lines to you and thank you for all you have done for me during the eight years I was under your kind and fatherly care in the dear Orphan Home, which I have left now for five months. Dear Sir, I am glad to tell you it was in the Orphan House I learnt to love my dear Saviour; but it was only a few months before I left. I wish it had been sooner. I am still rejoicing in Him, and I have taken a firm grasp of His kind loving hand, which, by God’s grace, I hope never to let go.—I thank you very much for the nice comfortable situation as a Telegraph Clerk, in which I have been placed. I am getting on very nicely, and will endeavour to continue so. I have such a kind Christian master and mistress, and they do all they can to make me happy.—May the Lord, dear Sir, continue to strengthen and cheer you in your work of faith and labour of love in which you are engaged for Him. May I ask your acceptance of my respectful love, and kindly remember me with the same to beloved Mrs. Muller, Mr. Wright, Mrs. Wright, and to all your co-operators in that great work of yours. I remain, Dear and Honoured Sir, your grateful Orphan,****."

Oct. 12. From Scotland £3., as "A thank-offering for special answers to prayer, during a period of sad bereavement." Legacy of the late Mrs. H. £1,000.—From Burnham, £50.—From the Hague, £1. 10s.—Oct. 16. From Yorkshire, £100.—Oct. 18. From Ireland, £8. 6s. 3d., as "Marine Insurance for August and September, saved by not taking insurance policy out for goods sea-borne."—Oct. 19. Legacy of the late Mr. B., of Philadelphia, U.S.A., 5,000 dollars = £1,002. 0s. 1d. Mr. B. insured his life for 5,000 dollars in the year 1868, with the intention that the amount should paid for the benefit of the Orphans on Ashley Down. The testator died on Nov. 20, 1874; but I had never heard the least about this. On my arrival in the United States of America I was preaching on Sep. 10, 1877, in Dr. Budington’s Church in Brooklyn, when a slip of paper was handed to me, on which it was stated, that if I would apply at such and such a place in Philadelphia, I might obtain this legacy of 5,000 dollars. I did so, and after some time obtained in full the amount. Thus, my being led of the Lord to labour for a season in the United States in word and doctrine, was also used as a means of obtaining the payment of this legacy. But this was not all. In New York, in Brooklyn, in Philadelphia, in Baltimore and in other cities in the United States, I had the joy of seeing Orphans, who had been brought up under my care, some of whom had walked in the ways of the Lord for a number of years, and one of them for about thirty. I saw also a gentleman, who told me the following deeply interesting facts, which a few days afterwards be had printed, and sent me. I give the narrative verbatim, as it will interest the Christian reader.

REMARKABLE USEFULNESS OF ONE OF MR. MULLER’S ORPHANS.

 

LINDALE, Modoc County, California, October 7, 1877. To the Editor of the "Witness."

The report of Mr. Muller’s addresses in Dr. Budington’s Church, as given in a late copy of the "Witness," calls to my mind some pleasant remembrances.

During the war I spent some time at Washington N.C., as agent of the Christian Commission. Having been informed that there was a band of earnest Christian seamen on board of the gunboat "Louisiana," then guarding the town, I improved the earliest opportunity to visit the vessel. On being introduced to them by one of the officers, the young men gathered about me, and spoke of the great joy they found in the service of Christ. Their whole conversation was religious. With no marks of fanatical enthusiasm, they seemed literally filled with Christian zeal. The interest I felt in them at the first introduction was greatly enhanced on learning from one of their number, by name Wilkinson, that he was one of Mr. Muller’s Orphans. (I had previously read Mr. Muller’s book, "The Life of Trust," and was greatly interested in the Bristol Asylum.) Wilkinson I found to be the leading spirit, and the recognised head of this little Bethel church. He, it was, who some months before, when the cloud of impending battle was hanging over the ship’s company, was one night pacing the deck with a comrade, when their conversation took a religious turn. Mutually impressed, they agreed to meet the following night in the "chain locker" for prayer. This was the beginning of one of the most remarkable series of meetings of which I have ever had any knowledge. The "chain locker" prayer-meetings were continued with increasing interest and attendance for about twenty months without the intermission of a single night. At a stated hour every day the whole company (the exact number of converts I am unable to state, but they were many) met to read God’s Word, and to exchange views upon it, Wilkinson being the chief interpreter. He alone of the whole group had any previous knowledge of the Bible. Up to the age of fourteen years and a half he had been faithfully taught at the Orphan Asylum. At another stated hour of the day Wilkinson, with some selected helpers, met the coloured sailors belonging to the ship, and taught them reading, writing, &c. Wilkinsen seemed to me, through several months of intimate acquaintance, to be a product of Mr. Muller’s faith. The calm confidence of God; the method in his whole manner of life; the persistence of purpose, and the quiet, spiritual power, which so characterise the founder of the Bristol Asylum, were, in an eminent degree, characteristics of my young friend. An incident illustrates the quality above mentioned. On one occasion he, with two other sailors, was detailed to make an awning for the ship, the work to be performed in a sail-loft on shore. The two associates were very rough, wicked men, and to sit down in their company, and be compelled for two weeks to listen to their lewd and profane conversation, was to Wilkinson no light affliction. At the time, he spoke of it with great depression. It was to him a providence he could not understand. But God had a purpose. His manner with his unconverted shipmates was commonly eharacterised by extreme reticence, so, during his stay in the sail-loft, he took scarce any part in their conversation; but it happened that a single sentence dropped from his lips by which the Spirit of God carried conviction home to the hearts of both his comrades. Before the two weeks were ended he led both of the men to my office for Christian counsel and prayer. Both came to trust that God, of whom they had been living in utter disregard, and almost utter ignorance. In three months from his conversion one of these men had read the Bible through from Genesis to Revelation. If Mr. Muller were able to trace the work which, under God, the Bristol Orphan Asylum has accomplished in the world, he might well exclaim, "What hath God wrought!" For some years I have lost sight of my friend Wilkinson. If this should meet his eye, I would be glad to hear from him.

J. R. HAMMOND.

After my having preached the first time in Calvary Presbyterian Church, San Francisco, California, on April 26, 1878, Mr. Wilkinson, who has a respectable situation in that city, introduced himself to me. I had not seen him for about twenty years. He holds fast the Lord Jesus, and is a happy Christian; and, as he told me, is even happier now than during the American civil war, to which the preceding narrative refers. It was a real joy to me to meet this former Orphan, about 6,500 miles from Bristol. I have to state, that thousands of similar instances of blessing have been the result of our labours. While engaged on a preaching tour in England, Scotland, and Ireland, I met converted Orphans in every one of the large cities in which I preached, and sometimes 10 or 15 at once, who, after the service, came to shake hands with me, some of whom had left the Orphan Houses more than ten or fifteen years, and are now fathers or mothers of families. Thus we reap in a small degree even now; but how vast will be the harvest in eternity! Nothing has so abundantly shown to me the blessed results of my labours in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution as going from city to city, and from country to country, on my preaching tours. In every city in England, Scotland, and Ireland where I preached, I had testimony from the mouth of multitudes of the great blessing which they have received through reading the Reports of the Institution, or the Narrative of the Lord’s Dealings with me, which contains the substance of the Reports. The same I found to be the case in the sixty-eight cities where I preached in Switzerland, the German Empire, and in Holland, also in all the many cities in the United States of America, where I have been preaching. While I am writing this, I am in San Francisco in California, where I shall, God willing, be preaching some time, as well as in seven or eight other cities in California, and where such labours are greatly needed. I am now about 6,500 miles from Bristol; but even here, though I have been only two days in the city of San Francisco, 1 have met already with many pastors of churches and other Christian gentlemen, who have been abundantly blessed, as they say, through reading the account of my trials of faith in connection with the Institution, and my practical remarks made regarding them. Thus, great as my expectations of blessing were, when I began this Institution more than forty-four years since, they have been increased a thousand times beyond my expectations. I refer to all this, in order that Christians, labouring in any way for the Lord, may be encouraged to go on in their service, being assured that, if we seek to be vessels meet for the Master’s use, and go on patiently and perseveringly with our work, in due season we shall reap.

Oct. 27. Four bags of oatmeal.—Oct. 30. From Malta £1. 12s.—From Scotland 100 pairs of boots, 10 wincey shirts, and 20 boxes of buttons.

Nov. 1. From Wolverhampton, 5 tubs of butter.—Nov. 3. From Cheltenham £60.—From Berkshire £75. for the support of six Orphans for one year.—Nov. 7. £1. 0s. 6d. with the following letter: "Very dear and Honored Sir, Will you please to accept £1. for the dear Orphans? Our Heavenly Father has given us 34 chickens, and not one of them has been taken by the fox, although our neighbours have lost many. Please accept 6d. for the beautiful Report you kindly sent us. Hoping that your valuable life will be spared, to be the Orphans’ friend, is the prayer of your unworthy servants, ****."—Nov. 8. From one of the former Orphans, who left 12 years and 4 months since, and has been a servant all this time in the same family, 15s.—Nov. 13. From Clifton £3., "instead of insuring the donor’s house."—Nov. 14. From Almondsbury, 3273 apples."—Nov. 15. Eight oil paintings, from a great distance, to be sold for the benefit of the Orphans.—Nov. 17. From London, 6 cases, containing a great variety of articles carved in wood.—Nov. 21. From Stoke Newington, London, £1. 15s., "being the amount it would have cost to keep a dog for 12 months," and 10s. weekly offerings.—Nov. 27. Legacy of the late Miss M. R. £300. less legacy duty. The testatrix I knew not personally, and, as far as I remember, not even by name. Thus it is with almost all the testators and testatrixes, who have kindly left legacies for the work. I request the reader kindly to observe, how many legacies were again paid to the Orphan Fund, during this year, and that was one especial means, which God was pleased to use, for furnishing us with means, to meet the large expenses for the support of the 2193 Orphans, under our care, during the year.

Dec. 3. From Tunbridge Wells £10., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Being on a visit to a friend here, and happening to mention your ‘Home,’ I was somewhat startled at her assuring me, that you had been obliged to shut up some of your houses on account of the want of means to carry them on. Now as I feel certain that such is not the case (as your Heavenly Banker can never fail you, so long as the power of the prayer of faith is granted you), I thought I would ask you, or some of your kind helpers, to give me a few lines, refuting the error, into which my friend has been led. I referred her to your last Report, but was told, it had happened since April or May, up to which time your Report was carried. I can easily believe, that the Lord may have been trying your faith, and keeping your funds low, as He has often done; but I will never believe (unless I hear it from yourself or those in your Establishment) that you have been led to shut up even one of your houses. I beg your acceptance of £10., praying that the Lord will bless you more than he has ever done. Believe me, dear Sir, yours sincerely, ****," In reply it was stated to the lady who wrote this letter, that all the five Orphan Houses were in full working order on December 4, 1877; that since May 26, 1877, up to December 4, 1877, there had been received 101 Orphans, to fill up vacancies occasioned by sending out servants and apprentices, etc.; and that in that very week, God willing, 15 more Orphans were expected to be received. Similar strange statements have often been made, even without a shadow of foundation. This too we take out of the hands of our Heavenly Father, seeking to exercise faith regarding it, and commit it in prayer to Him—Dec. 5. Received £2. 1s. 6d., with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Taking an interest in your work, but being at present unable to assist by sending any regular remittances, it has occurred to me, to forward you each month the fees I receive in my professional capacity as "a commissioner to administer oaths," so that I may help forward in some small degree what, I am satisfied, is God’s work. You should know (to appreciate the cause of any fluctuation in the amounts) that the fees for affidavits and declarations taken by commissioners are unsought by them and come, as people say, ‘by accident;’ and therefore, what you may receive from time to time, you may justly consider as sent to you direct from our Heavenly Father, I being merely the ‘conduit pipe.’ In order to draw the attention of my professional brethren to this method of ‘doing God’s service,’ please enter my donation as "A solicitor’s fees for affidavits taken in November, £2. 1s. 6d., etc." This is just another way, how God may work, in answer to prayer, in the hearts of His stewards; and we are thus further and further encouraged to trust in Him.—From a Bristol wholesale house of business, 8 barrels of flour, 16 half-boxes of raisins, and 1 barrel of currants, for the Christmas puddings of the Orphans.—Dec. 10. For the support of 9 Orphans for one year £117. 9s. 0d., with £10. 10s. for myself.—Dee. 12. From London £5., with this statement: "Had I not adopted the principle of proportionate storing, you would not have had this £5."—Dec. 13. From a Bristol firm, 10 boxes of old raisins and 10 boxes of new ditto.—Dec. 14. From Wolverhampton, 5 sacks of oatmeal.—Dec. 17. Legacy of the late Mr. E. M. L. £500. less duty.—Dec. 19. From the neighbourhood of London £290., with £10. for myself.—Dec. 20. From a Bristol firm, for a Christmas treat to the children, 40 boxes of fruit and 10 boxes of oranges. This, and the other presents in oranges and fruit, will give to the reader a little idea of the greatness of the work; for, immense as all this may appear, even for the largest family circle, in our case it goes but a little way. Even a comparatively small treat to these two thousand Orphans, with their teachers and other helpers, takes £50. or more.—Dec. 21. A lady in Clifton very kindly sent again, as many years previously, a large quantity of toys for the children, as a Christmas present.—Dec. 22. From Bath £63. 1s. for the support of five Orphans for one year.—From a Bristol firm, 20 boxes of oranges; and from another, 3 boxes of oranges.—Dec. 26. £1. from one of the former Orphan girls, now in service, with the following letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir; I am very thankful, at this happy season of the year, to have the privilege of writing to you, and asking you, kindly to accept the enclosed Post Office Order for £1. for the Orphans. I remember with what delight we, who have left the Orphan Houses, used to look forward to Christmas, and how we enjoyed the treats, you so kindly provided for us. Though those happy times have passed, yet, in the memory of them we sometimes seem to live and to enjoy them over again. How thankful we all ought to be to our Heavenly Father for having provided such a home for us, when He saw best to take our earthly parents from us. He has indeed, through you, fulfilled His promise to care for the fatherless. Please remember me gratefully to Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright and Mr. Horne. That every Christmas joy and blessing may be yours, is the prayer of your grateful Orphan, ****."—Dec. 31, 1877. From the pupils of a Grammar School, £12. 10s.—From a farm in the neighbourhood of High Wycombe £1. 4s., as "A penny in the shilling, taken for eggs, during the past year."—From the neighbourhood of Sheffield 113 pairs of slippers.

We were now brought to the close of another year. Very great and varied had been again, as usual, the blessings, which it had pleased the Lord to bestow upon us during the past year; and having Him, as during the 44 years of the existence of the Institution, as the Patron, who, during all those many years, at all times, and under the most difficult circumstances had proved to us, how blessed it is, to have Him as Patron, we looked peacefully forward to the next year, though we well knew, how greatly we should need His help during the new year also. I now refer to a very few other instances, to show the readiness of the heart of our Heavenly Father, in answer to our daily believing supplications, to send us the needed means, during this year also, to meet our very heavy expenses for this greatest of all Orphan Institutions in the world.

January 1, 1878. Already on the first day of this new year we received many donations for the support of our large Orphan Family, of which I will only refer to the following. From the neighbourhood of Glamorgan £30.—From Shrewsbury £10 and £10.—From New Wimbledon, £13. 10s. for the support of one Orphan.—From London £25.—From Clifton £13., for the support of two Orphans for 6 months.—From a Sunday School at Wellington, New Zealand, £1. 5s.—From New Zealand, a gold ring, a mourning ditto, a colonial gold ditto, and one set with onyx.—Jan. 5. From a Bristol donor £4. 14s. 6d., with the words: "My gross receipts for the New Year’s Day."—From Wotton-under-Edge 16s., "The takings in my small shop on New Year’s Day."—From E. B. £1., as "First cash taken in business this year."—Jan. 7. From Norwich 232 scrubbing brushes, 14 leather mats, some stove shavings, 234 oil brushes, 22 whips and 22 dog collars.—From friends at Durdham Down a great variety of articles as Christmas presents for the Orphans.—From the neighbourhood of Manchester £5. 5s. as "The twelfth part of my year’s commission as a commercial traveller."—Jan. 9. From a Christian former Orphan, an inmate 1850, £10., with the following letter to Mr. Wright: "Honoured Sir, When in New York in October last, I had the pleasure of crossing the ferry from Brooklyn to New York in company with Mr. Muller. At that time it was intended to fix the ship I commanded to Bristol, and I promised myself the pleasure of going to see the New Orphan Houses; but a day or two afterwards I received orders to fix for Liverpool, and, on account of the death of my late employer, whom I have served for more than nine years, the ship I commanded was sold by the executors, so that I am thrown out of employment, and cannot avail myself of the pleasure of seeing the New Orphan Houses; but please accept the enclosed £10., to be used at your discretion, as a thank-offering unto the Lord for His numerous mercies during another voyage, and bringing me safely back to my native land from the East Indies. We trust that the Lord is still blessing the labours of Mr. Muller in America, and himself and Mrs. Muller enjoying good health, also that yourself and Mrs. Wright are quite well, and, with Christian love, yours respectfully, ****."—Jan. 12. From Basle £28.—Jan. 23. From London £1. 4s. "From a Solicitor for fees on affidavits, taken in December."—Jan. 24. From the neighbourhood of Nottingham, a lady’s gold watch set with diamonds and a gold chain, as "Treasures in Heaven." Matthew vi. 20.—Jan. 26. Friends through "The Religious Journal of Neuchatel" 100 Francs=£3. 19s. 4d.—Jan. 28. From Cheltenham £60.—From Canterbury, New Zealand, £6.—Jan. 29. Legacy of the late Mrs. L., £100.—Jan. 30. From Scotland £8. 5s. This donation comes from a servant of the Lord Jesus, who has no property and no fixed salary or income whatever, and who for years has sent me for the benefit of the Orphans the fifth part of all that God is pleased to give to him in answer to prayer.

Feb. 1. £7. 10s. with these words: "Being half the money I took in prizes for my sheep, at different Christmas shows."—Feb. 16. From Hopton, near Harling, from 36 Christian friends, £20.—From Adelaide, South Australia, £10.—From Kent £91. 7s. for the support of seven Orphans for one year.—Feb. 20. From Chichester, a diamond ring.—Feb. 21. £2. from London, "From a Solicitor for affidavits taken in January."—Feb. 25. From York £200.—Feb. 26. £200. as the second instalment of the legacy of the late G. W., Esq.

March 1. The total income for the support of the Orphans today was £8. 14s. 4½d., but the average expense, for each day, for this object alone, is £73. What is to be done under such circumstances? We do not ask friends to help us. We do not send out circulars to make known our need. We do not in the least, for the time being, refer to it, outside the Institution. We pray and seek to encourage ourselves in God. And similar days come often. Yea the money in hand may sink more and more, so that the appearance is, very shortly we shall have nothing at all. And what do we then? We still wait upon God and trust in Him, and in Him alone. He has helped, and helped above forty years, and we trust He will yet help us; and thus we encourage ourselves in God.—March 8. From Limerick £20. "Being Marine Insurance on goods for November, December, January and February."—March 9. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £200.—March 16. The total income of today, for all the various Objects of the Institution, was only £10. 2s. 1 d., whilst the average expenses for one day, for all the Objects, amount to £124. per day. But our hope is in God, though our faith is tried.—March 22. From Hampshire £4. 7s. 1d., "Being one penny put by on each dozen of eggs sold, during the year."—From London £1. 11s. 9d. with this letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir, Enclosed I have the privilege to send you towards the support of the Orphans a cheque, value £1. 11s. 9d. (being "first fruits" on an increase of income, with 10s. added in gratitude to God, for the discovery of a mistake, in answer to prayer). Permit me also to express my deep thankfulness, that I ever came across your "Narrative," which has been to me a very great blessing, as it has also been to several others, to whom I have sent it, or otherwise made it known. With much prayer, that God may yet more abundantly bless you and your work, and make your last days your best days, I am, my dear Sir, yours in the Lord Jesus ****."—March 26. £2. from the neighbourhood of London with this letter: "Dear Sir, It is with much pleasure I enclose a Post Office order for the sum of £2. for the Orphan Houses. When I sent last year, I thought it would be the last I should ever be able to send, as I was getting old and had left service, to live upon the hard earnings of nearly fifty years. It is now twelve months since I left. To my great surprise my late master sent for me last week and presented me with a handsome sum which has enabled me to double the amount, which I have sent before. Oh, that men would praise the Lord for His goodness and His wonderful works to the children of men! I have had to plead with Him during the past year, and tell Him that the silver and the gold were His, and all hearts were in His hands; and now He has done much more than I could ask or think. What shall I render to Him for all His benefits! Yours respectfully, ****."

Apr. 3. From the Diamond Fields in South Africa £6.—Apr. 4. £1. 10s., with this memorandum: "Part of the donation is the sum of a debt, recovered in the following way. Failing in all ordinary attempts to get the payment of his debt, Mr. B. resolved not to put the debtor in court, but to put the matter in the Lord’s hands, with the further determination, that, if the money should be paid, he would devote it to the Lord’s service. Shortly after this the bill was paid, and Mr. B. herewith fulfils his purpose, with addition thereto."—From one of the former Orphans £1. 5s., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, Although it is now nineteen years, since I left the dear Orphan House, the love and interest I feel is as strong as ever for the dear Home. It was there I found the Saviour, and He has been my Friend and Guide to the present. I know all my path has been marked by a loving Father’s hand. I can trust Him for the future. My health is better than I ever expected, and I am able to obtain my own living, which I feel is a great mercy. I have been for the last five years engaged as a housekeeper to an uncle of my cousins. It is my privilege to be so situated as to be able to work for Jesus, both in the Sunday School, in visiting the sick, etc. Dear Mr. Muller, a lady wished me to forward you one pound for the Orphan work, and I feel pleasure in adding five shillings. May the dear Lord continue to bless you with health and strength, long to live and labour for Him, and give the same blessing to all the dear friends now engaged in the work with you. Believe me, dear Sir, Respectfully yours, ****."—Apr. 12. Legacy of the late Miss M. A. R. £100. less duty.—Apr. 20. From the East Indies £60.—Apr. 26. £3., with this letter: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in forwarding to you a cheque for £3., sent by my late clerk J. S., now a shepherd in Queensland. It is the second time this labouring man has sent to your Orphanage, and he desires to do so every year, etc."

May 6. From Limerick £5. 1s. 3d. instead of "Marine Insurance for March and April."—May 7. Total income this day £11. 15s. 2d., whilst our average expenses for one day are about £124. Thus it has been of late again and again. Under these circumstances we lay hold on the promises of our Heavenly Father, and thus seek to encourage ourselves.—May 16, From Cornwall £3. 9s. 6d. The writer says in his letter, that through my writings he was led to give systematically, at first a tenth, and that for the last five years he has given a third of all his profits to the Lord’s work. This leads me to ask the Christian reader, Are you giving to the Lord in some way or other of that with which the Lord is pleased to intrust you, on principle, systematically, according to the prosperity which God grants to you; or do you leave it to impulse and feeling? Let me affectionately entreat you to give, as God prospers you, in order that you may not lose blessing spiritually, which you most assuredly would, if you withheld more than is meet.—May 22. From Kingston-on-Thames £10, "In lieu of a gold bracelet, bequeathed, for the benefit of the Institution."

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Fourteen Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1878, to May 26, 1879, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1878, to May 26, 1879, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

When in the year 1835 I added the Orphan work to the other Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, my first and chief aim was not, to care for the physical well-being of the Orphans, though we seek with all earnestness to attend to this. Nor was the cultivation of their minds the first and chief object I had in view regarding the Orphans, though we do indeed seek this, not only through the instrumentality of Christian teachers, but of such who are fitted, as properly trained teachers, to carry out this point. Nor was even the salvation of the souls of these Orphans the chief and primary object of the Orphan work, though God has condescended most abundantly to bless our labours in the conversion of many hundreds of Orphans. That which I had, above all, in view regarding the Orphan work, and why it was commenced, was, that God might be glorified in its being seen, through this work, that He was as willing as ever to answer the prayers of His children, and how much even now can be accomplished through the instrumentality of prayer and faith. Because, then, this was, and is still before me, therefore is such stress laid upon receiving, what we receive, as the result of prayer and faith, without applying to any one but God Himself for help.

When our year commenced, on May 27, 1878, we had for the support of the Orphans £4708. 4s. 10½d. in hand. This may appear to one or the other a considerable sum, and, in a certain sense, it was even to us a considerable sum to begin the year with; but if it be remembered that often we have to pay out in one day £500., and sometimes even considerably more, it will easily be perceived, that we needed faith in the Living God, in order to be at peace regarding our necessities, and that this balance of £4708. could in no wise assure us that we should not want. We did, however, look to God, and to Him alone, and therefore was the heart at peace.

I will now seek to show to the reader, very briefly, how we fared, during this year with reference to pecuniary supplies for the Orphans:—

May 31, 1878. From Sacramento, California, a gold watch and chain.—June 22. The total income for all the five different Objects of the Institution was today £6., whilst the average expenses for one day, are £124.—June 25. Received £9. 10s. "instead of insuring 380 acres against hailstorms,"—June 27. Although, during the first month, from May 27 to June 27, 363 donations had been received, yet, as the total of them amounted only to £752. 14s., whilst our average expenses for one month for the support of the Orphans alone amounted to more than £2000., our balance was still further reduced, to what it had been at the beginning of the year; but our confidence in the Living God was as strong as before, and, by His grace, without wavering.

July 20. £10. 10s., from a former pupil of the first Boys’ Day School of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. This donor has given the same amount repeatedly.—July 25. At the beginning of this day we were still poorer than on June 27, because the income during the past four weeks had been again only £740. 11s. 8½d., instead of £2,200. But we looked out for help, and continued patiently, with prayer, to exercise faith in the power of God, and in the willingness of God to help us. In the meantime also, we had still something in hand to last a little while longer. Now, however, the time was come when the Lord graciously would give again more abundantly, after having tried our faith considerably for several months with regard to means. I received this day £5,000, free of duty, as payment of the legacy of the late W. C. H., Esq. This gentleman I had never seen, and the legacy was paid considerably before the legal time, both of which circumstances are to be noticed. I also received £1,293. 14s. 11d, today as payment of the legacy of the late C. G. E., Esq., this amount being a third of the residue. Legacy of the late Miss P. B. L. £5. In addition to this we received about £50. in various small donations. My heart rejoiced, when I thus again saw the hand of God so manifestly stretched out on our behalf, bidding us, so to speak, afresh to be of good cheer, and afresh assuring us by His dealings that He will never leave us nor forsake us.—From Liverpool 20 half boxes of soap.

Aug. 10. £200. as the legacy of the late R. M., Esq., less duty.—Aug. 12. From the neighbourhood of Gloucester £1. 1s. as "Firstfruits of the poultry-yard."—From Sussex £65.—Aug. 16. From Yorkshire £100.—Aug. 17. £4. 5s. 6d. "From a commissioner for affidavits for the months of May, June and July."—Aug. 27. Received 3s. with the following letter:—"Honoured Sir, I wish to thank you for the Report sent, which my wife and self have read with pleasure and profit, and, in some instances, with much joy; but it is with some concern we look at the figures at the end of the book. Of course we mean not so much as a matter of faith, but as a matter of fact. The difference between £10,936. [the balance in hand May 26, 1877] and £4,708. [the balance in hand May 26, 1878] is pretty palpable at first sight; and we judge that this decline has given not a little exercise of mind and trial to yourself, Mr. Wright, and others, and we send you as much as we can (3s. worth of stamps) to cheer you on your way in this new year of faith and hope.—We see, looking back, that you began May 26, 1874, with £4,057. and ended with £8,406., and let us hope that 1878 and ‘79 may prove as good, under God’s blessing. Please excuse and accept it in the goodwill with which it is sent, and believe us to be yours faithfully ****." I wrote on the receipt, in acknowledging this 3s., "Thanks for the kind sympathy. I trust in God, He has helped and He will further help."

I make the following remarks on this letter. 1, Such fluctuations do not take us by surprise; they were expected from the beginning of the work; periods even when all might be expended, when God, in answer to prayer, would make bare his arm, and send help for the Orphans, were looked for; and the very reason for founding the Orphan work was, to show to the world and the church at large, how much even in the 19th century can be accomplished by prayer and faith. This Institution has been from the beginning like the burning bush, and yet it is not consumed.

2, The writer of the letter knew not, that the balance in hand for the support of the Orphans, became reduced still further and further, week after week, in June and July, 1878; but our hope was in God. I say in God. Not in circumstances, not in natural prospects, not in former donors, but solely in God. This is just that which brings the blessing. If we say we trust in Him, but in reality do not, then God, taking us at our word, lets us see, that we do not really confide in Him; and hence failure arises. On the other hand, if our trust in the Lord is real, help will surely come. "According unto thy faith be it unto thee." Thus we have invariably found it during the 45 years of the existence of the Institution.

Aug. 31. Four tubs of butter and five sacks of oatmeal.

Sep. 2. By sale of dentist gold, etc. £28. 8s.—Sep. 3. From Jamaica £6.—Sep. 3. Received on account of the legacy of the late Mrs. S. S. £4,100. This Mrs. S. had never sent anything in her lifetime; I had never seen her, never heard her name; but hearing about the Orphan work on Ashley Down, she was induced, I understand, to leave this legacy. Thus God helps us. We make our prayer to Him, we look to Him, we do trust in Him; and He speaks and works for us, without our doing anything in the matter besides. Unspeakably blessed it is, thus to confide in God! Sep. 4. Today, when I had prepared the balance-sheet, it was found, that we had in hand for the support of the Orphans £11,575. 4s. 11½d. and £988. 3s. 8¼d. for the first four Objects. Within three months and eight days the Lord had been pleased to send us £18,400. 17s. 8d., by far the largest sum we have ever had, within the same space of time, during the 45 years of the existence of the Institution. Will not the beloved Christian readers see, if they have not done so before, how blessed it is to trust in God? Verily, those who do so will not be confounded, though their faith may again and again he sharply tried.—Sep. 9. "Given up for conscience sake" 4 gold rings.—Sep. 10. Seven sacks of potatoes.—Sep. 18. £5. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, Please to accept of the enclosed £5. for the use of the Orphans, as a thank-offering to our Heavenly Father for hearing and answering my prayers, by removing what had the appearance of being a stumbling block to the peace of mind to one of my family. I can truly say, God is good, etc."—Sep. 21. Received £5. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have the pleasure of sending you a £5. Note for the Orphan Homes. Please send me the last Report, as the reading of the Reports, on former occasions, has often strengthened my own faith. In the beginning of last year I resolved to put aside an additional portion of my income, as the Lord’s portion (£20.); and as I thought I could not afford to do so all the year through, I thought the first quarter was the best time, the command being, ‘Honour the Lord with the first fruits of all thine increase.’ The second quarter had no sooner commenced, than, by the sudden death of a relation, from whom I had no expectations, I received £20. 17s. This enabled me to do as I had done the first. But this was not all. Shortly after the beginning of the third quarter, a debt was paid, which had been owing so long, that I never expected to receive the money; and interest, unasked, amounting to nearly a third of the debt. May God abundantly prosper all the work He has given you to do for Him! Believe the, yours sincerely, ****."—Sep. 24. Ten barrels of apples—Sep. 26. From a farmer £2., as a thank-offering "For a good breed of lambs."—Sep. 27. Received £4. 8s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, On the 26th of last September I sent to Mr. Wright (your esteemed Son-in-Law) the sum of £4. 7s., being a thank-offering of 1s. a year for the eighty-six years of my eventful life, and 1s. for Report, etc. And as my Heavenly Father has been pleased to prolong my unworthy existence to the present day, I once more tender the same little offering of £4. 8s., viz. £4. 7s. as a thank-offering and 1s. for the Report, etc., with my sincere prayers for a continuance of the Lord’s manifest blessing on your noble and wonderful Institution. Believe me, dear Mr. Muller, to remain, in all sincerity, your sister in the Lord, ****."—Sep. 28. A diamond ring.

Oct. 1. £1. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose you a cheque for £1. for the Orphan Work, as a thank-offering to Almighty God for a prosperous year’s business, during a time of such great depression in trade; and also for the preservation of myself, family and friends from accident and sudden death, during a year which has been full of such calamities. Yours with Christian regards, ****."—Oct. 3. £1. 1s. as "A thank-offering for a son’s safe return, after a long voyage."—An Indian shawl, a Shetland wool ditto, 2 lace veils, a silver coffee-pot, a silver tea-pot, a silver feeding bowl, a silver muffineer, 2 silver ladles, a locket, 2 brooches, a ring, an earring, a gold seal, some Roman pearls, some scent bottles, brass ornaments, &c.—Oct. 7. £1. 1s. from one of the former Orphans, now in Ireland, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, May I have the pleasure of once more sending to you my mite for the blessed work in which you are now engaged. I do feel so happy when from time to time I have the pleasure of seeing how you are spared in health and strong to preach in so many foreign places the glad tidings of salvation; and I do pray, that you may have the joy of seeing many precious souls brought to know and love Jesus as their Saviour; and may God bless you abundantly in your own soul. Often do I think of the happy days I spent under your fatherly care; and now, that I am far away, I know that the same loving Hand is guiding me safely on, that first put me under your care. I have two dear good Christian ladies to serve. May God help me to serve them aright, always remembering that there is an Eye ever watching over me. May I ask you, ever to remember me in your prayers, that I may be kept faithful unto the end. I have sent a Post Office Order for £1. 1s., asking you kindly to send me a Report. Hoping this letter will find you in good health, I am, dear and respected Sir, your ever grateful Orphan, ****."—From Melton Mowbray £5., as "A thank-offering for the preservation of a valuable horse, when in great danger."—Oct. 10, Legacy of the late Mrs. K. £465. 12s. 6d. This lady, as far as I know, I have never seen, but God, in answer to our daily prayers for means to carry on this work, put it into her heart to leave us this legacy.—Oct. 14. Legacy of the late G. T., Esq., £100.—Oct. 17. From one of the Midland counties £70.—Oct. 19. From Germany a German Government Interest Coupon for 11 Thalers 7 Sgr, 6 Pf., as "A thank-offering for the safe delivery of the donor’s wife."—Oct. 23. From a Christian gentleman and lady £134. for the support of ten Orphans for one year.—Oct. 28. From Zeist, Holland, 10s.—Received 5s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I send you the enclosed 5s. as a thank-offering for the restoration of a very bad finger. Having read in your last Report about the horse getting better in answer to prayer, and the owner sending you Two Pounds, I told the Lord if my finger got better without a doctor I would send you the enclosed. At that time I could do nothing, but had to nurse it. That very night, however, it became so much better that I could work the next day. Now, thank the Lord for His loving kindness, I am able to act according to my promise. Please use the money as you think proper. Yours in Christ, ****."—Oct. 29. From the neighbourhood of Sydney, New South Wales, £20.

Nov. 4. As further payment on account of the legacy of the late Mrs. S. S. £131. 1s. 7d.—From a painter and decorator £3. 6s., being "Sixpence on each room, papered by him, during one year."—From various Christian friends at Montreux, Switzerland, 250 Francs = £10.—Nov. 8. From the neighbourhood of Hull £2. as "Produce of a pear-tree for the Orphans."—Nov. 13. £2. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, As I have received a present of £25., I promised beforehand to give ten per cent. to the Lord. So I send you an Order for £2. 10s. Please use it according to the Lord’s direction. I am yours truly, ****."—Nov. 14. Received 19s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed is a Post Office Order for 19s., which please divide between yourself and the Orphans. The enclosed is part of a bad debt of over £30. which I made in July; and as it was a very bad estate, I did not prove, and promised the Lord, that whatever I received from it, should be sent to you. The gentleman has promised to pay the whole amount (much to my surprise) in instalments, therefore I will send it, as I get it. Hoping that you are still enjoying good health, I am yours truly, ****."—Nov. 15. Received 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a Post Office Order for 10s., which kindly accept for the use of the Orphans. A few months ago I suddenly became very deaf, and feared the use of one ear was gone. Knowing the ear to be such a delicate organ, I always dreaded consulting a doctor about it; so I made it a subject of earnest prayer, and determined that if my hearing was restored, without medical advice, I would send 10s. for the Lord’s work in your hands. I now hear again as well as ever, so you can receive this trifle as another of the many interesting ways in which God answers your prayers. Many thanks for the three Reports received. I always read them with great pleasure, and, I trust, profit. I am going to send one to my brother, who is in Canada. With Christian regards, I remain, dear Mr. Muller, yours in the love of Christ Jesus, ****."—From Christian friends at Lausanne 250 Francs = £10.—Nov. 23. Received from Manchester £10. 10s. 7d. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, enclosed please find (for the Orphans) a crossed cheque for £10. 10s. 7d. The amount has been derived from a per centage (devoted to the purpose) on certain debts or claims which (rightly or wrongly) were considered doubtful, but were subsequently realized. An acknowledgment will oblige, yours respectfully, ****."—Nov. 27. £2. 15s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, As soon as the English took possession of Cyprus, I sent a man with all kinds of merchandise, and obtained a large store. I enclose 29s. 6d., being 6d. in the Pound of first money received from there; also 25s. 6d. instead of insuring a portion of the goods sent. The Tracts you kindly sent me, I have sent to Cyprus, and should be thankful if you would send me a few more. May the Lord of Love bless you in all your undertaking, is the prayer of one who loves those who love and serve the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. The first thing I ever sent you was a thimble. When first you commenced the Orphanage I was a little boy. Many hundred of times I have wished I could send you something, ****."

Dec. 2. From a widow in Aberdeenshire £1., with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, You have been a good deal on my mind for the past few weeks, and I have been asking my Heavenly Father to supply your need out of His fulness. I have not half an hour ago been paid my earnings, and how glad I am to be able to send you a mite for the Orphans. I am fearing you may have been feeling the sad result of this great commercial failure, the cause of so many more, I mean the Glasgow Bank. That you may be long spared to be His steward in this work of faith and labour of love, is the earnest prayer of my heart to Him who, I know, hears and answers prayer. I am, dear Mr. Muller, Yours sincerely, ****."—Had we no trust in God, such an event as the failure of the Bank referred to here, and that which was still nearer, the failure of the South Wales and West of England District Bank in Bristol itself, with its forty-two Branch Banks, would indeed have been calculated, naturally, to fill one’s heart with fear; but because we know God, and really trust in Him, and do not merely say so, therefore our heart was kept in peace, still trusting in Him, and looking to Him; and we have not been confounded.—Dec. 3. Received £5. with the following letter: "My Dear Sir, Once more I am spared to send you a contribution of £5., out of my storings for the Lord. Had I not adopted the principle of proportionate systematic giving, I feel sure I should not be able to do this; I should give much less and with more hesitancy. I rejoice that your great original works continue so well sustained. I was very fearful that, as somewhat similar Institutions were commenced, one after another in various parts, they would tend to detract from the flow of generous aid to yours. I rejoice that it is not so. Yours truly, ****."—From a poor man out of work 1s. 2d.—Dec. 7. Sent for the Orphans’ Christmas puddings, 16 half boxes of raisins, 1 barrel of currants and 8 barrels of flour.—Dec. 10. From Yorkshire £100. This kind donor has again and again sent us help, within the last four years, though not personally known to me.—From the neighbourhood of Birmingham £400.; this kind donor also has within the last few years sent to us considerable help, which again and again arrived, when greatly needed. She also is not known to me personally.—How precious it is, to have a Friend in Heaven to go to, in our need, and then to obtain help through His stewards, though we know them not personally.—From Scotland 4 cheeses.—Dec. 18. Received from London the first half of a £500. Bank of England Note, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I had intended leaving a sum of money for your Orphanages in my will; but as the funds of all Institutions are at present suffering from the commercial depression, I have thought it better to send the amount, £500., now, thus saving the legacy duty, and ministering to your present need; so please to enter it in your books as ‘Instead of a Legacy.’ When I see by advertisement in the ‘Daily Telegraph’ that you have received the first half of note enclosed, I will then post you the other. I trust that God will continue to guide and bless you in your work. Please to accept my kind regards and best wishes." This is another instance how God helps us, and how He has been pleased to supply us with means for the Institution during the past 45 years. We have not of course the least idea, who this kind anonymous donor is; but God knows him, and we pray that He will abundantly recompense him.—Dec. 21. For the Orphans 20 boxes of oranges.—Dee. 23. £16. 3s. 6d., with this letter: "A father, mother and three children, whose hands have during the year been engaged on behalf of the Orphans, with great pleasure send the result of their united labour as a Christmas gift."—From Clifton we received for the children a number of dolls, some fancy boxes, albums, games, balls, tops and a great variety of other play-things.—From Durdham Down, as Christmas presents for the Orphans, dressed dolls, boxes and packets of chocolate and sweets, some drums, tops, balls, marbles, whips and guns, boxes of toys, books, fancy cards, paint boxes, transparent slates, pocket-handkerchiefs, wool ties and ruffs, baskets and boxes, pencils, trumpets and other play-things.—Dec. 28. From J. J. 3s. as a quarterly contribution to the Orphanage, with the following written communication: "Since I commenced sending you from a very limited income the sum enclosed, quarterly, I must acknowledge that, through the mercy of God, it has trebled, and I am able to do good in other ways. I was very pleased to hear incidentally from the lips of a stranger to me a testimony to the value of your Orphanage and of the beneficial influence exercised on its inmates after leaving."—Dec. 31. Great and many and very varied had been the difficulties and necessities of the past year; but, by the help of God, all were now overcome, His help had been peculiarly manifested, in a variety of ways; and, as to the supply of means, though we had been most needy, particularly at one time of the past year; we were also helped so abundantly, when thus brought low, that at no period, since the Institution has been in existence, have we had so much come in, in such a short time, as was the case, immediately after our faith had been thus tried. The hand of God therefore was most manifestly stretched out on our behalf, and we entered, with confidence in Him, upon the new year, being fully assured that He would not forsake us, whatever difficulties, trials or necessities might yet await us.

January 1, 1879. Already on the first day of the year we obtained 83 donations for the Orphans, amounting altogether to £268. 10s. 0d. Of these donations I only mention £1. 8s. 2d., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I send you a Post Office Order for £1. 8s. 2d. for the Orphans. At the beginning of last year I promised the Lord, if he sent me 1,000 pairs of boots and shoes to mend, I would give one farthing per pair to the Orphanage. I have had 1351, therefore I present the above sum, with much pleasure. I am, dear Sir, yours in Christ, ****."—Jan. 3. From Leicestershire 13s. 10d., being "The first day’s takings in a shop in the New Year."—Jan. 4. From Manchester £16. 16s. 8d., "Being the excess beyond a certain amount which on a recent sale of property was devoted to the Orphans."—Jan. 14. Again £200. from the same kind donor in Yorkshire, who within the last four years has repeatedly sent to us similar donations.—Jan. 15. From believers at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £29. 2s. 6d.—From North Devon £1. 1s. as "A thank-offering for another merciful preservation in childbirth."—From Bideford £1. 9s. as "Weekly pence, collected round our table for the Orphans."—From Biarritz 115 Francs 90 centimes and 2 silver coins.—From Devonshire £68. 7s. 8d. from a donor who has kindly helped in the Orphan Work for more than thirty years, and who sends this sum now in consideration of the difficulties there may be on account of the failure of banks, etc.— £8. 8s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I am very glad to have the privilege of again sending my gross receipts for ‘The New Year’s day 1879.’ It was the best day of the week, and I only wish it were more. These are difficult times; but there is an over-ruling Providence, which will cause even this to work for good to those who love Him. May He still uphold your hands. You have my prayers and good wishes. Always yours, ****."—Jan. 27. £5. as "A thank-offering for God’s mercy that a dear child escaped a violent death."— £10. as "Part of a tenth, from the country."—Jan. 28. Christian friends, from Zurich, £7. 15s.—Jan. 29. From the neighbourhood of Dorchester £5., "Instead of insuring my stock-in-trade."

Feb. 10. £50. as "A thank-offering from Cork."—Through W. H. A., Esq., £63.—Feb. 11. From a solicitor £4. 18s. "for affidavits taken as commissioner in the months of November and December, 1878, and January, 1879."—Feb. 13. Legacy of the late Mr. T. C., £100., less duty.—From A. Y. Z., £52. 10s.— £2. as "A fee received on the Lord’s Day by an Irish country physician."—Feb. 14. £5. from the principal of a house of business, to whom three of our Orphan boys are apprenticed, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I am once more, through the blessing of God, able to send you, as His steward, a small donation of £5. Although times are very bad, I find no difficulty as yet; but quite the contrary, plenty of everything, and a little to spare. With kind love to all, I remain yours truly, ****." P.S. The three boys are doing well. B., the eldest, will be out of his time in April, and I am thankful to say, that during the whole of the five years he has not had a day’s illness. I am glad to say that he is a good tradesman by this time. He has had the sole management of, a Branch Establishment of ours during the last five months."—Feb. 15. Received £3. 19s. 11d. with the following letter: "Sir, I have much pleasure in sending you Post Office Order for £3. 19s. 11d., being the result of putting by, according as the Lord has prospered me. I have done this for nearly ten years, and certainly am not the poorer for it; far otherwise. You will please put it to the Orphanage account, and send receipt to me, ****."—Feb. 17. £10. 10s. "Being half the amount of prizes the donor has won with his sheep during the past year."—Feb. 18. From Taranaki, New Zealand, in ten different donations, £8. 19s.

March 3. £15. 6s. 2d. from "Amor Dei ducat."— Received £8. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed is a Post Office Order for £8., which we send to you to be used for the benefit of the Orphans. We send this as a thank-offering to God for blessing and prospering us since commencing business. As ours is principally a rearing farm, we promised to give to the Orphans 3d. for each lamb, 6d. each pig, 1s. each calf, and 2s. 6d. each foal. Our prayer is, that God will spare you yet many more years, to carry on this great and glorious work. Remaining yours affectionately, ****."—March 4. £200. as a third instalment of legacy of the late G. W., Esq.—From a donor in Devonshire £90. 10s.—March 7. From London £1. 10s. as "The Sunday dinner table collection of our children and selves."—From Barnstaple, 96 yards of Welsh flannel, 48 yards of ditto, 30 yards of Scotch gingham, 40 yards of Croydon calico, 80 yards of soft medium ditto, and 18 yards of boot elastic.—March 10. From a Bristol donor 54 rabbits and 13½ lbs. of butter.—March 29. £2. 2s. 6d. was received with the following letter: "Beloved servant of Christ, the enclosed £2. for Orphans and 2s. 6d. for four of this year’s Reports. My dear sister and myself remember you and your work twice every day, before our Heavenly Father, for your increase of faith and supply of your great need. Yours in our risen Lord, ****." I feel grateful for these prayers, and would earnestly entreat other Christians, kindly to help me by their prayers.

April 7. £100. as the legacy of the late Mrs. A. B.—April 10. From one of the Midland counties £70.—April 14. From Barbadoes £2., £1., £1.

May 3. From New Zealand £20.—May 5. Eighty new suits of boys’ clothes, value £66.—May 8. From Yorkshire £200.—May 9. £93. 16s. for the support of seven Orphans for one year.—From Notting Hill 7 pocket handkerchief pieces, 14 white skirts, 6 coloured ditto, 19 pairs of gloves, 64 neckties, 15 belts, 2 dozen shirt-fronts, 42 boxes of collars, a packet of cuffs, 2 pairs of braces, and 94 pairs of stockings.—May 10. £451. 10s. as the legacy of the late Miss M. A. P.—May 26. On this last day of the year of the Institution, we received, besides a number of other donations, £161. 3s. 3d. and a large quantity of silver articles, as the legacy of the late Mrs. G.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Forty-five Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1879, to May 26, 1880, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, practical remarks, etc.

26, 1879, to May 26, 1880, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, practical remarks, etc.

In the following pages I will now give some specimens of the way in which God was pleased, in answer to prayer, to supply us, during another year, with means for the Orphan work.

May 30, 1879. Legacy of the late Mr. M. £103. 7s. 10d.—A gold watch, a shawl, and a silk cloak lined with fur, from the Isle of Wight, to be sold for the benefit of the Orphans.

June 24. Five sacks of oatmeal. The same donor has sent fifteen times 5 sacks, three times 10 sacks, and once 16 sacks, 121 sacks in all, in the course of the year. A very valuable donation to us, as we consume about 7000 stones of oatmeal per year.—June 27. £1. as "The first fruits of a vinery."

July 14. Twenty half boxes of soap.—July 15. £10. 10s. from one of the former pupils of the first Boys’ School of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, who, year after year, has sent a similar sum.—July 24. From the Governors of the London Assurance Corporation £50.—July 29. From Birmingham £100.—July 30. From Sussex £129. 6s. 5d.

Aug. 8. From Leicester £100.—Aug. 12. From Yorkshire £200.—Aug. 22. A general’s full-dress tunic, undress surtout, trowsers, with gold lace, pair of boots, 3 pairs of spurs, gold lace sash, belt, Russia leather belt, cocked hat and feather, and forage cap.—Aug. 25. By sale of silver articles £52. 9s.—Aug. 26. Legacy of the late Miss S. M., 12 gold brooches, 6 silver ditto, 2 coral ditto, 2 gold watch seals, 8 gold rings, silver vinaigrette, 2 gold watches, 3 silver ditto, 15 shoe buckles, 1 tea pot, 1 coffee pot, 2 plain candlesticks, 4 embossed ditto, 1 cruet stand, 1 sugar basin, 2 cream jugs, 2 waiters, 1 silver taper stand, 1 toast rack, 1 cheese scoop, 1 skewer, 1 fish slice, 1 soup ladle, 2 gravy spoons, 3 sugar tongs, 18 dessert spoons, 20 large forks, 20 small ditto, 6 table spoons, 4 table spoons, 4 sauce ladles, 6 egg spoons, 18 tea ditto, 1 tea spoon, 1 caddy ditto, 1 cork top, 8 salt spoons, 1 knife and fork, 2 caddy spoons, and 1 wine strainer.

Sept. 3. A case containing a gold pendant, set with an emerald, pearls and diamonds, and a pair of earrings, set with diamonds, half for Missions, and half for the Orphans.—Sept. 8. £45. as the legacy of the late Mrs. B.—Legacy of the late A. B., Esq., with dividends thereon and less legacy duty, £9277. 7s. 3d. three per cent. consols at 98 = £9091. 14s. 6d. This legacy was a considerable time in Chancery; but, as I have often found, by prayer it was at last brought out of the Court. This is the largest donation we have received at one time; but, as I stated, when receiving £8100. at one time, that I expected yet greater donations, so I now say again, that it maybe yet further seen, how much even now can be accomplished by prayer and faith.—Sept. 9. Received from Ireland £1., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, It is most gratifying to find that your funds keep up in these times of depression in agriculture and commerce. It would seem as if your Orphan homes were hidden under the shadow of the Almighty from the storms of the age. I have pleasure in sending you a cheque for £1. towards the support of your Orphans. May you be long spared as the earthly father of so many fatherless children. Sincerely yours, ****." True faith prevents our being discouraged by the difficulties of this world, but leads us, by real trust in God, to be above war, famine, mercantile depressions, etc.: because faith lays hold on God Himself and can obtain from Him everything that is for His glory and our good. Thus, at the time of the Irish famine from 1846 to 1847, during the Crimean War (1854), and the distress in Lancashire among the weavers for want of cotton; also during the war between France and Germany in 1870 and 1871, when the streams of benevolence generally seemed expended on the necessities arising out of these calamities, our Heavenly Father helped us also; because we really trusted in Him, and sent pecuniary supplies to us also though such vast sums were sent out of the country through the calamities referred to. We told Him in child-like simplicity, that immense sums were expended on these objects (of which we were glad), but asked Him to send help to us also; and this He did so abundantly, that at those times we abounded more than was usually the case.—Sept. 11. Received 1s. 10d. with the following letter: "Please accept these few stamps (1s. 10d.) as a thank-offering for mercies in having employment, when many have none. From a poor widow and her family, for the Orphans."—Sept. 12. From the Mauritius £5.—Received £1. 12s. 6d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in sending you the enclosed Post Office Order for £1. 12s. 6d., being 7½d. per week for 52 weeks, formerly spent on tobacco. I tried all human effort to give it up; but all was a failure, till I was led to ask the Lord for help, and promised to send what it cost for the Orphans at Bristol. I thank God He has kept me through the past year without any desire for it. I remain, yours truly in the Lord Jesus, ****."—Sept. 15. "A thank-offering for the safe deliverance of my son from an accident, which might have proved fatal," 10s.—Sept. 16. From Portsmouth £1. 10s. 6d., being one penny a day for a year, for the Orphans.—Sept. 20. Received £1. 5s. 10d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have now been in business for myself as House Agent for 17 months. Previous to this I had much to discourage me. Herewith you have Post Office Order for 25s. 10d., which includes 7d. for one copy of your last Report, ending May, 1879, which perhaps you will kindly send to me. Four shillings and twopence of the above is the first-fruits of some new business, the remainder a tenth of an extra payment for work done to the satisfaction of the gentleman who employed me, which is for the Orphans. This is the fruit of reading your 36th Report, given to me by a friend the following February; but I could not see my way clear until reading the Narrative of your own life, given to me by the same friend, since my commencing business, which, by God’s blessing, has totally changed my inner life to one of perfect trust and confidence in Him. It has pleased God to give me the grace to devote to Him a tenth of my earnings, which I divide amongst sundry objects. I do indeed realize the fact, that it is more blessed to give than to receive. I have taken care to place a copy of the Narrative of your life on the shelves of the library of the young peoples’ Institute in this Town, which has 3000 members and subscribers, seeking God’s blessing on the same. Hoping that in the future the Lord will enable me to send you a little more money, I am yours truly, ****."—Sept. 10. From one of the former Orphans, now filling a very honourable and useful position, £10., with the following letter: "Beloved Mr. Muller and Mr. Wright, The kindness I have experienced at your hands, I can never fully repay, but whilst able, may I prove my willingness to show practically my sincere appreciation of the same. I beg you, therefore, to accept the enclosed donation of £10. towards the Orphan Fund, from which fund, through the goodness of the Lord, and the bounteous liberality of His people, I have myself benefited so largely. Truly the hand of the Lord has led me, and His blessing has been my portion. May my heart continually well up with gratitude to Him and to you; and with the voices of His people may mine unite in singing praise to the Lord! My earnest and constant prayer is, that the Lord will continue to uphold the work, of which you are the honoured directors, that it may stand for ages to come as a monument to faith, which infidelity could not destroy; a challenge thrown down by the former, which the latter durst not accept, for fear of certain and utter defeat; also, that many an Orphan, similarly circumstanced as I was, may partake of that goodness of which, in a very large degree, I have been the happy recipient. With sincere love and respect to you, my esteemed benefactors, I am, of your large family, a truly grateful member, ****."—From Hull £10., as "A thank-offering to the Lord for His deliverance from severe trouble."—Sept. 25. £1. as "A thank-offering for the recovery of a valuable horse, which was given up for lost."—Sept. 27. Received the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, this is my birthday, and this day last year I sent £4. 8s., being 1s. per year for 87 years’ pilgrimage and 1s. for your Narrative. I also send £4. 7s. to seven other Institutions, metropolitan and local, as a thank-offering to my Heavenly Father, for His loving, tender care over me so many years, promising in my mind, to do the same on this day, each year, God helping me, as long as I lived; but almost immediately after, the W. E. Bank failure occurred, and I cannot carry out my intention; but here I am in my bedroom, submitting cheerfully to the will of Him who knows what is best for me, and here I promise, by the same divine help, to devote the 26th of each month (as long as it shall please the Lord to keep me here) to entreat His blessing on the eight Institutions, which I promised to help; and I trust my poor prayers may be heard and abundantly answered. I remain, dear Sir, yours in Christian love and sympathy, ****."

Oct. 7. Legacy of the late E. B., Esq., £450. less legacy duty.—Oct. 8. A gold watch, a ring with key, 2 seals and a heart.—Oct. 9. From Herefordshire, £5. as a harvest thank-offering, "having been enabled to gather four-fifths of our wheat in fair condition."—From three Orphan sisters, formerly under our care, £3., with a grateful letter.—Oct. 10. 13 thousand needles and 2 gross of knitting needles.—Oct. 14. From one of the Midland Counties £70.— £14. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have lost a dear uncle lately, who has unexpectedly left me a very comfortable income. I therefore enclose you a cheque for £14. With kind regards, yours sincerely, ****."—Oct. 22. From one of the former Orphans, a printer, £3. 10s., with the following letter: "Dear and Honoured Sir, It is now more than nine years, since I left the Orphan Houses to learn a trade, which, I am thankful to say, now enables me to live comfortably and respectably. Ever since I left school, I have had great cause to thank God, that I was placed under your kind and parental care; and a recent visit to the Orphan Houses so deepened my sense of gratitude, that I determined I would henceforward help in some way, however feebly, such a good cause. As a beginning then, may I ask you to accept the enclosed amount, £3. 10s., £3. 5s. of which I wish to go towards the support of the Orphans, and the remainder is for a few copies of portions of Scripture, which I desire for distribution, if you will be good enough to forward them at your convenience. I have pleasure in saying, that the above sum is the bonus, at the rate of 3 per cent. declared on my year’s salary, by the firm in whose employ I have now been for four years.—I have ever had cause to be thankful, that my steps were directed to Ashley Down, and this for more reasons than one. It was there that I received an education, under the tuition of kind and able teachers, which now enables me to earn my livelihood; but better far than all this, it was there that I first realized Christ Jesus as my personal Saviour, who has been my guide until now, and through whose help I have been kept from falling into the many sins and temptations peculiar to youth, and especially to those engaged in our calling. My dear sister Ellen, who also was under your care about the same time that I myself was, joins me in thanking you and the dear teachers and assistants through you, for all the spiritual and temporal blessings, which, by God’s help, were bestowed upon us, whilst under your care. We pray that you may yet be spared for many years, to be the Orphans’ friend. We also pray, that a rich blessing may attend the preaching of the Gospel, in which you are at present so earnestly engaged. With a desire to be very gratefully remembered to all the dear teachers, and those who are engaged in the great and good work, may we remain, Dear and Honoured Sir, your ever grateful Orphans, **** and ****."—Received 4s. and some woollen articles, with this letter from one of the former Orphans, who has been 8 years in her first situation: "Dear and Respected Sir, I esteem it a great privilege to be enabled to address a few lines to you. I thank you for the yearly Report, you so kindly sent me. Will you kindly accept of this small trifle and also these woollen articles, which I am sending by this day’s rail, that my sister and myself have made by hand, to be sold for the benefit of the Orphans. It will be eight years next January, since I left your Orphanage. It was there I learnt to know my Saviour. I am still resting on Him, and hope, by the grace of God, I shall not let Him go. It was in the dear Orphan House I spent most of my happy days. I am sure I cannot thank you enough for all the kindness you have shown to me. If it please God, I hope year by year to send you a small trifle, for your kind and fatherly love to me, while under your care. I am happy to say, I am still in the same situation, that you provided for me, and have a very kind and Christian mistress. Please remember me kindly to Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright, Mr. French, and all the dear teachers and matrons of No. 2. I remain your grateful Orphan, ****."—Left anonymously, by a gentleman, at the New Orphan House, No. 3, 10 silver table spoons, 5 silver tea spoons, a silver cream jug, a pair of silver mounted spectacles, and £1.—Oct. 29. From Portobello £100.—Oct. 30. From a Moravian Missionary at Surinam, 20 gulden.

Nov. 5. Received the following letter with £180.: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in sending you a draft for £180. towards your good work. It has been given to me by a patient of mine to forward to you anonymously. You may enter it in the Report under the initials A. B. Yours very faithfully, ****." In this instance the reader has one of the numberless ways in which the Lord is pleased to supply us with means, in answer to our prayers.—Nov. 6. Legacy of the late W. D. Esq. £52. 11s. 10d.—Nov. 7. Three pieces of dress material.—Nov. 12. Legacy of the late Mrs. C. £45.—Legacy of a lady in Switzerland, 3000 francs, paid in two instalments.—From Sussex 2 sets and 3 pieces of artificial teeth, set in gold. During the past year again a considerable quantity of artificial teeth, set in gold, has been sent, whereby again a considerable sum of money has been obtained.—Nov. 13. 3249 apples.—Nov. 18. Received £158. 9s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, The time of year has again come round, when I have usually made my remittance for the benefit of your Orphan Houses, and, through the gracious mercy of our God and Saviour, I am now enabled to send it, and, as you will see, also, permitted to add to it; for it has pleased the Lord to commit to our care and into our charge another child (we humbly believe) to train up for Himself. We earnestly pray and believe, that, with the charge, He will supply all our need, to enable us to fulfil it, patiently, diligently and faithfully. Remember us in your prayers, and add your thanksgiving to our own. The cheque I enclose is for 1879, for 11 children at £13. 9s. = £147. 19s. and for your own personal use, which we present with our Christian good wishes, £10. 10s. With our kind regards and best wishes, from your sincere friend, ****." About 12 years ago the Christian gentleman, who is the writer of this letter, sent me the average expenses for three Orphans, per year, considering, that, as he had 3 children of his own, for whom he was able comfortably to provide according to their position in life, it would be well pleasing to God to give, as a thank-offering for this mercy, the means for 3 poor Orphans, deprived of their earthly parents. The next year he sent me the average expenses for 4 Orphans, the Lord having given to him another child; and thus, as the number of his children increased, he sent year after year the cost of as many Orphans as he had children of his own; and as he has now eleven children, he sends the average expenses for eleven Orphans, acting thus on the very opposite principles of men of the world, who would say, that, because their families increase, therefore they can afford less and less, instead of more and more for the Lord’s work.—Nov. 19. Received 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please to accept of this trifle, as a thank-offering to the Lord, for His blessings, both temporally and spiritually. Through reading your Reports I have been greatly blessed. When I was converted, I was very poor; for sometimes I did not seem to have a penny to spare for the Lord’s work. About ten years ago I met with Mr. P. He, knowing my case, gave me one of your Reports. I cannot express the joy I had, whilst reading it; aand ever since I have longed for the time for them to come out. My desire is, that Christians would read them more, and follow the example, that is set before us in them. At that time I was a smoker of tobacco. I then took up that passage of Scripture in Matthew xvi. 24. Also I Cor. xvi. 2, and devoted a part of my money regularly to the Lord’s cause. I was soon enabled to increase it, and now, although only a farmer’s man, it seems a wonder to myself at times, that I am able to do as I do. Although this past summer has been a trying one with hundreds, God has prospered me, and I am enabled to do more this year than ever, since I started in my Heavenly Father’s way. The desire of my heart and prayer is, that God may abundantly bless your testimony, both to the Church and world. Yours affectionately in the Lord Jesus, ****." Here is a Christian farm labourer from whom one or the other of my readers may learn a profitable lesson. He gives up the use of tobacco. Have those of my readers, who have been in the habit of smoking, laid aside the pipe and cigars entirely? This habit, an evil habit, is very injurious to health, as all disinterested physicians, who do not themselves indulge in it, will fully allow. A robust constitution may a good while resist its pernicious effects; but, sooner or later, these effects will be manifested. I beseech the Christian reader, prayerfully to consider this, in order that he may no longer indulge in that which is most injurious to the body, besides being a means of wasting his money also. From the moment I was converted, the beginning of November, 1825, I have never touched a pipe or a cigar. Notice also the second point to which he refers. He began to act according to I Cor. xvi. 2, viz. he put aside every Lord’s day, as the Lord had been prospering him. And what has been the result of this? This poor farm labourer is honoured by the Lord in being made a steward over more. So that, whilst, when first converted, he was so poor that with great difficulty he could afford to give a single penny, now he has the means of sending ten shillings at a time. As assuredly as any one is acting according to the counsel given in I Cor. xvi. 2, being constrained by the love of Christ, so assuredly will such a one be blessed abundantly in his soul, and the Lord will also increase his stewardship more and more. A great number of Christians I know personally, who act thus, and I have seen it in their case; a still greater number have given their testimony to me in writing to that effect. Are you, Christian reader, acting thus? If not, why not? Make a trial, and you will find out, from happy experience, the blessedness of that way. Systematic giving, giving on principle habitually, as constrained by the love of Christ, will bring, in every way, most abundant blessing. I have known myself, from happy experience, the blessedness of this way for more than fifty years.—Whilst there was such distress among the farmers during the past summer (1879), this farm labourer was able to do more for the Lord than ever. This is just what you would expect.

Dec. 1. From one of the former Orphans £2. as "A thank-offering from a little money, left her by an aunt."—Dec. 2. £5. as "A thank-offering for the conversion of two of the donor’s children."—From D——£65. 15s. 2d., the profit made on one purchase.—Dec. 4. For the Orphans’ Christmas puddings were sent, 16 half boxes of Valencia raisins, 1 barrel of currants, and 8 barrels of flour.—Dec. 15. From two ladies at Windsor Castle £5. 12s.—Dec. 19. "From an old sailor, as a thank-offering for preservation from the late gales," £5.—Dec. 22. From near London £290., with £10. for myself.—Dec. 23. Anonymously from W. S. S. £10., with the following letter: "Dear Brother in the Lord, I have been much exercised in my mind respecting two old debts. I have endeavoured, without success, to find out the addresses of the parties, and now in faith I would leave it in the Lord’s hands, to make it up to them or their families, if in the body. One to a tailor about £5.; one to a boot maker, about £5. I therefore send £10. to you for the Orphans, and trust God’s blessing may rest upon this act. I remain yours faithfully, W. S. S."—Dec. 24. 20 boxes of oranges, 25 boxes of fruit, and 25 boxes of sultanas.—20 boxes of oranges.

January 1, 1880. The old year closed with many blessings and mercies enjoyed by us, in connection with the Orphan work, as well as the other Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad; and, as the old year ended, so the new year began again with blessings. Of the means, received on the first day of the year, I will only refer to the following donations. From Maidstone £77. 2s. 3d.—From the Isle of Wight £50.—From Derbyshire £3. 9s. 4d. as "A penny for every day in the year, and a tenth of money gifts."—From Penarth £30.—Jan. 2. From Torquay £10. as "The first fruits of an unexpected legacy."—From Malta 43 Coupons at £3. each, less Income tax, £126. 6s. 3d.—Jan. 14. From Yorkshire £200.—Legacy of the late Mr. J. T. E. £100.—"The produce of two apricot trees" 10s.—Jan. 15. £30.11s. 9d. from "Believers meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal."—Jan. 26. Legacy of the late Mrs. K. £200.—Jan. 30. From Secunderabad, India, £21. 1s. 10d.—From Coonoor, India, £6.

Feb. 3. Received £13. 5s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I have very great pleasure in sending you Post Office Order for £13. 5s. for your Orphans. It is the half of the amount I have won with my sheep at different shows, during the year 1879. I trust the work in your hands still prospers, and that your valuable life may long be spared to carry on the Lord’s work. I remain yours sincerely, ****."—Feb. 4. From the neighbourhood of Wolverhampton £100.—From London £10. 13s. 5d. "for affidavits taken by a solicitor in the months of August, September, October, November and December, 1879, and January, 1880."—Feb. 5. A diamond ring.—Feb. 6. Legacy of the late Miss F. S. P. £50.—From Kent £80. 14s. for the support of six Orphans for one year.—Feb. 11. From Portobello £50.—Feb. 16. £10. as "A thank-offering for the gift of another child."—£90. as the legacy of the late Mrs. R.—From Staffordshire £4., with £1. for myself. The donor writes: "This last year, although so disastrous to most traders, has been the best I have ever had; and under God’s providence I have to thank you, for teaching me how to give."—Feb. 17. From Taranaki, New Zealand, £8. 5s. 6d.—From Wales £1. and a gold watch, as "A thank-offering to the Lord for being raised up from a serious illness."—Feb. 26. From Scotland £4. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in transmitting £4. from Mr. B. for the Orphans. I may mention how I have become the channel for this. I happened to give his late wife a Report. It interested Mr. B., and since he has laid aside a penny on every sheep and head of cattle be sells, being a cattle dealer, as well as £1. 15s. annually, which would be the cost of an insurance ticket for travelling. He sends this sum to you instead. With very warm desire for God’s continued blessing to you and your work and workers, I am yours truly, ****." This, and many other similar letters of donors, I have given, in order that the reader may see the great variety of ways, in which God is pleased to supply us with means. All comes from Him, to whom day by day we go for help in our need, regarding everything, and who, in answer to our prayers, helps us, and is now doing this in the forty-seventh year, and who, we firmly believe, will yet further help us.

March 2. £200. as the fourth instalment of a legacy of the late G. W., Esq.—March 3. A former Orphan sent £1. on the occasion of her marriage.—From Bath a gold ring set with topaz and brilliants, a gold brooch set with diamonds, and 10s.—March 18. From a Bristol firm the valuable donation of 20 cwt. 0 qrs. 19 lbs. white lead, 5 cwt. 0 qrs. 9 lbs. driers, 3 cwt. ochre, 2 qrs. umber, 1 qr. black paint, 1 cwt. putty, and 14 lbs. of Venetian red.—March 24. £100. as the legacy of the late Miss M. P.—March 25. From Edinburgh £50.—March 31. From a labourer in Queensland £6.

April 6. £1. 10s. 4d. from Barnstaple, as one penny per day, for the use of the Orphans.—From a little boy 10s. 7d., who, at his death, expressed a wish for his money to be given to the Orphans.—April 8. The total income of today, for all the five Objects of the Institution, was £6. 13s. 5d. instead of £124., our daily average expenses. Similar days we have again and again, and therefore need to look to the Lord with unwavering confidence.—April 9. £50. as the legacy of the late Mrs. A. D.—April 10. "Part of thank-offering from a poor servant of the Lord, for the recovery of a child," 5s.—April 12. From one of the Midland counties £70.—April 13. £50. as the legacy of the late Mr. J. H.—April 19. From Java 100 florins.—April 22. From Beverley £2. 10s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, In a time of deep anxiety I prayed for relief and help. I have reason to believe my prayers were heard and answered, in a very marked degree. I send you the enclosed to be used in supporting the Orphans under your care. It is an expression of gratitude. I hope to repeat it. Yours very faithfully, ****."—April 23. From Weston-super-mare £60.—From Herefordshire £4. 8s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a Post Office Order for £4. 8s., £3. 10s. fire insurance, that is £1. extra this year, because my corn had a most providential escape from a fire. Some boys, coming from school, had some matches, and were at play and said, ‘we will have a bonfire.’ They had some straw burning up the side of the ricks; but it pleased our Heavenly Father that the ricks should not be burned. He sent a gentleman that way, and stopped it. It was quite a miracle. One shilling each for every calf born alive. Yours truly, ****."—April 24. From Barbadoes £2., £1., £1., £1.—Legacy of the late Mr. W. A. £56. 18s. 7d.

May 8. Legacy of the late Mr. K. £90.—May 11. Legacy of the late Mrs. W. £200.—May 15. Legacy of the late Mrs. P. £36.—May 21. Legacy of the late Rev. A. P. £135.—May 24. From Malta £100.—May 25. "Thank-offering for receiving tidings of relatives, in answer to prayer, of whom the donor had not heard for many years," 10s.

Means for the support of Two Thousand Two Hundred and Fifty-two Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, sent in answer to prayer. Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

June 2. 1880. From the neighbourhood of Plympton £1., "saved through giving up smoking."—Received 12s. 6d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have been labouring in prayer for 4 years and 204 days, that a firm in a foreign country would pay me my just debt, and told the Lord, at the beginning, that I would give your Orphans ten per cent. of it. Having now received the money, I enclose you a Post Office Order for 12s. 6d., being ten per cent. on the full amount of the debt. I am, yours truly, ****."—June 3. From London £2. 2s. 6d. as "A thank-offering for the partial recovery of a beloved mother."—From Yorkshire £200. with these words: "Desiring to be a faithful steward of the bounties the Lord has conferred upon one who is unworthy of the many blessings He has bestowed, I send the enclosed cheque for £200. for the use of the Orphans at Ashley Down." For the sake of benefiting the reader spiritually, I make the following remarks in connection with the above statement:—1. Do you consider yourself a steward of the means you possess, or that you are the owner thereof? The right and scriptural way is, to look upon ourselves as stewards and not as owners of our property; for the time is approaching when stewardship will come to an end, and we shall enter upon the possession of our inheritance. 2. The steward has to give an account of his stewardship. It is indeed by grace alone that we are saved, through faith, and not by works; but this very fact should lead us the more earnestly to show our gratitude for the grace bestowed upon us, by walking consistently. 3. It becomes us to be faithful stewards. To the faithful steward the recompense is given even now in some measure while he is yet in the body; but in the world to come the reward of grace will be rendered according to the degree of faithfulness manifested by the steward.—June 12. From Wolverhampton 10 sacks of oatmeal.—June 14. From the neighbourhood of Auchterarder £20. 0s. 6d.—June 17. From Cornwall £11. with this statement: "£10. profits on a small stone quarry, and £1., contents of box on the chimney-piece."— £1000. as a legacy from the late Miss. J. S. The lady who kindly left us this amount was an entire stranger to me. I did not even know her by name; but our Heavenly Father, who is acquainted with the greatness of our expenses, to whom we betake ourselves day by day in prayer, spoke to her heart, and led her to leave this amount for the Orphans.—June 18. From Plymouth a gold watch.—June 26. From London 3 cases of stationery and fancy articles.

July 2. £500. as the legacy of the late Mr. R. B.—£100. as the legacy of the late Mrs. E. W.—In the South of Devon a musical entertainment was held for the benefit of the Orphans, but when the proceeds of it, amounting to £4. 5s., were sent to me on July 7, I returned them, not wishing to use money for the work of God obtained in this manner; for it is not money only which I desire, but money provided in God’s way. The kind intention, however, of those who set this entertainment on foot to help the Orphans, I do not question for a moment.—July 14. From Islington £13. 9s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, God, in His infinite mercy, having blessed me with a living son, I enclose cheque for £13. 9s. as a thank-offering, this being the cost of providing for one Orphan for one year. Yours truly, ****."—July 17. By sale of dentist gold, plate, etc., £90.—July 19. Twenty boxes of soap.—July 22. From the neighbourhood of Lisbon, Portugal, £5.—July 28. From an aged servant of the Lord Jesus, who labours in dependence upon Him for his temporal supplies, £7. 5s. This servant of Christ has sent me for a number of years, for the benefit of the Orphans, the fifth part of what the Lord has been pleased to give him.

Aug 7. From a former pupil in the First Boys’ School of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, £10. 10s.—Today, £264. 11s. 10d. was received as the legacy of J. B., a common labourer, who left his all to the Orphans. Notice this remarkable gift, and see how God cares for them.—Aug. 13. From a farmer in Hampshire £2., as "A thank-offering for a good breed of lambs."—From Wolverhampton 17 sacks of flour.—Aug. 16. Today, the expenses connected with the support of the Orphans were £1035. 11s 10d. The income for them amounted only to £24. 3s. When in the foregoing pages the income has been referred to (though specimens only of donations have been quoted) one side alone is seen. The greatness of our expenditure can only be learned from looking at the balance-sheet, which will be found at the end of the Reports; but the expenses do not decrease, but increase slightly, though but very slightly, year by year, as provisions, clothing, and everything connected with house-keeping becomes more and more expensive everywhere.

Sept. 1. £1600. as "Part of the legacy of the late T. H. Esquire." This legacy has been long in Chancery, but now at last, in answer to many prayers, we have received a portion of it.—Sept. 2. Received £300. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, At the request of Mr. ——, I forward you cheque for £300., which he intended to leave as a legacy to your Institution; but, inasmuch as his property consists principally of real estate, he could not legally make such a bequest. He has thought it best, therefore, to make the gift in his lifetime. Please acknowledge receipt to him personally. Yours truly, ****." This kind donor I have never seen, yet God leads him thus to help us. I take this opportunity of mentioning, that real estate has repeatedly been left for the benefit of the Orphans, and has, therefore, been lost to us, as no real estate can be left to a charitable institution by will. Having again and again been asked to give a legal form, for leaving a legacy to the Institution, I may mention that one will be found on the last page of the Reports, drawn up by an experienced legal practitioner.—Sept. 3. Received £2. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, As Mr. D.’s young man had an accident with his horse, about five weeks ago, which was almost rendered unfit for work, be was reading how the Lord had blessed Mr. Muller in his work; and he resolved to give £5. if the horse was restored, as a token of his gratitude to God, for answering prayer for the speedy recovery of the horse, in order to show all the believing family of God that there is no matter too small to take to Him, especially if done in faith. We have a female orphanage here, so my husband has divided the sum. I enclose a cheque for £2. 10s. to you, and have sent the same amount to the Orphanage here. We were at Bristol about five weeks ago, when we went over your Orphanage, which gave us great pleasure. Hoping the work of the Lord will still prosper in your hands, and that He will bless you for time and eternity, I am, yours in the Lord, ****."—Sept. 15. Received from London £3. 2s. 6d. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Nine months ago, in consequence of the great blessing I received from reading your Reports, I made the following note in our Bad Debt book: ‘I resolve to send one-half of any monies received from this book, after this date, to Mr. Muller’s Orphanage at Bristol.’ One account of £6. 5s. (owing since 1872) has just been paid, and I have very much pleasure in remitting you cheque for £3. 2s. 6d. I remain, yours very faithfully, ****."—Sept. 16. From Bohemia 13 Florins.—From Dudley £1. with the following letter: "Sir, At Christmas last we wrote off as hopelessly bad a debt, which has been due since 1878. Since then we have had some faint hopes of getting the money, and said, if ever we do get it we will send £1. for the Orphanage. A few days ago we received a cheque for the amount, and now enclose Post Office Order for £1. With best wishes for the prosperity of your Institution, we are, Sir, yours faithfu1ly, ****."—Sept. 21. £46. 2s. 11d. as "A thank-offering from South Devon."—Sept. 24. "From the sale of the produce of a greengage-tree," 10.—Sept. 27. Received from the Orphan Boys at New Orphan House No. 4 the following letter, written for my birthday. I received sixteen letters, one from each department; but can give only this one, as a specimen of the love of these dear children: "Dear and honoured Sir, We shall not forget the evening when you and dear Mrs. Muller returned from America. We remember what joy we felt, as we saw your carriage come up the hill. Our spirits had been depressed by the falling rain, and we thought at one time we should not have the pleasure of welcoming you home; but when the rain subsided, the sun shone out, and the cry arose, ‘They come!’ our hearts were filled with joy at beholding your kind face, radiant with fatherly love to us. We thank you for the kind messages you sent to the Orphans, and for the expressions of love contained in your letters to us from time to time; and we also thank dear Mrs. Muller for the beautiful little hymns she so kindly sent from America, especially ‘Passing Away,’ which reminds us, that time is flying and has brought us very near to your birthday. Our prayer is, that God may bless you richly, and permit you to see many more. Although you will have left England, and perhaps be on the waters of the mighty deep by the 27th instant, still we are sure you will allow us the privilege of wishing you many happy returns of the day. Will you kindly permit us to express our thanks to you for your kindness in associating your birthday with our pleasure by giving us an additional week’s holiday? We must not forget to thank you also for coming to see us and for bringing Mrs. Muller, too, to hear us sing. And now, dear Sir, for all your consideration for us and love bestowed upon us in so many ways, that we cannot mention them all, please to receive our sincere thanks; and as you and dear Mrs. Muller are about to leave us, we will pray for you, that your health may be spared, that your work for Jesus may be blessed, and that in God’s own time you may be brought back safely to us. May we ask your acceptance of the small amount of 13s. as a trifling token of our gratitude and high appreciation of your love to us; and ever praying that God’s choicest blessing may rest upon you and dear Mrs. Muller, we remain, your ever grateful Orphans, The Boys of No. 4." This sum was sent to me by these dear children, for myself as a birthday present. I also received similar affectionate gifts from each of the other departments. Such little love tokens from the Orphans I accept with pleasure, not for the value of the money, but to encourage feelings of gratitude in them.—Sept. 28. £1. as "A thank-offering for a quick delivery from rheumatic fever."—Sept. 29. £50. together with £30., received on 27th, as a legacy from Miss J.—From the neighbourhood of Greenock £40.

Oct. 4. Received from one of the Orphans formerly under our care £5. with the following letter; "Dear and honoured Sir, about twelve months ago it was my privilege to send you £3. for the benefit of the Orphans; the amount being a bonus on my twelve months’ salary. You will be pleased to know that I am this year enabled to send you another bonus (£4), together with £1., which a dear friend wishes me to forward. This is another instance of how true it is that God helps us in giving, if we only make an effort. When last year’s bonus was declared, it was thought that the continued depression in trade would preclude any possibility of another bonus this year. But, whereas, then 3 per cent. interest was the amount of dividend, this year it is 4 per cent. I have more than ordinary pleasure in thus contributing towards so deserving a cause, seeing that during several weeks I have been absent from business through sickness; but God has been pleased to restore me to health, and He enables me to testify in this way to His goodness. I take this opportunity of again thanking you and all those who so lovingly labour with you, for the kindness manifested towards me, whilst I was under your care; and desire ever to remain your grateful Orphan, ****."—Oct. 12. From the neighbourhood of Hull a diamond ring.—From a widow in Devonshire £10. with the following letter: "Respected Sir, enclosed is £10. for the use of your large family of Orphans, in which I feel a great interest. I was left an Orphan very young, but I have never found my Heavenly Father’s promise fail, that He would be a father to the fatherless and Husband to the widow. I am now over eighty years of age. He has been both Husband and Father to me. With my best wishes that you may have health of body and mind to enable you to continue this great and good work, and with affectionate regards, I remain, Yours sincerely, ****."—From Scotland, a bale of linen cloth.—Oct. 18. From Almondsbury, 3,100 apples.—Oct. 20. Received £5. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, I beg to enclose you a cheque for £5., as part of an amount that a man tried to claim wrongly from me, but, at the last moment, he withdrew the claim. I had promised the Lord, if he withdrew, to send you £5., and £1. to the poor people at H., where I am now doing business. With many good wishes I beg to subscribe myself, Yours truly, ****."—Oct. 21. From the neighbourhood of Fairford £50.—From Java 100 florins.—Oct. 25. £500 as the legacy of the late J. J. O., Esq.—Oct. 27. From Zurich, Switzerland, £8. 12s. 9d.

Nov. 1. £200. as the legacy of the late Miss E. W.—Nov. 5. £200. as the legacy of the late Miss M. W. A.—From Aberdeen 72 pairs of boots.—From Ludlow 6 bags of peas.—Nov. 13. From Wolverhampton 16 sacks of oatmeal.—Nov. 15. From Essex £1. as "A thank-offering for freedom for two years from severe suffering."—Nov. 27. Received £32. 17s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Mr. D. D. has instructed us to send you the enclosed cheque for £32. 17s., being the proceeds of a transaction entered into on behalf of your Orphans. Please acknowledge receipt to us, as Mr. D. being ill at home is unable, at present, to attend to business. Yours obediently, ****."—The same gentleman sent a donation the year before, which was the profit on a business transaction, and undertaken for the benefit of our Orphans.

Dee. 6. A barrel of currants, 16 half boxes of valencias, and 8 barrels of flour for the children’s Christmas puddings.—Dcc. 7. From Sunday School children at Madrid 8s.

Should the reader ask, why all these donations are referred to, the reply is: When on Dec. 5, 1835, I founded the Orphan Institution, my primary object in doing so was the glory of God, as I desired to show to the world, and to the church at large, that the Living God is unchangeably the same, and as ready in the nineteenth century to answer the prayers of His children as He was in the days of the prophets and apostles; and that, through the answers to prayer, which I might receive, the faith of believers in the Lord Jesus might be strengthened, and they be encouraged increasingly to roll all their burdens upon Him. In order to bring about this, I relate, as I do, what God has been pleased to give me, solely in answer to prayer.

Dec. 22. Received £5. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Last Christmas, when I sent you 10s. for the Orphans, I had a yearling calf that was very ill and not worth more than 5s. I made up my mind that, if it recovered (though I did not think that possible), I would send you half its value next Christmas; I therefore have the pleasure of sending you a cheque for £5. for the Orphans. I am, dear Sir, yours truly, ****."—Dec. 23. From near London £290. with £10. for myself.—From a Bristol wholesale house of business 5 boxes of oranges.—From another, 10 boxes of oranges, 25 boxes of fruit and 25 boxes of su1tanas.—Dec. 24. From Wolverhampton 16 sacks of oatmeal.—From a third wholesale house in Bristol 20 boxes of oranges, 2 baskets of figs, 1 barrel of ditto, 10 half-boxes of muscatels and 1 bag of nuts.—Dec. 29. From Woolwich £100.—From London a cask, containing a great variety of toys.—Dec. 30. From Maidstone £74. 17s. 4d.

Jan. 1, 1881.—Received 10s. "being ¼d. per pair for 480 pairs of boots mended during the past year.—Received 7s. 6d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Last October I was reading your annual Report, and I am induced to give up my pipe and tobacco, and send the sum to you thus saved yearly, for the Orphans. The enclosed 7s. 6d. is for the first three months. May the Lord accept this offering. Yours truly, ****."—Jan. 10. £200. from Yorkshire.—Jan. 11. From believers, meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £32. 3s. 8d.—Jan. 15. From Spain £3. 1s. 10½d.—Jan. 17. £36. 8s. 7d. with the following statement: "The half year’s produce of our dairy, which, in being able to give it to the dear Orphans, makes the farm work a real interest."—Jan. 20. £4. as "A thank-offering on the first-fruits of the land."—From Christians, meeting in the Corn Exchange, Cheltenham, £5. 8s. 1d.—Jan. 29. From a Bristol wholesale house 20 boxes of oranges.

Feb. 3. From Secunderabad, India, £16. 7s. 1d.—Feb. 11. From Wolverhampton 16 sacks of oatmeal.—Feb. 15. From Spain £2. 10s.—Feb. 18. From the Isle of Wight £53. 18s. for the support of 4 Orphans for one year.

March 1. £90. as the legacy of the late Mrs. S. M.—March 3. £200. as the fifth and final instalment of a legacy of the late G. W., Esq.—From Glasgow £5. as a thank-offering for the birth of a son.—11s. 4d. with these words: "2d. per couple on every couple of ducks I sold in 1880."—March 24. From Wolverhampton 16 sacks of oatmeal.—March 29. Legacy of the late G. B. Esquire, £450.—March 30. From various friends at North Adelaide, South Australia, £12. 7s. 6d.

April 28. From Yorkshire £100.—April 30. From Wolverhampton 16 sacks of oatmeal.

May 7. Received the following letter with £13.: "My dear Sir, I have much pleasure in enclosing a cheque for £13. for the support of one Orphan for one year. In reading your Reports from year to year I am particularly struck by observing how the Lord provides for you in such a wonderful manner, and during such depressing times as we have been, and are now, passing through. That He may still provide and give you faith to trust in Him at all times and under every circumstance, is the desire of yours sincerely, ****." How does it come, that "during these depressing times" we are provided for? Because we do not look at them, nor trust in friends, but depend wholly upon God. This is the secret whereby, year after year, for forty-seven years, we have been helped. Continually we ourselves feel the effects of the depressing times. This morning, for instance, while I am writing this, the income for today and yesterday amounts only to £28., but the average expenses for two days are £248. Often the income for one day is only £10. or £15., sometimes even less than £10.; and yet our average expenditure for a single day is £124. If, under these circumstances, we were not looking to God alone, we should soon be overwhelmed with difficulty; but as, by God’s grace, we are steadfastly keeping our eyes upon Him, and are expecting help from Him only, our hearts, year after year, are kept in peace under the most trying and difficult circumstances; and he has never suffered us to be confounded.—May 10. Received £10. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I beg to enclose a cheque for £10. for the Orphans. I have for several years past sent a small sum annually, but have now increased it, in order that, if I live for a few years longer, the Orphans may not suffer by my death. I continue to read your Reports with great interest. Yours very truly, ****."—From St. Petersburg £4.—May 20. From Manchester £60.—From Elizabeth, New Jersey, 3 gold rings, 5 silver labels, 2 silver fruit knives, 2 gold brooches, 2 silver coins, and three buckles.—May 25. A friend, by Mr. Rd. Y. B., £l,000.—May 26. From Redland £20.—From the neighbourhood of Thun, Switzerland, 250 Francs.

Thus we were brought to the close of another year, during which we were enabled to meet all the expenses for the Orphans, though they amounted to nearly Twenty-seven Thousand Pounds, and had even a balance left.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Twenty-two Orphans, who were under our care, from May 26, 1881, to May 26, 1882, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical Remarks, &c.

26, 1881, to May 26, 1882, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical Remarks, &c.

On May 27, 1880, we began the new year with £10,009. 16s. 4½d. in hand; but on May 27, 1881, we had only £2,922. 12s. 9¼d. to begin with.

On the very first day of the new year, May 27, 1881, we received from a donor, in one of the Midland counties, £50.—May 30. Received £100. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, It has been a matter of much regret with me, that I have not been able of late years to send you any contributions to your good work; but circumstances have not allowed me to do so. Some years ago my wife and myself resolved, that, if some shares, we held, advanced to a certain price and were sold, we would then send you £100. Last week they were disposed of at the exact price, and we are truly thankful to God that we are enabled to send you the enclosed cheque for £100. Please enrol it in your list of givers ‘For Christ’s sake from Shrewsbury for the Orphan Fund.’ Soliciting your prayers for our guidance in rather a perplexed state of temporal affairs, Believe me, very truly yours, ****."—May 31. From Graham’s Town, Cape of Good Hope, £1. 10s., £1., 10s. 6d., £1., £1., £1., £5.

June 11. Balance of legacy of the late T. H., Esq. £142. 0s. 4d.—June 15. Received £50. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose a Bank of England Note for £50. It is in memory of the late M. W., of W., near L., and by her dying request, that her two surviving sisters send this sum towards your great work. I am, dear Sir, yours very truly, ****."—June 22. Legacy of the late Mr. J. C. £150.

July 6. From a Yorkshire donor £200.—July 11. From one of the Midland Counties £60.—July 13. By sale of dentist gold, gold and silver articles, pearls, diamonds, etc., £120., with £44. 5s. for the other Objects.—July 16. From Bayswater four cases of a great variety of goods.—July 19. From Sussex £68. 17s.—From Bromley £20.—A ton of soap.—July 23. Received £3. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose you a cheque for £3., sent to you by my former Church Clerk, J. S., of G. G., Queensland, Australia. He is only a labouring shepherd, yet so great is his appreciation of your benevolent work for Orphans, that he hopes to send you £3. a year for them. I do not think you receive any more devoted offering to your work in the Lord; for he has only just what he earns for the maintenance of himself and family. Please to send me the most interesting illustrated work you have published; or, George Muller’s Life and Work, that I may send it to him, and enclose the bill, and I will remit you the cost. Yours truly, ****." This is one of the many ways in which God helps us.

Aug. 3. From Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, £13. 10s. for the support of 1 Orphan for 1 year.—Aug. 18. From Wales £90., with £10. for myself.—Aug. 20. By sale of gold and silver articles, £29. 5s.—Aug. 22. Part of the legacy of the late G. J., Esq., £1,000. This is the result of much prayer.—Aug. 26. From Staffordshire 90 pairs of boots, shoes, and slippers, 6 odd boots and shoes, and 10 pairs of cork soles.—Aug. 27. Received 10s. with the following letter: "Sir, I have this day received an unexpected sovereign from a Bristolian whom I have never seen since he was a boy, when I taught him in the pauper school. I received it thankfully, and send half to you. I am, Sir, yours in Christ (86 years old and 62 years a Christian pilgrim), ****."

Sep. 3. £3. 17s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, As my salary is due today, I send you the small sum of Two Pounds, also seventeen shillings on account of some small presents I have had given to me; and one Pound as a thank-offering for the Lord’s mercy and goodness to me, as I have been now 8 years in my present situation, and have been blessed with good health most of the time, and able to do the large amount of work that I have to do. My dear wife joins with me in love to yourself, Mrs. Muller, and Mr. and Mrs. Wright. We hope and trust you are all quite well, and long may you all be spared to manage the great and good work that you have of the Lord’s, is the wish of us both. Believe us, dear Mr. Muller, yours very faithfully, ****."—Sep. 5. From Church Stretton, £30.—Sep. 6. Received from Westmoreland, £100., when our funds were very low.—Also £10. from Newark.—On Sep. 7, came in from Macclesfield £5., and by sale of articles £10. 8s. 10d.—From Aberdeen 10s. 6d., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, The enclosed is for whatever you feel it is most needed, and may God prosper your work! Many a time, when my path seems dark, am I cheered to think how your faith receives its reward; and ever since I promised the Lord a part of my income, in sending it to your Institution, I have been able to give more every year, so that there is a blessing in giving to you. Yours truly, ****."—Sep 9th. From Ramsgate £l00.—From Old Broad Street, London, £5. 14s.—From the Mumbles £5.—From Shirehampton £5.—From Ipswich £2. 2s.—Thus God helped us in our time of need. Above £300. came in from Sep. 6 to Sep. 9 inclusive.—Sep. 12. From Hampshire £10. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Very grieved am I at the present time, for the severe trial sent by our Heavenly Father in the sickness of your large family; but rest assured, there was a need for it, if only to stir up the hearts of His professing people to practical sympathy towards you and your noble work; as in my own case; and with much pleasure and many prayers for great grace and strength to rest on you all, enclose a cheque for £10. 10s., a thank-offering for late mercies. Believe me, dear Sir, yours faithfully, ****." The affliction referred to here was, we had many cases of typhoid fever; but the Lord had mercy on us, and the cases were remarkably light.—Sep. 16. From Hull 10s. with the following statement: "Dear Sir, Will you please accept in the Lord’s name 10s. for the benefit of the Orphans. One penny a day enables us to send 10s. three times a year. With Christian love, I am sincerely yours in the Lord, ****."—Sep. 21. From a friend in Gloucestershire £50.—From Clifton £20. and two sets of artificial teeth, set in gold.—Sep. 22. From Yorkshire £200.—Sep. 24. Three large cheeses.—Sep. 27. From the neighbourhood of Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, £100. with £5. for myself.

Oct. 11th. From Preston 15 suits of clothes, 3 pairs of trousers, and 37 caps, a piece of material, and 14 woollen scarfs.—Oct. 12. £1. as "A thank-offering to God for saving my own children from becoming Orphans."—Oct. 19. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed 10s. towards the work amongst Orphans. Thanks for your Report, just to hand, which interested me much. As a young beginner in business, I resolved to put aside one Penny on each sale made, so enclose 10s., being one penny on 120 sales. Yours truly, ****."—Oct. 19. Although we have this day nothing at all in hand for the School—, Bible—, Missionary and Tract Fund, yet we are still provided with some means for the Orphans, though already more than two months since there was only enough in hand to meet the average expenses of 4½ days. God has graciously, as the result of our daily believing supplications, for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ, helped us; and He will do so further, though we know not how the help will come.

Nov. 3. Legacy of the late W. R. L., Esq., £200.—2,573 apples.—Nov. 7. £1. "The first few days’ wages, earned in Australia."—Nov. 11. £1. from one of the former Orphans, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. and Mrs. Muller, We should have sent our annual trifle sooner; but I am thankful now, that we did not. Our hearts are overflowing with thankfulness to God, for His mercy towards us in sparing the life of our dear babe. Last Sunday night she was close to death’s door. We could not bear to see her suffer, and prayed, that if it were God’s will, He would restore her speedily; and she is rapidly recovering. So, as a thank-offering to God, we, with pleasure, send £1. instead of 10s. as before. Once again I must thank you for eleven years spent in that Happy Home. May you long be spared to comfort many more poor Orphans. If there is such joy in simply giving a trifle to God’s cause, what must yours be, who are constantly working for Him. Yours respectfully and gratefully ****."—Nov. 11. A gold watch.—Nov. 16. From the National Provincial Bank of England, Bath, £100., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed we hand you, under direction of a client of ours (being unable to disclose name) Draft for £100. Kindly forward receipt in due course. Yours faithfully, ****." This donation of £100. came to hand, when the balance for the Orphans was reduced to £108. 15s. 9¼d., that is, the amount in hand was not quite enough to meet the average expenses of one day and a half for the Orphans. The total of the expenses for the Orphans alone in the previous year, from May 26, 1880, to May 26, 1881, had been £26,783. 10s. 10½d., therefore the average expenses of one day are £73. 7s. 7d. Will you kindly place yourself in our position, dear reader. What do we do under such circumstances? We only speak to our Heavenly Father, in order that, by the answers, which we receive from Him, we may encourage the Hearts of His children, increasingly to go to Him in all their need, and that thus their faith may be strengthened; and in order that those, who know not God, may see what a blessed thing it is to have a Father in Heaven. We do not send out advertisements, that we are so poor; we do not call on our rich Christian friends for help; we do not speak at all to persons outside of the work about our need; but we betake ourselves only to our universal remedy for all difficulties, trials and necessities, viz., prayer and faith. We do know God, and therefore put our trust in Him, according to that word in Psalm ix. 10, "They that know thy name will put their trust in thee, for thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek thee."—Nov. 17. From Clifton as "Proceeds of sale of work "£55. 10s.—Nov. 18. From X. Y. Z., £66. 19s. 8d.—Nov. 21. From South Australia £20., from a gentleman who, as he writes, was snatched from the very jaws of death, converted through his severe illness, and who now desires to devote himself entirely to God.—Nov. 22. £1. as "A thank-offering for the conversion of my brother."—Nov. 23. From a friend at Burnley £50.—Nov. 24. From a Christian gentleman and lady £162. 16s. for the support of twelve Orphans for one year, with £10. 10s. for my own personal expenses.—12 half sacks of flour, 1 barrel of currants, and 16 half boxes of raisins, sent by the donor for the Christmas puddings of the Orphans.

Dec. 6. £90., with £10. for myself, "A thanksgiving on the occasion of a silver wedding,"—Dec. 9. A £200. Debenture bond (with coupons attached for seven years) of the British and American Mortgage Company, Limited."—Dec. 10. From Paternoster Row £100.—Dec. 15. From Rugby £50.—A large box, containing black, drab and whited brown linen thread.—Dec. 16. Ten boxes of raisins.—Dec. 20. From near London £290. with £10. for myself.—From a person in an almshouse 5s. 6d., who lives upon 3s. 6d. per week, and who sends one penny out of every 3s. 6d. which she receives. See how even the poor seek to help in this work, as well as the rich; but we desire to receive every donation as coming from God, in answer to prayer.—A large number of boxes of sweets and small biscuits; 30 boxes, each containing a doll and material for clothes, and a number of scrap books, with £1. 1s. towards plum puddings.—Some bags of marbles, boxes and bags of sweets, some toy watches, 6 balls, some bells, a box of little dolls and some scrap books.—Dec. 21. Thirteen boxes of oranges, 15 half boxes of valencias, and 3 barrels of currants.—From Westmoreland £100.—Dec. 24. Two bags of figs, 1 sack of nuts, 12 boxes of oranges and 5 boxes of raisins.—Dec. 28. Received from Maidstone £75. 17s. 9d.—Dec. 29. From one of the Midland Counties £70.

Jan. 3, 1882, Received £5. 4s. with the following letter: "Sir, Enclosed you will find Post Office Order for £5. 4s., which please accept for the use of the Orphans. Last New Year’s day I sent you One Pound. I had been reading one of your Reports some time before, and I resolved I would try and help you. I therefore put a shilling a week by out of my wages, and, as soon as I had saved 20 shillings, I sent it. That is just a year ago. Soon after sending it, God gave me an unexpected increase in my wages, and I resolved at once to put two shillings per week by for the Orphans, throughout the year. He has also blessed me with health and strength, and I now send you the £5. 4s. as a thank-offering for all His many blessings and mercies vouchsafed to me. With best wishes to you, believe me, yours sincerely, ****."—Jan. 4. £200. from Yorkshire.—Jan. 5. £13. 17s. 6d. "Commission on the sale of a house."— Jan. 6. £5. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose cheque for £5. for the Orphans, as a thank-offering for my father’s conversion, at 72 years of age, when, after a few days’ illness, the Lord took him to Himself. Yours in the Lord, ****."—Jan. 10. Believers, meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £30. 17s.—Jan. 11. £50. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, As a thankful acknowledgment that all I have is the Lord’s, whose little ones you train for Him, in dependence on Him, I have put fifty pounds (£50.) to your credit today in Messrs. Stuckey & Co.’s Bank, Clifton, to be used for the Orphans. Yours affectionately, The Daughter of an Orphan who was cared for."

Feb. 14. From 46 friends at North Adelaide, South Australia, £14.—Feb. 17. Legacy of the late Mrs. A. M. R. £100.—Feb. 18. From Bath £100. The balance for the Orphans, when this donation was received, had been reduced to a little above £100., viz., only enough for the average expenses of one day and a half.—On the same day came in £5. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Wright, I have been pressed in spirit for a day or two to send you the enclosed for the Orphans, which please take as from a steward who desires to be found faithful. With Christian love and esteem, yours sincerely, ****."—There came in also, from Malvern, £13. 10s. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—Feb. 19. We have received many letters from the Orphans on Ashley Down, sent to my dear wife in connection with her birthday, of which as a specimen, I give the following: "New Orphan Houses, Ashley Down, Bristol, Feb. 7th, 1882. Dear Madam, The days have passed to weeks, the weeks have changed to months, and the day seems very distant since we bade farewell to you on the morning when you left us for the Continent, and thence to go to the Holy Land.—We thank you and dear Mr. Muller for your kind remembrances, and your messages of love contained in your letter to the Orphans.—We feel very happy to know that you are now in that wonderful country, which is so closely allied to the name of Jesus, and which is so intimately associated with the mighty works and powerful sayings of our blessed Lord.—We cannot read the beautiful and tender story of His life in the New Testament, now that you are in the country where He dwelt, and probably walking over the same ground He trod, without feelings of gratitude to God for His loving kindness to you.—We rejoice in the near approach of your birthday, and we ask you to permit us the pleasure of expressing our love to you and the hope that your coming birthday will be a season of quiet rest and close communion with our Heavenly Father; that your soul may be greatly blessed, and that you and dear Mr. Muller may abide under the shadow of the Almighty.—You will be pleased to hear, that the general health in the Boys’ Department is good; that we were striving to do well in our examination, which commenced yesterday, and that we are trying to be good boys, so that, when you think of us, your heart may be comforted.—Praying that God’s choicest blessing may remain with you, preserving you in health, protecting you from harm, and prospering you in your labour of love, and wishing you a bright and happy New Year, and many happy returns of your birthday, with much love, we are your grateful Orphans, the Boys of No. 4."—Feb. 24. From Weston-super-Mare £60.—Received 20 sacks of oatmeal. During the past year the same donor has kindly sent us eight similar donations, and altogether 146 sacks of oatmeal have thus come to us. This has been a great help; for about Christmas we bad no means to send for our usual order of 400 or 500 sacks of oatmeal to Scotland; but our large stock in hand was lengthened out by being thus gratuitously added to.—Feb. 26. The balance in hand today for the Orphans is £97. 10s. 7½d., viz., £24. more than the average expenses of one single day.

March 2. Our position now regarding the Orphan work is, praying day by day "Give us this day our daily bread. For a considerable time we have had day by day to look to the Lord for the supply of our daily wants; but God has helped thus far.—March 4. Legacy of the late Mrs. C. £156. 8s. 6d.—March 9. From Maidenhead £60.—A large silver salver.—March 11. Legacy of the late Mr. R. S. £18.—March 17. Legacy of the late Mr. G. F. £200. Many of the legacies have come in just when we were in great need. Thus it has been in particular regarding the last three legacies just mentioned.—Received also on the same day £8. 18s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have the pleasure to enclose for the Orphans and expenses connected with the Orphanage under your care a cheque for £8. 18s.—It may interest you to know the circumstances under which it is sent. The firm with which I am connected had a large sum of money justly due to them, but there seemed but little prospect of recovering the same, when I made a resolve, that if the money was ever obtained, one half of my share should be devoted to your Orphanage. This occurred about three years ago, and very soon after that time we began to receive instalments of the amount; and as the whole is likely to be settled in a few days, I hasten to fulfil my pledge, and to record another instance of the wonderful providence of God; for I feel that His hand is truly apparent here both for your help and mine. With kind regards, I am, Dear Sir, yours faithfully, ****."—March 21. From Sussex £13. 10s. for the support of one Orphan for one year.—March 25. From a Scotch donor, then staying in London, £100. When this donation was received, the balance of the Orphan fund was quite exhausted,—Received also from Sunderland £5.; and from Liverpool from "An old New Yorker" £5.—March 26. The balance in hand today is £32. 15s. 3d., viz., not one half of the average expenses for one single day.—March 29. £5. instead of insuring stock.—From the Isle of Wight £53. 18s. for the support of four Orphans for one year.—March 30. From Dublin, two sets of artificial teeth, set in gold.

April 10. £1. 10s. with this statement: "The enclosed is presented as an offering to the Lord for the Orphans, instead of being used for the purchase of an ‘engagement ring,’ by two believers who above all things desire that their united lives may be to the glory of the Lord, who loved them and bought them with His own blood." April 11. £6. 19s. 6d. as "First day’s receipt in my new shop."—April 17. From one of the Midland Counties £80., which came in at a time of great need.—April 18. Three bags of rice.—April 19. From Hull £5. as "A thank-offering to the Lord for saving us from being burnt down."—April 20. When in the greatest need we received from Edinburgh £100. with this statement: "The enclosed was intended as a legacy, but I have sent it in my lifetime." April 22. From the outskirts of Bristol £22.—April 26. From H. B. £100.—The late A. B., one of the Christian Orphans, who for nearly thirty years had walked in the ways of God, £5.—May 4. From "H. G." 5 cwt. of white lead, 10 cwt. of zinc white, 5 cwt. of oil ochre, 2 cwt. of oil black, ½ cwt. of Venetian red, 5 cwt. of driers, 2 gallons of varnish, and 2 ditto of japan black. This most valuable donation was very useful to us for painting in connection with our five large houses.—May 6. By sale of dentist gold £58. 2s. 6d.—May 8. £5. as "A thank-offering for restoration to health after a severe illness."—May 9. A satin jacket with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I send you by train to-night a box, containing a new satin jacket, which I only wore for the first time yesterday; but God has shown me, that it will be a snare to me. I have spent a most miserable night on account of it, and promised Him, I would give it to Him, and henceforth dress in what is needful, and not in costly apparel." This statement is to be pondered.—May 10. From Ootacamund, India, £14. 6s. 1d.—May 12. From the late Miss H. £20.—May 15. From Edinburgh £50.—May 16. From one of the Midland Counties £50.—From Trowbridge £13., for the support of one Orphan for one year.—May 17. From one of the former Orphans £5., as a token of gratitude, for what she had received at the Orphan Houses. A relative had left to her a small sum.—May 23. From "Hope," Taunton, £5.—May 24. From Manchester £55.—May 26. From Redland £20.—From Scotland £65. 6s. 8d.—By sale of plate, gold and silver articles, dentist gold, etc., £85. 14s.—6 table spoons, 4 dessert ditto, 1 gravy ditto, 8 tea ditto, 1 soup ladle, 12 forks, and a tea pot and stand, all of silver, and 1 plated skewer.

Means for the Support of the Two Thousand Two Hundred and Eleven Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1882 to May 26, 1883, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, &c.

26, 1882 to May 26, 1883, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, &c.

The readers of the previous pages will remember how very trying our position was, with regard to funds for the support of the Orphans, during the last year, and how, looking at things naturally, it seemed impossible that we should be able to continue to carry on an Institution, like that of the five Orphan Houses on Ashley Downs—where day by day about 2,100 persons sit down to their meals, and where the expenses of many thousands of pounds, besides those for food, have year after year to be met—without applying to any human being for a single sovereign. We grant, that, according to appearances, all was dark, and that there was no natural prospect of help; but we knew God. We did not merely say that we knew Him, but verily we did know Him. We did not merely say that we trusted in Him, but we did so in reality; and thus it has come, that we have been helped, as it is written:—"They that know Thy name will put their trust in Thee; for Thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek Thee." Psalm ix. 10.

We stayed ourselves upon God, and at the beginning of the new year on May 27, 1882, encouraged ourselves in Him. We were assured that help would come, though we knew not how; and that God, who raised up this Orphan Establishment at the first, who supported it while it was small, and under many difficulties; who enlarged the work until it became the greatest Orphan Institution under heaven, and who supported it, as such, simply through prayer and faith for so many years; would do this further.

I now give to the reader in the following pages some specimens of the manner in which it pleased God to help us. On the very first day of the new period, May 27, 1882, the dear Christian donor, in Ale County, United States, already several times referred to, an entire stranger to us, sent £20. By this, God would say, "Only believe;" only trust in Me; I have the hearts of all at my disposal; the gold and the silver belong to Me.—May 29. We received from Manchester £50. for the Orphans, with £50. for the first four Objects of the Institution.—On May 31, £13. 10s. 6d. came from Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope.

June 3. From Wotton-under-edge £500. A glorious deliverance was this donation, and a precious earnest of what God would do further for us. This donation came from a Christian gentleman who, though for very many years a donor to the Institution, is not personally known to us, and who had never given so large a sum before. This made the hand of God all the more manifest.—June 6. Anonymously from Glasgow £l5.—Legacy of the late Mrs. M. F. £500.—June 23. Legacy of the late R. W. Esq., £1,000. 3 per cent. reduced Bank annuities, less duty and brokerage. The testator says in his Will: "I give and bequeath to Mr. George Muller of Bristol, or such other person or persons, as shall, when this legacy shall become payable, be the Director or Directors of the New Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, near Bristol, the sum of one thousand pounds, three pounds per cent. reduced Bank Annuities, as a response to his confidence in Almighty God for the voluntary support of that Institution, to be applied for the purposes of the said New Orphan Houses." Produced (less brokerage of £1. 2s. 6d. and £100. legacy duty), £898. 17s. 6d.—By these and very many smaller sums, within the first month, from May 27th to June 26th inclusive, £2,874. 10s. 5d. for the support of the Orphans was received. By this the reader will see, that we did not wait upon the Lord in vain, nor rely upon Him to no purpose.—June 27. From a Bristol donor £10. 10s.—From another Bristol donor £100.—From London £30.—June 30. From Liverpool, from a former Orphan, who is the commander of a large merchant vessel, £13.

July 3. By sale of jewellery £11. 2s. 3d.—July 4. From Edinburgh £50.—July 5. From Yorkshire £200.—From Torquay £81. 18s. 9d.—July 6. By sale of dentist gold, and gold and silver articles, £36.—July 10. Received £13. 11s. 8d. with the following letter: "Dear Brother in our precious Christ, Our gracious triune covenant God having spared my dear little boy another year (his second birthday being tomorrow) I now enclose, as a thank-offering, my cheque for £13. 11s. 8d., being for the maintenance of one Orphan for one year, and trust, my dear little ones, by the gracious power of God the Holy Spirit, may in due time be brought to know the Lord Jesus as their Saviour.—I trust God may yet spare you to labour many years in His vineyard, and may bless your latter end even more than your beginning. With Christian love I remain yours sincerely, ****." From donors, "on their wedding day," £5.—July 15. From a donor on his wedding day £2. 3s. 10d.—From Sussex £49. 10s.—July 17. From Liverpool 20 boxes of soap.—July 18. "Money saved by me and my two children through not drinking sugar in our tea," 19s. 7d.—July 21. From Leicester, from a praying Christian, that she might have work, to be able to help us, £2. 10s.—July 25. From Stapleton £100.—From Bromley £50.—July

26. From a Bristol donor £100.—From New Zealand, 2 gold watches, 2 ditto chains, 1 watch key, 2 lockets, I watch hook, 1 pair of sugar tongs, 1 silver box of seals, 1 waistband slide, 1 clasp, 1 bracelet, 4 brooches and 1 ring.—July 27. Last evening our balance in hand, for the support of the Orphans, was £172. 10s. 7d., and the total income for them, during the two first months of the present period, from May 26th to July 26th inclusive, has been £4,602. 8s. 1d.—Legaey of the late Mr. J. W. J. £100. less legacy duty.—From Tottenham, 6 pieces of artificial teeth (4 set in gold).—From a working man at Cardiff £7.—July 28. From Westmoreland £20.—£8. "instead of insuring 320 acres of corn against hail."—July 31. From Wolverhampton, 18 bags of oatmeal.

Aug. 2. Legacy of the late Miss L. £100.—Aug. 3. From Huntingdon, 10 coats, 9 waistcoats, 10 pairs of trousers, a suit of clothes, 3 dresses, 4 jackets, 3 pairs of stays, 6 chemises, 3 pairs of drawers, 6 pairs of cuffs, 2 collars, a hat, a cap, 4 bonnets, 5 pairs of boots, 2 pairs of shoes, 1 pair of slippers and 1 pair of goloshes.—Aug. 7. "A thank-offering for safe return of my dear children from a foreign land," £5.—Aug. 9. From Clifton £50. 13s. 4d. for the support of 4 Orphans for one year.—Aug. 11. From Westmoreland £100.—Aug. 14. From Wotton-under-edge £100. from the same gentleman who had only on June 3rd given £500.—Aug. 16. From a gentleman, 93 years old, who can say, "Hitherto has the Lord helped me," £1.—Aug. 17. A diamond ring and coral necklace.—Aug 18. £3. from Derbyshire, "Instead of insuring life."—Aug. 19. From a working man 10s., as "A thank-offering for God’s mercy in restoring his wife from sickness."—Aug. 23. From Clifton £50.—Aug. 25. By legacy of the late Mr. W. C. £123. 14s. 7d.—From one of the former Orphans, who has been 16 years and five months in the situation to which she went when she left the Orphan Houses, £1. 10s. with the following letter:

"Dear Mr. Muller, May I have the pleasure of once again sending you a few lines, to thank you first very much for the nice Report, you so kindly sent me. Both Fanny and myself read it through with great interest, and have now passed it on for other friends to read, that they also may see how the Lord can supply the wants of His servants who trust in Him. Please accept the enclosed as the contents of my little box. The sovereign was dropped in by Mrs. L. a few days before the Report arrived. Trusting that God’s choicest blessing may still continue to rest upon your work, with grateful love from Fanny and myself, I remain, dear Mr. Muller, ever your grateful and affectionate Orphan, ****."—Fanny, here referred to, (another Orphan,) has also been 16 years and 5 months in the same excellent Christian family as a servant.—Aug. 29. From Cotham, Bristol, £100.

Sept. 4. From the neighbourhood of Berne, Switzerland, £20.—Sept. 7. £7. 7s. as "A thank-offering for being able to do without medical advice for six months."—Sept. 11. Legacy of the late J. E. Esq., £618. 4s. 2d.—Sept. 13. £1. 6s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please accept the enclosed Post Office Order for 26s., to be applied as you think best. It is gathered at our dinner table on Sundays—the only day in the week my boys and I dine together. Hoping it may be acceptable, though only a mite, in helping to carry on your work of faith and labour of love in the Lord, I remain, Sir, yours faithfully, ****."—Sept. 14. "Given by a friend, instead of buying a new dress," £1.—Sept. 15. From Bombay £10.—From Landport £1. 10s. 6d. and 6d. for a Report, with the following letter: "Dear Sir, We once more send our yearly offering, of a penny a day for your Orphans, with 6d. for Report received, for which we thank you. We thank God who has provided for your numerous family through another year, though it has not been without often trying the faith which He Himself has given you; but each year’s account of your trials, and the timely help sent to you, adds weight to the testimony you have so long borne to His faithfulness, truth and power. Commending you and all your work, with all your helpers in the work, to His keeping for the coming year, We remain, Dear Sir, yours very sincerely, ****."—Sept 16. £1. 12s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Since I sent to you last week, the Lord has been pleased to raise my husband’s wages six shillings a week; and to my astonishment he said one morning, we must send to Mr. Muller 10s. for you, 10s. for me, and 6s. as first instalment of a rise of wages, and 6s. as a part produce of a profitable hive of what had been troublesome bees."—From Manchester, a gold ring set with a diamond, a gold pencil case, a gold Albert chain, and a silver locket and chain.—Sept. 22. £5. as "A thank-offering for another year’s preservation from fire."—Sept. 23. From one of the former Orphans £5. 1s. 3d. with the following letter: "Dear and respected Sir, May I ask your acceptance of the enclosed, to be used for whatever it is most needed. I had intended sending £2. 10s.; £1. 10s. as what I usually put aside, and £1, as a thank-offering to my Heavenly Father, for his mercy in preserving me from evils that threatened me. The other £2. 10s. I was going to save, but hearing from one of my friends, that, according to the Report, the funds were low, I felt that it would not be right of me to hide my Lord’s money. The 1s. 3d. was given me by a young lady in farthings for the Orphans. May I ask your prayers, that the Lord will bring me nearer to Himself, and help me more entirely to trust in Him for all things.—Sunday, the 27th, is your birthday. I hope it may be a very happy day to you, and that you may be spared to see many more. Please remember me respectfully to Mrs. Muller, and Mr. and Mrs. Wright; and trusting that they and all connected with the work are enjoying good health, I remain, Dear Sir, Yours gratefully and respectfully, ****."—2 cwt. of rice, a ¼ cwt. box of Valentias and 6 lbs. of tea.—Sept. 25. As legacy of the late Mr. J. M. £150.—Sept. 26. £90. "As the legacy of the late Mr. W. W."—Received £3. 10s. from one of the former Orphans, with the following letter: "My Dear and Respected Sir, Once more my Heavenly Father has permitted me to send my offering to the glorious work on Ashley Down. It is with heartfelt gratitude, that I have been enabled to send the remaining sum of money, which I had promised to God. As you are aware, when in London, I told Him in my prayers that, if He saw fit to open a good situation for me, I would forward £12. as a thank-offering for His loving kindness towards me; and, for my Redeemer’s sake, He heard my prayer; hence my reason for sending all that I told God I would give to His work. And now, dear Sir, although within the last ten months I have been able, by God’s help, to fulfil my vow, still I do not intend to forget the work on Ashley Down. I think it would be very ungrateful on my part to do this, and especially I ought to think so, when I am now reaping the benefit of having been in that peaceful Home. I intend—my Father for Jesus’ sake helping me—to put by something for the grand work under your supervision, and, at the end of the year, I trust I shall be enabled to give you as good an offering as hitherto, or on previous occasions. Remember me to Mr. Wright with my best love to all, and to my school companions Messrs. M. and P., [now teachers at the Orphan Houses] and accept the same yourself. Believe me to be, dear Sir, yours very sincerely, ****."—From Downend, 7 sacks of potatoes.—From Preston, 20 suits of clothes.

Oct. 4. From Tunbridge Wells £5. as "Part of an anticipatory thank-offering, for health to be restored."—Oct. 9. £1. 6s. "Farthings taken by a tradesman during the quarter ending Michaelmas."—From Almondsbury 2,750 apples.—Oct. 10. From one of the Midland Counties

£70.—Received 10s. from one of the former Orphans, in service, with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I am writing a few lines to you, to thank you for sending me the Reports of the Orphan Houses year after year. They are very interesting to read, and also show how the Orphan work is getting on. I shall never forget the happy days I spent when I was in that happy Home. I can look back now and see how I was cared for, while there. Nearly eleven years I have left it, and am still in the same situation to which you at first sent me. It is like a home to me, and I ought to be very grateful to our Heavenly Father, for providing me such a good Christian home. I would ask you to remember me in your prayers, that I may love Him more, serve Him better, and live more closely to Him. I am sending you a small trifle for the dear Orphans. Please to remember me kindly to Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright, and all the dear teachers in New Orphan House No. 2. I remain your truly grateful Orphan, ****."—Oct. 17. £500. as "The legacy of the late Mr. C. J. K."—Oct. 18. £50. as "The legacy of the late Mr. G. T."—From Almondsbury 4,300 apples.—From the neighbourhood of Frome a large cheese.—From Reading 40 sacks of potatoes.—Oct. 19. From Auckland, New Zealand, £5.—From the neighbourhood of Trowbridge 3 cheeses.—Oct. 20. Received £2. 7s. 6d. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Enclosed I beg to hand you three Postal Orders, value £2. 7s. 6d., for your acceptance, in aid of the Orphan fund.—Allow me to say, that I was called upon by an insurance company to insure my men against accident, under the Employers’ Liability Act of 1880, and they asked for this amount annually as a premium, to cover all risk. I have never insured against anything for some years past with Man, only with the Lord; and He has kept me from all mishaps. Nevertheless I almost yielded my faith in God, at least I was tempted severely to do so in this instance, when the risk and the nature of my business were laid before me. But faith prevailed, and I still believe, that, putting my trust in Him, I shall not be ashamed. It was by reading your life and work, that I was led at first to see this; and I have to ask you, to pray for me, that my faith fail not. My prayer is, that you may be kept steadfast in your great work of faith, for His glory’s sake. Many Christians need to see, that by insuring all they have with societies, they are not giving scope for faith in God. The truth is, they are lessening their faith, and yet they ask God to increase it. May the Lord keep us steadfast, for His glory’s sake.—Believe me yours very sincerely, ** *."—Oct. 21. Received from Wotton-under-edge £1,000. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I am very thankful to be able to send you the enclosed cheque for your Orphans! Will you accept £100. of the sum for yourse1f, and believe me, with Christian regards, Yours most faithfully, ****." I make the following remarks in connection with this donation. 1. The kind Christian gentleman is personally unknown to me, though for very many years he has from time to time sent us donations. 2. During the present year he had already sent £100. and £500., making with this donation, up to Oct. 21, 1882, altogether £1,600. 3. How comes all this? God hears prayer; He verily listens to the supplications of His children, who, in the name of the Lord Jesus bring before Him petitions, which are according to His mind, and exercise faith in His power and willingness to help them; and who, in connection with this, continue to wait on Him, till they receive answers to their requests. Now, we asked for a thing that was according to the mind of God, when we entreated Him to give us the means needed to provide for this large Orphan Family; we were expecting help, not on the ground of our own goodness and worthiness, but simply as such who are united to the Lord Jesus Christ, and asked the answer for His sake; we also asked in faith; and persevered day by day in prayer. The Christian reader will not therefore be surprised that we received so large a sum from this Christian gentleman. 4. But notice further, he had already sent us £100. and £500. since May 26, and yet he sent £1,000. more. God, in answer to our prayers, spoke to His dear child, and inclined his heart to send to us more than ever. Thus He also gives proof, that during the previous year, when we were so low as to funds, it was only for the trial of our faith and patience, and not in anger; nor did He thereby mean to indicate, that He would not help us any more. For my own part, I expected further great help from God, and I have not been confounded. 5. One point more. Notice that the kind donor wished £100. of this sum to be used for my own personal expenses, by which God meant to say to my own heart: "I am pleased with thy work and service, in going about on these long Missionary tours. I will pay the expenses thereof, and I give to thee here a specimen of what I am yet willing to do for thee."

May God’s richest, choicest blessing rest on this dear donor, and all the dear Christian friends, who have helped us, whether with small or large sums!

On the same day there was received from Manchester £100., from a Christian gentleman, who for very many years has helped us considerably.

Oct. 25. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £200. with £5. for myself.—Oct. 28. Received £12. 13s. 4d. with the following letter: "Dear Christian Friend, As my little daughter is today spared to see the first anniversary of her natal day, I enclose £12. 13s. 4d., being the amount required to keep one Orphan for one year; and, by the blessing of our triune covenant God, I hope to be enabled to do the same annually, as long as my little ones are spared to me. My prayer is, that your valuable life may yet be spared many years, if God so will, to be the Orphan’s friend; that you may be kept firm in the truth as it is in Jesus, be daily favoured to enjoy very much of His gracious presence, and that, when you come to your journey’s end, dying grace may be granted for a dying hour, Yours in Him, ****."—Oct. 30. From Edinburgh £100.—Oct 31. Christian friends at Vienna £4. and a gold locket.

Nov. 1. £300. as the legacy of the late Miss E. R. of Bath.—Nov. 3. From Clifton £50., from a Christian lady who for many years manifested much interest about the Orphans, and who since then has been called to her heavenly home, now to reap, as she has been sowing.—Nov. 8. From Sussex £150.—Nov. 8. From a Shepherd in Queensland, Australia, £3., with the following letter from a clergyman: "My dear Sir, I have again the pleasure of enclosing you a cheque for £3., sent to you for the Orphans by my former Church Clerk at S——. May God continue to bless your work of faith and labour of love. We Christians owe you a debt of gratitude for increasing our faith by the evidence of the fruits of your own. Believe me, my dear Sir, Yours affectionately in Christ, ****."—From Wolverhampton, the valuable donation of 20 bags of oatmeal.—Nov. 10. Legacy of the late Miss M. £50.—A gold scarf ring, set with a brilliant.—Nov. 20. From McKeesport, Ale County, £10. with the following letter: "Dear brother, I am permitted to enclose fifty dollars more for the Lord’s poor. Freely I have received and freely I want to give. What have I, that I have not received? The little child feels proud, that it can drop the money into the box, after the parent has supplied the means, and told it to do so. So we are sometimes tempted to think we are giving of our own. The Lord bless your work. My heart is with you. Amen,

****."—Nov. 27. £50. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, As the circumstances of sending you a second and larger donation than usual, this year, are peculiar, they may not be uninteresting to you. They are these. I began business about twenty years ago, in a very small way, and have been prospered above all my expectations. I have been giving ten per cent. of my income to the Lord, mainly through reading Mr. Muller’s Narrative. At the beginning of this year I resolved, that all I should make, over and above the requirements of my family and household expenses, on a certain enterprise, I would give to the Lord’s work; and, though my books will not be made up until the 31st December, I can see I shall have a good surplus, and therefore it is that I now send you the enclosed. I have not time to write more particularly. Yours truly, ****." Here the reader has another proof of the blessedness of regular systematic giving, carried on faithfully as stewards for the Lord.—Nov. 28. From a Coffee Palace 16s., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, About three months ago some one sent me a Report of your Orphan Houses. I desired to help, but, having many claims, scarcely knew how to do so, until the thought was put into my mind to ask our manager’s wife (a dear Christian) to put a farthing into a box I provided for every gallon of coffee she made. I enclose 16s., which we found in the box this morning. I ask you to pray for a blessing upon this effort of ours to provide working men with good wholesome drinks, as well as to make this a centre of Christian work. Yours in the Master’s service, ****."—From Wales £75., with £25. for myself, from a Christian gentleman who gives systematically and regularly, and that very largely, just as the Lord is pleased to prosper him in his very large business.

Dec. 2. From a Bristol donor 16 half boxes of raisins, 1 barrel of currants, and 8 barrels of flour, for the children’s Christmas puddings.—Dec. 5. From Yorkshire £200.—Dec. 7. Received 2s. 6d. and a pair of bracelets with the following letter: "Sir, During the past five years, since my four nieces have been under your care, many times I have felt it my duty to write to you and thank you for the kindness and good training they have received, since they have been under your care. When I receive letters from them, speaking of their happiness in their happy Home, I am led to thank God that there is such a home for Orphan children. Having visited the Orphanage many times, I can look back, and picture many dear happy faces. Will you please accept

2s. 6d. which I have sent for Reports, which I have received from time to time, also a pair of bracelets, towards the support of the Orphans. It is but a trifle. I wish I could send more. Yours respectfully, ****."—Dec. 8. Received the following letter from the mistress of one of the Orphans sent out as a servant. The letter was addressed to one of the former teachers of this Orphan. "Dear Miss T., You will know that Annie has been seeking admission as probationer in the Leeds Training Institute for Nurses. Today she has word, that she is to be admitted early in the New Year. We hope she may suit, and that she will do well. It is eight years and a half nearly since she came to us, and she has done us the best service from then until now. She is and has been a God-fearing girl, and is more anxious to do her duty, than to have her rights. Her training in the Home must have been of the highest kind, and she has been a comfort and joy to us, as well as a most efficient help. I have thought it is due to the Teachers and Principals of the Home, that they should know these things, while perhaps it may also be a pleasure to them and to you. I am, dear Miss T., very sincerely yours, ****."—Legacy of the late Mr. J. C. £100.—From a Bristol donor the valuable present of 50 tons of coke.—Dec. 15. From a Bristol wholesale house 6 cases of currants, 15 boxes of fruit, and 10 boxes of oranges, for the Orphan’s Christmas Treat.—Dec. 20. From Bromley £50.—Dec. 21. Legacy of the late H. R. Esq. £50.—From a Bristol wholesale house 20 boxes of oranges.—From a former Orphan £2. 11s. 6d.—Dec. 23. From near London £290., with £10. for myself.—From a Bristol wholesale house 10 boxes of oranges, 10 boxes of figs, and a sack of nuts.—Dec. 30. Received £105. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, Through the utterly unmerited goodness of God, I am able to send you the enclosed cheque, on behalf of the Orphans placed by Him under your care. Please to apply £95. to the maintenance of the Orphans, and accept of the remaining £10. for yourself.—Were I to tell you of the circumstances, which have led to my sending you this money (although they would not surprise you), so remarkable were they, that "the children of this world" could not be expected to believe them—literally true as they were nevertheless.—I have therefore only to add, that my continual hope and desire is, that God’s best blessing may still be with you in your great work. Believe me, dear Mr. Muller, Yours very sincerely, ****."

Jan. 1st, 1883. Received £13. 8s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have much pleasure in sending you, as usual, the contents of our Orphan box, and also, because of what we have seen of the excellence of the training in your Institution in the servant we have, I add to the contents of the box enough to support one Orphan. I remain, dear Sir, Yours faithfully, ****."—Jan. 2. From Christian friends at Princes Street Room, Bath, £12. and some articles.—From Glamorgan £30.—Jan. 3. A gentleman had asked the question, whether we were in need of funds. When £100. was very kindly sent by him for the Institution, this question was not answered, because we speak only to God about these matters; and now, today, this gentleman sent us £1000. for the Orphans.—Received again from the donor at McKeesport, Ale County, £10.—Jan. 6. From one of the Midland counties £70.—Jan. 9. Believers meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £32. 13s.—Received on Jan. 10 the following letter from one of the former Orphans on completing his apprenticeship as Pupil Teacher and becoming an assistant master in one of our Day Schools. The letter was addressed to Mr. Wright. "Dear and respected Sir, It is with great pleasure and feelings of gratitude for the unwearied and unceasing kindness I experienced under the fatherly care of dear Mr. Muller and yourself, both during the years spent among the boys, and also those of pupil teacher, that, at the close of my apprenticeship, I write this note, to acknowledge it all, and still thank you for the further kindness in retaining me as an assistant teacher, with the means of providing comfortably for myself.—I can now look back on those years at the ‘Home,’ with heartfelt gratitude to my Heavenly Father, who so highly favoured me, and many others, with religious teaching while under such protection; and it is but the outcome of it, which inspires me with these grateful feelings; for it was my spiritual birth-place, where my lost and helpless condition as a sinner, and Christ as my Saviour and Friend, were by the Holy Spirit revealed to me. He has not failed to keep His holy promise; for surely I can say, ‘He has been a Father to the fatherless; and, trusting in Him, He will preserve me till the battle of this short life is past.’ I fervently pray, that the Lord will continue to bless Mr. Muller and yourself, with all the helpers in the many branches of the work to which you are called, and that you may long be spared to see still more of the fruits of your labours in God’s vineyard. I remain, Dear Sir, Yours most respectfully, ****."—Jan. 10. Received from Basle 500 Francs as the legacy of the late Miss L. B., and from the readers of the "Yolks Bote" 630 Francs.—£2. as "A thank-offering for restored health, after nearly twelve months’ illness."—Jan. 24. Received £1. 16s. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, We enclose an order for £1. 16s. for the dear Orphans. We decided to put by two pence per week when married, and have been married four years. This is our first donation, we wish it were larger. We are only working people, but feel it a privilege to be able to give our mite towards such a noble work, for Jesus’ sake. Yours in the Lord Jesus, ***."—From Edgbaston £200.—Jan.26. From Cork £50.—Jan. 27. From Dublin £100. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, On the 25th November last I sent you £50., and gave an account of how it came about that I so increased my usual donation. I find now, having made up my books to the end of the year, that I have a much greater surplus than I had expected, and have a difficulty in deciding as to how to dispose of it. I, however, have no hesitation in sending to you the first and largest instalment, as it was by reading your Narrative I first learned that it was my duty to give proportionately and statedly of my income to the Lord’s work. Please find enclosed first half Note £100.; and, unless you otherwise wish, I desire it to go for the support of the Orphans. Trusting you continue to enjoy good health, and that all your work continues to prosper, yours truly, ****."—Received £152. for the support of twelve Orphans for one year, together with £10. 10s. for myself.

Feb. 1. From a baker 160 quarterns of bread, "The average daily amount baked by me during the year ending March, 1879."—From Christians meeting at the Assembly Hall, Melbourne, Australia, £5.—Feb. 2. 102 pairs of infants’, children’s and women’s boots.— £25. "A widow’s mite. An intended legacy, paid during life."—Feb. 5. From a Swansea donor £50.—Feb. 6. From Burnham £50.—Feb. 13. £1. 9s. 6d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose you, with much pleasure, £1. 9s. 6d. for the Lord’s work in your hands. Instead of sending nine pence on each empty cask, (as before), I send you 1s. each on 7, and 1s. 6d. each on 15 empty casks, making £1. 9s. 6d. All I have sold, since I sent to you before. I meant just to say, I have had a better price for them this winter, than I have had for a long time, and a better sale for oil. I take it as the Lord’s blessing; and may it be to the praise of His name. The 6d. is for Report, whenever you have it ready. Yours very sincerely, ****."—Feb. 14. From Belgium £1. 19s. 7d.—Feb. 15. £2., "Part of a thank-offering for the conversion of my only remaining son."—Feb. 17. From Nottingham £50.—Feb. 20. From McKeesport, Ale County, £10.—Feb. 21. From Weston-super-Mare £60.—Feb. 23. From Church Stretton £30.

March 5. From Ventnor £53. 18s. for the support of 4 Orphans for one year.—From Rome £20.—March 17. £1. "In remembrance of being permitted to see a golden birthday."—March 20. £1. "The result of one farthing per gallon (for coffee sold), put into a box by the wife of the manager of a coffee palace."—March 21. From Croydon £50.—March 26. From one of the Midland counties £50.—March 28, From Maidstone £78. 0s. 10d.—March 30. £7. 10s. with this statement: "A thank-offering to our Father in Heaven for a legacy lately left me."—March 31. "Instead of buying a gold watch" £25. May the Lord abundantly recompense the donor for this act of self-denial, and may he continue thus to live for God!

April 5. From Birmingham £100.—April 6. "From an Orphan who was thirteen years under our care, and who is now in Canada," 5 dollars.—April 7. Legacy of the late Mrs. A. K. £200.—From Manchester £20.—April 10. From Leicester £300.—From Yorkshire £200.—From Bromley £20.—April 13. From one of the Midland counties £70.—From Wolverhampton 10 sacks of oatmeal and 5 sacks of blue peas.—From Servia £100.—April 16. Legacy of the late A. W., Esq. £500. The gentleman who left this legacy, as in so many cases, was an entire stranger to us.—April 17. From Wotton-under-edge £100. The same Christian gentleman, who had sent us already £100. £500. and £1000. during this period, kindly added this other donation to his former ones.—April 18. From a Bristol donor £60. for the support of 5 Orphan girls for one year, and £40. for the support of 3 Orphan boys.— £10. from a lady as "A thank-offering for her husband’s recovery from illness."—April 20. Legacy of the late Mr. J. O. £1000.

May 26. From Basle £22. 18s. 6d. "Being the value of 250 francs from the south of Russia, and of 330 francs as a result of meetings held in Basle in 188l."—From Manchester £20.—By sale of dentist gold, gold and silver watches, coins, diamonds, and jewellery, £153., with £10. for jewellery for the First Four Objects.—

The Lord was graciously pleased to help us, not only to meet all the expenses connected with the Orphan Institution, though they amounted altogether to £26,693. 12s. 10¼d., but also to close the year with £2266. 19s. 7¼d. in hand. We praise and magnify Him for this kindness!

Means for the support of the Two Thousand and One Hundred and Sixty Orphans, who were under our care from May 26, 1883, to May 26, 1884, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1883, to May 26, 1884, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

May 30. From South Australia £53., with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Will you kindly receive for the poor Orphans under your care the enclosed donation of Fifty-Three Pounds. I send this to you for them as a thank-offering to Almighty God, for His longsuffering and gracious dealings to me and mine in this foreign land. Pray for us, that we may walk worthy of an entrance into His heavenly rest. From a friend in Australia."

June 2. From Philadelphia 200 dollars (£40. 19s. 8d.)—June 5. From Sydney £30.—June 9. From one of the former Orphans, now in service, 4s., with the following letter: "Respected Sir, It is with feelings of gratitude I now avail myself of the opportunity of writing to congratulate you on your return from your mission work. I think of you daily, and pray that God will bless all your effort of labour and love for Him. It is a great comfort to know, that our heavenly Father does answer the prayers of His needy children. I pray that you may long be spared to carry on this great and noble work of winning souls for the dear Saviour. I have to bless God for placing me under your kind care in such a comfortable, happy home; but for that, I might never have known my dear loving Saviour. It is now nine years since I stepped into the liberty of the children of God. True happiness is found in Him alone. I ask you, dear Sir, to accept the enclosed mite, and trust dear Mrs. Muller, Mr. and Mrs. Wright and yourself are quite well. With much gratitude, your Orphan, ****."—June 22. £10. "Instead of insuring against hail stones."—The following letter was received from one of the Orphans who had been a Christian pupil teacher at the Orphan Houses, and who at this time was sent out as assistant teacher to one of our Day Schools. "Dear and respected Sir, Just a few lines, to thank you for the most comfortable home you have provided for me. It is a happy home indeed. I like my work very much, although I find the children not the same; but I hope, by God’s help, to prove an honour to you.—I must thank you for all the care and love I received while in the dear old home for twelve years. I am sure I should never have been provided for in such a way anywhere else. How clearly God’s hand can be seen in everything! I hope you and dear Mrs. Muller are quite well. We all remember you at family prayer and alone. We are all well here. The old pupil teachers wished to be remembered to you. Believe me ever to remain yours with much gratitude, ****."—From Clevedon, a number of pieces of material, a pair of skates, and a great variety of other articles.

July 10. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £200.—July 13. From Cheddar 119 pairs of socks.—July 14. From Liverpool 20 boxes of soap.—July 18. By sale of a little carriage £11.—July 19. With Matthew xix., 13-15, £100.—July 21. £2. 3s. 1d. from Beaver Falls, Pensylvania, U. S. A., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I commenced this year by systematically putting aside for you one cent. for each package shipped by my firm, and enclose you herewith £2. 3s. 1d. etc."—July 31. From the Mumbles 1 soup ladle, 14 table spoons, 9 tea spoons, 3 egg spoons, 2 sugar tongs, 4 salt spoons, 3 tea caddy spoons (all of silver), 2 rings, an old gold watch, and 2 boxes containing a great variety of clothing, etc.

Aug. 17. When we began this period, we had on May 27 in hand for the support of the Orphans £2266. 19s. 7¼d. This balance was today reduced to £111; but the Lord sent in £239.—Aug. 18. Having paid out yesterday and this morning £365. 17s. 5d. for the Orphans, and having only received £26. this morning, our balance was reduced this afternoon to £10. 2s. 7d. Think of this, dear Reader! Day by day about 2100 persons are to be provided for in the Orphan Institution, and £10. 2s. 7d. was all that was in hand to do this. You see that we are just in the same position in which we were 46 years since as to funds. God is our banker. In Him we trust, and on Him we draw by faith. This was Saturday. In the evening £30. was received. On Monday we received £129. further, but had to pay out £60. On Tuesday we received £295., but had to pay out £180.—Aug. 20. From Norfolk £27. 6s. for the support of four Orphans for six months.—Aug. 21. From Preston £146. 8s. 2d.—From Ale County, U. S. A., £10.—Five hampers of fish.—Aug. 23. £13. 13s. for the support of one Orphan for one year from Rickmansworth.—From Manchester £20.—From Madeira £13. for the support of one Orphan one year.—Aug. 24. From Preston 22 suits of boys’ clothes and 2s., with £2. 10s. for myself.—Aug. 25. From Wotton-under-edge £200 from a Christian gentleman. As the Lord is pleased by death to remove donors, or to take away from them the ability to continue to help us, or to direct their means into other channels; so also He raises up new donors, or inclines the hearts of those who have helped us before, to do this more abundantly. Thus the Christian gentleman, last referred to, has during the last three years helped us far more abundantly than before. God is pleased continually to vary His mode of dealing with us, in order that we may not be tempted to trust in donors, or in circumstances, but in Him alone, and to keep our eye fixed upon Him. This, by His grace, we are enabled to do, and our hearts are kept in peace.—By sale of dentist gold, plate and jewellery, £39. 12s. 3d.— £10. "From a happy husband and father, on his 15th wedding day, in token of thankfulness to the Father of us all."—Received the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I have to thank you for a copy of the Report, and am sending it to a friend of mine in North Devon. It is indeed a marvellous work you have been enabled to carry on, and I pray God will spare you yet many years to continue it. In travelling from Bath to Oxford in the month of February this year, I went in the same carriage alone as far as Didcot, with one of your Orphan girls, who was going to her ‘first place’ in London. Her manners were all that could be desired and, entering into conversation with her, I was greatly interested in all that she told me about her life at the New Orphan House No. 2, where she had been carefully nursed and trained ever since she was about two years old, and taught to be useful. She was now launched forth to gain her own living; and, if one might judge from appearances, she went forth with a healthy body and a well cultivated mind. She spoke most highly too of ALL, and was so simple and unobtrusive. I have often thought of and talked about her since. Her trust and confidence were very charming. At Swindon I said, ‘If you wish to get out, there is plenty of time.’ She said, ‘No, I must not get out until I get to Paddington.’ ‘And supposing there should be no one to meet you, what shall you do?’ She said (smiling), ‘Just stand by my box till some one comes and calls me by name.’—Dear girl, I hope there are many like her, who will have to thank God and you for what you have done for them.—It was owing to this little incident that I sent you the few things I collected together, and only wish it was in my power to help you largely with my substance. Our prayers need have no limit. Matthew vii. 11.—May I ask for your prayers and intercessions for myself, and for ten children, who were suddenly made Orphans in 1867 without a moment’s notice, that we may be found in the way of righteousness through Jesus Christ our Lord. Believe me yours faithfully, ****."

Sept. 20. From Adelaide, Australia, £20.—Sept. 26. £2. with the following letter: " Dear Mr. Muller, I received your Report this morning and return you my best thanks for it. I determined to send the enclosed £2. as a thank-offering to God for His great goodness to me and my dear wife during a time of severe trial. We have just lost a very dear girl, and had a confinement the day before the funeral, as well as another illness in the house; but the Lord has helped us thus far most wonderfully, and we wish not only to thank Him with our lips, but in a more substantial manner. I hasten to write now, because you will be leaving for India tomorrow. May the presence of the Lord be with you, and may it be a more prosperous tour spiritually than even your European ones, if possible. Yours very sincerely in Christ, ****."—Sept. 27. From Westbury-on-Trym 185 quarterns of bread.—£40. 9s. 3d. with the following letter from one of the former Orphans: "Dear and respected Sir, I have very great pleasure in sending the enclosed cheque for £40. 9s. 3d. from my brother-in-law, which he wishes to be taken for the Orphans. With deep gratitude for all the kindness I received while in the dear Orphan House, and kind remembrance to all the dear teachers who remember me, I remain yours respectfully and affectionately, ****."

Oct. 8. From South Australia £20. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I enclose a draft for £20., as a little assistance to the great work in which you are engaged.—It is a long time since I had the privilege of sending you money help, though you were the means (about forty years ago) of my ‘trusting the Lord.’ You know what that means. Words cannot express it. And all these years He has never cast me off; but the older I get, the more real and precious is the glorious gospel to my soul. I hesitate to occupy your time, but it may cheer you in your labour of love to know of another instance of God owning your work. Try to imagine what it has done for me these forty years.—For a long time I have thought it my duty to assist widows and fatherless relatives, also religious works in this country, and that these would suffer, in proportion as I gave to other objects. But this is a mistake. It is limiting the power of God, I know now; so I am able to enclose to you this thank-offering to the Lord for so many mercies. Yours in the believer’s Hope, ****."—Oct. 9. 16s. from North Petherton, "Saved by not taking sugar in tea."—Oct. 22. From New Zealand £10. 10s. as "A thank-offering to the Lord for great and many mercies and support under affliction and bereavement."—Oct. 27. From "The Coffee Palace at Merton 10s., the result of a farthing a gallon for Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa made in this Coffee Palace since Aug. 25."—From Great Tew £19. 9s. 10d., and from Clevely £2. 13s. 2d. as "A harvest thank-offering."—Oct. 29. From M. D. £100.

Nov. 2. In 41 coupons £153. 14s. 7d. from a donor who has repeatedly helped us in a similar way.— £51. 12s. "From one whose heart is in heaven."—Nov. 8. From Cambridgeshire £89. 8s.—From Smyrna £1.—Nov. 16. From a friend at Burnley £50.—From a Bristol firm a box of sewing cotton.—One of the masters of the New Orphan House No. 1 writes: "I am glad to be able to state that during the past year we have seen evidences of spiritual blessing among the boys, and we have not a few in the school at the present time, who profess to love the Lord Jesus, and whose daily life shows that they have indeed been born again; and whilst there are a few whose conduct does not so manifestly give proof of a spiritual birth, we are encouraged to hope that we may be enabled through Christ to teach them also the necessity of living as well as professing Christ."—A guinea piece.—Nov. 21. From Newark, New Jersey, £20.—Nov. 23. "From the haven of peace" £5.—Nov. 26. £10. from Ale County, U. S. A., with the following letter: "Dear Brother, This is a stormy morning. I was led to think how my Heavenly Father had taken care of every parcel I have sent to you these three years across the wide ocean, and what storms they have encountered, and my thoughts have been carried further back. It is about forty-four years, since first I prayed to God, and shed tears over sin, and I feel sure they are not lost, nor forgotten by Him. Yours in the good work, ****."—From Liverpool a ruby and diamond ring, and a solid gold ring.—Nov. 28. From Yorkshire £200.—From Beckenham £20., and from Islington £10. 1s., with £5. for myself. We had scarcely anything left for the Orphans when these three donations were received.

Dec. 1. From Ale County, U. S. A., £10.—Dec. 3. From a Bristol firm 16 half boxes of Valencia raisins, 2 cases of currants, and 8 barrels of flour, for the Christmas puddings of the Orphans.—Dec. 7. From Carlton, Australia, £2., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Please to accept for the Orphans this small thank-offering for many mercies. You will like to know, that in this far off land we pray for you and your work. My daughter died June 7 at Ballarat. She never forgot the good she received from your and Mr. Craik’s preaching when she was young. That God may continue His blessing to you to the end, is the prayer of yours sincerely, ****."—From Maryborough, Australia £100.—Dec. 7. Day after day, for many days, our balance in hand for the Orphans has been very small. Yesterday, when all expenses had been met, £34. 14s. remained in hand. This morning £256. 7s. 8d. came in, so that we had £291. 1s. 8d.; but the expenses of the day were so great, that the last sovereign was called for, and we had nothing at all left.—Dec. 8. £140. 2s. 4d. came in today; but all was called for again, and thus, up to Dec. 12, we were continually, day by day, without any balance in hand, though helped day by day.—In this state of things we continued till Dec. 19, when our balance was reduced to £7. 0s. 4d. I mention these particulars, because some of my readers may suppose that our trials of faith with reference to means existed only 46 years ago. Ever since the commencement of the work, we have gone on in the same way, and have acted on the principles on which the Institution was first begun. See therefore, Christian Reader, how truly blessed it is to have real trust in God; not only to say I rely upon God, but in reality to do so. Our daily average expenses for the Orphans alone amount to £73., and all we had left on Dec. 19, 1883, amounted to £7. 0s. 4d.—Dec. 8. From Wotton-under-edge £100. This kind donor has helped us within the last three years again and again considerably, when we were in great need, of which of course he knew nothing, because we make our wants known to our Heavenly Father only.—From Newark, New Jersey, £10. 5s. 4d.—Dec. 11. From South Australia £6. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, The day after reading your Report last year, I saw one of my bullocks was very bad. The thought struck me, if he gets better, I will sell him and send the proceeds to Mr. Muller. Well, he got better, I sold him to the butcher, and enclose the proceeds. Wishing you continued success in your noble undertaking, and that God may spare your life for many years to carry on your work, I am, dear Sir, yours truly, ****."—Dec. 24. From Aberdeen 50 pairs of boots.—From Redland 15 gross packets of sweets, each containing a miniature tool, with a Christmas card attached.—427 apples.—From a Bristol wholesale house 20 cases of oranges, 1 bag of nuts, 4 mats of figs, and a box of raisins.—Dec. 26. From a "Mother" £21.—From Bedminster 109 quarterns of bread.—Dec. 29. From a Bristol firm 2 cases of currants.—Dec. 31. The Lord has helped us through another year. Again and again all our means for the support of the Orphans were completely expended, so that not a single sovereign remained in hand, yet the Lord has not allowed us to be confounded. Whenever our money was gone, He again appeared on our behalf; we ended the year with a balance of £572. 15s. 5d. in hand, and, trusting in Him we entered in peace upon the new year.

Jan. 1, 1884. Of the many donations received on this day, I only mention the following. From Manchester £20. from a donor who has kindly helped us many times in a similar way.—From the neighbourhood of Melksham £10.—From Clifton £15.—From the neighbourhood of Flax Bourton £10.—From Tring £10.—From Cardiff £30.—From St. Gallen, Switzerland, £1. 7s. 8d.—From Maidstone £76. 14s. 8d.—Jan. 4. From Merthyr Tydvil £1. 5s. 6d. as "The result of my labours on New Year’s Day."—Jan. 8. A deposit certificate for £100. of the Liberator Permanent Benefit Building Society, as the legacy of the late Mrs. S. S. D.—Jan. 9. £60. from one of the Midland Counties.—From Believers’ meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £31. 12s. 11d.—Jan. 11. From Cork £50.—Jan. 19. Legacy of the late Mr. J. F. Y., £459. 8s. 4d.—From Wotton-under-edge £100.—Jan. 21. From Stuttgart £10.—Jan. 22. From one of the Midland Counties £60.—Jan. 25. Legacy of the late G. S. G., Esq., £500.—From "The Hope Coffee Palace, Merton," 14s. with the following letter: "Miss F. has much pleasure in sending Postal Order to the value of 14s. as the result of her manager’s wife putting one farthing into a box for every gallon of tea and coffee she makes. Miss F. believes much of the prosperity, which she rejoices to say accompanies the work in this place, is the result of this small offering. She asks for continued prayer, especially for a mission to commence next Saturday, conducted by G. S."

Feb. 6. From Kent £1. 10s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have sent you £1. 10s. out of the Lord’s treasury. I do so wish more of God’s people would adopt the systematic way of giving to the Lord, as He prospers them. Nature creeps in and robs the soul of a great blessing, and also robs the pocket. The Lord gives bountifully to those who give by faith to Him. It does away with that very unpleasant word, ‘I cannot afford it.’ I give so much every Lord’s day morning out of every £1. I take in my business. Yours in the bonds of Christian love, ****."—Feb. 8. Legacy of the late T. N. S., Esq., £100.—Feb. 18. Legacy of the late Mr. S. S. D., £90. 3s. 4d.—Feb. 19. £40. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I have sent you a cheque for £40. I have long since sent you a small sum each year, and I thought, as my age is getting on (I believe it is the same as yours) I would, as God gives me the opportunity, send what I can afford to your Institution. May God bless and prosper it as He has done hitherto, to the rescue of so many Orphans and the saving of souls. Yours faithfully, ****."—Feb. 26. From Sussex £189. 17s. 8d.—Feb. 27. From Bournemouth £50., with £10. for myself.

March 4. From H. G., the valuable donation of 25 cwt. of white lead, 5 cwt. of zinc white, 2 cwt. of driers, 3 cwt. of putty, and 1 cwt. 1 qr. of ochre.—March 6. From Weston-super-Mare £60.—March 10. From Ale County £10.—March 11. From one of the Midland Counties

£50.—March 13. From Ventnor £53. 18s. for the support of 4 Orphans for one year.

April 1. From Manchester £30.—April 2. By post, 2 sets and 4 pieces of artificial teeth, set in gold, and a small gold ornament.—From Yorkshire £200. This kind donor, whom God has raised up for the Institution within the last eight years, has helped us again and again in a similar manner in our need, without knowing of it. I state, without knowing about it; for we never make known our wants. The reason why we refrain from this, is not because we consider it sinful to let our Christian friends know that we are without means for the work of the Lord, but because, from the beginning, the Orphan Institution had for its especial object to strengthen the faith of Christians and to encourage them increasingly to give themselves to prayer in all their necessities; we desire also to show to an unbelieving and sceptical age, how much, even in the nineteenth century, can be accomplished by prayer and faith. On this account I never speak about the state of the funds, except in the yearly Reports, and all my fellow-labourers are requested to refrain from doing so when we are in need, in order that the hand of God, in sending to us help, simply in answer to prayer, may be clearly seen.—April 7. From Landport, a gold ring set with rubies.—April 8. From E. F. Two Argentine Bonds of £100. each.—From Edinburgh £25., "A widow’s mite, an intended legacy, paid during life."—April 16. From one of the Midland Counties £70.—April 19. From Wotton-under-Edge £100.—April 28. From Lahore, Punjaub, 100 rupees.—From Delhi 100 rupees.—From Pontypridd, 124 pairs of boots and shoes.

May 1. From Bath, for the support of one Orphan for one year £15.—In the previous part of the narrative many donations are referred to, in which donors gave the average expenses of one, two, three, four, six, and eight Orphans for one year, and thus, out of the 2160 Orphans who were under our care, during the past year, 54 were provided for. The sum sent was not always the same; sometimes a little too much, sometimes too little. The reason probably being this, that these donors did not refer to the last page of the previous Report, where the amount for the past year is always stated. During the last year the average expense for the support of one Orphan was £12. 17s. 8d. The price of provisions, the quantity of provisions, or material for clothes sent to us, the various expenses connected with the buildings, all these and other items affect the yearly expenditure for the support of the Orphans. May 10. From M. C. B., a gold pin, set with a diamond.—May 12. From Redland, a silver teapot.—May 13. From Mhow, Central India, 300 rupees and 100 rupees.—May 14. From Hastings 370 loaves of bread.—May 15. By sale of dentist gold £41.—Other amounts, besides this, have been received in the course of the past year by the sale of dentist gold. I take this opportunity of stating, that year by year gold and silver watches many articles of jewellery, plate, gold, and silver coins, new and second hand clothes, and many hundreds of other articles, are sent to us for sale. We have no bazaars, but sell these things in the ordinary way at No. 34, Park Street, where a room is fitted up for the purpose. By sale of such articles we have received from the commencement of the Orphan work £22,507. 8s. 8½d., and during the past year £386. 10s. 1½d.—May 16. From Stoke Bishop £31. 10s., with £1. 10s. for myself.—From a Coffee Palace, Merton, £1. 4s., being one farthing on every gallon of tea or coffee sold to working men.—May 17. From St. Marychurch £50.—From Edgbaston £200.— May 21. From Rockleaze £104. 9s. 6d.—May 26. Though many times during our past financial year all our money was gone, yet the Lord allowed us to see the close of the year, as the result of continued believing prayer, with a balance of £421. 16s. 3d. in hand for the Orphans.

Means for the support of the Two Thousand One Hundred and Ten Orphans, who were under our care during the year from May 26, 1884 to May 26, 1885, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

26, 1884 to May 26, 1885, sent in answer to prayer, Letters from Donors and Orphans, Practical remarks, etc.

Our balance in hand on May 27, 1884, was £421. 16s. 3d., which was only enough to last six days for the average expenditure for the support of the Orphans, though sometimes we pay away more than double this amount in one day. There was therefore again much need to stay ourselves upon God, in order that our hearts might be in peace. This, however, by His grace, we were able to do.

I will now give specimens of the manner in which it pleased the Lord to supply us with means.

May 28, 1884. From Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, £1. 10s., £5., £1. 17s., £1., £1., £1., £1., 15s., and 10s. 6d.—From Glasgow £1. 17s. 11d. This donor sends us help as God prospers him in his business.

June 7. From Edgbaston £37. 10s.—From the neighbourhood of Auchterarder £20. 0s. 6d.—Legacy of the late G. J., Esq. £11,034. 6s. This is the largest donation I have ever received at one time. I have had £8,100., and £9,091., at once, but no more. This legacy had been above six years in Chancery, and year after year its payment was expected, but remained unsettled by the Chancery Court. I kept on praying, however, and for six years prayed day by day that the money might be paid, believing that Cod in His own time (which is always the best), would help at last; for many legacies in Chancery I had prayed out of the Court, and the money was eventually paid. In the present case, too, after faith and patience had been sufficiently exercised, God granted this request likewise. In addition to the £11,034. 6s. paid on June 7, 1884, £1,000., as part of this legacy, had by the Court been paid to me a long time before. The following points are also further to be noticed regarding the payment of this legacy:—1, When the money was paid, our balance in hand was only £41. 10s., a very little more than one-half of the average expenses for the Orphans for one day. How kind it was, therefore, of the Lord to give us this money when He did! 2, There were before us sanitary improvements to be carried out, which we were strongly advised to adopt, as, within the last ten years, so much scientific progress has been made in reference to sanitary operations connected with dwelling-houses, etc. But to carry out all these, many hundreds of pounds would be needed; it was therefore so kind of the Lord to give us the means to meet expenses which would amount to upwards of £2,000. 3, And it was, lastly, a great mercy that we at length obtained this money, because it carried us along without difficulty, in reference to pecuniary supplies, irrespective of the sanitary alterations, as our expenses in other respects were so heavy, and the income was not nearly equal to the expenditure. Will my readers therefore admire the kindness of God, together with us, in helping us as He did?

June 11. Received from one of the former Orphans the following letter with £1. 1s.: "Dear Sir, enclosed you will find Postal Orders for £1. 1s., being the contents of my little box for the Orphans since last summer, the sum being chiefly made up of odd pence and half-pence, and occasionally silver, as we were able to give, or from relatives visiting us. It is wonderful how this little effort has prospered, I believe by asking the Lord to bless it. What a large sum of money might be raised, if all the Orphans, as they leave the Orphan Houses, were to start a little box and ask God to bless it.—I heard from Mr. Weeks that he had told you of my dear sister [also a former Orphan] leaving for the Congo River Mission, Africa. You will be glad, dear sir, to know that they (that is, the Missionary party) reached Sierra Leone safely, and were all well at that time. They had a little stay at Madeira before that, and a Missionary there kindly fetched them in a boat, and took them all about the place. They saw the school, had breakfast, received some lovely flowers and fruit, and then returned to the ship, having enjoyed the little change very much. Dear Mary was very happy, feeling deeply how great is her privilege of carrying the glorious Gospel message to the dear heathen. We little thought how the Lord was leading us when He took our parents, and then sent us to the dear Orphan House, where we continually heard of His great love, and were constrained to give Him our hearts and lives. I bless and thank Him for all the way in which we were led, though at times it seemed dark enough. I pray that He will prepare me, and open up the way, that I too may go out to Africa as a missionary in His own good time, ****."

June 12. £1. as "a thank-offering for a merciful escape from what might have been a serious accident."—June 14, From Wotton-under-edge £100., with £25. for myself.—From Scotland £66. 6s. 8d.—June 26. Six barrels of arrowroot.—June 28. From Ireland, a gold watch and chain.

July 1. £10., instead of insuring 400 acres against hailstorms.—July 5. Legacy of the late Mr. G., £l00.—July 9. £13. 12s. 10d. for the support of one Orphan for one year, as "a thank-offering that the donor’s little boy has been spared another year."—Legacy of the late Mrs. M., £200.—July 14. From Clifton £50.—July 15. From one of the Midland Counties £70.—From London £50.— July 19. From a shepherd in Queensland £6—July 21. From Vevey, Switzerland, £100.

Aug. 1. From a Bristol donor £75. for the Orphan girls, and £50. for the Orphan boys.—Aug. 7. By sale of gold and silver articles, watches, etc., £55.—Aug. 11. 3 sets of artificial teeth, set in gold, and 8 pieces (set in gold), a gold mourning ring, 3 gold seals and watch key, a silver watch, a silver snuff-box, a gold wedding ring, a silver top, label, thimble, a brass seal, 2 breast-pins, and 2s.—From Yorkshire £200.—From the congregation at the Union Evangelistic Hall, Ootacamund, India, Rupees 62; from a friend, Rupees 50; and from Mrs. H., Rupees 13.—Aug. 13. £11. 6s., "being 1s. each on articles I sell many of."—Today a Christian brother from the United States of America called on me, and stated that he had been greatly blessed spiritually through my publications; also, that having obtained possession of some property through the death of his sister, he had come from America to know me personally, to see the Orphan Houses himself, and to hand over the whole of the legacy from his sister to the Institution. He subsequently paid me £694., and stayed about ten days in Bristol. See, esteemed reader, how God works for those who trust in Him! Were the real blessedness of this way known, how we carry on the work of God by depending on Him alone for help regarding everything, tens of thousands of our dear fellow-labourers, in their work for the Lord, would act on precisely the same principles also.—Aug. 14. From Wotton-under-edge £200., from a Christian gentleman on whose heart the Lord had especially laid this Institution of late years.—Aug. 15. From a Bristol donor £100.—From a young man, a former Orphan, £4., with a grateful letter.—Aug. 18. From "G., Preston," £146. 17s. 6d.—Received the following letter from London: "Dear Sir, You will, I have no doubt, recollect a lad of the name of H. W. J., who was apprenticed to me from your Institution ten years ago. I am sorry to say he died on the 3rd instant at one of our hospitals, after some weeks of intense suffering. He lived with me some years after the expiration of his apprenticeship, but he left me to take the management of a branch shop for a gentleman at Woolwich, and gave him very great satisfaction. Through ill health he was obliged to leave, and for the last two years, up to the time he went into the hospital he lived again with me. He was a member of the Church, and I believe a truly Christian young man. He has left a world of suffering to be for ever with his Saviour, and we are left to mourn his loss, yet we are not left without hope. I am, yours faithfully, ****."

Sept. 1. From a gentleman at Hanham £80. 14s. 11d.—Received £12. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, Many thanks for yours of the 3rd instant, with your advice to put my trust in the Lord. How I wish I could do it more sincerely! I do endeavour to do so, but feel myself falling very short of what I wish to do. I may say for your comfort, that I was expecting an answer to your prayer about the time you would be receiving my letter, and was awaiting God’s reply in a turn towards recovery of my child from her suffering. I am now praising the Lord that she has been getting better, and as a thank-offering to Him I now enclose you the first half of a £10. note, believing that she will be spared to us. I could not pray for her recovery, but simply said ‘Thy will be done,’ which, I am happy to find, is to allow us to bring her up; and may we do this in the fear of the Lord! Enclosed you will also find two postal orders, to the value of £2., which are thank-offerings as follows: One night last week I fancied one £10. note I had was a bad one, which troubled me, but I promised the Lord, should it be a good one, I would send its tenth towards His cause. Thus I send 20s. from another different channel towards His work (the note was good). The second 20s. is also a thank-offering for being able to accomplish a task which I had endeavoured to do the last two years. I promised the Lord the above 20s., if He would assist me to do it; and the first time I tried I was successful. Another answer to prayer. Yours very gratefully, ****."—Received 10s. 6d., with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, I received your Report on Saturday, for which I return my sincere thanks, and must acknowledge that the reading of your Reports and the two volumes of the Lord’s dealings with you (which you presented to my dear wife, when she was leaving the Orphan Houses in her seventeenth year) have done my soul more real good than anything I ever read, except the Book of Books. I hold the position of lay preacher, and leader of a class, consisting of 40 members, in a little mining district in the Methodist Free Church Connection. Had not the Lord strengthened my faith through the reading of your works, I feel sure that neither I, nor yet the class under my care, would be in the healthy, spiritual condition, which we enjoy today. I just mention this to show that your work and publications are accomplishing all that you intended, and very much more. It truly is the Lord’s doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes. I am still hoping that you may see your way clear to have a Mission tour through England, should your years and health permit; for there are many Orphans in this district, who have little families now growing up around them, whose hearts would rejoice greatly could they but once more see their kind benefactor; and not their’s only, but their children’s also. I enclose postal order for 10s. for the Orphans and 6d. for the Report. My wife joins me in congratulations on your safe return from India, and prayer that God’s richest blessing may attend all your work of faith and labour of love; and may you even in your last moments consciously enjoy the peace of God, ****."—Sept 12. From Ale County, U. S. A., £10.—Sept. 16. From the neighbourhood of Tenby £50.—Received also £1. 11s., with the following letter: "Sir, We forward you a Post Office Order for £1. 11s., this amount being a penny a day for one year, and sixpence for a Report, hoping God will spare you for a long time to watch over the Orphan Houses, that great monument of His, which stands as a great lighthouse, constraining all men who see it or hear about it to know that God’s footsteps are still seen in the earth, and that the sceptic may be left without excuse. May all the prayers of the people, whose desire is drawn out towards the Orphan Houses, be the means of strengthening your faith in God. We allow ourselves only one penny for our milk daily, that we may have one penny to give for the Orphans. We are a little reduced in our circumstances, but we think God requires this penny for some time yet, and He is sure to give it out of His bountiful store." Observe, esteemed reader, the variety of ways God uses to supply us with means, and that He not only sends us help through those who abound, but also through such as are in comparatively needy circumstances.—Sept. 16. From an "Old New Yorker," £5. 5s.—Sept. 19. From Yorkshire £100.—Sept. 23. £4. "being 1s. each on 80 chests of tea sold."—1. as "the proceeds of bees, kept for the benefit of the Orphans."—Sept. 30. "From a commercial traveller, £3. 12s., being money saved on my journey through travelling by third class trains."— £10. "as a thank-offering on the occasion of their wedding day, for past and present blessing from sinners saved by grace."

Oct. 3. From a shipowner and merchant £21. "in stead of paying insurance to underwriters, trusting in the Lord."—A tin box, containing 2 gold watches, 1 silver watch, 1 gold chain, 1 ring set with diamonds and rubies, a gold thimble, 6 brooches, 7 rings, 2 breast pins, a fur cape, some shawls and dresses, a great variety of other articles, and £1.—Oct. 9. Received £1. from one of the former Christian Orphans, with the following letter: "Dear and honoured Sir, Please accept the enclosed on behalf of the Orphans. I have now been away from the Home over 19 years, and can testify to God’s exceeding mercy and kindness to me. The enclosed handbills will show how I am able to employ my evenings; and although I did not learn shorthand at the Orphan Houses, yet I received a thoroughly sound education which helped me on, and gave me the desire to learn shorthand. I have at my different classes nearly 100 pupils. Then, too, as you may already know, I was able, successfully, to pass the open competitive examination for the Civil Service 11 years ago, and am now receiving £200. per annum, rising gradually to £350. I feel, therefore, that I have special mercies, for which to thank God; and lastly, for a goodly measure of health and strength through all these years. And may you, dear Sir, be spared yet for some years to come, to carry on all the good work at Bristol and elsewhere. Your obedient servant and old Orphan, ****."—Oct. 11. Received £1098. 19s. 11d. as the legacy of the late J. G., Esq. This legacy had been in Chancery since 1869. Continually I prayed about this legacy also, and at last, after faith and patience had been long exercised, and much prayer had been offered to the Lord, this legacy too was brought out of the Court, and thus twenty legacies, at least, I have been enabled to pray out of Chancery within the last forty-five years. I relate this for the encouragement of Christian friends.—Oct. 13. Received £50. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, will you kindly accept the enclosed for the benefit of the Orphans? I intended leaving to you at my death this amount, but think it better to give it during my lifetime. May I beg an interest in your prayers, that the Lord may keep me faithful to the end? That you may long be spared to be the Orphans’ friend, is the earnest prayer of yours sincere1y,****."—From Aberdeen the valuable donation of 16 sacks of oatmeal.—Oct. 18. From Manchester £50. 9s.—From Blandford £50.—Oct. 21. From Southport £50.—Oct. 22. 8 doz. table forks, 8 doz. dessert do., 3 doz. do. spoons, 3 dos. table do., 3 doz. tea do., and 1 dos. gravy do., all of nickel silver.—Oct. 27. Received £12. 17s. 8d. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, If my dear little girl should be spared until the 27th Oct. she will be 3 years old, and I desire, therefore, to show my gratitude to my gracious God for His exceeding great goodness, in sparing her to me for another year, by enclosing you a cheque for the maintenance of one Orphan for one year. Trusting the blessing of Almighty God may still rest upon you, yours faithfully, ****."

Nov. 6. From a Christian in business, who gives as the Lord prospers him, £97. 15a. 8d.—Nov. 7. From India a chest of tea.—Nov. 8. Legacy of the late Mrs. F. S. S. £100.—Nov. 10. From Clifton Down £50.—Nov. 12. From a merchant and shipowner £21., "instead of insurance of a steamer for three months, trusting in the Lord."—From Hewish a large cheese.—Nov. 20. Received three very grateful letters from three former Orphans, who had been appointed to the situation of assisting mistresses in some of our day schools.—Nov. 25. Received £5. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, Please accept the enclosed £5. for your Orphans from my dear wife and myself, as a small tribute of thankfulness to our Heavenly Father for another year’s domestic happiness, yesterday being the anniversary of our wedding-day. Please enter it from ‘Haven of Peace.’ Wishing you every blessing, both temporal and spiritual, believe me yours very respectfully, ****."—Nov. 27. From Canada five large cheeses.—Nov. 28. £5. "From a happy man since visiting the Orphans."

Dec. 1. Legacy of the late Mrs. C., after having been three years in Chancery, £329. 11s. 4d. Here is another legacy, a third during this year, which I have prayed out of Chancery.—Received from the neighbourhood of London £100. with the following letter: "My dear Mr. Muller, I have much pleasure in handing you the enclosed £100. from my dear wife in aid of your great and good work. She had intended leaving this amount in her will; but, on consideration, she is led to think that it is more in accordance with the Lord’s mind that she give it in her lifetime. She is thus her own executor, and in every way I quite feel with her, that it is the better course. With our Christian love, and begging your prayers, I remain, yours in our Lord, ****."—Dec. 2. £1. 10s. with the following statement: "Twopence on each job of work the Lord has been pleased to bless me with during the year."—From six friends at Barnstaple £5. each, and from one £2.—Dec. 3. From Wales £80., with £20. for myself.—From Southampton £14. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, A debt of £140. having this day been unexpectedly paid me, I have great pleasure in sending you the enclosed cheque for £14. in aid of your excellent Orphanage. I should like £10. to be placed to the Orphans’ account, and £4. kindly accept yourself."—Dec. 6. £5. from one of the former Orphans towards the Christmas treat of the Orphans.—Dec. 12. Received £5. with the following letter: "Dear Mr. Muller, When a youth, I decided to unite with the Lord’s children, at the risk of losing all my earthly prospects. I am now approaching my ‘three-score and ten,’ and the Lord has dealt bountifully with me, and kept me, and I am well able to send for the Orphanage the enclosed cheque for £5."—Dec. 13. Received £2. 12s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I enclose £2. 12s. for the support of the Orphans, a thank-offering to my Heavenly Father for hearing and answering prayer. I have had a dispute with my employer about some claims for commission, which he refused to pay, without either legal or moral excuse for doing so. It appeared likely to lead to litigation and annoyance. Encouraged by your example, I made the case a matter of fervent prayer—in fact, placed it in the Lord’s hands, and promised, if it was arranged without litigation, to give 5 per cent, of the money I received as a thank-offering to the fund of your Orphanage. I have this day received £52. in amicable settlement of my claims, and now forward you Post Office Order for £2. 12s."—Dec. 16. Received a grateful letter from one of the Orphans, who, after having been thirteen years in the Orphan Houses, as one of the boys and as pupil teacher, was appointed as assistant master to one of our day schools.—From a Bristol wholesale house 8 barrels of flour, 1 barrel of currants, and 16 quarter boxes of Valentias, for the children’s Christmas puddings.—Dec. 17. From Cheltenham a gold watch.—Dec. 18. Received £90. for the support of 6 Orphans for one year.—Dec. 19. From Scotland £2., with this letter: "Dear Sir, Enclosed are £2. in aid of the Orphans. This sum is part of the amount I used to pay for fire insurance. I have asked God to protect my property from danger, and I give Him the sum I was in the habit of paying."—From New Jersey, U.S.A., £20.—Dec. 20. From a Bristol wholesale house, 16 boxes of oranges, 8 do. raisins, and 3 barrels of currants, for the treat of the children.—Dec. 22. From near London £190. with £10. for myself.—From a Bristol donor 15 gross packets of sweets, each with a Christmas card, for the Orphans.—Dec. 26. From Finland, Russia, £2.—10 boxes of oranges, 10 do. figs, and a bag of nuts, from a Bristol wholesale house.—Dec. 30. From Westmoreland £100.—From S. S. £50.—Dec. 31. From Westmoreland £40. with £10. for myself.—From Christians meeting at Prince’s Street Meeting Room, Bath, £13. 13s.—From North Adelaide, South Australia, £16. 5s. 6d. in 52 donations,—Thus ended the year 1884, during which we had been tried, greatly tried, in various ways, no doubt, for the exercise of our faith, and to make us know God more fully; but during which we had also been helped and blessed, and greatly helped and blessed. Peacefully, then, we were able to enter upon the year 1885, fully assured, that, as we had God FOR US and WITH US, ALL, ALL would be well!

Jan. 1, 1885. Of the very many donations which came in this day, I only refer to a very few. From Penarth £30.—From E. M., Clifton, £15.—From the neighbourhood of Launceston £8. 10s. 6d.—From London £25.—From Manchester £20.—From Clifton Down £10.—Jan. 6. 10s. from an Hotel Proprietor, "being one penny per night for each visitor occupying a bed during the past quarter."—Jan. 9. Received from Wales 17s. 2d., being the result of the labour of the donor on the first day of the new year.—Jan. 13. From our Sunday Schools in Barcelona, Spain, £2. 6s.—Jan. 16. From Believers’ meeting at Sand Area Chapel, Kendal, £34. 2s. 4d.—Jan. 17. Received 12s. with the following letter: "Enclosed I beg to hand you Post Office Order for 12s. for the Lord’s treasury. The Lord has been bringing some of my former sins to remembrance, and I desire to restore that which I took falsely away. The first item happened about 15 years ago. I was a steward on board of an American steamer running from New York to American ports. One morning I found a silver dollar, lost by a cabin passenger, and enquiry was made; but I denied having the dollar. Could I see that gentleman now, I would confess to him and humbly ask his forgiveness. But there is no way of finding him out. 2nd item. I was in the firm of Messrs. —— nearly 20 years ago, and one day I defrauded them of 4s. 6d. on the wages-sheet for men’s time. They became bankrupts, and I left. If this firm were in existence, I would gladly confess to them and restore. 3rd item. Twenty-seven years ago a boy whom I knew robbed a drawer in a public house, and gave me 1s. 6d. of the money, which I knew to be stolen; but I do not remember the name; so I thought to send 10s. to you, with 2s. as the fifth part, according to Leviticus vi. 1—5, for the Orphans. I would have done this long ago, but have not had the money. I have asked the Lord to forgive me, and trust you will pray for me." Restitution is the revealed will of God. If it is omitted, while we have it in our power to make it, guilt remains on the conscience, and spiritual progress is hindered. Even though it should be connected with difficulty, self-denial and great loss, it is to be attended to. Should the persons who have been defrauded be dead, their heirs are to be found out, if this can be done, and restitution is to be made to them. But there may be cases when this cannot be done, and then only the money should be given to the Lord for His work or His poor. One word more. Sometimes the guilty person may not have grace enough, if the rightful owners are living, to make known to them the sin; under such circumstances, though not the best and most scriptural way, rather than have guilt remaining on the conscience, it is better to make restitution anonymously than not at all. About fifty years ago, I knew a man under concern about his soul, who had defrauded his master of two sacks of flour, and who was urged by me to confess this sin to his late employer, and to make restitution. He would not do it, however, and the result was that for twenty years he never obtained real peace of soul till the thing was done.—Jan. 22. From Wooton-under-edge £100.—Jan 27. Received £3. 15s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, It has pleased God to spare me to reach the age of 75 years, in better health than I have been for several years at this season. This is a cause of very great thankfulness, and I now send you a cheque for £3. 15s., being a shilling for every year of the number I have attained. I esteem it a great privilege to be able to send you the enclosed, to help some of your little ones, and that you may train them in the fear and love of Him whom to know is Life Eternal. I pray that you may long be spared to carry on the blessed service of the Divine Master; and with best wishes for God’s continual guidance and strength, believe me, dear Sir, yours sincerely, ****."—Jan. 28. Legacy of the late F. R. Esq., £1,000. This gentleman I never saw, but God, in answer to our prayers brought before Him, day by day, inclined his heart to leave this amount to the Institution, and, at the same time, dispose the hearts of the executors to pay the legacy so soon; the will having been only proved ten weeks.—Jan. 31. From Maidstone £73. 5s.

Feb. 2. Received from Leicestershire £3. 15s. with the following letter: "Dear Sir, I have much pleasure in sending you the enclosed amount for the benefit of the Orphans under your care. I am sending you so much per head on the increase of all my stock for the year 1884—15 young calves, 1s. per head = 15s.; 58 lambs, 6d. per head = £1. 9s.; 22 pigs, 6d. per head = 11s.; arrears of former years, £1.; altogether £3. 15s." If God were thus habitually recognised as the giver, and if the first fruits were given back to Him, how different would the position of the children of God be, and how great would be the spiritual blessing in the hearts of donors if the love of Christ led them to act thus!—From Paisley 16 boxes of corn flour.—Feb. 3. Received £35. with the following letter, from the same shipowner and merchant who had recently insured twice before in the same way: "Dear Mr. Muller, Enclosed is a cheque for £35. for the support of the Orphans, instead of paying the same to underwriters for insurance of a steamer." The donor commits his steamers into the hands of the Lord, trusting in Him.—Feb. 28. From London £1. and a ring set with diamonds, rubies, and an emerald.

March 4. From the Isle of Wight £53. 18s. for the support of four Orphans for one year.—March 5. From Brislington £63. 17s. 6d.—March 11. From Believers at Ngaire, New Zealand £7. 7s. 6d.—March 12. From a Bristol donor £90. for the support of Orphan girls, and £35. for the support of Orphan boys.—March 13. From Weston-super-mare £60.—March 19. From Bristol donors 7 doz. shoe brushes, 28 doz. scrubbing brushes, 12½ doz. washing brushes, and 16 doz. mixed sort of brushes. A valuable donation for the use of the Orphan Institution, in which so many hundreds of brushes yearly are used.—March 25. Received from a great distance £2. 5s. with the following letter: "My dear Sir, I have never sent you anything before for the dear Orphans. I lost a sheep some time ago, and I felt sorry that it should be entirely lost, so I had it laid upon my heart that, if I sent you the price of it, the Lord would send it back. I told Him that if this was His will, I would be glad to send you the price of the sheep. The very next day a man found the sheep on a hill and brought it. I enclose, therefore, Post Office Order for £2. 5s. and may our loving Heavenly Father continue, through His people, to care for the dear Orphans."

Apr. 24. From Philadelphia £20.—Apr. 25. From the neighbourhood of Manchester £100.—Apr. 30. From Wotton-under-edge, £100.

May 5. Received 7s. 6d., with the following statement: "Enclosed are the first week’s earnings of my fatherless boy. Please use this small sum for the Orphans. The Lord has mercifully provided suitable employment for him near home, and we desire thus to express our thankfulness to Him."—May 9. From Bath, £40., as "a thank-offering to the Lord for help and deliverance under great depression in business."—May 13. Received from the neighbourhood of Hull 10s., with the following letter: "Dear Sir, Will you please to accept 10s. in the Lord’s name for the benefit of the Orphans? Five years ago He inclined us to put aside one penny a day for the Orphans, and thus we are enabled to send ten shillings three times a year. How many thousands of people, young and old, might lay aside so small a sum for the Lord’s sake, and thus gladden His heart in helping them." This letter shows how much may be accomplished by systematic giving to the poor or the work of God, even on the smallest scale.—May 15. Received the following letter from one of the former Orphans: "Dear Mr. Muller, It is now nearly ten years since I left your fatherly care. I was nine years an inmate of your home, and most sincerely thank you for the excellent education I received while under your care, which has enabled me to fill a very important and responsible situation. I have gradually risen from one stage to another, and am now managing entirely a Branch Post Office. I thought you would be pleased to hear of my success in life. My cousin, H. B., wrote you a little time ago respecting some books for distribution. I can assure you he, under God, has been the means of turning a great many from darkness to light, to God as their Saviour, and the books and pamphlets would be used in a good cause. He and a friend are labouring amongst some of the poorest outcasts of London. Will you please accept my warmest thanks for your past fatherly care? Believe me, yours respectfully, ****."—May 23. From Manchester, £20.—From a Bristol donor, £100.—May 26. This last day of our financial year a number of donations came in, amounting altogether to £82.

During the past year the average expenses for 47 Orphans were contributed by donors paying for one, two, three, four, and in one instance even for six Orphans. Thus, out of the two Thousand one Hundred and Ten Orphans who were under our care during the year, 47 were provided for.

In the course of the last year £14,647. 0s. 4d. came in by way of legacies, a greater amount than we have ever had during any similar period. If donors desire that legacies left by them to the Institution should really be received by us, they must kindly have the legacy inserted in the will minutely, according to the form which will be found on the last page of the Reports.

As in former years, so again during the past year, thousands of articles, new and second hand, have been sent, and ladies have again been engaged in making articles of linen, etc., for the use of the Orphans, or to be sold for their benefit. During the past year £444. 1s. 8½d. came in by sale of articles; and from the commencement of the Institution, £22,951. 10s. 5d. has been received. We have no bazaars, but sell the articles at 34, Park Street, Bristol, in a room fitted up for the purpose.