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Free Books » Muller, George » A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings

A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller - Part 6.3 A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings by Muller, George

Index

CHAPTER III.

IN this chapter will be found the statistics of the Institution from May 26, 1873 to May 26, 1885, as to the number of the attendants, year after year, in the Day Schools, Sunday Schools, and Adult Schools; also how much was expended, year by year, on the schools, and the results of our labours, in the way of spiritual blessing, in so far as they are known. Further, it will be stated how many copies of the Holy Scripture were circulated, year by year, at what cost, and the spiritual results of these operations if any have come before us. Further, how many Missionaries at Home and Abroad were assisted, year after year; how much was expended on this part of the work; and what were the spiritual results of these operations. Further, it will be stated how many religious Tracts and Books were circulated, year by year, at what cost, and what has been the spiritual result of these labours, in so far as it is known. Lastly, how many Orphans were received and dismissed, year by year; how many each year were under our care, at what cost, and what were the spiritual results of this part of the work. In addition to these various points, things of a miscellaneous character will be added, which may be of interest to the reader.

From May 26, 1873 to May 26, 1874, there were sixty day-schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Of these sixty day-schools, there were thirty-seven in England and Wales, ten in Spain, three in India, three in Italy, and seven in British Guiana. Besides these sixty day-schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, eleven other day-schools in England, Wales and Scotland were assisted.

The master of the Schools at Walham Green, writes on May 20, 1874:—"Thank you very much for 15,000 tracts and 1,000 little books received. So many of the dear children are desirous of distributing the tracts, that I find it necessary to tell those who wish to distribute to go to the class-room. Yesterday, I found twenty-one there, all of whom professed to be the Lord’s, many giving clear testimony as to the reason of the hope that is in them. Today, more are asking for tracts. These, I hope to see tomorrow, to ascertain as far as we can, whether they know and are in the way, before seeking to lead others. I believe we have had and are having some of the droppings of the great shower descending upon the people of our land."—The master of the school at Clayhidon sends this Report to the School Inspector: "Through the Lord’s grace much blessing has rested on the schools during the past year. No previous year has been so fruitful in conversion. Refreshing showers have indeed descended on us, telling us that ‘God is in the midst’ of His people. It would be impossible for me to give you details of the many striking conversions that have taken place within the past year. One or two perhaps, will suffice: —— was a young girl of about 16, who has been a pupil at the school since its commencement. Many times the Spirit of the Lord has wrought in her heart, but to all appearance she had resisted and rejected all appeals; so much so, that all our confidence was removed; we feared she never would be the Lord’s. But ‘the Lord knoweth them that are His,’ and often when we are not expecting, He reveals His power, that we may not trust in ourselves, but in the Living God. So in this case. There had been much awakening among the children and several of the elder youths and girls had decided for the Lord, yet this girl held out stiffly. But one morning while setting a copy, I asked if she was always going to refuse God’s mercy. She looked surprised, and after a moment’s pause said, ‘But I am not very old yet, sir.’ ‘True,’ I said, ‘still you are old enough to die, and if unsaved, old enough to be lost.’ I said no more, but passed on to other duties. But ere the day was over, I noticed a great change in the girl, she seemed melancholy and wretched, yet I said nothing, feeling it would be best to leave her entirely in the Lord’s hands. She came to school no more that week, I thought, because she did not wish to be spoken to on soul matters. On the following Sunday she was at the meeting; and at the enquirers’ meeting, after the usual service, she was found with four others of the school, weeping bitterly. Before the day was over, all these were brought into peace, by faith’s apprehension of Isaiah xliii. 25 and xliv. 22. Then she explained the cause of her absence from school the previous few days. She had been so miserable and wretched, and the words spoken to her so alarmed her, that she couldn’t come; she was afraid all the other girls would laugh at her, as she could do nothing but cry all day long. A very happy Christian she now is, and although she has borne much opposition and persecution, she rejoices in being counted worthy to suffer as a Christian. Her brother has also been brought to the Lord. —— was another young person who had, in former years, been in the school, but had gone to a distance, to reside with some relatives. Her younger sister was at the time with us in the school. When Mr. Muller made the school free, her parents thought they would give her a little more education, and, while she came to school, her younger sister could take her situation. She came, and although 19 or 20 years of age, she made great progress. Still in spiritual things we could see no change. The Christmas holidays were drawing very close at hand, when she would leave for her former work. Only a week remained, yet she was not saved. She had been very anxious for many weeks, but, as is often the case, Satan seems to arouse all his force to drag the soul into evil, when the Lord is working through the Spirit in the heart. And so it seemed, for, instead of being willing to listen to the Word, she became most rebellious, and to her parents would say most dreadful things of every Christian. But it was Satan’s last resource; the Lord did not leave her, and the result was, she became more unhappy than ever, when one day, the day before school was suspended, she said ‘I can’t go back as I am, oh! I must be saved before I go back.’ That very night, the Lord spoke peace to her soul. She left the next week and her sister returned to school. In a fortnight she was also converted, and these both are walking most happily and consistently. Two of their brothers have also been decidedly brought to the Lord. I could give you many instances of similar happy conversions, but time will not allow. I would add two more, that of two youths who have been to the school for some time. The Lord had been working in their hearts for some months, for they would often remain behind, after school hours, to be spoken to. Still, they could not, for some weeks, grasp the Truth. Surely, ‘faith is the gift of God.’ But they were set at liberty in a most happy manner. We had had a most impressive season at the afternoon meeting one Sunday, and I saw they were both deeply moved. I asked them to come and take tea with us, hoping to have a little private and personal dealing with them. The Lord gave the opportunity, and we were found all three of us together, reading Isaiah xliii. and xliv. with other Scriptures. The Lord gave sight, and they both could rejoice in the conscious knowledge of sin pardoned, and themselves accepted in the Beloved. Both these also are walking with the Lord, and bearing testimony to Him in their life. I can only say in closing, that such blessing was more than we even looked for. How true it is, ‘He is able to do exceeding abundantly above all we ask or think.’ More than a dozen, we have reason to believe, have been converted in the youths’ Bible Class alone. To God alone we would ascribe all the praise."—The teacher of the School at Sheldon writes: "Several of the children have been converted to God, and are holding on well, while others, although not decided, are very attentive. The condition of the school is generally very good."—The mistress of the school at Chittlehamholt sends the following report: "Four dear girls have professed faith in Christ; two have been admitted into fellowship here, and all four are showing by their lives that they have indeed been with Jesus. This appears a small number when compared with the many still unsaved. I reckon all difficulties small, compared with the glory by and by."—The master of the Mixed School at Cardiff reports: "We have much to be thankful for, because the Lord, in answer to much prayer, has of late been wonderfully working among some of the children, and we can, we trust, say, that there are at least seven who have really found peace through the blood of Jesus, and rejoice in the fact that their sins are put away. Every Wednesday evening we have a children’s prayer meeting, when suitable portions of the Word are read and. simply commented upon; these meetings are very blessed indeed, the numbers attending them have gradually increased, and the Lord is very manifest in His work among several of the dear children, who gladly meet together. We have, indeed, much cause to bless and praise the name of our God, and rejoice in the God of our salvation."—These reports from the teachers of the schools might be greatly multiplied, did not space forbid so to do. The reader, however, cannot fail to see, that the Lord’s manifest blessing rests upon these schools. In the sixty day-schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1874, four thousand eight hundred and fifty two pupils. Of the schools merely assisted, no report as to numbers is asked, nor other particulars.

There are now twenty-eight Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these twenty-eight Sunday Schools there were, on May 26, 1874, altogether Three Thousand One Hundred and Sixty Three Scholars. There were, likewise, during the past year, fifteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these fifteen Sunday Schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the twenty-eight Sunday Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 8 are in Spain, 4 in British Guiana, the others are in England.

In the Sunday School in Bristol the Lord was pleased again to work greatly during the past year by the power of the Holy Ghost. A number of the young persons attending it were brought to the knowledge of the Lord.—In the Sunday School at Walham Green the blessing of the Lord was so great, that it was thought well to have a class for believers only, so that they might be taught the way of God more perfectly. In this class there are fourteen boys. The believing girls have not yet been separated.—In the Sunday School at Burrington was one case of decided conversion.

There are now seven Adult Schools, with 483 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are 3 in Spain, 1 in India, 1 in Bristol, 1 at Callington, and 1 at Walham Green. In addition to these seven Adult Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there was one in Hertfordshire assisted.

It will appear, from the foregoing statement, that there are altogether Ninety Five Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (60 Day Schools, 28 Sunday Schools, 7 Adult Schools); and that during the past year 27 Schools were assisted, viz., 11 Day Schools, 15 Sunday Schools, and 1 Adult School. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the Ninety Five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1874, altogether 8,286 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Thirty-eight Thousand Eight Hundred and Nineteen, viz., there were 23,915 in all the Day Schools, 9,121 in all the Sunday Schools, and 5,783 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £3,327. 17s. This does not include £1,540. 6s. 8½d. expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund, to which it more properly belongs. There has been expended on the Schools, from the beginning of the Institution, £26,490. 4s. 2d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1873 to May 26, 1874, is as follows:

5,620 Bibles have been sold.

1,186 Bibles have been given away.

26,544 New Testaments have been sold.

4,340 New Testaments have been given away.

560 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

653 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

4,694 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

3,816 Ditto given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 88,516 Bibles, 205,528 New Testaments, 15,484 copies of the Psalms, and 159,449 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During the past thirteen years and a half we have especially availed ourselves of the openings, which the Lord has been pleased to give for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Italy, so that many thousands of Italian Bibles and Testaments have been circulated; and, as the Papal State was opened for the circulation of the Holy Scriptures four years since, we have sought to the utmost of our power to spread in it also the Word of God.

For years past we have also circulated many Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Swedish, Danish, Welsh, and Dutch Bibles and Testaments. Likewise Testaments in Russ.

There are kept for sale at the Depository, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol, cheap Bibles and Testaments in the following languages: Welsh, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Also the New Testament only in Russ, Swedish, Ancient Greek, and Greek and English. Likewise the Old Testament and Psalms in Hebrew.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,220. 8s. 6d.

The total amount spent, since March 5, 1834, is £16,813. 10s. 2d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during the past year, as during the previous years.

Before leaving this part of the operations of the Institution, and writing about Missions, I make the following remarks: To the careful readers it will be obvious, how greatly this part of the Institution, as well as the School department, has been of late years enlarged; and yet the openings become more and more still. During the past year we have continued, by the help of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Many thousands of copies of the New Testament and many Bibles have been thus placed again in the hands of men, women, boys, and girls working in these factories and mills; and this work steadily is going on. This dear man goes from one mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The expense to meet this is considerable; but the importance is so great, that of late years we have given still further considerable help to several Christian colporteurs, to go on with this work in Wales, Gloucestershire, Somersetshire, &c. The greater the efforts which are being made to put aside the Word of God, or to do without it, the more it becomes us to spread it abroad, with earnest, believing, expecting, persevering prayer.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid missionary efforts.

During the past year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for this Object, the sum of £10,816. 2s. 10½d. By this sum One Hundred and Eighty-nine labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions

in India ………………………..…… £107 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana …... 177 11 8

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ……………. 1,078 11 11½

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ……………… 177 3 1

Towards the support of a "Home" for

enquiring Jews ……………………… 30 0 0

Also expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire, £43. 16s. 2d.

Many hundreds of letters were received from the 189 labourers in the Word, between May 26, 1873 and May 26, 1874, relating how they had fared in the Lord’s service, and referring to many hundreds of deeply interesting instances, in which their labours were blessed. A great number of these letters are given in the Report, which refers to this period; but I cannot here any further enter upon this part, than to state, that the labours of these 189 Missionaries were abundantly owned by God.

I cannot leave this part of the Narrative without making a few more remarks, in connection with the Missionary Object of the Institution. Most of my readers, if not all, know, that there are Hundreds of Millions of Idolaters yet, to whom the Gospel has never been carried; that there are many scores of Millions of Mahometans; and many scores of Millions of Papists; and many Millions belonging to the Greek Church; a few Millions of Jews; and many Millions of nominal Protestants, all of whom have never heard the Gospel preached. The conclusion, therefore, is, that we have reason to believe that there are about a Thousand Millions of souls, who have never heard the Gospel preached, and that therefore at least Forty-nine out of every Fifty, are not privileged as we who know the Lord Jesus, have been. It is an awful consideration, that the vast majority of our fellow-men have never yet had the light of the Gospel; have never had salvation through faith in the atoning death of the Lord Jesus preached to them. Have we sufficiently pondered this? Has it had a practical effect upon our lives? And what effect has it had? 1. Has it led us to earnestness in prayer ? Day by day should we pray, that God would abundantly bless the labours of all His servants, who preach the Gospel at Home and Abroad. Every day that we neglect this, we neglect, what, as believers in the Lord Jesus, we ought to attend to. But we should also pray for those who are engaged in preaching the Gospel at Home and Abroad, that they may be upheld and strengthened, both as to their outward and inward man. 2. But, if we are sincere in our prayer, we shall do more than this. Perhaps we can give ourselves to this service, of making known the unsearchable riches of Christ, for the remainder of our lives. At least we should offer ourselves for this to the Lord. Should He not accept us for this, so that our earthly occupation is to be given up, we may yet be able to give at least a part of our time to this service, though it were only in a more private way; but could even this not be done, every disciple of the Lord Jesus should at least embrace every private opportunity, offered to him by His Lord, to point out the way of salvation to his friends, his relatives, his servants, and others with whom he may come into contact; and every believer in the Lord Jesus ought to aim after this, that he in his life and deportment commends the truth. 3. Are all believers considering, that there is obligation laid on them by the Lord, to seek to help those, who as Missionaries in foreign lands, or as Evangelists at Home, have given themselves to the service of seeking to spread abroad the way of salvation through the crucified and risen Lord Jesus Christ? How can we suppose that we love the Lord Jesus, if we do not practically show our interest in the labours of those, who, often with their lives in their hand, seek to spread that Gospel, to which we owe our spiritual life, peace, joy, yea everything with reference to eternal realities? Now what are we doing to help these Missionaries and Evangelists? How much of our time do we devote for them? How much of our money do we give for them? What self-denial in the way of dress, luxury, pleasure, sight seeing, etc., do we practice on their account? Do we all spend as much as the twentieth part of our income for this object? Let us examine ourselves, let us be honest to our own hearts! Life will soon have come to an end. Our one brief life will soon be over. And then, in the retrospect of that one brief life here on earth, shall we be able to say, that we did what we could (generally speaking), to help to spread the Gospel? I fear many beloved true disciples of the Lord Jesus do very little with reference to Missionary operations. Let us be in earnest about this matter. There are openings in abundance for helping preachers of the Gospel. 4. If these various points were attended to, the beloved disciples of the Lord Jesus would be more abundantly blessed in their own souls, and would be to a greater extent used by the Lord. Moreover, we should see the number of Missionaries and Evangelists not only greatly increased, but their labours would be far more abundantly blessed than they have been hitherto.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1874, is £137,891. 13s. 4d.

The fourth Object of the Institution is the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers. As it respects tracts for unbelievers, we especially aim after the diffusion of such as contain the truths of the Gospel clearly and simply expressed; and as it respects publications for believers, we desire to circulate such as may be instrumental in directing their minds to those truths which, in these last days, are more especially needed, or which have been particularly lost sight of, and may lead believers to return to the written Word of God.

There has been laid out for this object, from May 26, 1873 to May 26, 1874, the sum of £1128. 4s. 11¼d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Seven Hundred and Seventy Five Thousand (exactly 3,775,771) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £23,339. 15s. 2d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1874, is about Fifty Millions (exactly 49,979,528).

More than Three Millions and Two Hundred Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously. Hundreds of believers have been engaged in spreading them abroad, not merely in many parts of England, Scotland, and Ireland, but in various other parts of the world. During the past year, we heard again and again of cases, in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

For the sake of younger believers in Christ, I make the following remarks with reference to their service in seeking to circulate the Holy Scriptures and Tracts.

What have we to do as Tract or Bible distributors? 1. Never to reckon our success by the number of Bibles, Testaments, or Tracts, which we circulate; for Millions of Bibles, Testaments and Tracts might be circulated, and little good result from our efforts. 2. We should, day by day, seek God’s blessing on our labours in this particular; and on every Tract or Copy of the Holy Scriptures which we give, we should, as much as possible, ask God’s blessing. 3. We should expect God’s blessing upon our labours, and confidently expect it; yea, look out for his blessing. 4. We should labour on in this service, prayerfully and believingly labour on, even though for a long time we should see little or no fruit; yea, we should labour on, as if everything depended on our labours, whilst, in reality, we ought not to put the least confidence in our exertions, but alone in God’s ability and willingness to bless, by His Holy Spirit, our efforts for the sake of the Lord Jesus. 5. And what will be the result of labouring on patiently in such a spirit? We find the answer in the epistle to the Galatians, vi. 9; "Let us not be weary in well doing; for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not." Observe, in due season. The whole of our earthly pilgrimage is a sowing time, though we may be allowed to see now and then, already in this life, fruit resulting from our sowing to a greater or less degree; but if it were not thus, or if comparatively but little fruit were now, in this life, reaped, the due season is coming. At the appearing of our Lord Jesus all will be made manifest; our reward of grace will be given to us for our patient service then; and in the prospect of that day we have patiently to continue in well doing. But this patient continuing in well doing calls for much prayer, for much meditation on the Word of God, and for much feeding on the work and person of our Lord Jesus, in order that thus our spiritual strength may be renewed day by day.

Tract distributors who can afford to pay for publications, and who desire to procure them from us, may obtain Tracts for this purpose with a discount of one-half, or 50 per cent. from the retail price, and Books with a discount of 25 per cent., or one-fourth from the retail price. We state this, as many believers may not like to give away what does not cost them anything, and yet may, at the same time, wish to obtain as much as possible, for their money. Applications for this would need to be made verbally or in writing to Mr. James L. Stanley, at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol. To him, also, application may be made for specimen packets, containing an assortment of the Tracts and small Books which are kept. By sending 3s., 5s., 7s., or 10s. in postages to Mr. Stanley, packets will be sent to any part of England, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Jersey, Guernsey, &c., containing specimens to the amount of the postages which are sent.

A Catalogue of the various Books and Tracts sold at the above Warehouse of the Institution, with their prices, may be had there, by applying either personally or by letter to Mr. Stanley. There are now kept on sale 1045 different Books, large and small; and 832 different Tracts, which number is continually added to.

The fifth Object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and Scripturally educate destitute children who have lost BOTH parents by death.

At the commencement of the last period there were 1993 Orphans in the new Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the past year 268 Orphans were admitted into the five houses; so that the total number on May 26, 1874, would have been Two Thousand Two Hundred and Sixty-one, had there been no changes. But of these 2261, Thirty-two died, of whom five were young infants, and sixteen fell asleep as decided believers in the Lord Jesus, giving to us great comfort in their end. Fourteen out of the 2261 we were obliged to expel. We had long borne with these boys and girls. They bad been remonstrated with, prayed with, and a great variety of means had been used, to bring them into a different state; but at last we were obliged, in mercy to the other Orphans, whom they sought to corrupt, to use this last remedy. We follow them, however, still with our prayers. Again and again we have had yet, at last, comfort, in such deeply trying cases. Twenty of the Orphans we were obliged to return to their relatives, after they had been for many years under our care, at least in most cases, as we could not recommend them as servants or apprentices, either because they were scrofulous, or had curvature of spine, or had epileptic fits, of which we had not been informed, when they were admitted, or were weak in mind, or had most defective sight, or were morally unfit to be recommended. Twenty-four Orphans their relatives took back, as by that time their own circumstances were altered, and they were now able to provide for them, and felt it their duty so to do. Thirty-four boys were apprenticed, of whom eight had been believers some time before they left. One hundred and forty-five girls were sent out as servants, of whom sixty-one had been believers some time before they left. These 269—are therefore to be deducted from the 2261, so that on May 26, 1874, we had actually 1992 Orphans in the five Orphan Houses. The total number of Orphans, who were under our care from April 1836 to May 26, 1874, is 4408.

The total income for the first four Objects of the Institution, during the past year, was £16,574. 15s. 5½d. and for the support of the Orphans, £21,281. 0s. 0d.

From May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, seventy Day-Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Of these seventy Day-Schools, forty-four are in England and Wales, fifteen in Spain, three in India, three in Italy, and five in British Guiana. Besides these seventy Day-Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, seven other Day-Schools in England and Scotland were assisted.

Our School Inspector and the Master of one of the Boys’ Schools in Bristol report, that there is reason to believe ten boys in that School were converted during the past year. The following statement is the report, both of the Day and Sunday School at Kenilworth, which the Mistress of the Day School sent: "The Spirit of God is working and drawing young hearts to Jesus. It is a gentle work, blessed be God; but souls are being saved. It commenced in the Sunday School, now it has extended to the oldest in the Day School. The oldest of the girls have a prayer meeting in my School Room every Tuesday. Some are anxious about their souls. I trust they will soon find peace. There has been a blessed work going on since my little girl was baptized and others at the same time. There was a youth brought under conviction that evening, and when he found peace in believing he set to work to bring others. And now there are thirty boys in the Sunday School, some of whom are very anxious about their souls and some are brought to the Lord. Truly this is a blessed work! I can only pray and praise."—Of the School at Hopton the statement is, that there is spiritual life in some of the children.—In the Walham Green Schools there have been again, during the past year also, some decided conversions.—The following statement, given by the master of the boy’s school at Clayhidon, gives the report of the Day and Sunday School there: "Our numbers are more encouraging than ever before, and I think I may say, the work in all its branches is most cheering. Many of the dear children are really desirous of spiritual things, and what is so much better, their parents are equally desirous for their blessing. Even many of the ungodly who were formerly most bitter opposers to the truth, now confess openly to many of our brethren, that there is a most marvellous power in the word of God at it is taught in the Schools, and they allege, that they can see a great change brought about, by means of the simple Gospel amongst the young. They have, I believe, been asked individually, throughout the Parish, whether they would rather have the Schools with or without Bible teaching, and not one in the whole parish but has expressed his manifest wish and desire, that the Bible should be taught, and in the same plain and simple manner as it ever has. The incorruptible seed must spring up, and the harvest must be reaped, if we faint not. Regarding many of the dear children, we have much to praise the Lord for. In the hearts of several the Lord has been working for a very long time, and many, I firmly believe, are lambs of the fold—brought in gradually—the Word finding entrance into their hearts, showing them their need of a Saviour, giving them an earnest longing for salvation, and at last a trust in Jesus bringing joy and peace in believing."—The master of the Howle Hill School reports, that he has reason to think, two boys have received the truth.—The Exeter Schools are in a prosperous condition.—The master of the School at Purton reports thus: "It gives me joy to record to the praise of our Heavenly Father, that we never were so happy in our School before. Not that during the past year we have had more dear children who have given their hearts to God, than in former years, or even so many, though five have within the last six months professed to be trusting in Jesus for salvation. But as before, so now, we would not speak positively of these, until we have seen for some time a consistent walk. But our joy is, that there never were so many dear children, who love to meet together to hear the Word of God, as at present. For instance, we have now three Bible Classes in the week. Not that we have opened the classes, and then invited the children; but the dear children themselves asked us to open one of these classes. We formerly had but one, now we have one for boys, one for big girls, and one for the little girls in the juvenile school. We are now looking out for great things from our Gracious Father, who has been so good to us. May I just add, that three out of the five who profess faith in Jesus are among the elder boys, where I have long been looking for blessing."—The mistress of one of the Schools at Barnstaple reports: "I am thankful to be able to tell you of the conversion of two dear girls, who have left the school, but both date their conversion to the impressions received while in the School. One who is in church fellowship a few miles from here, said, she never had a happy minute since she left school, until she bad given her heart to Jesus. The interest manifested by my dear children, while reading the Scriptures, enables me to expect greater things than these."—The master of the Otterford School reports one conversion.—Of the children of the School at North End it is stated, that they give great attention to Scripture truth.—The master of the School at Saul writes: "We trust, God is blessing our labours. The work was never more pleasant. The teachers and children are working earnestly and happily together. Scriptural instruction is prized. The precepts of the Lord are evidently influencing the children, and some, we hope, are looking to him as a Saviour."—In December, 1874, the master of one of the Schools in Cardiff wrote to me: "I have no doubt you have heard from Mr. Horne, [the School Inspector] of the meetings I hold each week, one for boys and one for girls. I am so thankful to inform you, that the Lord has wonderfully owned and blessed my labours and the preaching of His glorious Gospel. I could write you a long letter on the numerous cases of conversion among the dear children; sights I have witnessed among them have caused me to shed tears of joy, and to praise God more and more for bringing me here. There are now 26 boys and 37 girls, who profess to have found peace in Jesus, through believing." In a subsequent letter, this same master reports to the School Inspector, that about eighty boys and girls profess faith in the Lord Jesus. The master of another school at Cardiff writes: "I am happy to say, that notwithstanding the immense difficulties I have had to encounter in organizing so large a school [491 on the books, and only about 11 months yet in operation], I have not met a single case, in which any extreme measures were necessary to enforce discipline, or to maintain order. The school stands high in the estimation of the public, and I am receiving constant applications for fresh admissions. I am very pleased and thankful to God for the manifest sense of justice and right that exists amongst the elder scholars, and though I cannot say any of the children are decided Christians, yet I know, that several of them have been making enquiries as to the way of salvation. I have discovered this fact from my connection with many of them on the Sunday. I feel that I have great reason for thankfulness to our Heavenly Father for His manifest presence and blessing on this work, for the strength and energy He has given me, to prosecute the work so far successfully."

On account of the popish influence at Cardiff, which is made to bear upon the children, to lead them early into idolatry, I had been again and again requested to establish a school at Cardiff on Scriptural principles. At last we were able to find suitable premises, and in August, 1873, our first School was opened, which shortly after was increased to a boys’, girls’, and infants’ school. In September, 1874, we opened another mixed school. Of both these the head-teachers give the report in the previous extracts. In January, 1875, we opened another mixed School at Cardiff. In these five schools we had on May 25, 1875, altogether 904 children. These, and all the many hundreds besides who had passed through the schools since August, 1873, we were thus able, with God’s help, to bring under the sound of real Gospel instruction not only, but scores of them have been actually brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus.

These are some of the statements to be made about the Home Day Schools. I do not here enter upon the account of the Mission Schools, which more properly belong to the Missionary Operations. The number of the pupils in the Home Day Schools, on May 26, 1875, was 4846; in the Missionary Day Schools, 1548, in all 6394.

The reader cannot but see that the Lord’s manifest blessing rests upon the Schools. I have of late years given myself especially to the enlargement of the School Department, as in years before that to the increase of the Orphan Work, in order that children, from their early days, may be grounded in the Word of God, as the powers of darkness make every effort to put it aside.

There are twenty-seven Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these twenty-seven Sunday Schools there were, on May 26, 1875, altogether two thousand six hundred and thirty-one Scholars. There were, likewise, during the past year, fifteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree assisted by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these fifteen Sunday Schools, which were only partly supported, no report as to numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the twenty-seven Sunday Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 7 are in Spain, 4 in British Guiana, 1 in India, and the others are in various parts of England. The fifteen Schools, which were only in part supported, are all in England.

The Mission Sunday Schools are referred to under the Missionary Operations.—There has been a considerable number received into Church Fellowship, during the past year, from among the Sunday School scholars in Bristol.—In the School at Hopton there have been two cases of decided conversion during the past year.—At the Walham Green Sunday School there has been during the past year also fruit reaped, and there is the prospect of more.—At Burrington there have been two conversions.—In the School at Barnstaple it is believed, that there are several born again.—The School at Otterford is in a very prosperous condition.—The report of the North End Sunday School is, "During the past year we have cause to thank God and praise Him, that six boys, in the Bible class, have been brought to a saving knowledge of Christ. Two of the boys were once very trying to us, and were the subjects of many prayers. The conduct of these six has been most consistent since. They have been received into fellowship at the Lord’s table. Two are now teaching in the school, and the others are engaged in Tract distribution, &c. Most of them have borne a good testimony before the whole school. We believe that many of the elder scholars are under conviction of sin, and we are looking to see these and many more brought into liberty and peace."

There are now eight Adult Schools, with 216 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are 5 in Spain, 1 in India, 1 at Callington, and 1 at Walham Green.

It will appear from the foregoing statement, that there are altogether One Hundred and Five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (70 Day Schools, 27 Sunday Schools, and 8 Adult Schools); and that during the past year 7 Day Schools and 15 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated it will likewise be seen, that in the One Hundred and Five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1875, altogether 9,241 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Forty-six Thousand Four Hundred and Fifty-one, viz., there were 29,610 in all the Day Schools, 10,573 in all the Sunday Schools, and 6,268 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £4,856. 16s. 4d. This does not include £1,838. 13s. 6d., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund, to which it more properly belongs. There has been expended on the Home Schools, from the beginning of the Institution, £31,647. 0s. 6d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, is as follows:

6,935 Bibles have been sold.

830 Bibles have been given away.

29,399 New Testaments have been sold.

12,670 New Testaments have been given away.

256 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

107 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

5,174 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

200 Ditto given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 96,281 Bibles, 247,597 New Testaments, 15,847 copies of the Psalms, and 164,823 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,278. 2s. 11½d.

The total amount spent, since March 5, 1834, is £18,091. 13s. 2¼d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during the past year, as during the previous years.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid missionary efforts.

During the past year was expended of the funds of the Institution for this Object, the sum of £9,303. 12s. 7d. By this sum One Hundred and Seventy-nine labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree, assisted:—

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions

in India ………………….…………………. £195 0 0

For the support of Schools in connec-

tion with Missions in British Guiana ……… 141 5 4

For the support of Schools in connec-

tion with Missions in Spain ……………….. 1226 8 7

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ……………………… 275 19 7

Towards the support of a "Home" for

enquiring Jews ……………………………... 30 0 0

Also expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire, £40. 19s. 1d.

During the year from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, there were received many hundreds of letters from the 179 Missionaries who were assisted by the funds of the Institution, and the greater part of a deeply interesting character; but, gladly as I would give extracts from these many hundred letters in this Narrative, I am unable to do so, and I must refer the reader to the Thirty-sixth Report of the Institution, which is still to be had for sixpence. I will only say further, that again Thousands were converted through the labours of these 179 Missionaries, during this year.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1875, is £147,195. 5s. 11d.

The fourth Object of the Institution is, the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers.

There has been laid out for this object from May 26 1874 to May 26, 1875, the sum of £1,440. 7s. 1d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Five Hundred and Twenty Thousand (exactly 3,520,818) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £24,780. 2s. 3d.

The total number of all the tracts and books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1875, is Fifty-Three Millions and a half (exactly 53,500,346).

Nearly Three Millions of the Tracts and Books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously. During the past year also, we heard again and again of cases in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the commencement of the last period, we had 1992 Orphans under our care, in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5. During the past year 269 Orphans were admitted into these five houses, so that on May 26, 1875, we should have had altogether 2261 Orphans, had there been no changes. But of these 2261 Orphans, 23 died during the year. How small this number is, if the class of children under our care is considered, who for the most part are the offspring of consumptive parents, every one sees at once. Sixteen out of these 23 fell asleep in Jesus, as decided believers, and several of them had been so for a good while; two of those who died were very young infants; about the other five we can say nothing decidedly. Three Orphans, out of the 2261, we were obliged to expel, in mercy to the other children, as they sought to corrupt them. This was the last means resorted to. Fifteen Orphans we sent back to their relations, because we could not recommend them as servants for situations or as apprentices, either on account of mental, physical, or moral defects. Twenty-two of the Orphans were given up to near relatives, who, by that time, were in improved circumstances, and desired for the future themselves to care for them. Out of these 22 seven had been brought to the knowledge of the Lord whilst under our care. Fifty-six boys were sent out as apprentices during the year, and One Hundred and Forty-Seven Girls as servants. Out of the 56 boys sent out as apprentices, 22 were believers, and out of the 147 girls, 58 were believers, and many of these, both boys and girls, had known the Lord for a considerable time, and had walked consistently. 266 are therefore to be deducted from the 2261, so that on May 26, 1875, we had only 1995 Orphans under our care. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care from April, 1836 to May 26, 1875, is 4677.

The total amount received during the year, from May 26, 1874 to May 26, 1875, for the first four Objects of the Institution was £16,746. 17s. 8½d., and, for the support of the Orphans, £28,485. 14s. 5d., altogether, therefore, £45,232. 12s. 2¼d.

From May 26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, there were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 75 Day Schools. Of these 75 there were 43 in England and Wales, 13 in Spain, 4 in India, 3 in Italy, and 6 in British Guiana. Besides these 75 Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 3 other Day Schools were assisted, 2 in England, and 1 in Scotland.

The master of one of the Boys’ Schools in Bristol writes: "Though there has not been any extensive religious awakening among the dear children during the past year, still there is much to encourage me. During the year six boys have left the school as professed believers. There are still attending school two others, who, through the grace of God, have felt the life-giving and soul-sanctifying influences of the Holy Spirit, and are rejoicing in Christ as their personal Saviour. They exemplify the sincerity of their profession, and the reality of their conversion, by their consistent walk and conversation."—The mistress of one of the Girls’ Schools in Bristol writes: "I am greatly encouraged by the interest the children manifest in the daily Bible reading and address. This is especially the case with two families of Jewesses, to whom the New Testament is novel and strange. They listen with great earnestness and intelligence; and I have reason to hope, that the oldest, a girl of 13, is seeking after the truth."—The master of the Boys’ School at Clayhidon writes: "Seven of the boys and girls, who were in the school two or three years or more ago, and who then were much concerned about their souls, have, within the past twelve months, been brought to the Lord, through various instrumentalities, and have joined Christian churches in various places. Most of these date their first impressions from the school teaching here. Many we still have with us who are truly the Lord’s, we believe, and some really adorning the doctrine of Jesus Christ. It rejoices us to know, that two, out of the seven mentioned, are engaged in preaching the Gospel at various places; so that we cannot say, where the blessed results will be carried."—The mistress of the school at Sheldon reports: "I can only mention two conversions to God, still others among the children seem very much interested at times. Those, who professed faith some time since, are most of them going on well."—The master of the school at Yeovil reports thus: "In the past year the Lord was pleased to remove from us by death four of the children; but all left a most blessed testimony behind of having passed from death unto life. Two boys, brothers, not only spoke of the hope that filled their hearts with joy even in the prospect of death, but preached the Gospel most clearly to those who came to see them. There had been a most marked change in all their ways some time before they were taken ill. At the present time there is an evident interest in the Bible lesson. One girl professes to have found peace, and another is in deep concern about her soul. At times she lingers, after the others are gone, and seems so glad, if her teacher speaks to her on the subject."—The head teacher of the Bute Docks Schools, Cardiff, with 323 children, writes, with regard to the spiritual state of the schools:—"We have much cause to praise the Lord for the help He has granted us throughout the year; and for sending us the children, so that the three schools have generally been full. As regards conversions to God, they have not been as many as our hearts would have rejoiced to see; still we have continued the children’s Bible Meetings throughout the year (the girls one evening and the boys another) with increased interest and joy, as there seems a great interest manifested by many, who profess the name of Jesus, for the word of truth. To see each child eagerly turning to the various passages referred to, is really delightful to behold. There are generally between 30 and 40 gathered together each week."—The head teacher of Tredegerville School, Cardiff (with 502 children) reports: "During the past year three of the children have become members of Christian churches, and I believe I have good reason for hoping that several others are the subjects of religious impressions. I do not remember a single case of insubordination during the year, but a most willing obedience is manifested by all the children. This to my mind indicates, that a very healthy tone prevails amongst the children. Our Heavenly Father’s presence and blessing is manifestly with us."

Scores more of such extracts might be given, showing how the Lord was pleased to bless these schools during the year; but space obliges me to be brief.

The number of the pupils in the Home Day Schools, on May 26, 1876, was 5422; in the Mission Day Schools, 1596, in all 7018.

There are twenty-nine Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these twenty-nine Sunday Schools there were, on May 26, 1876, altogether 2,444 scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, twenty-two Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these twenty-two schools, no report as to the numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of these twenty-nine Sunday Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, seven are in Spain, six in British Guiana, the others are in England.

Eight of the scholars of the Sunday School in Bristol have confessed the Lord Jesus during the past year, and have been united to believers in fellowship.—The report of the Sunday School at Kenilworth is, "Those who were truly brought to the Lord remain steadfast, and the boys have a Bible class, to search the Scriptures minutely, and are very eager over the Word. Both boys and girls are in a nice spirit to learn more of Jesus."—Two of the Gospel Hall Sunday School, at Portsmouth, were decidedly converted during the past year.—Three of the North End Sunday School are considered to be converted.

Their are now six Adult Schools, with 360 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are three in Spain, 1 in India, 1 at Callington, and 1 at Walham Green.

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there are altogether One Hundred and Ten Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (75 Day Schools, 29 Sunday Schools, and 6 Adult Schools); and that, during the past year, 3 Day Schools and 22 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in these One Hundred and Ten Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were, on May 26, 1876, altogether 9,822 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Fifty Three Thousand Four Hundred and Sixty-three, viz., there were 34,923 in all the Day Schools, 12,033 in all the Sunday Schools, and 6,507 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £5,501. 18s. 11d. This does not include £1,855. 13s. 7d., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund, to which it more properly belongs. There has been expended on the Home Schools, from the beginning of the Institution, £37,148. 19s. 5d.

The second Object of this Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

We sell Bibles and Testaments to poor persons at reduced prices, or, if the cases be found suitable, give them altogether gratuitously. In cases of needy Schools, carried on in the fear of God, it would be joy in the Lord to us to supply them with as many copies of the Holy Scriptures as they may require. This applies especially to all Missionary efforts in foreign lands, or to any Scriptural means which are used to spread the truth of God in the dark places of our own land.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, is as follows:

9,325 Bibles have been sold.

336 Bibles have been given away.

23,277 New Testaments have been sold.

1,694 New Testaments have been given away.

346 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

24 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

4,001 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 105,942 Bibles, 272,568 New Testaments, 16,217 copies of the Psalms, and 168,824 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,279. 15s. 11d.

The total amount spent, since March 5, 1834, is £19,371. 9s. 1¼d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during the past year, as during the previous years.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid missionary efforts.

During the past year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for this object, the sum of £9,342. 18s. 1d. By this sum One Hundred and Seventy-eight labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions in

India …………………………………. £176 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ……… 141 3 4

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ……………….. 1297 1 5

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ………………… 241 8 10

Towards the support of a "Home" for

enquiring Jews ………………….…….. 20 0 0

For the Waldensian Missions (given ex-

pressly for these Missions) ……………. 30 0 0

For the Moravian Missions (given ex-

pressly for these Missions) ……………. 30 0 0

Also expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire £28. 2s. 0d.

While I am able to state to the praise of the Lord, that the labours of the 178 Missionaries were abundantly blessed, between May 26, 1875 and May 26, 1876, so that thousands of souls were won for our Lord Jesus, yet I must refrain from recording here again extracts from their letters, which were given in the Thirty-seventh Report of the Institution, published in 1876, still to be had.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1876, is £156,538. 4s.

The fourth Object of the Institution is, the circulation of religious books, pamphlets and tracts for the benefit of both believers and unbelievers.

There has been laid out for this object, from May 26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, the sum of £1,419. 6s. 7d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Four Hundred and Forty Thousand (exactly 3,441,095) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £26,199. 8s. 10d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1876, is more than Fifty Six Millions and a half (exactly 56,941,441.)

Three Millions of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously. During the past year also, we heard again and again of cases in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the commencement of the last period, we had 1995 Orphans under our care, in the New Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5. During the past year, 275 Orphans were admitted into these five houses, so that on May 26, 1876, we should have had altogether 2270 Orphans, had there been no changes. But of these 2270 Orphans, 42 died during the past year. Though this number is larger than during any previous year, yet it is still small, when it be remembered that one or both of the parents of three-fourths of the Orphans, whom we receive (as we know from certificates) died of consumption; and, consequently, the greater part of the children, whom we receive, are constitutionally delicate. A considerable number of these 42, like their parents, died of consumption. Seventeen of those who died, were decided believers, and most had been so for a considerable time; of the others several were very young. Eleven out of the 2270 Orphans we were obliged to return to their relatives, instead of finding situations for them, as we could not recommend them as servants or apprentices, on account of their moral condition. Other twelve we were also obliged to return to their relatives, on account of physical or mental unfitness for situations, though these twelve were not blameable. Twenty-one of the Orphans we gave up to near relations, after having for a longer or shorter time cared for them, as the temporal circumstances of these near relatives were now improved, and they felt desirous of henceforth providing for these Orphan relatives. Five of the Orphans were sent out to become Pupil Teachers, viz., two by the wish of near relatives, and three girls at the expense of the Institution; for as, more than three years ago, we began to train our own masters, from among the male Orphans, so we have now begun to train likewise teachers from among the female Orphans. Fifty-one Orphan boys were apprenticed to masters. Of these 51, seven had been for some time believers. One Hundred and Thirty-three Girls were sent out to service. Seventy of the girls who were sent out, left us as believers in the Lord Jesus Christ, many of whom had known the Lord for a considerable time and walked consistently. 275 are therefore to be deducted from the 2270, so that on May 26, 1876, we had only 1995 Orphans under our care. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care from April 1836, to May 26, 1876, is 4952.

The total amount of the Income from May 26, 1875 to May 26, 1876, was £45,257. 5s. 3¼d. The total of the expenditure, during the same period, was £43,518. 0s. 1d.

During the year from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, Seventy-five Day Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which number there were Forty-nine in England and Wales, 14 in Spain, 4 in India, 2 in Italy, and 6 in British Guiana. Besides these 75 Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, eight other Day Schools have been. assisted, one in France and seven in England.

The master of Walham Green School reports to Mr. Horne, our School Inspector:—"I have been cheered during the past four or five months by eight children asking to be spoken with, both individually and collectively, after school hours, concerning their souls’ salvation; and am hoping that in some it is the Spirit’s work, and not affection for their teachers which prompts it. A few days since a letter came to hand from a parent whose child has just been removed to a small-pox hospital, in which I am told that the child desired me to know that she was happy; and continually spoke of the blood that cleansed her guilty stains. Such unsought testimony cheers, in spite of much that exists, that grieves, but at the same time leads us to Him through prayer. I feel sure we arc blessed in answer to the prayers of the teachers, some of whom assemble every Monday morning, in the class room, lately added to the premises, for prayer, for blessing, grace and patience in our work. Mr. D. is also encouraged in the Night School, two professing conversion."

The master of the School at Clayhidon, Blackdown Hills, reports:—"The Numbers show for themselves what difficulties we meet with. Sixty-nine have left the school in the past twelve months. Looking at it from one standpoint, it certainly seems very discouraging, but from the position of Isaiah xxxii, 20, we can rejoice and will rejoice. The "Seed of the Kingdom" has been sown in each of their hearts, and sooner or later must spring up in some; while God will be glorified in all. That there is a deep work of Grace produced in many hearts, I can entertain not even the slightest doubt. What I want to see, is the work spreading and increasing with greater rapidity. I don’t know whether I told you, when you were here, of the goodness of God in bringing one young man to the school, on purpose to be converted. He had for a long time been very anxious about his soul, and longed to know salvation. His friends, who live fourteen miles off, thought and had faith to believe, that, if he came to this school, God would meet with him. Many difficulties lay in the path, but all were cleared away, and he came. In a fortnight he found the long-sought Saviour, or was found by the Shepherd who had long sought his sheep. He is still in the school. Our hearts can only praise God for the blessing he has already bestowed on the schools, and take courage. The attendance at the Sunday School is better than at the Day School and not subject to such change. We have much encouragement in that many have been led to Jesus in my sister’s Bible Class during the year, and give great joy and comfort to us."

The mistress of one of the Schools at Barnstaple reports to the School Inspector of the Institution:—"Six dear girls profess to be converted, and several others are deeply concerned about their souls. We are more than ever encouraged to go on sowing the good seed, knowing that in due season we shall reap if we faint not."

The mistress of the School at High Bickington writes:—"The children still continue to manifest interest in the Scripture lesson; and during the past year I believe three girls have been truly converted to God."

The number of the children in the Home Day Schools on May 26, 1877, was 5,396; in the Mission Schools, 1,726, in all 7,122.

From May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, there were Thirty-three Sunday Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, in which there were on May 26, 1877, altogether 2,487 scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, thirty-four Sunday schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these thirty-four schools, no report as to numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the thirty-three Sunday Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, ten are in Spain, seven in British Guiana and the others in England. The thirty-four Sunday Schools, which were only partly supported, are in England, Wales and Ireland.

The report about the Sunday Schools at Portsmouth is, that in one, two girls of 16 and 14 years have given evidence of faith in the Lord Jesus, and there is reason to hope, that the Lord is working in the hearts of several more. The superintendent of another school at Portsmouth reports, that three of the scholars have been brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, and that he has good hope regarding them.

The following is the report regarding the Sunday School at Purton: "Through the mercy of our God, we trust we can with confidence tell of the conversion of four more dear children in our Sunday School."

The report about the North End Sunday School is, that three of the Bible class girls have been converted. There are now six Adult Schools, with 166 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are 3 in Spain, 1 in India, 1 at Callington, and 1 at Walham Green.

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there are altogether One Hundred and Fourteen Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution (75 Day Schools, 33 Sunday Schools, and 6 Adult Schools;) and that, during the past year, 8 Day Schools and 34 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in these One Hundred and Fourteen Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1877, altogether 9,775 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Sixty Thousand One Hundred and Ten, viz., there were 39,921 in all the Day Schools, 13,443 in all the Sunday Schools, and 6,746 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £6,653. 7s. 9½d. This does not include £1,948. 11s. 11d., expended on the Mission Schools alone. There has been expended on the Home Schools from the beginning of the Institution, £43,802. 7s. 3¼d.

The second Object of this Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1876, to May 26, 1877, is as follows:—

7,155 Bibles have been sold.

792 Bibles have been given away.

19,951 New Testaments have been sold.

3,050 New Testaments have been given away.

2,504 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

24 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

10,951 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 113,889 Bibles, 295,569 New Testaments, 18,745 copies of the Psalms, and 179,775 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,374. 4s. 10½d.

The Total amount spent, since March 5, 1834, is £20,745. 13s. 11d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during the past year, as during the previous years.

The third Object of the Institution is to aid missionary efforts.

During the past year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for this object, the sum of £7,173. 12s. 10d. By this sum One Hundred and Seventy Three labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions

in India ………………………..…….. £132 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ….… 151 5 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ………..…….. 1,369 1 9

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ……………….. 281 5 2

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in France …………….. 15 0 0

Also expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire £31. 0s. 11d.

For the account regarding the labours of the Missionary brethren, I have to request the reader to refer to the Report for 1877, which can be still obtained at the Bible and Tract Warehouse, No. 34, Park Street, Bristol. I should be delighted to give here also extracts from the letters received from these dear brethren; but all this would be too voluminous. I only state that again the work of these beloved brethren was abundantly blessed, in the conversion of many hundreds of souls.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1877, is £163,711. 16s. 10d.

The fourth Object of the Institution is the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers.

There has been laid out for this object, from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, the sum of £1,136. 14s. 2d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Four Hundred and Sixty Thousand (exactly 3,466,774) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £27,336. 3s. 0d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1877, is more than Sixty Millions (exactly 60,408,215.)

Nearly Three Millions of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously. During the past year also, we beard again and again of cases in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

The fifth Object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and Scripturally educate destitute children who have lost BOTH parents by death.

I give the statistics in connection with the Orphan Institution, from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877.

At the commencement of the last period, we had 1,995 Orphans under our care, in the New Orphan Houses, No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the past year 247 Orphans were admitted into these five houses, so that on May 26, 1877, we should have had altogether 2,242 Orphans, had there been no changes. But of these 2,242 Orphans, 40 died during the past year. Of those who died, fourteen were young infants, and thirteen had been some time decided believers before they fell asleep in Jesus. Twenty-four out of the 2,242 were delivered up to their relatives, who by that time were in better circumstances than when we received the children, and were on that account both able to provide for these Orphans and also felt it their duty so to do. Twenty-four Orphans we were obliged to return to their relatives, because either on account of their physical or mental state they could not be sent to situations, or their deportment bad been such that we could not recommend them to masters and mistresses. Thirty-nine of the boys were apprenticed, of whom nineteen were sent out as Christian lads. Three girls were sent out as pupil teachers, and One Hundred and Twenty-nine to situations, as domestic servants. Of all the girls, who were sent out during the past year, fifty-eight were believers in the Lord Jesus, and many among them had known the Lord for a considerable time. Two Hundred and Fifty Nine are therefore to be deducted from the 2,242, so that on May 26, 1877, we had only 1,983 Orphans under our care. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care from April 1836 to May 26, 1877, is 5,199.

The Income from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1877, for the first four Objects was £16,145. 16s. 6d.; and the Income for the Orphans £25,462. 11s. 9½d.; in all £41,608. 8s. 3½d. The total expenditure for the first four Objects was during the year £16,430. 16s. 8d., and for the Orphans £25,714. 0s. 6½d. Thus the balance in hand at the beginning of the year was somewhat reduced for all the Objects. We enter now upon the next year.

From May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, there were 77 Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Of these 77 Day Schools, 16 were in Spain, 4 in India, 2 in Italy, 6 in British Guiana, and 49 in England and Wales. Besides these 77 Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, four other Day Schools, 1 in France and 3 in England, were assisted.

The master of the Cardiff Bute Dock School reports to the School Inspector of the Institution, after having stated that there are 318 children on the books: "Looking back over the past twelve months, one can scarcely fail to praise the Lord for His love and kindness shown in so many ways. He has sent us the children, so that our rooms are all full; and although it has not pleased Him to let us see any decided cases of conversion, yet it is joy to know that the seed which has been sown day by day will assuredly, with God’s blessing, sooner or later, spring up for His glory and honour; and one feels more and more the blessedness and importance of scattering the precious Truth in a locality such as this, where houses are overcrowded, and where evil of all kinds abounds on every hand. We have continued our Bible Meetings throughout the year, and for the last three months have been using the Scripture Questions compiled by Mr. Horne, which we find extremely useful; a certain number are taken down from the blackboard each week by the children at these evening meetings, and the answers brought the following week. Although there is often much to cause dismay, yet looking to Him we take courage and go forward."

The master of Cardiff Roath School reports: "It gives me great pleasure to send you the annual statement of the condition of our Schools. I am glad to say it continues to flourish. We have manifest proofs of the Divine blessing resting upon it. During the year three of the scholars and two of the monitors have professed to have found the Saviour, have cast in their lot with the people of God, and have entered into Church fellowship. Many of the scholars give such evidence that leads us to believe that a good work has begun in them. The general tone of the School is highly satisfactory. The number of children at present on the books is 510."

The master of the Canton Cardiff School states regarding his school: "The great feature of the year in my school is the great increase in the number of the children. We commenced the year with about 200 in attendance, and now have to record nearly 400, showing, we think, the increasing estimation in which the school is held in this place. Here we would say, "What hath God wrought!" This great increase rendered the engagement of an Infants’ Mistress necessary towards the close of the year 1877, and this has been found to work in every way to the advantage of the school. The only sad feature in regard to the school is the want of accommodation. So much is this felt that now, for several weeks, we have been obliged to refuse to receive any fresh children, the doing of which causes us great regret. We cannot help feeling the encouragement which this mark of God’s favour is calculated to impart."

The mistress of the Girls’ School, Bear Street, Barnstaple, writes: "Two dear girls, who left the school some little time ago, are truly converted. Four others I am very hopeful of, and I believe that the Lord is working in the hearts of many who, in time will be made manifest as lambs in the fold of Jesus. We have indeed much to praise the Lord for. The school continues to be greatly valued, and I am still obliged to be constantly refusing children for the want of room."

The master of the School at East Brent writes: "I am happy to say that the school is in a satisfactory condition; it is a blessing to the parish; the children are making progress, the parents are satisfied, and best of all is, that 10 of the children yesterday have decided to give their hearts to God. I have great confidence that He who has begun the good work in their hearts will continue it right to the end. I feel truly rejoiced and grateful to the Lord for the encouragement He has given me in this my work for Him. I am daily looking to Him for more and more blessing. I know He will not disappoint, and to Him and Him alone shall be ascribed all the praise and glory."

The mistress of the School at Hopton writes: "Repecting the Lord’s work in our Day and Sunday School, we never had such cause for thankfulness and encouragement. Many young people have, since this time last year, been received into fellowship, causing much thankfulness. As we look round at the Lord’s table and see the beaming happy faces of some who were the most unruly, it gives us unfeigned joy in the Holy Ghost, and we say to one another, ‘In due season ye shall reap if ye faint not.’"

The master of the School at Bishopswood gives the following account regarding his school during the past year: "One feels there is much to be thankful for in the many cases of very deep interest, one in particular, that of a dear boy, who was brought to know the Lord. He was called away a little time since, after suffering a great deal most patiently. During his illness he sent some precious words to his school fellows. Speaking of him in few words, he was all that could be desired in health and sickness."

The mistress of the School at Chittlehamholt reports: "About the time I wrote last year, God was working very powerfully among the children; four of these, with some others who had ceased to attend the Day school, have been received into church fellowship, and give us hope of being the Lord’s. Two or three others we are equally hopeful about, and we believe there are at present some who are more or less anxious about their souls."

The mistress of the North End School writes: "During the past year four of the scholars have manifested real earnestness about their souls, and I rejoice in believing them to be the Lord’s. Others have given much encouragement by the questions they ask about their souls, showing plainly that a work is going on within."

The Master of the School at Yeovil reports: "We have been much cheered lately by the manifest conversion to God of one, a boy in the first class. His brother, who some time since was in school, is also converted, and speaks with much gratitude for having received such knowledge of the Word while in school. He is witnessing a good testimony in the midst of blasphemers, scoffers, and infidels, by a silent but consistent walk. I have at times been pained by an apparent carelessness over the Bible, but I trust it was the darkness before the dawn."

The accounts about the Home Day Schools might be multiplied were I not obliged to consider the size of this Volume. The number of the pupils in the Home Day Schools, on May 26, 1878, was 5,908; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,803; in all, 7,711.

I doubt not that the reader will see that the Lord’s manifest blessing rests upon the Schools.

There are thirty-nine Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these thirty-nine Sunday Schools there were, on May 26, 1878, altogether 2,721 scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, twenty-nine Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Regarding these twenty-nine schools, no report as to the numbers or otherwise was requested to be sent in. Of the thirty-nine Sunday Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, fifteen are in Spain, six in British Guiana, two in Italy, and the others in England and Wales. The twenty-nine Sunday Schools, which were only in part supported by the funds of this Institution, are all in England or Wales.

The superintendent of the Bristol Sunday School reports: "We have had the joy of seeing several received into the visible fellowship of God’s people, during the past year; but we long to see more fruit to God’s glory."

The report about the Kenilworth Sunday School is "The Sunday School is going on steadily. No conversions, but the boys who were brought to the Lord are labouring with us in the work, and are very zealous for the Lord. It is cheering to see them stand fast for Christ. I do trust the Lord will gather in precious souls into His fold."

The superintendent of the Bethel Sunday School at Portsmouth received recently a letter from one of the girls who has lately left the School and gone to service, in which letter she expresses her thankfulness for the instruction she has received whilst in the School, and says, that she is now happy in the knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ as her Saviour, and she adds, I do now trust Him with all my heart. Also one of the elder girls at Fareham has been converted within the last few months.

There are now six Adult Schools, with 102 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are three in Spain, one in India, one at Callington and one at Walham Green.

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there are altogether One Hundred and Twenty-Two Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 77 Day Schools, 39 Sunday Schools and 6 Adult Schools; and that, during the past year, 3 Day Schools and 29 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in these One Hundred and Twenty-two Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1878, altogether 10,534 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Sixty-Six Thousand, Six Hundred and Forty-Two, viz., there were 44,876 in all the Day Schools, 14,892 in all the Sunday Schools, and 6,874 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £7,275. 15s. 3d. This does not include £1,909. 5s., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund, to which it more properly belongs. There has been expended on the Home Schools from the beginning of the Institution, £51,078. 2s. 6¼d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, is as follows:

9,471 Bibles have been sold.

826 Bibles have been given away.

17,955 New Testaments have been sold.

2,248 New Testaments have been given away.

304 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

55 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

15,645 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 124,186 Bibles, 315,772 New Testaments, 19,104 copies of the Psalms, and 195,420 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,266. 2s. 11¼d.

The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £22,011. 16s. 1d.

The circulation of the Holy Scriptures in Spain was continued by the Missionary brethren, labouring in that land, during the past year, as during the previous years.

From May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, there was expended on Missionary Objects of the Funds of the Institution the sum of £5,327. 5s. 10d. By this sum One Hundred and Sixty-Five labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions

in India …………………………….. £132 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ……. 144 18 4

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain …………….. 1,378 2 8

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ……………… 249 4 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in France …………… 5 0 0

Also expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire … £18 18 6

Ditto, ditto, in Devonshire ….... 2 2 4

In order to give to the readers some insight into our Missionary operations, I give a few extracts from the letters received from the Missionary brethren, between May 26, 1877 and May 26, 1878:—Mr. H., who has been for many years a missionary in the East Indies, in acknowledging £70. sent to him, writes on October 15th, 1877, from Nursapur: "My dear Brother in Christ, I am sorry to have been so long in answering your last. Soon after receiving it, I had to prepare for a tour on board the boat, which lasted three weeks. How thankful we were to receive the help you have again so graciously sent us. The famine, as you know, has been and is very bad; and as children in the school had rather increased in numbers than otherwise, things looked very dark. A sum, which last year would have sufficed for 3 months, this year scarcely suffices for one; but help has always come in at the right time—the meal and oil fail not—and we can but praise the God of all grace, who deals very bountifully with us. Since writing to you last, some souls have been brought to Jesus. Some who formerly blasphemed His name, and persecuted ‘this way,’ could find no peace until they had cast themselves into the loving arms outstretched to receive them. During one tour about twenty were baptized. Others are desiring baptism. Some of the children in my wife’s school are, we trust, truly converted. Yesterday a man from a village near this, came to speak to me about his having come to Jesus; and told me that others were desiring me to visit them in their village. Brethren M. B. and I. desire to go over to see them tomorrow, if possible. I have not seen the native Evangelists lately, but hoped that they might have been in today—however they have not arrived, and I fear the famine has hindered them. With grain at its present price, they must find it almost impossible to engage a man to carry their things. In a letter which I received from Nathaniel [one of the native Evangelists] not long ago, he mentions his wife having been confined, and that for nearly a month he felt doubtful regarding her recovery; also, that he was suffering greatly in consequence of the famine. Since receiving that letter, I have sent him £4. of what you sent him. In my last tour, from which we returned only the other day, I had the pleasure of Brother M.’s company. One object in taking the trip was, to supply grain at a reduced rate to those who could buy, and to give gratis to those Christians who, from want of work or sickness, had no means of support. We left the grain at a certain village, with directions how it had to be sold and to whom, then visited some who lived in villages where no work could be had, and assisted those who were most in need. We afterwards continued our journey on foot, and visited a good many villages situated in a feverish part of the country, near the jungles, where a missionary had scarcely ever been. It was a most interesting time, but most solemn to think that many of these poor people were hearing the Gospel for the first time. Amongst others we met with Koi villages and spent two or three days amongst that interesting people. In one village we found three young men (Kois) who could read a little, and one of them was so much pleased with a Gospel hymn that was sung, that he asked for a copy of it (it was one of Nathaniel’s hymns). After it was written out and given to him, he could not rest until he had mastered the tune and was able to sing it himself, which we heard him doing most lustily, little thinking that in so doing he was proclaiming the good news. When at a certain village on our return, where a market was held, we were surprised to hear another young man asking us for a copy of the same hymn. On asking him what he knew about it, he said a certain Koi had sung it to him. It is a hymn in which the Gospel is most clearly and fully proclaimed; and we trust that many in those jungle villages may thus become acquainted with their Saviour."

Again Mr. H. writes, in acknowledging a cheque for £91. 10s. 3d. on January 21, 1878: "My dear Brother in Christ, Many thanks for what you have again sent us for the work of the Lord in this land, also for what you have sent for those suffering from the famine. It is all most acceptable, as the price of grain still continues very high, and some of the Christians who had a little cultivation, have realized scarcely anything; not enough in many cases for the rent due to Government. Brothers E., B. and I were out together since I last wrote, and Brother B. and I have just returned from a three weeks’ tour. On both occasions we met with much distress, and were thankful to have funds in hand to relieve it. (Besides relief for our poor brethren, we have received some for needy ones outside, and every week more than 250—mostly poor widows, many of them Mahomedans—assemble to receive about 6d. each. On such occasions one of us preaches the Gospel, so that many, who would otherwise shut their doors against us, thus hear the good news). When Brother B. and I were out together (Nathaniel accompanied us), we had many good opportunities of preaching Christ, and sometimes were cheered by the interest displayed. On one occasion, after preaching in a large village and retiring to the shade of a mango garden, we were pleased to see some, whom we had met in the village, come to hear more of the good news. One man especially seemed to drink in all that was said, and took away two Gospel hymns after learning their tunes from Nathaniel. We see God working here and there in the conversion of sinners unto Himself and some (two last week) have lately been baptized. A young woman died last night who has lately been brought to the Lord. Before her departure she spoke with confidence of going to be with Jesus. Three, who were formerly in my wife’s school, have lately confessed Christ and been baptized."

Mr. B., labouring in the Gospel at Nursapur, writes on December 18, 1877: "In the midst of distress and widespread calamities, the Lord’s purposes of grace are being accomplished. He is working and manifestly gathering out His people. By ones and twos those which shall be saved seem here and there taking refuge in the Ark. It gives me much joy to say that the seed of the Gospel has lately been manifestly taking root in the hearts of some of our pupils, and resulting in (as we truly trust) the bringing out of some from darkness into marvellous light. Our many prayers that we might be permitted to see more fruit of the Word daily taught in the School, have apparently been answered to some extent in a remarkable manner, illustrating, however, that

"God moves in a mysterious way

His wonders to perform."

We knew there were some of the youths in school who had long been impressed by the truth of the Gospel, and been persuaded to abandon their heathen ideas and practices, but through fear of the result as regards this world, were unable to come to any decision as to following Christ. It pleased the Lord to bring some of these to a decision by one or two remarkable events last October. First, one young fellow was suddenly carried off by a fatal disease, while apparently in the enjoyment of the best of health, and in his last moments anxious to hear those things that belonged to his peace. Scarcely a fortnight had passed after this solemn event, when another young man was still more suddenly removed by cholera, having been in school, well and hearty, just two days before his decease. What made his removal all the more solemn, was the fact that he had once professed to have come to the Saviour, and evinced a desire to follow Him, but the fear of man caused him to draw back and renounce his intention. His sudden death caused a deep stir in the school, especially among his classmates, two of whom, who had been of the "almost persuaded" ones, appeared deeply concerned about their own state, and anxious to find salvation. After a short time they both professed to be led by the Spirit to rest in Christ, and seemed to be filled with joy and peace in believing. At the same time another young man in the same class was one day, while in school, seized with what appeared to be cholera, but, by the mercy of God, the timely administering of remedies restored him to health eventually. However, his sudden illness appears to have been used of Cod to awaken him to think of his salvation. He was, when I went to see him and give him some medicine, in a state of great anxiety as to his soul, having given himself up as beyond recovery, and was very anxious to hear the Word. His impressions seemed to increase, and when he was recovered, he expressed, together with gratitude for the Lord’s mercy, a desire to follow Christ, in whom he had, he said, believed to the salvation of his soul. Thus three of the young men in the same class have professed to have received Christ and found salvation in Him; nor can we doubt that they have been the subjectsof a work of grace. The results, however, with regard to these three dear youths, at present, are, that two of them have more or less confessed their faith at home, or given their friends to understand that it is their desire to follow Christ alone, and in consequence they have been and still are apparently in sore trouble. They were at once removed from school and kept strictly confined and watched, lest they should attempt to carry out their resolve. One of them, the last mentioned, has been removed to his native village at some distance, where we can learn nothing of him, nor ascertain, what we long to know, how it fares with him; but we have hope from the joyful confidence and boldness he manifested, that, through grace, he will be kept faithful, and that his faith will not fail. The other youth too, although a resident of this place, has been, for a season at least, removed to a distant village, but we have been able to gather some information regarding him, showing that he has been enabled to remain steadfast, notwithstanding he has been made to suffer in various ways; and his desire for the Word seems very great, though he has been deprived entirely of his Bible and other books. No doubt the intention of these young men’s friends is, by depriving them of liberty and subjecting them to harsh treatment, eventually to break down their spirit and get them to renounce their faith and intention. Our only confidence is in the power of the grace of Christ, which is alone sufficient for them, to keep them from going back to the pit from which they have been delivered; while, at the same time, we can only look to Him who over-ruleth and controlleth all events, to open the way for them to recover their liberty. The third young man, though still apparently rejoicing in Christ, has not yet been bold enough to make a confession of his faith and determination at home. The case of these young men and all others in similar circumstances is a very trying and perplexing one, and they need much the fervent prayers of the Lord’s people. The opposition they have to encounter at home, and disgrace to endure in public, is not the only trial that lies in their path. The law of the land prevents their pursuing a course contrary to their parents’ wishes till they are past a certain age, which (as the natives have no reliable means of ascertaining their ages) their parents try by every expedient to prove they are still under; so that a youth into whose heart the light of life has shone, finds himself bound hand and foot, should he desire to obey any of the precepts of the word of God in opposition to the wishes of his earthly guardians and protectors, unless he is clearly beyond the age fixed. You will be glad to hear that in the district also, as well as in this place, there have lately been several additions to the churches, I trust of "such as shall be saved;" indeed, there have been generally manifest tokens of the Lord’s working among the people who have long heard the Gospel, but till now have appeared to have heard in vain. Particulars of these, however, you have, I doubt not, heard from the other brethren. My dear wife still continues her visits to the female members of native families in the place, often meeting with much encouragement.

Again Mr. B. writes in February, 1878: "I was enabled about the middle of this month to attend with many of the brethren, European and Native, the annual festival or religious assemblage at Antravedy, where to the poor sin-deluded thousands we were enabled to testify of the better and only perfect way of deliverance from sin, through Christ Jesus and Him crucified. My dear wife accompanied me, and others of our sisters in the Lord were with us and afforded us assistance in speaking to the people. There was the usual opposition and boisterousness on the part of many, especially of the Brahmins. Nevertheless some listened attentively to, while most heard more or less of, the word of life. A good number of tracts and handbills were also carried away. May the Lord grant that fruit be found at the appearing of Jesus Christ! Whatever the cause may be, it is evident that this festival, if not others, has been sensibly decreasing in respect of the numbers that attend it, for the past few years. For several years past we have not seen the enormous crowds, the unceasing stream of people that formerly astonished us. I am glad to say it appears as though the blessed Spirit were working in this place and other villages. Several of those in connection with the congregations have lately been baptized and have joined the church, especially one elderly man, once quite a heathen belonging to one of the respectable castes, has lately been baptized, having previously given very marked evidence of having found the Gospel the power of God unto salvation. He belongs to a distant village, Chikkala, and needs our prayers very much, for he has many trials and much opposition to contend against. My dear wife is in the habit of, two or three times in the week, visiting the families of some of the higher caste people in the town, and often finds encouragement in declaring the blessed Gospel to the females, who live in such seclusion as to be difficult of access by any other means."

Mr. E. S. B. writes on April 23, 1878, from Nursapoorum: "We are cheered from time to time by seeing one and another professing faith in Jesus, and confessing Him in baptism. Brother H., just before leaving, during a ten days’ tour, which he, brother M. and I took together, baptized nine persons, and there are now several others desiring to follow the Lord in the same ordinance; among them is a blind man who has for the past three or four years been under the sound of the Gospel, and for more than twelve months has professed faith in Jesus, but feared to leave his friends. A fortnight since he came in here, and is now remaining with me; he was a Shudra, but having eaten of food given by us has already broken his caste. Another case is that of a young man, about twenty years of age, who was driven from his home because he believed in Jesus and refused to work on Sundays; he has a great desire to learn to read and write, and by diligent application has, through the aid of a Christian woman who is employed as a school teacher, learnt already to read tolerably fluently. Both these will, I hope, be baptized shortly. I have great hopes that the last mentioned will be useful later on in reading and expounding the Scriptures to those who cannot read for themselves. Though from among the lowest caste, he displays a good deal of intelligence, and his desire to gain knowledge is very great."

Mr. G. writes from Singapore on April 22, 1878: "Through the Superintendent we have a field opened to us in the prisons. Of nearly 1000 prisoners, 150 or 200 come in chains every Lord’s day to a shed, appropriated for the purpose, to hear the Gospel; native brethren, See Boo and others, take a leading part in this service. The Superintendent desires that all who pass through his hands should hear the Gospel. The warders also, who are English soldiers, come to this house for a Scripture reading once a week—fifteen or twenty in number. One of the Chinese brethren has been with me this
morning. He gives an account of himself which has features of much interest. I paid a short visit of a fortnight to Penang, where there was much to call forth thankfulness; among the English brethren especially. The fruits of Mr. M.’s service there are very precious, for he has had seals to his ministry, the only thing that will evidence one’s being sent or sanctioned by God. I am deeply humbled that such faint appearance of seals should be manifested here. And if in days past there were few and small signs of blessing, when one had strength and vigour, there seems little human ground to expect much now. Yet the Word speaks of ‘fruit in old age.’"

Mr. K., who has for above twenty-four years laboured in British Guiana, writes from Peters Hall, Demerara, on January 24, 1878: "The Lord has been working in some hearts here, both in conversion and restoration. One sister has been lately restored, and five have been lately converted to God."

Again Mr. K. writes on April 25, 1878: "The Lord gives me (blessed be His name) strength equal to my day, so that I am able to be about the Lord’s work at the various stations. Lately I have visited every station in the colony except the dear Indians at Mattara, Berbice, and there are some conversions. I baptized seven at one station last month, and there are some negroes and some Chinese to be baptized at Peters Hall next month."

Mr. W. writes from Georgetown, Demerara, on August 3, 1877: "Two months ago, we came over from the Essequibo Coast and have since visited several places up the Demerara river, having some very encouraging meetings and good congregations; although, it being the rainy season, the people had to come through roads that would be impassable to Europeans, often up to their knees in mud. It really seems to inspire one to be in earnest in proclaiming the glorious gospel of God’s grace, when they see that the people are in earnest to listen to it. We have had some interesting meetings here lately, with increased congregations at each meeting; and I feel sure, that, if the Lord would incline some one to come out for Town, he would not only have the joy of the sower, but the joy of the reaper also."

Again be writes on December 22, 1877: "I have just returned from a journey into the interior, via the Demerara river, where I have had some most delightful and blessed work for the Lord; in fact my heart is just full of joy at the remembrance of what I have seen and heard during this last journey at every place I visited. The dear people welcomed me with a warmth that was most touching, and showed that it was sincere, by proofs of the most practical kind; and they came out to the meetings in exceeding good numbers, especially in the evenings—although the weather was stormy and densely dark—and best of all, the Lord graciously gave us evidence that there were not only ears to hear, but also hearts to receive the truth as it is in Jesus. As you know, beloved brother, it is indeed an easy and blessed work to tell out the love of Jesus to willing ears and receptive hearts, and such many of the people seem to possess, and I am looking for much more blessing, for ‘He is faithful that hath promised who also will do it.’ There were some that confessed their faith by baptism at Mahaica Bally and Dalgin, and there were several others at Issuru and Dalgin, that desired to do so; but I thought it wise that they should wait until my next

visit.

On April 24, 1878, he writes from Queenstown, Essequibo: "During the last three months I have been labouring principally in Essequibo, and, in addition to the gatherings already established, I have been enabled to open up other places for the preaching of the gospel; and, in each of these places, the numbers that attend are most cheering. Especially so is this the case at a place called Henrietta, where I have opened a large chapel, which had been previously closed for some mouths; and better still, the Lord is manifestly blessing His word to the salvation of souls. I have also lately taken a journey into the bush, on a visit to the Indians, and had a short but interesting work amongst them, and hope shortly to visit them again. You will be interested in knowing, that the school at Danielstown is prospering exceedingly well. I was present at the examination at the commencement of the year, when nearly one hundred of the children were examined, and it was with surprise and delight that I heard them go through portions of scripture, &c. I could not but regret that yourself, dear Mr. Muller, were not present, so that you might have seen how well the money that you so kindly send for the carrying-on of the School is used. I have the very utmost confidence in brother G., the children under his charge being educated not only for time but for eternity. He has also a large Sunday School, although he stands almost alone in carrying it on."

Lough Ah Fook, a native of China, writes regarding his labours among the Chinese in Demerara, on January 17, 1878: "I am happy to inform you of the prosperity of the Lord’s work during the past year in this Colony. We have had the pleasure of receiving forty-nine into fellowship and the restoration of two backsliders. Two have fallen asleep in the Lord. The Lord is also blessing the work of that faithful brother whose name I mentioned last year labouring on the west coast. Out of the forty-nine, fifteen are from thence. Our brother Ah Sune at Camody Creek is still happy in the work of the Lord. Besides preaching in the Meeting room, he goes from place to place, so as to spread the gospel. We have enlarged the room at that place. Brother Chan Ah Moon is still going on steadily in the work of the Lord. I myself have to go about so as to visit the different Gatherings. Some of the other brethren also go along with me. On Sundays, several of the brethren go about proclaiming the gospel."

Mr. J. writes on December 20, 1877, from Winchow, China: "Since our dear brother and sister Mr. and Mrs. S. left for home, we have had much cause for gratitude to God on account of blessing upon the work here. From August 8 up to the present time we have received into the Church by baptism seventeen persons, five women and twelve men. Each of these since their baptism have given evidence that their conversion was real, by seeking the salvation of their relatives and friends. On Lord’s day next, I hope to have the pleasure of baptizing the second pupil received into the school. About four months ago I sent him to assist at our station at Chu-chow. I gave him no instruction to preach, as I was not quite sure of his spiritual state. Some time ago I was pleased to hear by letter that be was throwing heart and soul into the work there. Three weeks ago I paid a visit there, and had an opportunity of observing his earnestness and suitability for the work. It was when there that he applied for baptism. He has a fair knowledge of the native character, and can speak the Mandarin and Ningpo dialect besides his own. This will greatly add to his power of usefulness as a preacher to the heathen. We have seven other candidates for baptism, and several very interesting enquirers besides."

Mr. R. writes from Tai Chow in December, 1877: "Although but few are turning to the Lord, yet when we look back to 1870, when we first came down here, and remember that there were but two Christians in this whole district, and only one station; as we look round upon the seven stations, and sixty-nine members in communion at the present date, we are compelled to say, ‘What hath God wrought! He hath done great things for us whereof we are glad.’ We have had eighteen received this year and one death. We have just heard of the death of one who has been an enquirer for some time and was a candidate for baptism when he died. The members believed him to be a true Christian, but as he lived some miles away and was absent when I was there I have not seen him myself, but our native helpers there and the Christians buried him according to the New Testament, and all that could, followed him to the grave; and no idolatry was allowed. This was by consent of his friends, although they are not Christians; but as his last moments seem to have been spent in exhorting them to receive Christ, we hope that this may be the case. We have one very promising young man just now; he was baptized last July. I had employed him for some time as my teacher, to see what he really was, and am quite satisfied with him. He has suffered persecution from his own family, but has stood firm; and now his mother comes every Sunday and on Wednesday to the meetings for women, so that we have hope of her. There is also another interesting case of a night watchman who used to go his rounds at night, beating a hollow bamboo and repeating his prayers to Budda aloud. Now he seems truly converted and goes his rounds repeating a few sentences to this effect: ‘If we wish to be saved, we must pray to God and trust in Jesus, then we can go to Heaven.’ No sooner than he began this, the people began to find fault with him, and he wondered why they should do so, seeing they never found fault with him for repeating Budda’s name. Who can tell how much good he may do in the still hours of the night."

Mr. A. F., labouring in Madrid, writes on June 18, 1877: "Through the Lord’s goodness the interest in the meetings continues—three more come into fellowship next Sunday, if the Lord will. Other cases are being considered; last night a respectable young woman told me she now knew that she was saved. Today I met with a very sincere woman who has been coming to the meetings here, one who has been a very fervent Roman Catholic, she said ‘I am not yet saved.’ It is so good to get such a confession as this in Spain. One of the three coming into fellowship is the widow of the jailor of Granada, who had Matamoros and his fellows under his care. The conduct of Matamoros was the means of giving light to the jailor, who became changed into a friend, and whether for this or not, was soon turned out of his office—came to Madrid—attended the first meetings after the revolution, and his widow believes died a saved man. Not long ago we received the daughter, a nice young woman, about 17 years old. A younger child is with us in the Orphan house and has been saved. Matilde the elder girl was turned out of the shop where she worked, because she would not confess to a priest. She earned 1s. 8d. a day, which was all the money the family had for clothes, shoes, &c. The mother giving her services in a house where she and her family have food and shelter. When the sorrowing girl returned home, the mother told her she had done quite right. One of our dear boys having the ague and my dear wife being very low, we went away for ten days, and in order to cheer our poor lonely brother M. M. we went to A. The Lord gave us the joy of being instrumental to the bringing his wife to the knowledge of Christ. We were also used to console a dear sister, wife of a civil guard, who is sent from place to place and most cruelly treated because he is bold for Christ, and will not confess to the priests. He is threatened with a false charge being brought against him, and that he shall be sent to a penal settlement. He knows not what to do. M. M. tried to establish a small meeting—he was called before the Governor. ‘Who pays you for this?’ ‘No one.’ ‘What do you gain by it?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘How do you live?’ ‘I work with my hands in a mine.’ ‘Why do you hold meetings?’ ‘Because God has blessed my soul and I wish others to he blessed.’ ‘You, you were made a miserable day labourer, I prohibit the meetings.’ ‘I yield to force, but as long as I have a mouth to speak, I shall speak for Christ.’ For years he has stood in A. quite alone and stood nobly, now he has joy in his wife. We have received them as members with us—the nearest church five hours railway journey—nearly 6 by 3rd class trains. These are jewels in Jesus’ crown, and it is our great privilege to help such. If God permit we must see if we can visit them sometimes—though really we are nearly overwhelmed with work."

The reader will feel interested in learning, that the number of the children, who attended our sixteen Day Schools in Spain, amounted on May 26, 1878, to 1,095. These are the children of Roman Catholics, some of whom are from time to time not only themselves brought to the knowledge of the Lord, but also their parents, through the copies of the Holy Scriptures, which the children bring home from the Schools, or through what they have heard at School and repeat to their parents at home.

Mr. McL. writes from Armagh, Ireland, on February 4, 1878: "I have been in this country, more or less, the last three months. In two places, called Killeen and Seghan, there has been a mighty work going on. Killeen was one of the darkest and most wicked places in Ulster. There is a saying connected with it, which shows what kind of a place it has been, ‘Sweet Killeen that never saw a Sunday.’ Praise the Lord! those days are past, and God has come in and saved many souls. We have been in no hurry, and as far as we can judge there cannot be less than eighty who appear saved. Many more have professed."

Mr. S. labouring in Swansea, Wales, writes on Sept. 29, 1877: "Here is an interesting instance of the dealings of God with a soul: a middle-aged man stayed after a week-night service a few weeks ago, to speak with me. He said, ‘I want to talk with you about my poor soul,’ and then told me the following: ‘A month ago I heard you for the first time at the Music Hall, and your words took hold of me, and have I hope led me in a new way. Before that, I had attended no place of worship for years; but passing the Music Hall one Sunday evening with my little girl, she said, ‘Father come in and hear the singing,’ I said, ‘No, come along.’ The next Sunday we passed again, and she again asked me, but I refused. A third time she made the same request, and that evening I came in, and it has made a new man of me.’ This was the dear man’s simple story. The results I leave to God, but, so far, the man has continued to attend both on Sundays and week-days, and is evidently a changed man—I hope, brought to God.—I spoke to a young man the other evening, and he very cheerfully replied, ‘I am a Christian and a member of a Christian Church; but you were the means of arousing me when you were preaching at the Star two years ago, from Joseph and his brethren.’ This man had been blessed then, and had continued to walk as a believer.—A young woman, the daughter of Christian parents, began attending our meetings, and was soon deeply convinced of sin; her state for weeks was painful—weeping and praying continually. One Sunday evening, coming as usual, very wretched, she was set free while I spoke of ‘Moses’s Choice,’ and is exceedingly bright and happy since.—About two months ago one of our helpers said to me after the service was over: ‘There is a man here who wants to speak with you.’ I found, on conversing with this man, that he had attended no place where the Gospel is preached for some years, but that last Christmas he came to the Music Hall and had attended regularly since—that he had been brought into a state of anxiety about his soul and was for some weeks seeking peace, but that on the Sunday previous to his speaking to me, he had been set free while one of our brethren was praying with him in his own house after the evening service. Another case of blessing is that of a man who began attending because his relatives came, and one evening, while sitting in the Hall, saw the gospel plan of saving his soul very clearly, and at once received and rejoiced. This happened some mouths ago (though only recently he told me of it), and the man walks steadily, I believe. We are making special prayer just now for the children of believers, and earnestly desire to see fruit amongst them."

On January 30, 1878, he writes: "In reviewing the past year, I had one cause for much praise, viz.: that amongst the many associated with us, scarcely any had given us cause for sorrow. This, when one remembers the many young persons joined with us, and how busy Satan is, seemed to me a cause of real joy. The ingathering of souls has gone on. A young man came to tell me he was leaving Swansea the next day, but wanted me to know he had found Christ in our meetings. Another man who attended regularly for many months, has lately professed himself a follower of Jesus. An elderly man who for years has been a most attentive listener at our meetings, and who often, when spoken to personally, seemed softened yet did not accept the gospel, stayed after one of the services to see me, and said with tears: ‘I have held out a long time, but do now give myself to God.’ This is several months ago, and he continues to walk consistently."

Mr. Y. writes from Barnstaple, on September 29, 1877: "Since last writing to you, I have been encouraged in the work of the Lord, not only in the case of persons to whom the word of life has been spoken recently, but in others also to whom it was spoken years since and apparently in vain; such having called upon me, since my removal to Pilton, in the character of anxious enquirers. I may also mention an interesting case of an old man, who, seven or eight years since, occasionally passed my window at a time when I was confined to the house through illness. He was unknown to me and I was unable to speak to him; but when I saw him I prayed for him. For several years I lost sight of him, and did not know that he was living, until I removed here; soon after which I was asked to go to him quickly as he was dying. Remembering the prayers of years ago, I felt sure it was for life and for the glory of God. In hastening to his bedside, I overtook a young person, who proved to be his grand-daughter, and spoke to her of the great salvation. She is now in Christ. The old man is also now resting in Christ, and his wife is anxious about her soul; while other members of the family have attentively listened to the word of life. How encouraging to remember, that, when we cannot speak to sinners about Christ, we can hopefully speak to God about them."

Mr. L. writes from Cheltenham on January 30, 1878: "Some time since I heard of two aged persons 3½ miles in the country, who were anxious about their souls, and had no one to speak to them of Jesus. The husband was 88 years of age, and the wife 80. I have several times visited them, also another dear brother, and I quite believe they have savingly received the gospel. My weekly visits to the Workhouse give large opportunity for testifying of Jesus, and last Lord’s day afternoon I was delighted with the reception I met with at the lodging houses, and the many willing listeners there were, whilst the love of God in Christ Jesus was proclaimed. Also recently 3 of us have commenced to visit the Public-houses on the Lord’s day evening from about 8 to 10 o’clock, and I am surprised to find what an opportunity it is of briefly preaching Christ to many. We go with Gospel books and tracts, and proclaim ‘Jesus only’ as the Saviour of sinners. The landlords, except in one or two cases, as yet have not hindered us; and it is solemn to see, what a number of persons spend their Sunday evenings in these places. I would ask the prayers of the dear brethren at your Monday evening prayer meeting for this work. I hope by His grace to continue it both here and elsewhere as I have opportunity."

Mr. P. writes from Waterloo, Hampshire, on October 1, 1877: "We are thankful to tell you that the Lord has been graciously pleased to give us much blessing. Many souls have been quickened and saved during the past year, so that we are greatly encouraged."

Mr. L. who labours among the most degraded class in the East of London, writes on January 30, 1878: "The first soul we knew of for the Lord this year, was a man taken from a low court close by to a Hospital very ill. We visited him there and the Lord owned the Truth. He became painfully convicted of sin, crying out that he was burdened with his sins, and with terror declaring ‘I’m lost! I’m lost!’ The precious Saviour of the lost was set before him; the light shone in; he found joyous peace in Jesus—in fact, his joy was so great, the nurses complained of him being too much excited. Thus he continued for a week when the Lord took him. Another soul we rejoice over, is the father of seven Christian children. For years he had been a sad, sad slave to drink, causing them the severest suffering. Now they all rejoice together. Another soul for the Lord Jesus is an aged woman, who for many years has been sought by me for the Lord—all the time she has lived in one of the lowest dens—now she is bright and happy in Him.

Mr. C., who labours in the neighbourhood of London, writes on January 29, 1878: "With regard to our work, or rather the Lord’s in Bow Common, I may say we are still rejoicing over the dead being made alive and the lost being found. Fifty-eight souls were added to the Fellowship last year, and we have had several pleasing cases out of the Sunday School. We have from four to five hundred persons gathered together on the Lord’s day evening to hear the gospel, and in nearly all cases, working men and their wives. By God’s goodness we have in a small measure, I think, solved the question ‘how to get hold of the working man.’ I don’t think it any great secret at all; if you go and meet them on their level, shake them by the hand whether it is clean or dirty, and have an unshaken faith in the Gospel you preach, they will come—at least, this is my experience. I may mention as a pleasing feature, that nearly 200 of our members in fellowship are working men and their wives, and as for real Christian work I know no other class like them. We are blessed beyond description by a band of men whose hearts God has touched; they are poor and some of them very rough and rugged; but their hearts are given up to God, and He has accepted the offering. We have from 3 to 4 hundred children in our Schools on Sundays, and a very good work is going on in their midst."

Mr. B., who labours on the Blackdown Hills, Somerset, writes on January 28, 1878: "We have continual cause for praise and thanksgiving to the Lord for souls saved from the power and dominion of Satan and sin, in the various parts of this Mission. Some young men who have been opposers, and who have sought to lead others wrong, have recently been converted, and are now seeking to undo the past evil of their lives by seeking to lead their companions to the Saviour. I trust that the Lord may call some others in due time to witness for Him in the gospel. Some are desirous to give themselves to the Lord for foreign Mission work, and such are doing Mission work at home as the best preparative for it—thus seeking to prove their calling of God for the work. Several of the young men who have been in our Schools are now preaching the gospel with blessing from the Lord, and many now in the Schools, I hope, will be called of the Lord to some such work for Him."

Mr. C., who labours especially among the Jews, writes on September 29, 1877: "I visited the Jewish quarter, and the first Jew I met was an old man whom I had seen several times before; and on asking him how it was he was not in the Synagogue on this most solemn day, he said: ‘To tell you the truth, you have quite upset my mind, and I am beginning to see that God requires of us to rend our hearts and not our garments: what is all our fastings and crying without the "blood" of which you spoke to me when I last saw you, and, as you said, makes atonement for the soul. I have read Lev. xvii, 11, and I found that you were right again.’ Pray for this old man, who is 79 years of age, that at the eleventh hour he may see Jesus in all His blessed fulness."

I have thus, in the preceding pages, sought to give to the reader a little insight into the Missionary operations in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, both as to the kind of Christian men who labour, and the character of their work. I might in this way easily fill many hundreds of pages, were it desirable to do so; but the Reports of the Institution, published for more than 51 years, make this needless, especially as all those, which have been published during the last 30 years, can yet be obtained.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1878, is £169,039. 2s. 8d.

There has been laid out for Tracts and Books, from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, the sum of £1,287. 1s. 7¼d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Two Hundred and Five Thousand (exactly 3,205,445) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £28,623. 4s. 8d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1878, is more than Sixty-three Millions (exactly 63,613,660.)

More than Two Millions Eight Hundred and Forty Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously.

I give now the statistics in connection with the Orphan Institution, from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878.

At the commencement of the last period, we had 1983 Orphans under our care, in the New Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 5. During the past year 210 Orphans were admitted into these five houses, so that on May 26, 1878, we should have had altogether

2193 Orphans, had there been no changes. But of these 2193 Orphans 19 died during the past year.

We gratefully own the Lord’s kindness, in that only 19 died out of 2193 who were under our care, during the year. Of these 19 who died, 13 had known the Lord some time before their death, and fell asleep peacefully as believers, and two were young infants. Four of the Orphans we were obliged to expel from the Institution, in mercy to the other children, that they might not be injured. This last most painful means was resorted to, after everything else had failed. We yet hope, however, that even now our labour regarding these four captives of Satan may not be in vain. Twenty-five we had to return to their relatives, either on account of their physical state, their mental weakness, or their moral condition not allowing us to retain them, or to be able to recommend them for situations as domestic servants or apprentices. Nineteen of the Orphans were delivered up to their relatives, who were now in a position themselves to provide for them, and felt it their duty to do so. Six of these last two classes were believers. Thirty-seven of the boys were sent out as apprentices to learn a trade or business, and four besides as Pupil Teachers. Of these forty-one, 17 were believers. Of the girls One Hundred and Forty-one were sent to situations, besides which number three were sent out as Pupil Teachers. Of these 144 girls, 69 were believers, and most of them had known the Lord some time. 252 therefore in all are to be deducted from the 2193, so that we had actually only 1941 Orphans under our care on May 26, 1878. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care from April 1836 to May 26, 1878, is 5409.

We have especial reason to be grateful for the manifest blessing, which during the past year has rested upon the Orphans, with regard to their physical, moral and spiritual state.

During the last five years we have sought to train Christian lads and girls, from among the Orphans, to become teachers, if they manifest aptitude for teaching, have a desire to become teachers, and are in other respects suitable. The Lord has caused His blessing to rest upon this also, and we have been thus able to appoint several young men already as assistant masters at the Orphan Houses and in some of the Day Schools, connected with the Institution.

The total of the expenditure for the first four Objects of the Institution, from May 26, 1877 to May 26, 1878, was £15,245. 10s. 11d. and for the support of the Orphans £26,504. 2s. 8½d., in all £41,749. 13s. 7½d.

From May 26, 1878 to May 26, 1879, there were seventy-six Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Of these 76 Schools, there are 14 in Spain, 4 in India, 2 in Italy, 6 in British Guiana; the other 50 are in England and Wales. Besides these Seventy-six Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, five other Day-Schools have been. assisted, two in Devon, one in Worcestershire, and two in France.

The master of the School in Silver Street, Barnstaple, writes, in answering questions sent to him regarding the previous year: "The two monitors R. A. and J. E. profess faith in Christ Jesus, our Lord, and their conduct is in accordance therewith. Four of the children appear to have life through hearing. The last two summers we had monthly meetings of the children on Monday evenings, for spiritual benefit, especially to those who came. They were very well attended. We have had two this month, and are encouraged for another the first Monday evening in June. At the first of these meetings this year, there were about 12 present, at the last about 40. There is no inducement of books or tea, and I take the attendance as a token for good from the Lord. The general condition of the School, with regard to attainment and behaviour, is improved, though it is far from what I desire."

The mistress of the Girls’ School, Bear Street, Barnstaple, gives the following report: "I cannot speak of any decided conversion during the past year, yet I feel sure the Lord is opening the hearts of many of my dear children to receive the precious truth of His own Word, which is read in the School, day after day; and the earnestness and interest manifested, while reading it, is truly delightful and encouraging to witness. Often is my heart gladdened by the cheerful greetings of some of my old scholars, who are truly converted and happy in the Lord, and I trust are also honouring Him in their different callings."

The master of the Boys’ School, Bute Docks, Cardiff, writes: "The Lord in His goodness has brought us through another year, during which He has wonderfully helped us; and although large Schools have been opened adjoining our yard, instead of decreasing our attendance as might have been expected, our numbers on the contrary have been swelled in each department. Respecting conversions, there are no decided cases, as far as we can judge; but we labour on, believing that the good seed sown must eventually bear fruit to the glory of Him, whose work it is. It is very cheering to meet with so many of the lads who have passed through the Schools and are now at work, conducting themselves in such a manner as to show that the labour bestowed has not been in vain."

The master of the mixed School, Tredegarville, Cardiff (481 children on the books) gives the following report: "With feelings of devout gratitude to our Heavenly Father, I send you my usual annual statement. I feel grateful that my humble efforts have been owned and blessed; not only in the matter of secular education, but also in the impartation of Religious knowledge. Two of the children have joined churches and are at present in the School, and I believe there are others in whom the good work has begun. One boy has died during the year, trusting in the Saviour."

The master of the mixed School at Clayhidon, Somerset, writes, Dec. 27, 1878: "Over forty, who have been in the Schools, are now converted, and have joined various sections of the Church of God." On March 26, 1879, the same master writes: "We are expecting that five of our elder scholars (one has left the School) will shortly be received into Church Fellowship. They are under visitation. This certainly is most cheering." On May 24, 1879, he again reports: "With regard to the children’s spiritual condition, I cannot speak of any absolute conversions in the School, but seven have been brought to the Lord in the year, who have been in the Day School, and have left, all dating their first convictions and impressions made while at School. Two of these serve the Lord in Gospel testimony, one entirely given up to mission work, now studying at the East End Training Institute. All this encourages us, in the midst of much to cast down and discourage. Several in the School are in a very hopeful state, and I doubt not will shortly come out boldly for Jesus. We sow ‘in hope, till the reapers come, gladly to gather the harvest home.’"

The mistress of the Cubitt Town School reports: "I have realised much blessing from the Lord, during the past year, both in the work and in my own soul, and believe that the good seed, daily sown in the hearts of the dear children, will, through grace, one day, yield an abundant harvest to the glory of God. One boy of 11 years has confessed to having found peace, through believing the truth, as it is in Jesus. His efforts to influence his class boys for good, by word and example, are a testimony to a change of heart, which I trust is real. I may here mention, how much impressed I am daily by the perfect stillness which prevails, even among the little children, during prayer, without any more effort than earnestly reminding them before prayer, of the presence of the Saviour, to whom they are brought in prayer to be blessed. It is very gratifying, too, to see the harmony which exists among the elder boys and girls, whose greatest pleasure is to know that they are approved of, both for lessons and conduct. My examination, yesterday and the day before, of the upper classes, on paper, seemed to have a very beneficial effect. Certainly there was a manifest improvement since that of a month ago."

The mistress of the School at High Bickington writes, in giving an account of her School, as to its spiritual condition: "With regard to conversion among the children, I am happy to say, there are 3 elder girls, who have lately left school, whom I believe are the Lord’s; there are six in the school still (two of whom are boys) who really seem anxious to lead their companions to Christ; two other girls seem desirous about their souls’ salvation, and they with others often ask to stay behind after school, so we have purposed to hold a meeting every Wednesday morning, after 12 o’clock, for any who wish to remain. Last Wednesday a good number remained, and we had a happy meeting. In a meeting sometime ago (after school) one of the dear girls prayed; her testimony is very clear."

The mistress of the North End School, Fulham, writes: "I know of no decided cases of conversion, during the past year; there are anxious ones of whom I have good hopes, and I feel quite sure the Lord is working in the hearts of several. I am very happy to add, those who professed Christ as their Saviour, last year, have shown, by their walk, that they do really belong to Him; three of them are still in the School, and they are bright exanrples to their schoolfellows."

The master of the School at Saul reports regarding the state of his School: "In no previous year have the children studied harder, behaved better, or been more happy. We have been a happy family at home. That some love the Lord I have no doubt."

The master of the School at Yeovil reports on December 24, 1878, regarding his school: "In looking back upon the past year of school work, I can truly say that it has been the happiest; for the Lord has blessed our labours. About two years since we were much exercised as to the manifest effect of the Scripture upon the children, and we gave up a portion of the dinner hour to prayer every day. At last two were converted and joined us. About two months since, three others were brought to the Lord, and remained with us to pray, and lately the number has increased to ten. I have no reason to doubt the reality of the work in any one of them. It was a joyful sight, on the last day of school work, to see ten Christian scholars, four anxious after the way of peace, beside teachers bowing together in prayer. The work has been very quiet and all among the eldest. The whole of my first class are the Lord’s. I have carefully avoided being personal or asking direct questions, lest any should be tempted into a false position. I write thus fully, that you may rejoice in the fruit to eternal glory, from the Scriptural Knowledge Institution Schools."—On May 24th, 1879, the same master writes: "During the past year we have had much cheer, for several of the older scholars have been brought to the Lord, and testify, by their walk, whose they are and whom they serve. Two have been received into church fellowship. It is a joy to see them, as they leave school for work, go forth as disciples of Jesus. I will not speak of numbers, as the real fruit from the sowing of the Word of God will only be manifested in its fulness at that time when the hidden things shall be brought to light."

Extracts from the letters received from masters and mistresses, of the various Home Day Schools, might be greatly multiplied. With scarcely a single exception, the teachers are greatly encouraged in their work. The number of pupils in our Home Day Schools, on May 26, 1879, was 5,718; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,795; in all, 7,513.

There are thirty-six Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these thirty-six Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1879, Two Thousand Four Hundred and Nine scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, sixteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the thirty-six Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, twelve are in Spain, six in British Guiana, two in Italy, the others are in England and Wales.

There are now six Adult Schools, with 96 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. Of these there are three in Spain, one in India, one at Callington, and one at Walham Green.

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there are altogether One Hundred and Eighteen Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 76 Day Schools, 36 Sunday Schools and 6 Adult Schools; and that, during the past year, 5 Day Schools and 16 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in these One Hundred and Eighteen Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1879, altogether 10,018 scholars. The total number that frequented the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning to May 26, 1879, amounts to Seventy-One Thousand and Ninety-Six, viz., there were 48,095 in all the Day Schools, 16,034 in all the Sunday Schools, and 6,967 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £7,201. 19s. 1d. This does not include £2,137. 10s., expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund. There has been expended on the Home Schools from the beginning of the Institution, £58,280. 1s. 7¼d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1878 to May 26, 1879, is as follows:

10,446 Bibles have been sold.

593 Bibles have been given away.

65,437 New Testaments have been sold.

2,024 New Testaments have been given away.

368 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

1,092 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

65 Ditto have been given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 135,225 Bibles, 383,233 New Testaments, 19,472 copies of the Psalms, and 196,577 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,524. 11s. 5½d. The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £22,270. 5s. 5¼d.

During no year since the beginning of the Institution has so large a number of copies of the Holy Scriptures been circulated as during the past year. This is chiefly owing to the fact that the colporteurs, who are supplied by us, have been enabled to circulate a large number of copies; and especially, through open-air preaching in connection with a Bible Carriage, a most extensive circulation has been promoted. The factories and mills of Lancashire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, are still visited, for the purpose of placing the Word of God in the hands of the men, women, boys and girls, who are employed in them; and these efforts have been blessed, during the past year also, as in former years. The expenses, of course, have been proportionately great, as this Object has been increased; but we have judged that the greater the efforts which are being made, to put aside the Word of God, or to do without it, the more it becomes true disciples of the Lord Jesus to circulate it with earnest, believing, expecting, and persevering prayer.

The Godly evangelist, who goes about with the Bible Carriage [our beloved brother, Henry Moorhouse, since fallen asleep], wrote from Blackpool on August 28, 1878: "Beloved Mr. Muller, We are having a glorious time here, selling about 1,000 copies of the New Testament a week, and preaching to thousands in the open air. Enclosed P.O.O. for £12. 10s. Please send us 3,000 2d. Testaments. Many thanks for your kindness in giving them at half price to us. God bless you, dear Mr. Muller."

In acknowledging the receipt of the Scriptures sent, he writes again from Blackpool: "Beloved Mr. Muller, The New Testaments have arrived safe from London. I thank you very much for giving them to me at 1d. each. The expenses of the Gospel Carriage, for horses, lights and rent of ground, will average about £3. a week; and I trust the sales of Bibles, &c., will cover this. I wish you could see the thousands of people listening to the preaching of the Gospel in the open air, and sometimes hundreds of men weeping. You would say this is the Lord’s Work. I wish there were a dozen more carriages out in the villages.—I met a great many, in the States, who were much blessed by your ministry, out there; and many ministers told me how much they loved you. Again thanking you for your kindness," &c.

On Oct. 14, 1878, he writes: "Beloved Mr. Muller, I sent last Monday £10. for Testaments; hope it arrived safe; and I now enclose draft for £20. 16s. 8d. for more. The Lord is blessing very much this work, and we all have great joy in spreading the blessed Gospel of our Saviour. We were at Leicester last week, and in the fair sold 500 New Testaments, in six hours. A publican, opposite whose place we stood, sent for the police to remove us. He could scarcely get a customer into his place. Of course the police could not interfere, as we were breaking no law. The chief magistrate, in every town we have visited, in almost every case, has stood our friend, and given orders for us to have the best place in the market for our carriage. On Saturday last we were selling in three places, Preston, Blackburn, and Leicester. A lady in Leicester has taken off her jewellery, and is going to sell it and buy with it a Bible carriage for the county. We hope to go next to Clitheroe, then to Oldham. May the loving Lord bless you in your glorious work for Him."

On March 25, 1879, he writes to Mr. Wright: "Now I want to thank you and beloved Mr. Muller, for your love in giving us the Blessed Book at so cheap a rate, and to tell you the work is just grand. We came to London the beginning of this month, and pitched our carriage on a waste piece of land, in the poorest part of London. It turned out to be the place where Bradlaugh and his men had been preaching against the Bible, and, in less than two weeks, the power of God had broken up these meetings, so that they could not get six people to listen to them; and on that very spot we have sold, in three weeks, over 5,000 copies of the Book they have been running down. Could you see the class of people who, as a rule, buy them, your loving heart would rejoice. Bloated, blear-eyed men and poor fallen women, often come for the book, and I am sure there will be many saved through these dear little Testaments. We hope to start North again in a couple of weeks, taking the villages and towns on the way, preaching our Lord’s glorious Gospel and selling His Word. Will you get much prayer for this?"

To this one devoted servant of Christ we sold, during the past year, at reduced price, Two Thousand Six Hundred and Fifty-Six Bibles and Fifty-Two Thousand Four Hundred and Twelve Testaments, which he spread in connection with his open-air preaching and the Bible Carriage.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid Missionary efforts.

During the past year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for this Object, the sum of £6,506. 4s. 6d. By this sum One Hundred and Sixty-Six labourers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in. connection with Missions

in India ………………………………… £264 0 0

For the relief of sufferers from the famine

in China, sums given specially for

that object ……………………………… 19 3 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ………. 236 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ………………… 1,416 19 10

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy ………………. 220 10 2

Also expended in connection with some

preaching places in spiritually dark

villages in Somersetshire and Glou-

cestershire …………………………………. 18 11 6

The total amount of the Funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1879, is £175,545. 7s. 2d.

There has been laid out for Books and Tracts from May 26, 1876 to May 26, 1879, the sum of £l,418. 9s. 7d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Two Hundred and Sixty Thousand (exactly 3,264,193) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this Object, since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £30,041. 14s. 3d.

The total number of all the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1879, is more than Sixty-six Millions Eight Hundred and Seventy-seven Thousand (exactly 66,877,853).

Two Millions Four Hundred and Forty-five Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously.

At the beginning of the year of the Institution, May 27, 1878, we had 1,941 Orphans under our care. During the year, from May 26, 1878 to May 26, 1879, there were received into the Orphan Houses 273 Orphans, so that on May 26, 1879, we should have had altogether 2,214, had there been no changes. But out of these 2,214, Twenty died. Only twenty! I draw attention to this particular kindness of the Lord, in that again not one per cent. of the Orphans has died during the past year. It is indeed true, that good air, simple yet nourishing food, regular habits, cleanliness, and suitable clothing, instrumentally may be used by God to preserve health and life, and He does use these means; nevertheless, when the many infectious diseases are considered to which children especially are exposed, we can only admire the kindness of God that so few children have died; and all this becomes the more remarkable, as three-fourths of our children lost one or both parents from consumption. Of these 20 who died, nine were truly brought to rest on the Lord Jesus for the salvation of their souls, and six were young infants. Four of the boys we were obliged to expel. We had long borne with them, and had sought by a variety of methods to turn them from their evil ways; but, as all was in vain, it was necessary at last, in mercy to the other children, to resort to this most painful remedy. Twenty-five of the Orphans were sent back to their relatives, after most of them had been for a very long time under our care, because on account of mental or physical weakness, incurable disease, or their moral condition, we could not recommend them for situations. Nineteen Orphans were delivered up to their relatives, who now through altered circumstances were able and desirous to provide for them. Thirty-one of the boys were apprenticed, and One Hundred and Twenty-seven girls were sent to situations. Six Christian girls were sent out as Pupil Teachers, and two of the male Orphans as Assistant Masters to two of our Day Schools; both had been believers for a number of years. Besides the nine who died as believers, 83 of those Orphans who were sent out were converted, and many of them had known the Lord a considerable time and walked consistently. These 234 therefore are to be deducted from the 2,214, so that on May 26, 1879, we had actually only 1,980 Orphans in the five houses. The total number of Orphans who have been under our care from April, 1836 to May 26, 1879, is 5,682.

In looking back upon the past year, we have especial reason to be grateful to the Lord for the blessing which He has been pleased to cause to rest upon the Orphan Work.

The income for the various Objects of the Institution, from May 26, 1878 to May 26, 1879 was, for the first four Objects £17,216. 4s. 9d., and for the support of the Orphans £29,950. 4s. 6d., in all £47,166. 9s. 3d. The expenses for the first four Objects were £16,738. 17s. 10d., and for the support of the Orphans £26,920. 14s. 11¼d., in all £43,659. 12s. 9¼d.

From May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880, there were Seventy-five Day Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and one Day-School was assisted. Of these 75 Day Schools, there were 14 in Spain, 4 in India, 1 in Italy, and 6 in British Guiana; the other 50 were in England and Wales.

The master of the Boys’ School in Bristol reports, in. reference to the state of his School, May 26, 1880: "Among the encouraging features of the School are the undiminished interest the dear boys display in their Bible lessons, and the manifest improvement in their behaviour. God’s own definite promise of success, ‘Ye shall reap if ye faint not,’ is a great encouragement to me in sowing the incorruptible seed of His word. May this seed take deep root in the hearts of the dear children and bring forth fruit a hundred-fold. Some of my old scholars have allied themselves to Christian churches and are, I trust, consistent believers."

The mistress of the Girls’ School in Bristol states: "I have much pleasure in being able to give a favourable account of my school. The moral tone of the school is good. The past year has been one of marked improvement. The children generally are respectful in their deportment, obedient to their teachers, and attentive to their lessons. They manifest considerable interest in their Scripture lessons. I have strong reasons for believing that God has blessedly owned my labours. Three dear girls who have recently left the school were the subjects of religious impressions."

The mistress of the Girls’ School in Barnstaple wrote in November 1879: "You will rejoice with me that another of my dear girls who left the school has found Christ, and last week two other old scholars were baptized on their profession of faith in Christ."

The same mistress reports about her School May 25, 1880: "Two dear girls in the first class I believe to be truly converted to God, and I am hopeful about several others. The school continues to be valued by parents, and I am often obliged to refuse children for the want of room. I am thankful to say I am more than ever encouraged in the Lord concerning my labours in the School."

The master of Howle Hill School states: "I am grateful to our Heavenly Father for having permitted me to see some good fruit as the result of the scripture lessons. Several scholars profess to have found peace in Jesus, and are, as far as I can judge, really converted to God. The general condition of school, behaviour, punctuality, obedience and honesty in work, is very cheering."

The master of the School at Bow reports: "I cannot report on any conversions to God during the year; yet I feel fully persuaded that not a few shall be ere long savingly converted, through the instrumentality of this blessed work. It is quite cheering to notice the marked attention and the pleasure the children feel in their scripture lesson from day to day; all tending to the sweet assurance that many shall soon be gathered into the fold of our dear Lord Jesus, and that we shall yet have cause to rejoice that our labours are not in vain. We shall reap in due time—God’s own time. I am happy in saying the school is in a satisfactory condition, giving general satisfaction to all connected with, and interested in its welfare."

The master of the Boys’, Girls’ and Infant Schools, at the Seamen’s Bethel, Cardiff, with 340 children in these schools, writes on May 25, 1880: "I am very happy to be able to report that the past year has been one of the most prosperous since the schools were opened. The Lord has been most pleased to send so many children that not only have our averages been higher than during any previous year in each department, but we have had difficulty at times to seat them all. It is very cheering to see how the children are attached to the school, some having been with us from the commencement; and although we have not the joy of being able to record any decided cases of conversion, yet one cannot fail to see the effect of the teaching in many ways. It is very precious to look back and know that during the time we have been labouring here, many hundreds of little ones have been brought under the simple teaching of God’s blessed word. It is labour, that we are sure, God will bless; and in the days of increasing disregard for the truth we realize more and more the importance of the work, and look to him only for results."

The master of the Roath School, Cardiff, reports May 26, 1880: "I cannot say decidedly that any of the children have become converted to God during the year, but the steady and thoughtful demeanour, together with the entire absence of any criminal offences among the older scholars, lead me to hope that there is some good thing found in them. The general condition of the school is satisfactory, which the recent examination proves. The number at present on the books is 386."

The master of the Canton School, Cardiff who has 224 children under his instruction, writes: "I am not certain that any conversions to God have yet taken place, but I believe that the seed which has been sown is not lost. I am glad to say that the children take an increasing interest in the Bible lesson. I have visited the children’s homes to enlist the co-operation of the parents in securing the regular and punctual attendance of their children. In nearly every case they were quite willing to do so, and thanked me for calling on them."

The mistress of the School at Chittlehamholt states: "A former scholar converted some years ago, and who commended herself as a follower of Christ among believers in a neighbouring town, has this year passed away to be with Christ. She returned here about twelve months before her death, and during that period she displayed great calmness and much of the peace of God keeping her heart, whilst she waited the will of God to be done either by restoration to health or to be called up higher."

The master of the School at Clayhidon, writes on Sept. 24, 1879: "You will be glad to know that three of the scholars in the day school were baptized and received into fellowship a fortnight ago; their ages being respectively 15, 16 and 17 years. This year five from the school have been baptized and received into the Church."

The same master writes Oct. 21, 1879: "The Lord is working in our midst. Another girl has confessed to salvation, and I think there is little doubt of her reality. She is an ex-VI standard girl. I have another girl in Standard VI deeply anxious; she is affected under every Bible lesson, and I feel confident that ere long she will be set free. So that, though we have often unusual discouragements, the Lord has evenly balanced it by giving us to see constant blessing in conversions. We labour not for time merely, but for eternity! Sowing to reap, and sowing in hope till the reapers come, gladly to gather the harvest home."

On Dec. 15, 1879, he writes again: "You will be glad to hear that the Lord is encouraging us in our work. We have had some special services for the young, and they have been owned of God in the blessing of some who had for a long time been anxious. During the past week or two, four in the schools have been brought to a saving knowledge of Christ. All these have been in the Day School, and date their convictions to teachings there given. Two are still in the Day School, and two are in the Sunday School."

Once more the same master writes on May 24, 1880: "We are rejoiced to be able to say that, during the year, eight have been most hopefully converted, two in the Day Schools and six in the Sunday Schools, while six have been baptized and received into Church fellowship who were converted in the year previous to May 26th, 1879. These all continue to stand firm, and are, I believe, seeking to adorn the doctrine of our Lord Jesus. There are still others who are "not far from the Kingdom," of whom I trust we may shortly have to say they have crossed the border line. All this encourages, and we desire devoutly to praise our God and Father by whose spirit alone any blessings can be effected. We "thank God and take courage."

About the School at Hopton, the following report is given: "We have during the last month had the joy of knowing that two dear children, a sister and brother, who received their education in this school, gave the most decided proof of conversion to God; both died triumphantly, trusting only in the precious blood of the Lamb for salvation. There are others who are giving proof that they are trusting in Jesus. Another dear girl, just 18, having been in service for 2½ years, wrote a very comforting and cheering account of her decision for Christ; she was trained in this school, her parents live in this village."

The master of the Kilburn Day Schools writes on May 25, 1880: "We have been privileged to have had the care of over three hundred dear children for another year. We attach great importance to their instruction for the present life, but supremely desire that they may become the true disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ. To this end we labour and pray, assured that His word shall not return void."

The teacher of the North End School reports: "I know of one conversion during the past year. A little boy of nine years of age told me he was able to say that Christ was his Saviour, and that he had found Him to be very precious to his soul. I am anxiously longing to hear more confess His name. I meet with many encouragements from them, but more especially from their parents, who have acknowledged that they have heard the truth of God from their children. I trust there will be a glorious harvest when the Master comes."

The mistress of the Girls’ School, Plympton, writes on Oct. 29, 1879: "You will rejoice with me when I tell you that five of the dear children have given their hearts to God, and more are anxious. Last Friday some dear girls wished to speak to me, and having talked to them they sobbed aloud. They all told me it was through the Scripture lessons and conversation I had had with them that led them to decide for Christ; so by God’s blessing my labours have not been in vain, and He raised me up for a purpose—to Him be all the praise."

The master of the Boys’ School at Plympton reports May 24, 1880: "On looking at the past we can truly say, ‘Ebenezer’; for God has indeed helped us. May we be encouraged, by the blessing which we have received, to trust Him for the future. An incident came to my notice recently of the good effect of the scriptural instruction given in the School. One of the elder boys, who formerly gave great trouble to the teachers, latterly gave evidence of becoming more serious and thoughtful concerning eternal things. He has, since leaving school, taken a small Testament with him to his daily business. As he daily walks 4½ miles to his work, and does not return home till night, he has opportunity in the dinner hour for perusing God’s word; and it is encouraging to think that a lad, surrounded by godless companions, takes such a safeguard and guide daily with him. During the past twelve months, the school has been steadily improving, both in tone and demeanour, and this is attributable in no small measure to the Bible lessons."

The mistress of the Infant School at Underwood states, May 24: "The conduct of the children is satisfactory, and there is increased attention during the Bible lesson, especially among some of the elder boys. I have every reason to believe that the Lord is working in the hearts of many of the children, and although the Word has been feebly spoken, it is not lost, but has been carried home by them to their parents, who have been pleased to speak of it again. Not many months since I happened to overhear a conversation between two of my little girls. I had been giving a Bible lesson the morning before on ‘The love of God to sinners but His hatred to sin.’ One of them was absent, and the other was trying to make her understand what I had been saying. The one said to the other, ‘What do you think Miss H. said yesterday? The Lord Jesus loves us when we are naughty, only He’s so sorry.’ This although so simple in itself, gives me great encouragement to labour on."

The master of the School at Purton writes on May 26: "One of our elder scholars sent us a letter wherein she states the conflict of mind she has passed through of late concerning her spiritual condition, and through the work of the Holy Spirit she now professes to have peace in Jesus. One day last month two of the children came to me at the desk before the commencement of school, and with quiet earnestness of spirit said, ‘We do want to be Christians.’"

The master of the School at Saul reports on May 25th: "The school year just closing has been one of deep interest and cause for great thankfulness. Undoubtedly God’s spirit has been poured out upon this neighbourhood. Numbers of the present and former (now grown up) pupils of this school, their parents and friends, have been brought to a knowledge of God, and have obtained forgiveness, and found peace through believing in the Lord Jesus."

The report of the master of the School at Stroud on May 25th is: "I have great pleasure in stating that the children generally have studied more perseveringly and behaved better than during any former year. I can truly say this has been a happy year, because two of the dear boys have given strong evidence of the Holy Spirit’s work in their hearts. Their general demeanour indicates that they love the Lord, and I have reason to believe others are seeking Him."

The following is the report of the master of the School at Yeovil: "I cannot speak definitely of conversions to God during the past year. Three profess to have believed to the salvation of the soul, but as yet I cannot speak of them with confidence. One that had left school has professed Christ and walks with Him. She gives us much joy and often comes to our house for conversation on the Scriptures. It is an encouragement to hear her speak of schooldays, of the convictions then received and the help which the reading of the Scriptures then, are to her now. Others of whom I spoke last year leave us no room for doubting the reality of the work of faith in them. We seek to bury the seed, desiring to leave the result in our Father’s hand, but are thankful for whatever fruit He gives us to see now. As to discipline and order, we have no difficulty. The children are obedient and cheerful."

Many more extracts from the letters of the teachers might be given. They are all equally encouraged in their work. The number of pupils in our Home Day Schools on May 26, 1880, was 5,435; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,579; in all 7,014.

There are thirty-six Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these thirty-six Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1880, Two Thousand Three Hundred and Ninety-seven scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, fourteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the thirty-six Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, eleven are in Spain, six in British Guiana, one in Italy, four in Gloucestershire, three in Somersetshire, two in Devonshire, one in Cornwall, three in Hampshire, three in Middlesex, one in Norfolk, and one in Warwickshire. Of the fourteen Sunday Schools, which were assisted by the funds of the Institution, three are in Gloucestershire, one in Somersetshire, one in Wiltshire, one in Devonshire, one in Cornwall, one in Hampshire, one in Herefordshire, one in Yorkshire, two in Middlesex, one in Essex, and one in Wales.

The accounts from the Superintendents of the Sunday Schools are encouraging, and show that the Lord is working by His Holy Spirit in the hearts of many of the children.

There are now six adult schools, with 93 scholars, connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds.

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there are altogether One Hundred and Seventeen Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 75 Day Schools, 36 Sunday Schools and 6 Adult Schools; and that, during the past year, 1 Day School and 14 Sunday Schools were assisted. From what has been stated, it will likewise be seen, that in these One Hundred and Seventeen Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26, 1880, altogether 9,504 scholars. The total number that attended the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to Seventy-Six Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-Six, viz., there were 52,495 in all the Day Schools, 17,184 in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,087 in all the Adult Schools.

The amount of means, which was expended during the past year, in connection with the various Schools, amounts to £7,289. 0s. 2d. This does not include £1,889. 12s. 1d. expended on the Mission Schools alone, which is charged to the Mission Fund. There has been expended on the Home Schools, from the beginning of the Institution, £65,569. 1s. 9¼d.

The second Object of this Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880, is as follows:—

14,881 Bibles have been sold.

1,052 Bibles have been given away.

82,448 New Testaments have been sold.

2,130 New Testaments have been given away.

158 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

70 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

1,628 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

200 Ditto have been given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 151,158 Bibles, 467,811 New Testaments, 19,700 copies of the Psalms, and 198,205 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,860. 2s. 10d.

The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £24,130. 8s. 4d.

During no year, since the beginning of the Institution, has so large a number of copies of the Holy Scriptures been circulated as during the past year. This is chiefly owing to the fact that the many colporteurs, who are supplied by us, have been enabled to circulate a large number of copies and especially, through open-air preaching, in connection with three Bible Carriages, a most extensive circulation has been promoted.

The dear evangelist, Mr. H. M., writes in September, 1879: "Our Bible Carriage opened at Wigan on Saturday. I was much concerned about this dark town, most of the people being colliers, and a great many out of work and others out on strike. But God, who hears prayer, opened the way. We sold on Saturday 1017 New Testaments in the Market-place, besides Bibles, "Words of comfort," and giving away above 12,000 little books. To our living Lord be all praise! I am sending for more Bibles and Testaments, also for 120,000 little books from you, through Mr. Stanley. I do thank beloved Mr. Muller and yourself for the kind way you give me these messages from Heaven. Never could we have done such a work but for your kindness and love in giving us the Bibles, Testaments and books so cheap. I am hoping, God willing, next month, to open a second Bible Carriage for London, this modern Babylon."

In October, 1879, he writes: "We have had a blessed time at Leicester, and many souls, I trust, have decided for the Lord Jesus. During the fair, in one week, 1711 New Testaments have been sold, besides Bibles and portions. At Wigan a grand work has been done, and up to last Monday over 2,000 New Testaments were sold. Praise be to the Lord for inclining the hearts of the masses to purchase the Scriptures. The Lord has been giving great blessings in conversion, through my ministry, the last eight weeks. Over 150 have professed conversion."

On Jan. 12th, 1880, this dear brother writes regarding his work: "We are hearing of conversions to God every week. The other day a poor woman bought a twopenny Testament. She opened it: her eyes fell on John v. 24. She was convicted and converted, and is now in happy fellowship with the Lord’s people." This letter contained an order for 5,000 New Testaments and 600 Bibles, a similar order we have often from him.

On Feb. 16th he writes: "The blessed work of circulating the Scriptures seems rather to increase than diminish. Never had we such a week before as last week at Oldham, taking over £30. for Bibles and Testaments. Praise to the Lord! In many mills, I am told, the girls are reading now the Scriptures during the dinner hour, and the masters say these girls do more work than those who are careless about better things." The letter is again accompanied by an order for 5,000 Testaments and 200 Bibles.

On May 6th he writes again: "We are still having very blessed times. Our carriage was at Stockport Fair last week, and in three days we sold more than 1,000 New Testaments and many Bibles. At Bradford, Yorkshire, we took more than £25. last week for Scriptures, and thousands heard the Word of Life." The letter is again accompanied by an order for 5,000 New Testaments and 600 Bibles.

To this devoted servant of Christ we sold, during the past year, at reduced price, Four Thousand Two Hundred and Thirty-Six Bibles, Fifty-Four Thousand and Twelve New Testaments, and many tens of thousands of books, which he spread in connection with his open-air preaching and three Bible Carriages.

During the past year was expended of the Funds of the Institution for Missionary Objects, the sum of £4,631. 9s. 1d. By this amount One Hundred and Forty-Eight labourers in Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions

in India ……………………………… £176 0 0

For the support of a Mission School

at Colar, given specially for that

object ……………………………….. 10 0 0

For the support of Schools in connec-

tion with Missions in British Guiana .. 171 19 0

For the support of Schools in connec-

tion with Missions in Spain …………. 1,314 8 4

For the support of Schools in connec-

tion with Missions in Italy ………….. 217 4 9

Also expended in connection with some

preaching places in spiritually dark

villages in Somersetshire and Glou-

cestershire …………………………… 18 17 0

The accounts received from the Missionary brethren, both with regard to their general labours and the schools under their superintendence, are full of encouragement, giving again abundant cause for thankfulness, that during the past year also thousands of souls were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, through their instrumentality; but space forbids me to enter more minutely into this, and I must refer the reader to the Report from 1879 to 1880.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1880, is £180,177. 4s. 3d.

There has been laid out for the circulation of Tracts and Books, from May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880, the sum of £1,176. 11s. 8d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions Four Hundred and Eighty-Six Thousand (exactly 3,486,004) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £31,218. 5s. 11d.

The total number of the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840 to May 26, 1880, is more than Seventy Millions Three Hundred and Sixty-three Thousand (exactly 70,363,857).

Two Millions Five Hundred and Forty-seven Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously. During the past year also, we heard again and again of cases in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the beginning of the year of the Institution, May 27, 1879, we had 1,980 Orphans in the five houses. During the year, from May 27, 1879 to May 26, 1880, we received 265 Orphans, so that, on May 26, 1880, the total number under our care would have been 2,245, had there been no changes. But of these 2,245 children, 20 died in the course of the year. Only 20. Of these twenty, eight were infants, and three died very happily, as believers. Six Orphans we were obliged to expel from the Orphan Houses. Three and twenty of the Orphans were returned to their relatives on account of their physical, mental, or moral state, which prevented our being able to send them out with commendation as apprentices or servants. Twenty-four were returned to their friends, because the circumstances of their relatives had altered, and they felt it their duty themselves to care for these Orphans; 138 girls were sent out to service, and 40 boys were apprenticed. Also two Christian girls were sent out as pupil teachers, and one Christian lad. Of the girls who were sent out, 43 were believers, and of the boys 11; 254 are therefore to be deducted from 2,245, so that on May 26, 1880, we had actually only 1,991 Orphans in the five houses. The total number of Orphans, who have been under our care, from April, 1836 to May 26, 1880, is 5,947.

The total income for the first four Objects: from May 26, 1879 to May 26, 1880, was £14,568. 3s. 8½d.; and for the Orphans £27,271. 9s. 6d. Altogether £41,839. 13s. 3¼d. This was the fruit of daily waiting upon God. The total expenditure for the first four Objects of the Institution was £15,026. 2s. 7d.; and for the Orphans, £26,274. 11s. 11d. Altogether £41,300. 14s. 6d.

We now proceed to the next year, in giving the statistics. From May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, we had Seventy-six Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and two Day Schools in Devonshire were assisted. Of the 76 Day Schools entirely supported, 14 are in Spain, 4 in India, 1 in Italy, and 7 in British Guiana; the other 50 are in England and Wales.

The master of the Bristol Boys’ School states: "I am glad to report a marked improvement in the general conduct of the boys. The moral tone of the school is good. As to the spiritual condition of the children, there are encouraging signs. The elder boys especially manifest a love of God’s Holy Word. They are particularly attentive during the Scripture lessons, and display a great interest in them. Four boys have professed to be on the Lord’s side."

The mistress of the Bristol Girls’ School writes, with reference to the state of her school: "I am pleased to record that there has been an extensive awakening among the dear children. Many have openly professed their conversion, and are now acting in accordance with their Christian profession. The monitor, too, has decided for Christ."

The teacher of the School at Bishopswood writes: "One of the elder children professes to have found the Lord Jesus as her Saviour; and her conduct since has been such as to give evident testimony to it. In the Sunday School, three of the elder children have also borne testimony to having found peace and joy in believing; and their walk as believers, as far as I have been able to gather, by personal observation and inquiry about them, seems to bear out what they profess."

The master of the School at Bow wrote on August 12, 1880: "I am happy to say the Lord has graciously visited us with a little shower of blessing during the last month. On the 15th July, 18 of the children in the Day School decided for the Lord; on the 16th three others, and on the 19th two more, making in all 23, who have professed faith in our Lord Jesus. The conduct of those children, since then, has been most exemplary, giving us much satisfaction."—On May 25, 1881, he reports: "I am thankful to say the Lord has graciously visited us during the year, and has given us some tokens for good, in the conversion of several of the children, eight of whom are walking very consistently in the good way, and 16 are adhering to their confession of faith in our Lord Jesus, but are occasionally tripped in the way by the great enemy of souls. Much of their failure is owing to the ungodly influences of their homes."

The master of the Brentford School writes: "We have had three of our elder scholars pass away during the past year, and three happier deaths I have seldom witnessed."

The master of the Seamen’s Bethel School, Cardiff, wrote on Feb. 22, 1881: "I write this with a heart full of praise to our blessed Lord for blessing on the work here. I was getting well nigh weary, no result of all the seed that had been sown could be seen; but the dear Lord has broken down the power of sin and Satan, and between 30 and 40 of the dear children have professed to be saved through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, among them 2 of my monitors and several of the worst boys.

On May 25 he again reports to our School Inspector, regarding the past year: "I believe this year has been the best we have had since the Schools have been opened; we look back upon it with very great pleasure, and see, amid many discouragements, endless causes for praising and blessing our Lord. ‘He truly has done all things well.’ He has graciously sent us overflowing numbers of children, so that we have been compelled to turn away many, seeking admission; and, above all, He has been manifestly working among them, and blessing the labours of His servants in the conversion of many of the dear children. We have been sowing the seed, year after year, with but little manifest result, and were getting, at times, well nigh cast down, when the Lord commenced a work among them, and privileged us to see many of the boys and girls, with tearful eyes, confessing Jesus to be their Saviour; the lives also of some adding testimony to the reality of the work. There has also been a marked difference in the School, and one feels a sense of increased joy in the daily labour among the children. We can indeed say, ‘What hath God wrought!’ We need much prayer, that the work may go on, that those who have confessed His Name may be kept near Him and lovers of His Word."

The master of the Roath School, Cardiff, writes on May 24: "As to the moral and spiritual condition of the School, I have to say, that though I have no positive evidence of any particular cases of conversion to God through the instrumentality of the Day School, yet I am pleased to say that several children, who were only a short time ago in the School, have united themselves to God’s people, and joined the Church upon whose premises our School is held. I am frequently brought into contact with them at a religious service we hold especially for young people, and it is gratifying to observe their zeal and consistent conduct. I cannot but think, that the prayers and efforts of the Day School must have been one of the means used in bringing about this happy result."

The master of the Clayhidon School reports: "The condition of the Schools, from a spiritual point of view, is not altogether discouraging. To us it looks bright and cheering. During the year, 9 have professed conversion. Four of them are in the Day School: of these, 2 are over 20 years of age (they having come to school for improvement in education), and the Lord saved them. Praise His Name! One, a young man of 21, said he came hoping to find the Lord while here, and he tells me God has given him his desire. The remaining 5 are in the Bible classes of the Sunday School, and each is, we believe, walking humbly in the fear of the Lord. Two others have professed conversion, but of these we are not so confident, so I have not included them in the aforementioned."

The master of the Boys’ School in Exeter reports: "There are four boys, known to us, who have received spiritual benefit by attending the meetings in connection with the recent special efforts made in this city to reach the unconverted. Their conduct confirms their statement as to the inward change that has been wrought."

The mistress of the Infant School in Exeter writes: "I was much encouraged, about six weeks ago, when a person called at the School and thanked me for teaching so much Scripture. She went on to say that her husband, who was formerly opposed to religion, had been induced to listen as the children repeated the portions committed to memory. He gradually became less opposed; is now a decided Christian; has united himself with God’s people; and either is or is about to become a Sunday-School teacher. My special difficulty (as in former years) is, how to provide accommodation for the large numbers who present themselves for admission.

The mistress of the School at High Bickington states: "I am glad to be able to say, my monitress has, during the past year, found peace in Christ, and been received into Church fellowship. The general conduct of the children is good."

The master of Howle Hill School reports: "Fifteen children profess to be converted to God. From their fruits (Matt. vii. 16), love for prayer, etc., I believe they are truly converted to God."

The mistress of the School at North End writes: "The Lord has been good in converting 6 precious souls. I believe all of them are really anxious to live out what they have professed."

The master of the Purton School states: "This has been the best year of our School life. There has been a great awakening, and many of the children have been brought to a knowledge of the Lord. We have just had the joy of proposing some for Christian fellowship. It is very pleasing to hear them pleading with God for the salvation of their unconverted relatives, and in several cases God has answered their prayers, and the blessing has spread all around us."

Further extracts from the letters of the teachers might be given. They are all more or less encouraged in their work. The number of pupils in the Home Day Schools of the Institution, on May 26, 1881, was 5,394; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,583; in all, 6,977.

There are thirty-seven Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these thirty-seven Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1881, Two Thousand Six Hundred and Twenty-nine scholars. There were likewise during the past year, nineteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the thirty-seven Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, twelve are in Spain, six in British Guiana, one in Italy, the others are in England. The nineteen Sunday Schools, which were assisted, are in England and Wales.

The accounts of the Superintendents of the Sunday Schools are very encouraging, and show that the Lord is working, by his Holy Spirit, among the children. The Superintendent of one of the Schools in Bristol reports, that during the past year 37 children have been converted (22 boys and 15 girls). The Superintendent of another Bristol School states: "We have great joy in telling of many conversions. In the young women’s class nine have been brought to the knowledge of the Lord. In the young men’s class one at least has been also brought to rest upon Christ for salvation. Besides these, we have many in the upper classes of the School, whom we believe to be truly the Lord’s. One dear child has passed away, after giving evidence that she was the Lord’s.

The report of the Sunday School at Purton is: "Several of our Sunday Scholars have been converted this year, and all the teachers have rejoiced with the angels over new-born souls. Since the awakening we have found it needful to have an evening service once a week, especially for the young, to instruct them in the Holy Scriptures, and to encourage them in the exercise of prayer."

In reference to the Sunday-School at Kenilworth the report is: "The Sunday-School is getting on very well. One girl, nearly 16 years of age, has been brought to the Lord."—The account of the Walham Green Sunday School is: "Two girls in the Bible-class have been converted. Respecting others, we have good reason to hope, but I desire to see profession unmistakably verified, before saying much about them."—The statement of a Sunday School teacher at Southsea is: "I have been able to praise God for having converted three of the dear girls of my class; they are very bright and happy. Others are anxious about their souls."—At Fareham two have been led to the saving knowledge of the truth, within the past year."—The report of the Sunday School at Clayhidon, Blackdown Hills, is: "Five in the Bible Classes of the Sunday School have been converted during the past year, and each is (we believe) walking humbly and in the fear of the Lord."—In the Sunday Schoo1 at Beer six of the children were converted during the year.—Regarding the Sunday-School at Bishopswood the statement is: "Three of the elder children have borne testimony to having found peace and joy in believing; and their walk, as believers, so far as I have been able to gather, by personal observation and inquiries about them, seems to bear out what they profess."

There are now six Adult Schools, containing 97 scholars, connected with the Institution, and entirely supported by its funds.

From what has been stated it will be seen that altogether there are One Hundred and Nineteen Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 76 Day Schools, 37 Sunday-Schools, and 6 Adult Schools; and that during the past year two Day Schools and 19 Sunday Schools were assisted. It will likewise be observed, that in these One Hundred and Nineteen Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were altogether on May 26, 1881, 9,703 scholars. From the beginning, the total number attending the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, amounts to Eighty Two Thousand Four Hundred and Forty; that is—there were 56,917 in all the Day Schools, 18,318 in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,205 in all the Adult Schools.

The sum expended during the past year in connection with the various Home Schools, amounts to £7,347. 12s. 5d. On the Mission Schools £1,652. 15s. 2d. has been spent. From the beginning there has been expended on the Home Schools £72,916. 14s. 2½d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, is as follows:

13,986 Bibles have been sold.

238 Bibles have been given away.

73,393 New Testaments have been sold.

1,496 New Testaments have been given away.

183 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

24 Copies of the Psalms have been given away.

1,681 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

75 Ditto have been given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 165,382 Bibles, 542,700 New Testaments, 19,907 copies of the Psalms, and 199,961 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,767. 7s. 7½d.

The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £25,897. 15s. 0½d.

During the past year our circulation of the Holy Scriptures has again been very extensive, a circumstance which is owing to our supplying many colporteurs with copies of the Word of God at reduced prices, and especially brethren who preach the Gospel in connection with Bible Carriages, and who thus circulate Tens of Thousands of the Holy Scriptures. Their work was most abundantly blessed as to their ministry, and a great many persons were converted, simply through the reading of the Word of God. The chief mover in reference to these Bible Carriages in England (our excellent godly brother, Henry Moorhouse, who sank under the abundance of his labours during the past year), wrote, on July 23, 1880: "The circulation of the Scriptures still goes on in a marvellous way, and God is blessing it. I enclose cheque for 5,000 New Testaments and 200 Bibles. I am sure God will reward you for this blessed work. God bless you, beloved Mr. Milller."—On August 16, 1880, he writes: "Beloved Mr. Muller, The blessed work is still going on, and we are constantly hearing of conversions through the circulation of the Scriptures and the preaching of the Gospel from the Bible Carriages. Our large carriage goes (D.V.) today to Stockton-on-Tees to the races, where we are hoping to give a good testimony for our Lord Jesus Christ, and to sell hundreds of New Testaments to the betting-men and pleasure-seekers there. I enclose cheque for 5,000 more Testaments and 100 Family Bibles."—A little later this dear brother wrote: "We have had glorious times at Stockton-on-Tees and Blackpool with the Bible work. There were numerous conversions to God, and great joy we all have had the last few weeks. Praise be to the Lord! I enclose cheque for 5,000 Testaments and 600 Bibles, with many, many thanks for all your kindness."—On Sept. 2nd he writes: "Beloved Mr. Muller, we have had a glorious time at Darlington and Stockton-on-Tees. Tens of Thousands at the latter place have heard the glorious Gospel of our Lord Jesus. We took the carriage to the races, and never had we such a week before at any place. We took for the sale of the Scriptures the large sum of £34. 18s.; so you see how God is giving His blessing in the circulation of His own blessed Word. Could you see the hundreds listening with upturned faces, and many with tearful eyes, to the simple story of Calvary, your heart would rejoice, and you would feel repaid for all the loss you sustain in giving us the Scriptures and the little Gospel books at so cheap a rate. May God bless you, beloved Mr. Muller. I enclose an order for 5,000 New Testaments and 600 Bibles, with many thanks for all your kindness and love."

On December 27, 1880, this most valuable holy brother fell asleep, his labours for many years having been very great, and too great for his strength. We have agreed to supply the Bible Carriages which were under his care (as during his lifetime) with the Holy Scriptures at very reduced prices, considering this work to be of deep importance. We do the same also in the case of approved Godly colporteurs.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid Missionary efforts.

During the last year the sum of £4,272. 10s. 1d. was expended upon this object out of the funds of the Institution, and by this amount One Hundred and Fifty-one labourers in Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

There was expended or the support of

Schools in connection with Missions in

India …………………………………… £132 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ………. 126 10 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ………………… 1269 14 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Italy …………………. 124 11 2

Also expended in connection with some

preaching places in spiritually dark

villages in Somersetshire and Glouces-

tershire ………………………………… 22 14 11

The labours of the brethren, who as preachers of the Word were aided by the friends of the Institution, from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, were again, as usual, very greatly blessed, so that there is reason to believe, that again thousands were brought to the knowledge of the Lord, through the instrumentality of these 151 labourers in the Gospel; but I have again to refer the reader for particulars to the Report published in 1881.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1881, is £184,449. 14s. 4d.

There has been laid out for the circulation of Tracts and Books, from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, the sum of £1,125. 14s. 10½d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Three Millions and Eighteen Thousand (exactly 3,018,754) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since November 19, 1840 amounts to £32,344. 0s. 11¼d.

The total number of the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated since November 19, 1840 to May 26, 1881, is more than Seventy-Three Millions Three Hundred and Eighty-Two Thousand (exactly 73,382,611).

More than Two Millions and Four Hundred Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the past year, were given away gratuitously.

At the beginning of the year of the Institution, May 27, 1880, we had 1,991 Orphans in the five houses. During the year, from May 27, 1880 to May 26, 1881, we received 261 Orphans, so that, on May 26, 1881, the total number under our care would have been 2,252, had there been no changes. But of these 2,252 children twenty-two died. Ten of them were decided believers in the Lord Jesus and seven young infants. One Orphan we were under the painful necessity of expelling, in mercy to the other children, all means to bring about reformation having failed. Twenty-six, out of the 2,252, we were obliged to send back to their relatives, on account of their physical, mental, or moral condition, as they gave us no prospect of being able to apprentice or recommend them to situations. In a few instances, also, the medical judgment concerning these children was, that their native air would be of great benefit to them. Fifteen of the Orphans were delivered up to their relatives, in consequence of the circumstances of the latter having greatly improved, since they placed the children under our care. Forty-nine boys were sent out to learn a trade or business, One Hundred and Fifty-two girls took situations as domestic servants, and Three of the Orphans became pupil teachers. In all, therefore, 268 are to be deducted from 2,252, so that on May 26, 1881, we had 1,984 Orphans and 110 helpers in the five houses. Of these 268 who were sent out or died, 72 girls and 11 boys were believers. These 83 believers are to be added to the 512 converted Orphans, and the 230 in a hopeful state spiritually, whom we had in the Five Houses on May 26, 1881. The total number of Orphans we have had under our care from April, 1836 to May 26, 1881, is 6,208.

The total of the expenditure for the various departments of the Institution, from May 26, 1880 to May 26, 1881, was £41,359. 18s. 4d. After having met all the expenses, we had yet for the first four Objects £124. 6s. 2½d., and for the Orphans £2,922. 12s. 9¼d. left.

The following pages give the statistics from May 26, 1881 to May 26, 1882.

During this year Seventy-Two Day Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and Two Day Schools in Devonshire were assisted. Of the 72 Day Schools, entirely supported, there are 13 in Spain, 4 in India, 1 in Italy, and 7 in British Guiana; the other 47 are in England and Wales.

The master of a Boys’ School in Barnstaple writes: "Two or three Boys have professed faith in Christ since they have left school; but I cannot speak of any conversions amongst the boys who now attend the school; but the Word of God which is daily read in their midst, accompanied by simple expositions, chiefly of such Scriptures as show our lost, ruined condition, and the fitness of Him, whom God has provided, to take away the guilt and power of sin, will be owned and blessed of God in His own time, though I may have to say ‘one soweth and another rcapeth.’"

The mistress of a Girls’ School in Barnstaple sends the following report regarding her school: "Four dear girls, now in the school, I believe to be truly converted, and many, many more I am very hopeful of. It is most charming to witness the marked attention of the dear children and the pleasure they take in the Scripture lesson from day to day; and the precious seed being sown will, in God’s own way and time, spring up and bear fruit to His honour and glory. Many of our old scholars have joined Christian Churches and are, I trust, walking consistently. The general condition of the school, the behaviour, obedience and honesty in the work of the dear children is very cheering."

The master of a mixed School at Cardiff, attended by 331 children, states: "I am happy to be able to report at the close of another year, that the condition of the schools is one of continued prosperity. The Lord has sustained and greatly helped us. To His Name we desire to give unceasing praise. The numbers have been, as usual, throughout the year; and when some have left, the Lord has sent in others to fill their places, so that we have been always full and the work regular. With respect to the chief object for which this work is carried on, viz., for the conversion of the children, one feels a reluctance in giving numbers, but blessed thought ‘The Lord knoweth them that are His.’ Among the girls there are six, at least, who manifest by their lives that they have been born again. We have great hopes of some others, but the work is not so clearly seen to human sight. With some of the boys evidence of spiritual life is often seen, and I believe several of them are really saved, and with not a few God is graciously working. The attention shown during the Scripture Lesson each day, which we find best to give in the middle of the morning, is very marked; and I feel deep cause for gratitude to the Lord for the great privilege of being permitted with perfect liberty to sow the incorruptible seed daily in so many precious souls. Although cast down at times, yet in His gentle way He cheers us on, renews our strength and fills us with joy."

The mistress of an Infant School at Cardiff reports respecting her school: "It is very cheering to notice the spirit of love towards the Friend of little children, which is prevalent amongst them. Some of the elder ones I know love Him because He first loved them: they show it too, by trying to do right because it will be pleasing to Him; and I find that they repeat at home the hymns they are taught here. One day during the Scripture lesson I was telling them that the gods of the heathen are made of silver, wood, clay, &c., and asked, but what is our God made of ? not expecting any reply, one little girl of seven said brightly, ‘Our God is made of goodness.’ I did not try to spoil that answer. At the close of another lesson recently, a bonnie rosy child of five started up and said, ‘Teacher! I do love the Lord Jesus, I do.’ During the day she again reiterated the same words; a few days later, and the Good Shepherd gathered this little one into the upper fold. Other little incidents might be mentioned, which would tend to show that even the youngest in this corner of the great harvest field are not without a sincere desire to belong to the Master, and I am grateful to Him for these signs that tiny grains of the Truth, sown throughout the year, have not all been lost amongst the thorns and stones; for I believe that many of these children, if spared to pass to the upper schools, will there become decided Christians."

Another master of a school in Cardiff, attended by 389 children, writes with reference to that school: "Though I am unable to report positively any conversions to God during the past year, yet I do cherish a hope, that amounts almost to a certainty, that amongst the children there are some who may be reckoned as lambs in the Saviour’s fold. My hope is further confirmed by noticing that several of them attend regularly a meeting held expressly for young people every week, and also that during the year, several who were formerly scholars in the school have professed their attachment to the Saviour, and have joined the Church."

The master of the Boys’ School in Bristol, sent in this account: "Four boys, having the love of God shed abroad in their hearts by the Holy Spirit, have left the School during the year. I have had some very refreshing seasons with the dear children—one little boy, timid and rather reserved, amiable in temper, professes to have given his heart to the Saviour. His reverent manner, when speaking of divine things, is very pleasing. The general tenour of his conduct evidences the sincerity of his profession. The general state of the school is promising. It has been a source of encouragement and gratification to me in meeting old scholars occasionally, and hearing from their lips that they have given their hearts to the Saviour and are members of Christian Churches."

The mistress of the Girls’ School in Bristol, writes: "With regard to the Spiritual condition of my School, I am thankful to record that a few more of the girls have been added to the number of those who were converted last year. Two dear girls are under spiritual conviction. Those who professed a change last year have since walked consistently with that profession. I have heard a very good account of two girls who have left during the past year. I have reason to believe that one of them has exerted a most salutary influence on the members of her home circle. One girl asked me to pray for her mother’s restoration to health, and another little girl is praying for the conversion of her father. We still hold our Prayer Meetings, and derive from them spiritual refreshment."

The mistress of the School at Chittlehamholt writes: "We have had a case or two of conversion this past year. One has been received into fellowship. Several others, at times, manifest decided concern about their souls. We had hoped, ere this, to have seen more manifest fruit, but believe the Lord is working with some. Several of our old scholars, who had not left the meetings, have been converted and added to the church. This cheers us, as our children generally leave us young."

The master of the Clayhidon School reports: "We have had much to encourage us in the spiritual condition of the children; and for this we feel devoutly thankful. Many of those who professed conversion are, we believe, genuine cases. Of many who have professed conversion in the schools, several have left. As far as we can judge after five or six months’ trial, we have no doubt whatever of ten or eleven; of eight or ten more, we are not so confident, as they are not so decided in their testimony, but we could not say that they are unreal."

The mistress of a School in London writes: "I am thankful to be able to state that the Lord has graciously been pleased to own and bless my feeble efforts to serve Him here in various ways during the past year, especially amongst the dear children, four of whom have of late confessed Jesus as their Saviour. Their testimony is so clear that I trust they are safe in the fold. Their walk is very consistent, and they are sincerely desirous of increasing daily in the knowledge of Him who so loved them. All who are old enough to understand, appear to delight in the reading of the Scriptures; and I am convinced that they are used in bringing to their homes the word of Life, as they invariably mark the lessons read in school, that they may be able to read them at home to father or mother, besides being, very often, the bearers of tracts and Christian papers to their parents and friends."

The master of the Boy’s School at Exeter writes, in his report regarding the school: "It is cheering to hear from time to time of instances of conversion among the children who have left the school. Promise and prayer assure such gracious results, and we labour and pray for them and expect them. Surely the Scriptures read, learnt and explained daily must be productive of untold good, in storing the memory with Divine truth, in checking the commission of evil, in forming the character, in impressing the mind and heart, and in making them more receptive of holy influences. When such preliminary work has been going on for years, we can expect with greater reason and certainty, other things being equal, the hearts of the children to respond more readily to the appeals of Divine love and invitation."

The teacher of the School at Hopton reports: "There is now, at the present time, a manifest work of the Spirit going on in many of the dear children. I have much joy in seeing prayer is being answered. I never remember such a spirit of awakening amongst the children before. I pray God it may increase, and that many, in these last solemn days, may not only be saved very early in life, but may be good soldiers of Jesus Christ and champions of His truth."

The master of the Howle Hill School writes: "I am able to say that 16 children give evidence of having been converted to God during the past year, and of this number eleven are walking as children of light."—"I may here add that during the past winter the Lord has used the staff of the School in the salvation of sinners. Four of the children’s parents were converted through them."

The mistress of the North End School, near London, states: "I feel quite sure there is every proof of real earnestness, and a longing desire to please God, going on in the hearts of many of our scholars. Five girls and one boy have professed Christ as their Saviour, and I believe there are not a few, who, although they have not spoken out so boldly as others, are none the less saved, as their lives and general conduct speak very loudly."

The master of the School at Purton reports: "Some of our dear children are walking in the fear of the Lord, and others give us joy, because we believe they are wrought upon by the Spirit of God, although they have not yet openly confessed His name. Our special service for children, every Thursday, has afforded good opportunities for pressing upon their consciences the importance of decision for Christ; and young believers at the meetings have the privilege of speaking for the Master. One of our old scholars accompanied me, last Sunday afternoon, to an open-air service about two miles from home, and with others he preached the gospel to about 80 people. Our desire is, that the Lord would make every dear boy in our school a preacher of the Word of Life."

The master of the School at Saul writes: "We are much cheered by the many good reports we get of numbers of our former pupils who are now scattered far and near, of their honest, truthful, active lives; and that so many are giving evidence that they are new creatures in Christ Jesus, by loving and walking with Him. The promise, ‘Cast thy bread upon the waters and thou shalt find it after many days,’ spiritually and mentally has been fulfilled."

The master of the School at Shaftesbury reports: "God has graciously answered our prayers and efforts in turning one to Himself, and stirring up many of the elder girls, both in the Day and Sunday Schools, to be concerned about their souls. A special weekly prayer meeting is now held for these, and is well attended."

The master of the School at Stroud states: "I can confidently state that two of the dear boys have decided for Christ during the year. Since their decision, their conduct has been very exemplary, and indicates the change they have undergone. ‘By their fruits ye shall know them.’"

The master of Walham Green School writes: "We look upon the Children’s Service, as a time when those, with whom God is working, have an opportunity of declaring themselves on the Lord’s side. More than a hundred have so declared themselves during the past two years. Many of these have left the school, but some are with us today and give us pleasure by their consistent walk. During the summer months the larger service is discontinued, but a Bible-reading and meeting for prayer is held for the young ones professing Christ. In this meeting, last night, I found a boy, who has given very much trouble, in tears, and professing himself anxious about salvation. For lying, stealing, deceit and obstinacy, I do not know his equal in the school. What a trophy, if really converted to God!"

Further extracts from the letters of the teachers might be given. They are all more or less encouraged in their work. The number of pupils in the Home Day Schools of the Institution, on May 26, 1882, was 5,340; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,538; in all, 6,878.

There are thirty-eight Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these thirty-eight Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1882, Two Thousand Six Hundred and Ninety-six scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, Twenty-two Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the thirty-eight Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, thirteen are in Spain, four in British Guiana, one in Italy, the rest are in England.

The Superintendent of the Bethesda Sunday School in Bristol reports: "As regards conversions, we can only speak as to eight during the past year. There have been seven of our scholars who have joined the Church, and at present one has been proposed for fellowship; and during the year one of our lads, whilst proposed, passed away to be with Christ ere he was admitted."

The Superintendent of Stokes Croft Sunday School in Bristol writes: "Many of the cases of which we were hopeful last year, are now truly brought to the Lord. We have now to speak of seventeen who, we believe, are resting on Christ for salvation. And though we cannot in every case trace conversion immediately to the school, we remember the word ‘One soweth and another reapeth,’ and therefore rejoice. These are mostly in the upper classes. We are much pleased also with those who were converted prior to this year. In some of these, growth in grace is particularly noticeable. Another matter for thanksgiving is, that twenty-seven connected with the School have during the year been received into Church fellowship. We have received during the year 120, and have now 255 on the books. The teacher of the young men’s class desires thankfully to acknowledge the Lord’s continued help. The increased acquaintance with and desire for the Word of God, in this class cheers us much. There are 15 in this class, and 12 have been received into Church fellowship. The teacher of the young women’s class is also much encouraged. She has received many letters speaking of the blessing received in the class. Here there are 37 on the book, and 11 have been received into Church fellowship. There is but one unconverted in the class, and that is a hopeful case."

The statement of the Sunday School at Lambeth is: "There have been some conversions, 14 we feel quite clear about, 10 have been received into Church fellowship, 6 girls and 4 boys. Three girls, who have long been scholars, are now teaching junior classes. There are some others, about whom we are not so clear, and these I need not say are the cause of much care and anxiety."

The report of the Hopton Sunday School is: "Three of the boys who have given us trouble, we have good reason to believe have been converted."

In the Day and Sunday Schools at Clayhidon, twenty were hopefully converted during the year.

The report respecting the North End Sunday School is: "Several of our scholars have professed to have found that peace which passeth all understanding, and we trust they will prove to be real conversions to God, which they certainly appear to be at present."

The Superintendent of the Walham Green Sunday School states: "With regard to conversions I have not, in consequence of the short time I have been connected with the school, made any particular enquiries as to the number, although I know there have been many, and I was much pleased, a few Sundays since, in taking a girls’ class during their teacher’s absence, to find that they nearly all professed conversion to God."

There are now six Adult Schools, containing 97 scholars, connected with the Institution, and entirely supported by its funds.

From what has been stated it will be seen that altogether there are One Hundred and Sixteen Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 72 Day Schools, 38 Sunday Schools, and 6 Adult Schools; and that during the past year two Day Schools and 22 Sunday Schools were assisted. It will likewise be observed, that in these One Hundred and Sixteen Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were altogether on May 26, 1882, 9,671 scholars. From the beginning, the total number attending the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, amounts to Eighty Eight Thousand Two Hundred and Thirty-Seven; that is, there were 61,111 in all the Day Schools, 19,821 in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,305 in all the Adult Schools.

The sum expended during the past year, in connection with the various Home Schools, amounts to £7,621. 5s. 10½d. On the Mission Schools £1,549. 2s. 10d. has been spent. From the beginning there has been expended on the Home Schools £80,538. 0s. 1d.

The second Object of this Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments and portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1881 to May 26, 1882, is as follows:

10,381 Bibles have been sold.

135 Bibles have been given away.

66,739 New Testaments have been sold.

1,008 New Testaments have been given away.

59 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

3,446 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 175,898 Bibles, 610,447 New Testaments, 19,966 copies of the Psalms, and 201,427 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,540. 7s. 7½d. The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £27,438. 2s. 8d.

During the past year our circulation of the Holy Scriptures has again been very extensive, a circumstance which is owing to our having supplied many colporteurs with copies of the Word of God at reduced prices, and especially brethren who preached the Gospel in connection with Bible Carriages, and who thus circulated Tens of Thousands of the Holy Scriptures. Their work was most abundantly blessed as to their ministry, and a great many persons were converted, simply through the reading of the Word of God.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid Missionary efforts.

During the past year the sum of £2,791. 18s. 1d. was expended upon this object out of the funds of the Institution, and by this amount Fifty Three labourers in Word and Doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools, in connection with Missions in

India …………………………………….. £132 0 0

For the support of Schools, in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ………… 138 15 0

For the support of Schools, in connection

with Missions in Spain …………………… 1,155 4 11

For the support of a School, in con-

nection with Missions in Italy ……………. 123 2 11

Expended in connection with some preach-

ing places, in spiritually dark villages

in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire ……. 18 15 3

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1882, is £187,241. 12s. 5d.

There has been laid out for Books and Tracts, from May 26, 1881 to May 26, 1882, the sum of £1,033. 11s. 11d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Two Millions Five Hundred and Seventy Four Thousand (exactly 2,574,227) Tracts and Books. The sum total which has been expended on this object, since November 19, 1840, amounts to £33,377. 12s. 10¼d.

The total number of the Tracts and Books, which has been circulated to May 26, 1882, is more than Seventy Five Millions Nine Hundred and Fifty-Six Thousand (exactly 75,956,838).

More than Two Millions One Hundred and Nineteen Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were given away gratuitously. During the past year also, we heard again and again. of cases in which the circulation of the Tracts, which had been sent out from the Institution, was blessed to the conversion of sinners.

At the beginning of the year of the Institution, May 27, 1881, we had 1,984 Orphans and 110 helpers, in the five houses. During the past year there were received altogether 238 Orphans, so that, had there been no changes, we should, on May 26th, 1882, have had 2,222 Orphans in the five houses. But of these 2,222 twenty-four died. Only 24, though we had the measles, scarlet fever and typhoid fever during the past year in the Orphan houses; and though three-fourths of the children have lost one or both parents by consumption. We admire the hand of God in this. Of these 24, ten were young infants, and seven died as decided believers.—Four boys we were under the painful necessity of expelling, because they were morally injurious to the other Orphans.—Twenty-Nine we were obliged to send to their relatives, either on account of their physical, mental, or moral state, because we were unable to recommend them as servants or apprentices; and 13 Orphans we delivered up to their relatives, who by that time were able and desirous to provide for them.—Four Orphans (two lads and two girls) were sent out as pupil teachers; 45 boys were apprenticed; and 131 girls were sent out for service. Of the boys who were sent out, 14 were believers, and of the girls 67, this makes 88 with the seven believing Orphans who died. Truly we do not labour in vain! We have, therefore, to deduct from the 2,222 the number of 250; so that on May 26, 1882, we had actually only 1,972 Orphans in the five houses. The total number of Orphans we have had under our care, from April, 1836 to May 26, 1882, is 6,446.

We enter now upon the statistics of the year, from May 26, 1882 to May 26, 1883.

During this year there were Forty Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, of which there were 14 in Spain, 5 in India, 1 in Italy, and 6 in British Guiana. All the others were in England. In addition to these Forty Day Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, one Day School in Devonshire, and one in Wiltshire, were assisted.

The master of the School at Clayhidon writes in reference to his School: "The past year has not been as fruitful in conversions as many former years, only three having been brought to the Lord; but these we are thankful for, and take courage therefrom. I am also glad to find that seed, sown in former days, is not lost. One young man, formerly in the School, I find the arrows of conviction have never left; and now, after some years of absence from the neighbourhood, he is brought to the hopeful condition of felt-need and said last week, ‘I have advanced in the path thus far; I know and feel I am a sinner; I want to be saved; I know and believe Jesus Christ died; but I feel there must be a lack in my faith somewhere, for it does not give me rest.’ Surely such a one is ‘not far from the Kingdom of God.’ There are several young lads and others in a similar state, for whose souls we are watching and praying and working."

The mistress of the Girls’ School in Exeter states: "Several of my old girls, now filling situations, have been admitted to church fellowship during the past year, and there is good reason to believe that two or three, now in the school, are the Lord’s. Quite lately, parents have expressed to me their sense of the value of the truth taught, and more especially of the Scripture itself; so that we thank God and take courage."

The master of Purton School reports: "The daily conduct of some of our scholars gives us great encouragement in our work, and we cannot but believe that the Holy Spirit of God is working graciously in. their hearts. We feel more than ever the importance of imparting line upon line, and precept upon precept, from the treasury of God’s Word."

The mistress of the Infant School at Purton writes: "During the past year we have seen many evidences of the working of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of the little ones; and think we may safely say that many of them are the subjects of enlightening and saving grace. Some time since a little girl, in the Sunday School, was weeping, and, on being asked the cause, said, ‘She wanted to love Jesus.’ This child, with many others, pays very great attention to the Scriptural instruction given. We find that some of these are always ready to forego half an hour’s play, at the dinner time, for a little prayer and singing."

The master of the School at Yeovil reports on May 24, 1883: "During the past year we have been cheered by the conversion to God of two, a girl and a boy. The former gives me much joy, and of the latter I have no doubt as to the reality of the work."

The number of pupils in the Home Day-Schools of the Institution, on May 26th, 1883, was 1,242; in the Mission Day Schools, 1,514; in all, 2,756.

There are forty-four Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these forty-four Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1883, Two Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-eight scholars. There were likewise, during the past year, Fifteen Sunday Schools, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the forty-four Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, fourteen are in Spain, six in British Guiana, one in Italy, five in India, the others are in England. The Fifteen Sunday Schools which were assisted are in England and Wales.

The report regarding the North End Sunday School is: "I am thankful to say that we have every encouragement to go on in this important work. We have in fellowship now 6 who have recently been converted in the school, and are working very earnestly in the open air; and I am pleased to say there is a good work going on throughout the whole school. The Lord be praised!"

The Superintendent of the Lambeth Sunday School writes: "We have but two manifested cases of conversion, belonging to the senior boys’ class, thus making the whole of the class on the Lord’s side. Our senior girls are all converted, and most of them are sitting down at the Lord’s table. During the past year it has given us great pleasure to add two more teachers to the school, taken from senior classes. The general condition of the school is good."

In reference to the Sunday School at the Gospel Hall, Portsmouth, the statement is: "Four have been converted to God."

The report about the Sunday School at Purton is: "For the spiritual well-being of young and old we have a Bible reading and prayer meeting every evening in the week, and at 7 o’clock on Sunday morning, besides the usual Lord’s day services. Several of our Sunday scholars are the children of God through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ."

The Superintendent of the Sunday School at Stokes Croft Chapel, Bristo1, writes: "Not only have the numbers steadily increased, but better far, 12 have been brought to the Lord. Of these, 2 are in the young men’s class, 4 in the young women’s class, and the other 6 are in the upper classes of the school. Some of them, the teachers say, manifest great love for the Word, and all so walk as to give us great confidence and comfort. Besides this, many in the young women’s class have spoken of the blessing they have received; and one young man says he has obtained much spiritual help from the lessons. Eight have been received into Church fellowship during the year."

In the Sunday School connected with Bethesda Chapel, Bristol, there have been also, during the past year, several conversions.

There are now seven Adult Schools, containing eighty scholars, connected with the Institution, and entirely supported by its funds.

From what has been stated it will be seen, that altogether there are Ninety-one Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 40 Day Schools, 44 Sunday Schools, and 7 Adult Schools; and that during the past year three Day Schools and 15 Sunday Schools were assisted. It will likewise be observed, that in these Ninety-one Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were altogether on May 26th, 1883, 5,824 scholars. From the beginning, the total number attending the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, amounts to Ninety-Two Thousand One Hundred and Nine; that is—there were 63,503 in all the Day Schools, 21,209, in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,397 in all the Adult Schools.

The sum expended during the past year, in connection with the various Home Schools, amounts to £4,272. 8s. 4d. On the Mission Schools £1,620. 15s. 0d. has been spent. From the beginning there has been expended on the Home Schools £84,810. 8s. 5d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26th, 1882, to May 26th, 1883, is as follows:

5,592 Bibles have been sold.

170 Bibles have been given away.

11,097 New Testaments have been sold.

152 New Testaments have been given away.

77 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

2,158 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5th, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 181,660 Bibles, 621,696 New Testaments, 20,043 copies of the Psalms, and 203,585 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £717. 10s. 10d. The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, on this Object, is £28,155. 13s. 6d.

During the past year, from May 26, 1882, to May 26, 1883, the sum of £4,607. 2s. 5d. was expended on aiding Missionary operations, and by this amount One Hundred and Thirty-two labourers in Word and Doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, to a greater or less degree, assisted.

There was expended for the support of

Schools in connection with Missions in

India …………………………………… £176 0 0

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in British Guiana ………. 171 18 9

For the support of Schools in connection

with Missions in Spain ………………… 1,130 3 4

For the support of a School in connection

with Missions in Italy …………………. 142 12 11

Expended in connection with some preach-

ing places in spiritually dark villages in

Somersetshire and Gloucestershire ……. 19 7 5

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1883, is £191,848. 14s. 10d.

Our Lord gives us to understand, that one single soul is worth more than the whole world; and, if it be remembered, that many tens of thousands of souls were, instrumentally through the dear brethren, converted; who have been aided by the funds of this Institution, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1883, how small a sum is £191,848. 14s. 10d., in comparison with what has been accomplished. Dear reader, remember the value of ONE soul!

There has been laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26th, 1882 to May 26th, 1883, the sum of £830. 3s. 6d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than One Million Eight Hundred and Eighty-six Thousand (exactly 1,886,680) Tracts and Books. The sum total expended on this object, since November 19th, 1840, amounts to £34,207. 16s. 4¼d.

The total number of Tracts and Books circulated since November 19th, 1840 to May 26th, 1883, is more than Seventy-seven Millions Eight Hundred and Forty-three Thousand (exactly 77,843,518).

More than One Million Forty Four Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were distributed gratuitously.

At the beginning of the year of the Institution, May 27th, 1882, we had 1,972 Orphans and 110 helpers, in the five houses. During the past year there were received altogether 239 Orphans, so that, had there been no changes, we should, on May 26th, 1883, have had 2,211 Orphans in the five houses. But of these 2,211 sixteen died. Notice, only sixteen, out of 2,211! We praise God for this His kindness, and ascribe it to Him. Of the sixteen who died, eight were decided believers, and had been so some time before their death. Eighteen of the Orphans we gave up to their relatives, as by that time their circumstances had altered, and they wished to provide for them. Thirty-one we were obliged, during the year, to return to their relatives, on account of their physical, mental, or moral state, as we were unable to recommend them for situations or to apprentice them. Forty-Three of the boys were apprenticed to a trade or business; One Hundred and Forty-Six young women were sent out to service; and four Orphans were sent out as pupil teachers. Out of all those, who left the Orphan Institution, Ninety-Eight were believers, and by far the greater part had been converted for a considerable time. Two Hundred and Fifty-Eight are therefore to be deducted from the 2,211, so that on May 26th, 1883, we actually had only 1,953 Orphans and 110 helpers in the five houses. The total number of Orphans we have had under our care, from April, 1836 to May 26th, 1883, is 6,685.

The total amount of the income, for the various Objects of the Institution, from May 26, 1882 to May 26, 1883, amounted to £40,076. 7s. 2½d.; the total expenditure was £37,200. 12s. 1d.

We enter now upon the statistics for the next year.

From May 26, 1883 to May 26, 1884, there were 39 Day-Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, and one Day-School in Devonshire, was assisted by its funds. Of the 39 Day Schools, 14 are in Spain, 3 in India, 1 in Italy, and 7 in British Guiana; the others are in England.

The master of the School at Clayhidon, writes on March 25, 1884, regarding his school: "On Saturday last I was called to see a poor lad, who formerly was in the day-school, but now was ill in bed, suffering from rheumatic fever. His parents are about the poorest people in the parish, and his home, the most wretched. His surroundings were anything but favourable to the growth of the good seed; for he had been in farm service with most bitter opposers to the truth and most wicked people. When I saw him, wasted to a skeleton, he burst into a flood of tears, and said he was so glad to see me, for he was so miserable. I asked him why?—and he said he was unsaved but wanted to know how he could be saved. I spent some time with him, pointing him to Jesus, and quoted Matt. xi. 28—when, with a heavenly smile, such as I think I never saw on any face before, he said, ‘I have just read that verse,’ and he repeated the whole passage; adding, ‘Jesus said, suffer the little children to come unto Me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven’—then, as though he had entered on a new world of vision, he burst out singing, ‘Jesus loves me, this I know; for the Bible tells me so,’ and commenced singing one hymn after another. He seemed quite ecstatic in his joy. ‘Where did you learn all these beautiful texts and hymns?’ I asked. ‘At your school, Sir!’ he replied. ‘And you believe that Jesus loves you?’ ‘Yes, oh yes, for He loved me and died for me the Bible says, and he has said, "I go to prepare a place for you, and if I go to prepare a place for you I will come again," and He’ll be sure to do it, won’t He?’ If ever I felt a joy akin to the angels’ it was then, and could indeed praise God for allowing us to be the unworthy instruments of sowing seed, that, after many days, has sprung up to His glory and honour."

The same master reports to our School Inspector, with reference to the state of the School, on May 22, 1884; "In spiritual things, the year has been full of patient sowing, though the Lord has been pleased to cheer us by giving us to see ‘the blade and the ear,’ and, in some cases, we believe, ‘the full corn in the ear.’ We are hoping shortly to receive into church fellowship three who have received blessing—two of these while at school, the third after having left; but in this case the teaching of the Word, while at school, was blessed to his conviction of sin. Last week I was cheered by hearing of one of my old scholars, who had been at the Day and Sunday Schools for years, and the subject of much prayerful interest while here, having been truly converted in America. While a lad in the Bible Class, he would very frequently leave weeping, and was ‘almost persuaded.’ The seed sown has sprung up there, and the grace of God glorified in God’s own way. Thus are we strengthened to go onward and upward still."

The master of the School at Yeovil reports to our School Inspector on December 27, 1883, in reference to his School: "Again I beg to forward the school accounts to the last week for this year. I trust that you will find them correct. During the months now nearly passed away we have proved much of the goodness and mercy of our God. None of the children have been taken by death. One has been very ill, but during the illness she found her rest in Christ. She is now restored and is giving manifest proof that the work is of God. Last night a mother called to tell me of the conversion of her daughter, who left some few months since for work. This cheers our hearts. During the past year the especial object I have had before me has been, to create and maintain a love and a reverence for the Scriptures of Truth."

The same master writes on May 24, 1884, to the Inspector: "I always hesitate to speak of definite numbers being converted. During the past year we have been encouraged in God, for we have beheld fruit of Calvary’s cross in the conversion of some, and our hearts rejoice. Upwards of 1,000 children have passed through the school or are in it now, and each and all have been taught the Holy Scriptures. We are thankful for every present manifestation of His saving power, but our hearts reach on to the great harvest day, when He shall see, to the full, of the travail of His soul and shall be satisfied. For this we work, pray, and wait."—On Feb. 5, 1884, we received the following information regarding the school at Hopton: "We have joy in the sweet remembrance of the fulfilment of the sure promise, ‘In due season we shall reap if we faint not.’ When I watch the many dear children who have been taught in this school, some of them fathers and mothers of families now being trained by them for the Lord; others, who have filled situations, manifesting they are walking with God, and have been used in blessing to their fellow servants and some to their mistresses (in one case a dear sister was the means of leading to Christ an aged lady of 80 or more), this fills our hearts with unspeakable joy and gladness. Lord give us more grace to labour on, rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation, instant in prayer!"

The mistress of the Girl’s School at Exeter writes regarding her school on May 26, 1884: "The record of the past school year may be summed up in the word ‘Ebenezer.’ Good health of teachers and children; happy working; good numbers, and good averages. I know of nothing special in the way of difficulty, or indeed special at all. Only very much to be thankful for. Sometimes one meets with parents of children who have left, and are filling situations of some kind; and it cheers one to be thanked for past care and labour. Several old pupils have joined the Church."—The mistress of the Infant School at Exeter reports on May 24, 1884: "The children greatly enjoy the Bible lesson, and I am often encouraged by seeing a number of people standing outside the door, listening to them, as they repeat chapters and Psalms learnt at school. ‘My Word shall not return unto me void.’ Pleading that promise we go on, from day to day, leaving results to Him, who will never disappoint."—The master of the Purton School reports to our School Inspector at the end of May, 1884: "This has been a year of encouragement to labour on in faith, sowing the seed of eternal truth in young hearts. Several letters have been received during the year from old scholars, who trace their conversion to the scriptural instruction received in their youthful days, and some, who are now attending, give us joy in the hope of their being on the Lord’s side. We must keep on praying, working, believing, and rejoicing. Faithfulness to Christ and His Word will be sure to bring blessed results sooner or later. One of our monitors left school for business this year. She is a decided Christian."

The number of pupils in the Home Day Schools of the Institution, on May 26, 1884, was 1,279; in the Mission Day Schools 1,520; in all, 2,799.

At present there are forty-two Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these forty-two Sunday Schools there were on May 26, 1884, Three Thousand and Eighty-three scholars. During the past year, Twenty-nine Sunday Schools were likewise, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the forty-two Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, fourteen are in Spain, six in British Guiana, one in Italy, four in India, the others are in England. The Twenty-nine Schools which were assisted are all in England or Wales.

For fifty years, from March, 1834 to March, 1884, the Sunday School belonging to the church assembling at Bethesda Chapel, Bristol, has been entirely supported by the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. On April 8, 1884, this School contained Three Hundred and Ninety-eight scholars, of whom 77 were believers and 24 in an anxious state, about their souls. Of all our Sunday Schools, this has been the most particularly blessed; but in March, 1884, the teachers decided that it was unsuitable the Institution should any longer bear the expense of this Sunday School, but that the Church, which furnishes it with teachers, should also supply the means. The same resolution was come to by the Sunday School at Stoke’s Croft Chapel, Bristol, where a branch of the Bethesda Church assembles. This school also has in every way been blessed; spiritually it is in a most flourishing state; and henceforth will no longer be supported by the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, but by the Church, which supplies it with teachers.

The report of the Schools at Portsmouth is, that four of the scholars in one of them have been converted, and in another eight.—At North End, the Superintendent of the Sunday School states, that in the young men’s Bible class four of the number have been converted.—The Superintendent of the Walham Green Sunday School reports, that two of the older boys have confessed Christ, and that several of the girls are under conviction of sin.—The Superintendent of the Sunday School at Purton writes: "We do all in our power to keep the children under spiritual influences during the week, by having a special service for them every Thursday evening, a Dorcas meeting every Wednesday, and prayer-meetings every evening in the cottages around. Some of our children are in fellowship with the Lord’s people here and in other places.

There are now 3 Mission Adult Schools, containing 65 scholars, connected with it, and entirely supported by its funds.

From what has been stated it will be seen, that altogether there are Eighty-four Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 39 Day Schools, 42 Sunday Schools, and 3 Adult Schools; and that during the past year one Day School and 29 Sunday Schools were assisted. It will likewise be observed, that in these Eighty-four Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were altogether on May 26, 1884, 5,947 scholars. From the beginning, the total number attending the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, amounts to Ninety-five Thousand and One Hundred and Forty-three; that is there were 65,237 in all the Day-Schools, 22,434 in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,472 in all the Adult Schools.

The sum expended during the past year, in connection with the various Home Schools, amounts to £2,379. 9s. 10½d. On the Mission Schools £1,727. 17s. has been spent. From the beginning there has been expended on the Home Schools £87,189. 18s. 3½d.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26, 1883 to May 26, 1884, is as follows:

7,472 Bibles have been sold.

227 Bibles have been given away.

25,311 New Testaments have been sold.

768 New Testaments have been given away.

232 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

1,437 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

62 Ditto given away.

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 189,359 Bibles, 647,775 New Testaments, 20,275 copies of the Psalms, and 205,084 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During the past year also many thousands of copies of the Holy Scriptures have been sold at a reduced price to Bible Carriages and Colporteurs, and thus a great number of persons have been spiritually benefited.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £909. 18s. 9½d.

The total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £29,065. 12s. 3½d.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid Missionary efforts.

During the past year the sum of £4,784. 17s. 7d. was expended upon this object out of the funds of the Institution, and by this amount One Hundred and Thirty-two labourers in Word and Doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater or less degree assisted.

There was expended for the support of Schools in connection with Missions in India £176; for Schools in connection with Missions in British Guiana £172; for Schools in connection with Missions in Spain £1,242. 15s. 7d.; for a School in connection with Missions in Italy £137. 1s. 5d. There was expended in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire, £15. 0s. 7d.

Though the size of this volume will thereby be increased, yet I give once more a few extracts from some letters received from Missionary brethren, between May 26, 1883 and May 26, 1884, in order that the reader may not only see what kind of men we seek to help in the work of the Lord, but that also a little at least may be seen regarding the fruit of their labours.

Mr. G. S. writes from Wenchow, China, April 18, 1883 (received in July): "I have just come in from the country, and have had a very pleasant and profitable time. On Lord’s day two persons were accepted and baptized, and there are still a few hopeful inquirers. Also some, who were put under discipline last year, have been walking orderly for many months, and have asked to be restored to fellowship. At the same station a few new hearers are taking an interest in the truth, and some of the older brethren are doing something to spread abroad the knowledge of Jesus’ love. It is very gracious of the Lord to allow us to see some walking in the narrow way. On the Lord’s day before last we had four men baptized at Wen-chow. We have known them for a long time. One of them is an itinerant tailor, and, since he knew the way of truth and life, has not been hiding his light under a bushel. In his district, while working at his trade, he has opened four villages for preaching the gospel, and in each of them there are one or more hopeful inquirers, to whose houses we are made welcome at any time, and can make them a centre. This man’s brother-in-law was baptized at the same time, and has opened two large villages, his own with about 1,000 families, and his wife’s mother’s with about 1,500 families. Surely we ought to thank God and take courage. For about ten years I have been trying to gain a foothold in some of the many villages that cover this plain, but could not succeed; now seven in all are open, and our anxiety is how we shall be able to enter and possess them all. When He opens, no man can shut; and when He shuts no man can open. My dear wife is also being encouraged to labour on among the women. The Lord’s day Bible class contains sometimes over forty. About twenty are believers, and some of them for years have been adorning the doctrine of Jesus Christ."

Again Mr. G. S. writes from Shanghai, China, on July 20, 1883: "The Lord is still pleased to give His blessing on our labours. The Lord’s day before leaving, seven persons were baptized and there are still a number of candidates and inquirers, some of them giving us much hope and encouragement, for which we thank our God. His kindness to us in His service is more than we could tell. In countless temptations He has kept our feet from falling and guided us in His way, and through His redeemed ones has supplied all our temporal wants, so that we have lacked no good thing. Your kind gift has enabled us to take this change, which I hope will do us much good, and when I feel better I shall write to you."

Mr. A. W. D. writes from Chefoo, China, April 18, 1883 (received in July): "I have charge of a hospital and dispensary in association with Dr. P——. The native church is also under my care, and we have many opportunities of preaching to the people who come from the surrounding towns and villages for medical assistance. Several of our in-patients have been baptized, and are now in communion; but as yet none of the three thousand out-patients who were relieved last year, have shown any interest in eternal things. Still we know this branch of our work is not in vain, for it brings us into contact with many whom we could never reach by any other means, and, by removing their prejudice against foreigners, we prepare them to receive the gospel. Since the dreadful famine which occurred in this province a few years ago, the preaching of the gospel has been attended with much success. Twenty years ago there was not a Christian in the province, but now there are over four thousand, besides many hundreds of inquirers and adherents, who have not yet decided to come boldly out on the Lord’s side. One of the American missionaries has just returned from a journey, which has occupied five months, and reports that during that time he has baptized two hundred and eighty converts."

Mr. W. D. R. writes from Shanghai, July 13, 1883: "One very encouraging feature of the work is, that so many come now and ask about the gospel. It is only a few years ago that it was a difficult thing to get people to listen to it attentively, but now they often come and ask us to tell them about the plan of salvation. Not long since, while on a visit to several of our out-stations, I walked about nine miles, and, having allowed plenty of time for the journey, sat down now and again to rest by the way; and no sooner had I sat down, the first time, than I was asked to tell them about the gospel. Although I had been this road a good many times, I had never met with this before; so I asked where they had heard about it, and found that they first heard it from one of our native helpers, who often goes this way, and had been to one of our little chapels not far distant. Soon after, an old man and his wife came out and brought a tract, asking me to explain it to them and to teach them how to pray. And so we went on all the way, having eight or ten attentive little congregations, who seemed to listen as I have seldom seen them do before. I had ample proof that our native helpers, in that district, are making known the gospel, and that their efforts are not in vain. An old woman came and began to ask questions. I asked her where she first heard the gospel, when she said, ‘From you, nearly ten years ago, and I have never worshipped idols since.’"

Mr. E. T. writes from Gan-King on May 15, 1883 (received in July): "At the close of last year I had the great joy and privilege of baptizing eleven converts in a village which had never before been visited by a foreigner. They were all the result of the earnest efforts of one man, who had been converted at a place in the north of Kiang-su, during a visit of Mr. J. of the Baptist Mission. I found them a bright and earnest band, witnessing for the Master and enduring persecution. I spent eight happy days with them, and was surprised to find how much they knew of the Scripture and its teaching. They have no pastor and no foreign or native preacher in their midst. They stand alone, far removed from other Christian brethren, but meet for worship on the Lord’s day, and study the Word of God, depending upon the Spirit for instruction. Would that we might see many more such. These are not men, sheltered by foreign influence, but exposed to the full force of temptation and persecution from every side, with no hope of foreign intervention; and supply a good answer to those who believe the Chinese are ‘rice’ Christians. They treated me with great hospitality, and on my leaving brought out money to help pay my expenses home. Two of those whom I baptized brought us three days on our journey, and others lent us beasts to ride on and carry our luggage. Such things as these greatly cheer us and encourage us to labour on in hope. I would ask you to remember those people in prayer; they need our prayers greatly; their position is not an easy one, and their trials such as we can know little of."

Again Mr. E. T. writes from the same place on July 24, 1883: "In my last I told you of a remarkable work which had commenced in a village about 300 English miles from here. I am glad to be able to say that that work is still progressing in the same wonderful way. I paid a visit to the place this year, in the month of June, in company with another brother, and I can assure you we had good cause for praising God for what we saw there. We had not long arrived at the house of one of the Christians, in the principal street of the village, before about twenty men, believers, came in a body to welcome us, and at once commenced a warm prayer and praise meeting. Upon examination we found that more than 20 inquirers were seeking baptism, 19 of whom we accepted. They were all baptized in a mountain stream, their ages ranging from an old lady of 75 to a youth of 13. It was a time of praise amongst native Christians, that I have not had the privilege of witnessing before. From the time the first candidate stepped into the water till the last one came up out of it, they sang the doxology without ceasing. Such a din it was, each singing to his own time and tune. Amongst those baptized were several specially interesting cases. Two were men who had been violent persecutors of these poor people, and had come down to this place with the express intent of doing something to stop Christianity spreading. They were the owners of the farms cultivated by these people, and had thought to turn them out or sell off the property, if possible. But after they arrived and began to persecute them, the Spirit of God laid hold of them, in answer to the prayers of the Christians. They were both convicted, and repented, weeping bitterly for their sin, and especially on account of the way in which they had formerly been guilty of persecuting the followers of the Lord. They now no longer think of selling these farms, but have, on the contrary, promised to build there a private chapel for Christian worship. Another man was the father of two brothers who were baptized on the previous visit. He too had formerly persecuted his sons, and made their lives bitter on account of their having become Christians; but they had unitedly cried to God (often with tears) for his conversion, and He heard them, and now this man and another of his sons confessed Jesus as their Saviour. Two lads of 13 and 16 years of age, were also baptized, and on the following day, early in. the morning, they destroyed the idol Ghoine that was in the place, and broke the god to pieces. Another cause for praise is, that the work is spreading to other villages, so that in a place, 12 English miles distant, there are 5 or 6 waiting for baptism. We are having a remarkably pleasant summer here, and I am glad to say that both my dear wife and myself are being preserved in health and strength. Accept our united Christian love and sincere thanks for your kind remembrance of us. I cannot tell you in a letter the cheer you brought to our hearts; the day will declare it."

Mr. T. H. writes on July 25th, 1883, from Nursapur, India: "When out the other day, I visited a village in which a woman of high caste lives, who was baptized by me some time ago on confessing Christ. She seems happy in the Lord, of whom she speaks to others, but dreads the thought of being cast out altogether by her relations, who suspect, but are, perhaps, not sure, that she has broken caste. In the same village I met a Brahmin woman, who spoke confidently of her faith in Jesus and entire renunciation of idolatry. Her father and husband are also of the same mind, I hear."

On Oct. 16th, 1883, Mr. T. H. writes: "I have lately had the pleasure of baptizing four persons in a village near Nursapur. They seemed quite to understand, from the Word, that they must not look for peace to surrounding circumstances, but only to the Lord, who, when here, had not where to lay His head. A youth, who has been placed there by our brother M., is diligent in reading the Scriptures to them, and one of them is able to read himself. A few children likewise are being taught there. Some at Nursapur are desiring baptism, whom we think sincere in their profession of faith; but as they are closely connected with Christians, we have to be careful. Many are now talking about entering ‘the religion’ instead of coming to Christ; so we have to watch and pray, lest we err either in rejecting those, who have come to Christ, or in receiving those who have never come at all to Him for salvation."

On Feb. 10th, 1884, Mr. T. H. writes from Nursapur: "We were very much cheered by the clear and hearty testimony of one man who has known the Lord only a few months. I think our brother M., who started for those parts, will baptize him today. We hope to baptize four young women in this town on Wednesday."

On April 3rd, 1884, Mr. T. H. writes: "I returned a fortnight ago from a five weeks’ tour, during which time I visited two large native festivals. I also spent a week in the jungles amongst the Kois."

Mr. J. B. writes from Nursapur on July 17th, 1883: "Work in the school is now proceeding in regular order, with a full school of more than 170 children and youths, exclusive of my wife’s little school for girls which contains about 50 names, and is also progressing satisfactorily. There are one or two causes of encouragement and hope in the boys’ school, afforded by the return of some lads who were withdrawn for apparently leaning towards the faith and practice of Christians, but who still manifest the same desire, though with much more caution and reserve."

Mr. J. B. writes again on Oct. 20th, 1883: "There are at least two of the young men, or rather lads, in the school, whose hearts have been apparently opened to attend to the things concerning their eternal peace. But it seems as if beyond opening their hearts to us, and expressing their confidence in the Word they have found to be life and peace to their souls, they are bound hand and foot as it were by reason of caste ties and tender age, and unable to take a practical and public stand as belonging to Christ. One of these two, a short time ago, left his place with a view to escape the dreadful results of making an open profession of his faith in Christ, and, if possible, to confess Him in baptism at another place where he would not be known. He was, however, pursued and captured by his friends on the way, and placed out of hearing the Word or seeing any of us. May the Lord help him and keep him. The numbers are still keeping up at the usual figure, there being now nearly 170 names on the books."

On Feb. 16th, 1884, Mr. J. B. writes: "If we cannot fully rejoice that many more souls who hear the gospel are turning unto the Lord, yet we can rejoice with Paul that Christ is preached, and that by means of the schools the way of salvation is made known to many who have not, and perhaps would never have heard, the blessed sound. There are now in daily attendance in the boys’ school 150 pupils, exclusive of the vernacular and elementary classes numbering 30 children. To provide satisfactory Scriptural instruction for all these is a matter that just now causes us considerable difficulty, for our native brother Venketachellam, who was brought to the Lord in the school, and for many years gave us much assistance, especially in the Scriptural instruction, having left us to labour in S. India, the burden of this part of our work falls now entirely on my brother and myself, and we find so large a number cannot satisfactorily be attended by us two only. I am sorry to say also my own health has lately, within the last two months, been rather seriously affected, so that I have been obliged to refrain from much of my usual labour. Indeed, a medical man I consulted strongly advised me not to remain in this place during another hot season. However, under the present pressure of work, I cannot but look after that which necessarily devolves on me. In addition to our own particular school duties, I am thankful to be able to report very favourably on the girls’ school attended by heathen children, and under the superintendence of my wife; my brother’s wife and her mother attend to the needlework, and, in addition, two teachers are employed. There are now 56 names of girls on the list, who learn every day, besides other useful knowledge, portions in the Bible and Gospel, and on Sunday they voluntarily attend, usually to the number of over 40, School. May the dew of the Holy Spirit’s blessing fall upon these efforts to make known the Saviour of sinners, and permit us to see that they are not in vain in the Lord. The Lord gives us to see encouraging signs of His Spirit’s working in various places in the district. In this place this week we had the pleasure of receiving into the church by baptism 4 persons who have been for some time past professing faith in Christ, and we hear of another elsewhere. We do want, however, not only to hear of baptisms in increased numbers, but far more that those converted and bearing His name should be living witnesses amongst their heathen surroundings, to the saving and sanctifying power of the Holy Name they bear."

Mr. C. B. writes on May 3, 1884, from Nursapur: "In addition to my school duties, I may have informed you before, that I have the oversight of a small church about four miles distant, where our blessed Lord has graciously separated a few for Himself. The Word has for many years been preached, making a little impression, but recently, through our brother and sister M.’s visits and others, many have been aroused to a sense of their true state before God, and have professed faith in the only Saviour. The church there now consists of 21 members, who are very happy in the Lord. At brother M.’s request, that he may be relieved and allowed to attend to the other churches further away, with the consent of the other brethren, I accepted this charge as from the Lord, whose grace alone, I feel, can fit and enable me to minister to them. Since the commencement of the year I have had the joy of baptizing and receiving eight persons into fellowship. Two others are desirous of confessing their faith in Christ, whom I propose (God willing), to see tomorrow. May the Lord seal this little work with His Holy Spirit, so that many others may be brought to His feet, and all the praise shall redound to His own glory!"

Mr. J. N. M., stationed at Palcole, India, writes on July 19th, 1883, from a camp, being out on a missionary tour in villages: "My dear wife, being now so much better, is able to travel in a country cart, and we have with us four preachers, a Bible woman, a teacher, and my Bible class of six young men selected from distant villages, so that we are quite a strong party. Our plan is, to travel five or six miles every three days or so, and while the preachers go out into the neighbouring hamlets, the Bible woman visits the women in the nearest villages, and endeavours to get them to come to the tent, or prepares the way for my wife to visit them. In the mornings I take my Scripture class, and in the afternoons and evenings accompany the preachers. There is generally a willingness to listen to the Word, and less opposition than in the lower country, where Brahmins abound; but we long to see a joyful reception of the Gospel, and many turning to the Lord. Being out of reach of post offices, I have not been able to send this letter off. Since writing the above we have moved on to the northward, and have found open doors and ready listeners. May the Holy Ghost mix faith with the Word in those that hear it. At Yewanagooden, our last stage, a large company of Brahmins and others came to the tent from one o’clock till dark, asking questions, and listening in a most interested manner. Here there seems an equally open door. Two of our brethren have been entertained by the people of the village they went to, and will stay all night; and wherever the brethren go, there seems a great desire to hear the Word. This evening we had a good time in this village, the Gospel being fully proclaimed, while those who went to a neighbouring village have two invitations for tomorrow. Pray for us, for the labourers are very few. Our great want is efficient native workers full of the Holy Ghost and of faith."

On Nov. 7th, Mr. J. N. M. writes from Palcole, India: "Yesterday brother J. B. and I went to a village where the Lord has been working of late. There were three men there who had been previously examined by brother C. B. and myself, whose testimony was satisfactory. One of them is a leper, lame on both feet, who was formerly a hinderer, if not an adversary, to the truth. After the preaching, they were again publicly questioned as to their faith, and then, a young man (who has long appeared an interested hearer, though he opposed his brother’s baptism in May last), confessed that he too had found the Lord about a month ago. Another young man also, hitherto quite a heathen, came forward and said that just a week ago he was led to see the folly of his ways, and had sought and found peace by believing in Jesus. His confession surprised some, but the brethren being satisfied that the change was real, we determined to baptize these two also. Whilst sitting down. to remember the death of the Lord Jesus Christ, a woman came to say that the wife of the last mentioned brother had gone off with their son, saying she would never return to her husband, but he had grace given him to remain still, and I trust that it may be only an idle threat, though some are called to suffer the loss of all things. There are others at that village of Agatapalem interested in the truth; one dear young girl especially, but her parents are much opposed to her in consequence." Again he writes from Palcole on Feb. 21st, 1884: "Last Lord’s day I was privileged to baptize a man and two women in a new village, and there are two others who 1 trust are believing, though their testimony is not quite clear. Old Mr. B. frequently visited this village in former days, but of late years it is only occasionally that our preachers have gone there; now, however, through grace, fruit is found. This encourages us to go on; for we bear precious seed, which shall not return void to Him who sent it."

Mr. A. H. writes on June 27th, 1883, from Bethel, Jamtara, India: "Six native brethren go daily, two and two, preaching in different villages. May God strengthen them to uphold His name. Sixteen men and women, from six villages, were baptized during the last three months. Two are chiefs (headmen) of villages. One of the converts tried to kill his old mother and sister five years ago, for daring to believe in Christ, and for expressing a wish to be baptized. At present he sits at Jesus’ feet, having been a believer in Christ for three years. Please do not omit to breathe a hearty prayer for the 100,000 unsaved people in our district."

On Oct. 8th, 1883, Mr. A. H. writes: "Twenty-seven men and women have come out for the Lord, during the last six months, including two headmen of villages. I do wish 10,000 would turn besides; it seems so sad that they should be left in Satan’s hand."

On Jan. 29th, 1884, Mr. A. H. writes from Bethel, Jamtara, India: "You will rejoice to hear what God has been doing here, since I wrote last. On the 9th December, 1883, I baptized two Brahmin priests and two Santhals. Again on the 30th December I baptized the headman of Poomona and one of his farmers, so that 34 men and women now (including the above) and three Manjhis (chiefs or headmen of villages) have been baptized. Two other Brahmin priests are wishing to be baptized, but the wife of one threatens to leave him if he dares to be; and the other thinks it hard to lose the income as a priest that keeps him and his family in food, &c., and which has come to him from his forefathers. I asked him, recently, whether he was prepared to go to perdition for the sake of a little money? Please to pray for them. After the baptism on the 9th Dec., all returned to the chapel to commemorate the Lord’s death. Former missionaries would have jumped for joy if they could have seen 3 Brahmin priests, 4 Europeans, and a few score of Santhals and Hindoos taking the Lord’s Supper together. Was there not joy even in heaven over one sinner who turned to God on earth? I suppose, therefore, that there must have been great rejoicing, this year, in the presence of God, over these sinners who turned to Christ."

On April 24th, 1884, Mr. A. H. writes: "You will rejoice to hear that our Tabernacle, which is capable of seating from 500 to 600 people, was completed last month. As the concrete floor continues to need drying, we shall have to wait perhaps 14 days more before using it for divine worship. Our village schools have increased to 31, in which about 700 children are instructed in the way they should go. Six young men and four young women have been baptized from our boarding schools. Sixty-two men and women, including 3 Santhals (headmen of villages), 1 Hindoo (headman of a village), 3 Brahmin priests, 3 Brahmin ladies (their wives), and the wife of the Hindoo headman have been baptized during the last 12 months. They have come from 23 villages."

Mr. W. M. writes on July 14th, 1883, from Penang, Straits Settlement: "On the 24th June, four men and two women confessed the living and true God in baptism here. On the 1st instant ten men and two women, in like manner, confessed Him in Laroot, and on the 8th another individual also was baptized in Penang. All of them were Chinese. Two Chinese brethren are labouring with me in the Gospel here, and the younger one shews at present much earnestness and diligence. Fourteen strangers from China, on their way to Rangoon, have been with us for several days. It was a privilege to be able to serve them. Four are professing Christians, the other ten are hearers of the Word. A new station for preachng the Word has been opened at Laroot, and many are hearing it there. The truth is being blessed, but there is also some opposition."

On Nov. 6th, 1883, Mr. W. M. writes again: "The Christian Chinese sister, whose husband deserted her, departed to be with Christ, two days after his return from China. He took no interest in the funeral, but did not hinder its being conducted by Christians. A number of her relations were present, who heard of the glorious hope of the Christian through the resurrection of Christ from the dead. The husband then wound up his affairs, so as to return finally to China. His youngest daughter, who had followed the footsteps of her mother, he denounced at a family meeting, and, at the request of her believing uncle, gave her over into his charge. She has since been married, is now the wife of a Christian Chinese, and is very regular at the meetings. Our Heavenly Father has also heard and answered prayer on behalf of the Chinese youth mentioned in two letters. His soul has been restored and strengthened, so that he has assembled with Christians, has been baptized, and has joined with us at the Lord’s table. It has cost him, and does still cost him, much suffering to be faithful to the Lord in the face of the commands of both his parents, as well as the tears and entreaties of his mother; but he is helped of God, and has proclaimed the Gospel of Christ to many, including Europeans. Another young man, also a Chinese, who had been turned out of doors by his father for being an opium smoker, has been with us about four months. Now, not only is the opium given up, but he seems to have truly received Christ, for whose name he is suffering reproach."

On Dec. 19, 1883, the same brother writes from Penang: "I returned the night before last from the Malay Kingdom of Perak. Three Chinese were on this occasion baptized. On Saturday evening last a cottage prayer meeting was held in that land, and, after the Sunday night English preaching, another prayer meeting. At the latter, seven persons were present. It was said that these two meetings were the first of the kind held in that Kingdom."

On Aug. 4, 1883, Mr. R. writes from George Town, Demerara: "I write to acknowledge the receipt of cheque for £15., which came safely to hand, for which kindly accept my grateful thanks in the Lord, as it was to us a very precious mark of the Lord’s goodness. I have to thank you likewise for two supplies of tracts; also very especially for the grant of reward books for the Mission Schools, for which I am very thankful and glad; and further still for the continued help granted in circulating the Scriptures, through the assistance afforded by the Scriptural Knowledge Institution in granting supplies from the Depot, on such terms as enable me to carry on this service, by the Lord’s grace and continued help and blessing. It is a matter of great joy to me to receive so abundant a supply as has just arrived, and a precious privilege it is to spread them, by many ways, over the land. On Friday last, when I went to the Essequibo Coast, I took with me a good quantity, and, whilst visiting the Stations, sought to carry on some colporteur work also, by holding three sales amongst the people on the Coast; £5. worth were thus disposed of on the journey. Brother G. kept the remainder, who is going to take his donkey and cart on to a large estate near (if permitted), and seek to sell amongst the people further up, where I did not visit. On Tuesday he assembled his school together, before the holiday, when we examined the scholars and had an opportunity of distributing these rewards amongst them, which we trust will stimulate the little people. He is a steadfast godly man, and the Lord helps him."

On Oct. 18, 1883, Mr. R. writes: "The Lord continues to help us to preach the gospel of the grace of God, both in the meeting-room and elsewhere, and to circulate His precious Word, which is a most interesting part of our work. It is remarkable how large quantities of the Scriptures gradually diminish, scattered all about, whilst it becomes more known that we have Bibles, &c., to sell."

On Feb. 14, 1884, Mr. R. writes: "Last Lord’s day we had the joy of baptizing 2 aged sisters, black persons; and a brother was restored. The gospel meetings are, through the Lord’s help, sustained, and we realize His presence and grace in setting forth the truth to believers, though conscious of much feebleness and lack of power in our midst."

Mr. A. W. writes on Feb. 12, 1884, from Hyde Park, Demerara River: "With respect to the beloved work of God in our hands, I am thankful to say that we still have much to cheer and encourage, both with regard to the numbers brought under the sound of the truth, and those who are brought under its blessed, mighty, transforming power. I have lately had the privilege of baptizing believers at two places up the river; and I hope (God willing) to baptize some others next Lord’s day, a few miles higher up this river. But whilst we are thankful for these tokens of the Lord’s presence, we mourn over the many who yet live on, utterly regardless of eternal realities."

On May 21, 1884, Mr. A. W. writes again from Hyde Park, Demerara River: "With respect to the beloved work of the Lord in which we are engaged, I am thankful to say that we still have much to cheer in the various gatherings and other places where I seek to carry the Gospel, both with respect to the numbers brought under the sound of the glad tidings, and to some who are brought under its blessed, saving, and transforming power. A few weeks ago I had the privilege of baptizing five persons at Dunoon; last Lord’s day I baptized three aboriginal Indians also, at the same place; and at some of the other gatherings there are persons who thus desire to confess their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. But while thankful for the few thus rescued, we often mourn over the strange indifference of the many to eternal realities."

Mr. A. F., labouring in Spain, writes from Madrid, on June 11, 1883: "We had a very full day yesterday, a day of joy and blessing. In the afternoon I baptized seven persons, including two young men, formerly pupils in our school, and another, formerly in the school of another mission. A fourth, brought to Christ by one of them, could not be baptized yesterday, but will be tomorrow. Two others, on account of health, could not be baptized. Thus the Lord has added ten more to us, making thirty-two since the year began. In the evening they broke bread. The Lord be praised for His great mercy to us. Our meeting in the evening was full, and some persons were evidently impressed. I could have wished for an after meeting, but as it was 10 o’clock I was thoroughly tired out. The little house taken at Bellas Vistas, two and a half miles from here, was well filled again yesterday. I went on Wednesday evening, and the meeting was most encouraging. The poor people beg me to provide a school. They are in a most heathenish condition. I think we should get from 70 to 100 children very soon. As it is, 20 come for an hour’s instruction before the meeting, and at each meeting mothers bring us more."

On Nov. 20, 1883, Mr. A. F. writes: "On the opposite page I send the statistics of the five Madrid Schools. Thanks to God they hold their ground, but it is against very great and increasing opposition. The balance of numbers is not in our favour as compared with May 26, 1883, when the totals of that year were,—‘Received’ 364 and ‘attending’ 350; the totals today being less by

57 and 13 respectively. The very trying winter, total stagnation of all branches of work, and change of government, I think are the causes. What distresses us so much is, that we see so little fruit in conversion. Nearly 3,000 children have been instructed in the Scriptures, but very few have joined the churches after leaving school. We continually pray that upon this sown field showers of blessing may soon descend. Oh! could we but visit the homes of our scholars, who can tell what would be the results. The doors are open to us, but we are physically unable to enter them. There is work for many helpers. Chamberi is the most promising part of Madrid. All here admit that it is so, for it has been well worked. In the consciences of the people we have a place. Are there not in Bethesda meeting, ladies who could learn Spanish and visit the children’s homes? And is there no brother who could come and help me? We ought to have preaching in two or three places in Chamberi, also in Poras and in Clavel."

On May 26, 1884, Mr. A. F. writes: "Since June, 1882, we have been graciously visited by the Holy Spirit’s power. More than a hundred persons have been awakened, and some of them saved; but a large proportion gave way before the opposition of family, neighbours, and public opinion. Still, while many went back, and others found it easier to confess Christ in other parts of Madrid, a goodly number have been added to us, in all thirty-seven, men being the larger proportion. Over some of them we have had to mourn, for they could not stand the trial of faith, and have yielded to the influences of Rome, while telling us that in heart they are with us as before. Death has also removed some, and others have left the neighbourhood, so that we are still only a little flock. You will be glad to hear, as evidences of life, that the Spaniards themselves, with only a little help from us, have taken a cottage in a most wretched, godless place, and have gone regularly, all weathers, two miles, on Sunday afternoons and Wednesday evenings for an hour, to teach poor children to read, and then hold a meeting another hour for adults. These winter evenings they are even exposed to danger, for the roads outside Madrid are very lonely and unsafe. The schools, now five in number, have prospered. I have always to report them, fuller than ever. We have 420 children under Bible instruction at present, and, from the beginning, about 3,000 have been taught more or less of the Word of God and Gospel hymns. Our fifth school is in a very important district; which for years we endeavoured to enter, and now God has given us excellent premises, the very spot we so often longed for in passing, and said, ‘That would be the best place if God would give it to us.’ Meetings, by invitation, are held in the school-room, which is well filled."

Mr. H. P. writes on Nov. 1, 1883, from Barcelona, Spain: "The S. Gabriel Girls’ School is now quite full, so that we cannot receive more. The others remain about the same as usual. We continue to look to the Lord for the Barcelona Schools, both for boys and girls, that suitable teachers may be given us. The second teacher of the girls’ school, Ferlandina, commends herself to us in every way, both in godliness and in her school work. She was formerly a scholar in S. Gabriel School, and has since obtained a government certificate as teacher."

Mr. H. P. writes from Barcelona, Dec. 12, 1883: "Last month we had another baptism, when three were baptized. One was the fruit of the schools, a very precious case, a daughter of English parents, who for years have been moving about on the Continent. They came to Barcelona three or four years ago, and, hearing of our Schools, sent their children to them. The testimony of the converted one is so good, that her father, who makes no profession, says he wishes all were such Christians as his daughter. I trust we shall see more fruit still in this family. During the year, nine have been received into fellowship with us, and of these, three are from the schools. There are others also of whom we are very hopeful, but wait to see more clearly the work of God in them. The number seems small compared with the many who still remain outside, but there is something encouraging in the conversion of children in Spain. They have not known the depths of Satan as many have of riper years, where sin, like cancer, seems to have eaten into their souls. Then they begin their spiritual life with a knowledge of the Word of God, and consequently with a better conscience; hence a clearer testimony is given. We have examples of this in a few who have been with us for some years; and when we think of the surroundings of these children, their homes and their temptations, who can tell their dangers, and, if saved, what they have been saved from. In one family, we know, two of the children are converted, who have borne a steady testimony for the truth in the midst of family persecution; and a younger daughter, the mother keeps, as far as she can, from all gospel influence, fearing that she too will be converted; so she is led into the world by her parents, to the ball-room and the theatre. Another dark case in Gracia may be mentioned also. A girl of S. Gabriel School, not only attended the school, but the meeting and Sunday school afterwards; but at last, having to decide between the world and Christ, she chose the world; sank deeper and deeper into it, and at last, in her distress and shame, drank a dose of poison and died. How solemn!" With reference to the Schools—Mr. R. S. writes on May 12, 1884, from Barcelona: "The spirit manifested by the teachers is (I don’t think it is too much to say) all that one could wish. They are most united, and seem very happy in their work. D. Pedro [a teacher who was obliged to become a soldier] is a great auxiliary. He has fought the Lord’s battles during the three years he has been in the army, the result of which is that, instead of having received damage to his soul, his position has been the means, in the Lord’s hand, of blessing to him; for he has come out from his military career with more Christian experience and weight of character than when he entered it. This is a cause for much thankfulness, as his influence and help are so valuable, both in the church and also in connection with the schools. The meetings too have been well attended lately on the whole. Last evening, at the gospel meeting, there were not less than sixty or seventy persons present; quite a monster meeting for Gracia. I understand it is some years since so many were seen at a preaching meeting at S. Gabriel. The Lord grant that the seed sown may bring forth fruit to eternal life in the souls of some of the hearers. I have with me for a few days a young man from Iqualada (Mateo Solar), who was converted through attending the meetings there, and who now holds a little meeting himself at a private house in that place every Lord’s day afternoon. I am glad to find he is holding on. His interest in the things of God does not seem to have decreased, though he has been so separated from real Christian society." In May, 1884, there were in the Day Schools at Barcelona 456 pupils, and in the Sunday Schools 304. During the past fifteen years, whilst these schools have been in operation, more than eight thousand have been attending them.

On May 31, 1884, Miss C. C. writes from Gracia, Barcelona: "For some months we have been much tried by the indifference manifested by the very few who cared to attend the meetings. This led to much prayer, and now we see the Lord is giving us an answer, by not only awakening an interest in the public services, but by leading us also to fresh persons, who are thirsting for more knowledge of divine things than they can find in the Church of Rome. One case connected with the schools will interest you. A woman, whom we visited lately, on her return to Barcelona, told us of the death of her niece, a child of ten, who had formerly been taught in the Barcelona School, but had been obliged to leave on the removal of her parents to a town at some little distance. There, it seems, she was in the habit of reading the Bible to her family, and also to some of the neighbours who liked to listen, while she explained what she had learned of its meaning. A short time ago she was taken ill, and, after a few days’ suffering, died, we quite hope, trusting in the Saviour. She loved her Bible, and, whilst ill, spoke often to her mother of the parable in Matt. xxii. 1—14. Her aunt said, if it had not been for the child, they would never have heard the gospel. She is not converted, but reads her Testament attentively every day, and comes also to the services. We hope shortly to go to the town where the mother lives. Other cases, equally interesting, show us that the Lord is working, and He leads us to expect greater things."

On June 4, 1883, Mr. T. B. writes from Pontevedra, Spain: "Since I wrote to you about the work here, eight more have been baptized and received into fellowship. Others are asking for baptism. The Lord grant that they may be real cases."

On Jan. 8, 1884, the same brother writes from Pontevedra: "God is graciously blessing His own Word in the place. Fifty, belonging to this place and San Tome, have professed their faith by baptism, and were received into fellowship last year. Every one of them has had to suffer the most violent persecution, both publicly and privately. At San Tome the first convert (now a true worker for the gospel), has, in her love, given her little house to be pulled down, in order that a little chapel may be built in its place, and others are giving help, or are willing to give help, in carting stone, wood, etc., and also give trees and money. The young woman who acts so liberally, is only a plain needle-woman who gains her livelihood by going out to sew, besides possessing a little land."

Mr. J. P. C., labonring among the Jews, writes from London on Oct. 18, 1883: "You will, I am sure, be pleased to hear that, from the very favourable appearances around me, I cannot help thinking, bright gleams are beginning to pierce the dark overhanging clouds of Israel’s unbelief. A young Russian Jew, whom I recommended to read the New Testament, said to me yesterday morning, ‘You know what a self-righteous man I was, when first you told me to believe in Jesus, whom I then utterly despised; but I am thankful to tell you, that a great change has taken place in me. Although I cannot call myself a Christian, it is my earnest desire to become one, and I daily ask the Lord God of Abraham to guide me into the right way.’ I was in the habit of preaching the good news of the Gospel to an old Rabbinical Jew from Poland, but it always appeared that the doctrine of the Cross did not make much impression on him. On meeting him however last Saturday, he said, ‘I now believe that Jesus is my Saviour; my convictions of the truth of the Gospel are such, that to disbelieve the claims of Christ appears to me equivalent to denying the existence of a God in the universe.’ Please to think of this dear old man in your prayers. He is more than 82 years of age."

On May 27, 1884, Mr. C. writes again: "You will, I am sure, be pleased to hear that I am still encouraged in my feeble efforts among my brethren according to the flesh. Last Friday I met a Polish Jew, whom I recommended, six months ago, to read the New Testament and was truly glad to hear him say, that the Lord had greatly blessed the Word to his soul. ‘You know,’ he said, ‘what a self-righteous man I was when you first preached to me the Lord Jesus, whom I then so thoroughly despised, but I am thankful to tell you that a great change has come over me since then. I earnestly asked the Lord God of Abraham to guide me in the right way; it has pleased Him to open my eyes to see, and my heart to receive the gospel of His love, and since then I have enjoyed much peace in my soul.’ I saw tears trickling down his cheeks as he spoke of the Lord Jesus Christ, and of what He suffered for him."

Out of the many hundred letters, received from the 132 preachers of the gospel, whom we sought to assist during the year from May 26, 1883 to May 26, 1884, I have given a few extracts; but during the past fifty-one years, that the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad has aided Missionary brethren, Tens of Thousands of similar letters have come to hand, quite enough to fill Thirty large volumes and more. We must therefore once more refer our readers to the Reports of the Institution, should they desire more minute information. I only add, that Tens of Thousands of souls have been converted through the instrumentality of these beloved brethren, since March 5, 1834.

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which has been spent on Missionary operations, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1884, is £196,633. 12s. 5d.

There has been laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1883 to May 26, 1884, the sum of £829. 1s. 5½d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Two Millions Three Hundred and Seventy Five Thousand (exactly 2,375,816) Tracts and Books. The sum total expended on this object, since November 19th, 1840, amounts to £35,036. 17s. 9d.

The total number of Tracts and Books circulated since November 19, 1840 to May 26, 1884, is more than Eighty Millions Two Hundred and Nineteen Thousand (80,219,334).

More than One Million Eight Hundred and Eighty Three Thousand of the tracts and books, circulated during the year, were distributed gratuitously.

At the commencement of the last year of the Institution, (May 27, 1883), we had 1,953 Orphans in the five houses, and 110 helpers. During the past year, 207 Orphans were received, so that, had there been no changes, we should, on May 26, 1884, have had 2,160 children in the five houses. But of these 2,160, thirty-four died, and twenty-one out of this number of consumption. Three-fourths of the Orphans whom we receive (as we learn from the medical certificates of the death of their parents) lost one or both of them through this disease. The constitution therefore of the children being, in most cases, very weak, we cannot be surprised that many of them should die in consumption; yet the Lord allows us the joy of seeing that, through His blessing, upon thorough cleanliness, simple, yet wholesome and nourishing food, suitable clothing, a healthy locality, exercise, etc., a very small proportion only sink under disease. Three of the Orphans died from brain fever, and two from convulsions (one of them an infant during teething). Four young children, of weakly constitutions, died of whooping cough, with which many of the Orphans were afflicted during the past year. One of the children died of struma, one of atrophy, one of diarrhoea, and one of typhoid fever. Out of these thirty-four, thirteen were infants, and fourteen died as decided believers, most of whom had known the Lord a considerable time. One boy and one girl we were obliged to expel from the Institution, that the other children might not be corrupted by their ways. It was necessary also to send back fifteen of the Orphans to their relatives, as on account of mental, physical, or moral defects, we could not recommend them for situations. Twenty-five likewise were given up to their relatives, because the latter were now in a position to support them, and had a desire to do so. Fifty of the boys were sent out to learn a trade or business; and One Hundred and Thirty Five of the girls were sent out as domestic servants. One Orphan was placed out as nursery governess, two of the girls went out as pupil teachers, and two young men who had been trained as teachers in the Orphan Houses, were appointed as assistant masters. In addition to these last five, who were all believers, as well as the fourteen who fell asleep in Jesus, Fourteen of the boys who were apprenticed, and Seventy-Eight of the girls sent out as servants, were believers; in all, therefore, One Hundred and Eleven had been converted. Truly, our labour is not in vain in the Lord, for year after year we see abundant fruit resulting from it. I judge, however, that all we see now is but the firstfruits, and have ground for saying this, as year after year many letters are received in which those who were formerly in our Schools, or in the Orphan Houses, tell us, that, though they left without having made a profession of faith in the Lord Jesus, yet that the instruction they received, either at the Orphan Houses or in the Schools, was afterwards the means of leading them to Christ. From the 2,160 therefore, 266 are to be deducted, so that on May 26th, 1884, we had 1,894 Orphans and 110 helpers in the five houses. From April, 1836 up to May 26, 1884, there have been altogether 6,892 Orphans under our care.

From the commencement of the Institution, up to May 26, 1884, I obtained, simply by prayer and faith, the sum of One Million Twelve Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Pounds sterling.

We enter now upon the statistics of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, from May 26, 1884 to May 26, 1885.

During this year, Thirty Nine Day Schools were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. Of these there are 14 in Spain, 3 in India, 1 in Italy, 7 in British Guiana, and the others are in England. In addition to these 39 Day Schools, 2 Day Schools in England were assisted.

The master of the School at Clayhidon writes to the School Inspector of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution: "During the year we have had many difficulties to encounter; but, on looking back, we have to register more mercies than troubles. Our hearts have been greatly cheered in seeing several in our Bible Class happily brought to Jesus, and some of these have been added to the Church. Quite an earnest work is going on in many hearts among the elder scholars; and those who are the Lord’s in the school are diligently seeking the blessing of others. Our Bible Class was never more encouraging nor better attended. The Day School continues at about the same number as for several years past (109). We trust the condition of the School generally has been improving. The work done by the children has been more satisfactory to the teachers. During the past winter the attendance has been seriously checked by the prevalence of whooping cough, measles, and small-pox. This last disease, though not actually visiting the parish, but being most prevalent in adjoining neighbourhoods, was sufficiently near, greatly to alarm many parents, and at one time it was deemed almost desirable to close the school for a while; but the Lord heard prayer, and it was not found needful to do so. And so we have experienced all through our journey that ‘the name of the Lord is a strong tower, the righteous runneth into it and is safe.’ ‘Ebenezer’ must be written over the year gone by, to the praise of His glory; and ‘Jehovah-Jireh’ we inscribe on the commencement of the time to come. At times we have been well-nigh overcome by discouragements, but even then His loving kindness has held us up. We thank God and take courage. One thing greatly sustains us, and that is the assurance of the prayers of the Lord’s honoured servants on Ashley Down. ‘The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much.’ During the past year eight were converted from the School."

The head master of the Exeter School reports on May 25th, 1885, to our Inspector: "Occasionally we are gratified by the unsolicited expressions of appreciation from parents with respect to the knowledge of Scripture gained, and the progress in standard work made by their children. More gratifying was the recently volunteered information by a mother respecting the conversion of her son. Stopping me in the street, on leaving school, she inquired, ‘Do you know that John has given his heart to Jesus?’ He had been in the school about seven years, and having passed the successive standards, had lately left to begin work. That conversions in the school are rare, is the burden of regret. All along the same means are used. The Scriptures are read daily; the way of salvation is made known; the necessity of complying with Jesus’ terms in Mark i. 15, is enforced; the importance of early decision is urged; and many prayers are offered, but the results, notwithstanding, are apparently small. It may be that the ‘due season’ is not yet come; but the more probable reason of small blessing may lie in deficient spiritual aptitude, insufficient grace, or inadequate faith for the object aimed at. As time passes, and the reckoning-day approaches, the privilege, joy, and solemn responsibility of labouring for the Lord Jesus Christ among the young becomes more vividly recognized. Twenty-five years in all of happy toil in connection with children, must not be deemed any excuse for relaxed effort, lukewarmness, diminished sympathy or unfaithfulness to the trust committed. In these days of many and varied allurements to pleasure and evil, presented to the young, it is increasingly important to keep in mind the object for which the Schools are maintained. Where an earnest and prayerful desire to lead the children to Christ exists, surely there will also be a readiness to detect the slightest indications of spiritual life, and due care will be exercised in gently encouraging and helping the new weak life. Where a good work has begun in the heart, sooner or later its presence and reality will be manifested.

"As to the number on the register (354), average attendance, tone, discipline and staff of teachers, the school, I think I may safely say, will compare favourably with the past. With comparatively exceptionable advantages, the results, secular and spiritual should be proportionate.

"It may interest you to know that many boys who have been scholars here are in respectable and fairly remunerative situations in the city. About a dozen are employed in the printing offices; some in connection with the railways; others are engaged as office clerks; and three are telegraphists and sorting clerks in the Post Office. Cheek Street School has been an important link in the chain."

The master of the schools at Stroud, attended by 260 children, writes to our School Inspector, on May 22nd, 1885: "I am not aware of any conversions having taken place during the year; but when the Bible lessons are given, very great interest is shown, especially by the elder children. I have lately been much encouraged, in sowing the seed of God’s truth in youthful hearts, by meeting with some old scholars,
who are now decided believers in the Lord Jesus Christ. They attribute their happy state of heart to the Scriptural instruction im-’parted to them whilst attending our school."

The mistress of the school at Hopton reports: "I am thankful to be able to state that I fully believe several of the dear children have believed in Jesus to the saving of their souls. I have been convinced for a long time that blessing would come, and now we are rejoicing in the evidences the children clearly give that they are lambs of the Good Shepherd."

The head master of the schools at Yeovil, attended by 178 children, writes on May 25th, 1885: "During the past year we have been much cheered by some of our old scholars, now fine young men, confessing Christ and openly speaking of their gratitude for the knowledge of the Scriptures gained whilst in the school. The value of the daily reading of the Word of God, especially the Old Testament, has been made very manifest. To many it is simply a book of history; but to those young men it is full of Christ. Also during the past year, God has been manifestly working with those in the school, and several—I do not like to speak of definite numbers—have been born again from above, among them my own eldest boy. Thus our God, whom we seek to serve, has given us a double cheer. The longer I am engaged in this work, the more I am convinced of the mighty power for good or evil of the life we live. It is very interesting to me sometimes to go into the infant room and hear their little prattling tongues engaged in telling Bible stories. The other day I heard them repeat nearly sixty verses of Scripture, with scarcely a single mistake. In the day of the Lord Miss R. will, I feel sure, reap much fruit from her quiet labour among the young ones of our school."

The master of the schools at Purton, attended by 187 children, writes on May 26th, 1885, to our School Inspector: "We have again to speak of the loving-kindness of God our Father, in giving us tokens of His favour and blessing through another year. Some, who have recently left school for work, have written to us concerning their faith and trust in our Lord Jesus Christ; parents have also cheered us with encouraging letters regarding their children’s behaviour; and tidings of old scholars have gladdened our hearts, on account of their steady perseverance in the ways of God. One is now superintendent of a large Sunday School, and others are serving the Lord as teachers and itinerant preachers. This is a great joy to us, because in such instances we realize the blessedness of that promise, ‘He will fulfil the desires of them that fear Him.’ It is our constant prayer that all the dear children belonging to our schools should become servants of the Most High God, showing unto others the way of everlasting life. Our special difficulties are well known to you. We are surrounded by those who seek to draw the children from the path of simple faith in Christ for salvation into the delusive paths of ceremonialism and ritualism, and to our sorrow in some instances they succeed. Many of the children now attending give us joy, because we believe, from their attention to spiritual things, that the Holy Spirit of God is working upon their hearts. We lament that this is not the case with all, but, as dear Mr. R. Chapman says, ‘Sowing is reaping, and he that soweth spiritual things shall reap also spiritual things.’"

The number of pupils in the Home Day-Schools of the Institution, on May 26th, 1885, was 1206; in the Mission Day-Schools 1597; in all, 2803.

At present there are Forty-three Sunday Schools connected with the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. In these forty-three Sunday Schools there were, on May 26th, 1885, Two Thousand Seven Hundred and Forty-two scholars. During the past year, Twenty-five Sunday Schools were likewise, to a greater or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. Of the forty-three Sunday Schools, entirely supported by its funds, twelve are in Spain, six in British Guiana, one in Italy, four in India, three in Somersetshire, six in Hampshire, seven in Middlesex, one in Norfolk, one in Warwickshire, and two in Glouccstershire. Of the Five-and-twenty Sunday Schools which were assisted, five are in Somersetshire, two in Staffordshire, one in Wiltshire, three in Middlesex, one in Worcestershire, two in Devonshire, two in Lancashire, two in Gloucestershire, one in Hampshire, one in Kent, and five in Wales.

The report of the Hopton Sunday School is: "We have had one case of conversion, and indications of the Spirit’s working in one or two others."—Of the Sunday School at Beer: "One case of conversion during the past year, and one of the scholars died, trusting in Jesus. Nearly all the young Christians in the gathering were members of our Sunday School."—The statement regarding the Sunday School at Bishopswood is: "Two were received into Church fellowship during the year; and several older scholars encourage us to hope that God will graciously manifest them soon as His."—The report regarding the North End Sunday School is, June 1st, 1885: "We have 328 children on the books. Several of the scholars are in Church Fellowship and several more are to be baptized this week. We have a good band of Christian workers in the School, and all have their hearts thoroughly in the work, having the one aim, the glory of God and the salvation of the scholars."—"At Portsea two have been converted in the Sunday School."—Regarding Portland Hall Sunday School the superintendent reports: "Four cases of special blessing have come under my notice."—The report of the Purton Sunday School is: "An interesting case of conversion has encouraged us in the young people’s Sunday afternoon Bible Class, through the singing that sweet hymn, ‘My faith looks up to Thee.’ A special children’s service is held every Thursday, and a Dorcas meeting for the girls every Wednesday. There are meetings every evening for the spiritual well-being of children and parents."

There are now 3 Mission Adult Schools, containing 68 scholars, connected with the Institution, and entirely supported by its funds.

From what has been stated it will be seen, that altogether there are Eighty-Five Schools entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, 39 Day Schools, 43 Sunday Schools, and 3 Adult Schools; and that during the past year two Day Schools and 25 Sunday Schools were assisted. It will likewise be observed, that in these Eighty-Five Schools, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 26th, 1885, 5,613 pupils. From the beginning, the total number attending the Schools of the Institution, entirely supported by its funds, amounts to Ninety-Eight Thousand One Hundred and Five. There were 66,967 in all the Day Schools, 23,591, in all the Sunday Schools, and 7,547 in all the Adult Schools.

The sum expended during the past year, in connection with the various Home Schools, amounts to £2,239, 12s. 5d. On the Mission Schools £2,023. 19s. 4d. has been spent, which has been charged to the Mission Fund, to which it properly belongs. From the beginning, £89,429. 10s. 8½d. has been expended on the Home Schools.

May I request the reader to pause a few moments? It is seen that Ninety-Eight Thousand One Hundred and Five souls have been brought under habitual instruction in the things of God in these schools, and many attended them for 5, 6, 7, and 8 years. How great has been the blessing! But far more than this is the fact, namely, that thousands have thus been brought to the true knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. We have had years, when 50 and 60 even, in one school were converted in the course of a twelvemonth.—Whilst travelling on my Missionary journeys in 23 different countries, I met again and again with persons who were converted in our schools; and I have received many letters from happy Christians, who owed their knowledge of the Lord Jesus entirely to the instruction they received in them. We therefore go on joyfully in this service, being assured that all the fruit we have seen already is but little in comparison with what we shall see in the day of Christ.

The second Object of this Institution is, to circulate the Holy Scriptures.

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the Holy Scriptures, which has been circulated from May 26th, 1884 to May 26th, 1885, is as follows:

10,332 Bibles have been sold.

306 Bibles have been given away.

85,788 New Testaments have been sold.

1,309 New Testaments have been given away.

216 Copies of the Psalms have been sold.

1,866 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have been sold.

There have been circulated since March 5th, 1834, through the medium of this Institution, 199,997 Bibles, 734,872 New Testaments, 20,491 copies of the Psalms, and 206,950 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures.

During no previous year have we circulated so great a number of copies of the Holy Scriptures as during the past twelve months, which arises chiefly from the fact that we have supplied Colporteurs and Bible Carriages in England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and Australia with copies at reduced prices. In connection with these Bible Carriages the Gospel is preached in the open air, and thus not only have hundreds of thousands of persons heard of the way of salvation, but great numbers also have been truly converted. We praise God for having permitted us to help in this glorious service, and we ask Him to allow us the honour of thus serving Him more than ever.

The amount of the funds of the Institution, spent during the past year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, is £1,300. 4s. 3d. The total amount spent since March 5th, 1834, is £30,365. 16s. 6½d.

The third Object of the Institution is, to aid Missionary efforts.

Ever since my conversion (now 60 years ago), I have taken a deep interest in Missionary work. Indeed at five different times, within the first eight years after I had been brought to the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, I offered myself to Him most solemnly for work among the heathen; but each time it was most plainly shown to me, that I should serve Him by remaining in Europe. As I could not, therefore, go to heathen nations myself, I have sought to help on Missionary operations to the utmost, and was further stimulated to this through receiving the truth of the Lord’s coming, to which I was led in July, 1829. The moment I saw this truth clearly revealed in the Holy Scriptures, the thought occurred to me, "What can I do to make Him known before His return, seeing that He may soon come?" Ever since July, 1829, the certainty of the return of the Lord Jesus has been a stimulus for good to my soul, and especially in quickening me to exertion with regard to Missionary work. But more than ever I have been roused to effort since the Lord at last allowed me, after 58 years, to see the field of Missionary labour in India myself, to which, as a young believer, I had so earnestly desired to go. The sight of idolatry in India, in the many places which I visited in my Missionary tour, and especially at Benares, stirred my soul to the utmost, leading me more than ever to take the deepest interest in Missions, and to decide that I would devote every sovereign that could be spared to this object, besides being led to pray more than ever that God would incline the hearts of great numbers of His children to help me with their means. I have now to state that in some measure my prayers have been answered, for since my return from India (on May 19th, 1884) we have been enabled between May 26th, 1884 and May 26th, 1885, to devote £6,593. 6s. 4d. to Missionary operations, and, from the commencement of the Institution, £203,226. 18s. 9d. has been expended in this way.

During the past year 136 labourers in word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were assisted by the £6,593. 6s. 4d. spent on Missionary operations. There was expended for the support of the Schools in connection with Missions in India £264.; for Schools in connection with Missions in British Guiana £258; for Schools in connection with Missions in Spain £1,282; for the support of a School in Italy £219. 19s. 4d.

Expended also in connection with some preaching places in spiritually dark villages in Somersetshire and Gloucestershire £14. 7s.

Many hundreds of deeply interesting letters were received from the 136 Missionaries, who were helped during the year, from which could be gathered that again thousands of souls had been won for our Lord Jesus Christ, through their instrumentality; but I am obliged to refer the readers to the Forty-Sixth Report of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, for particulars, as otherwise this volume would be too large.

The fourth Object of the Institution is, the circulation of such publications as may be calculated, with the blessing of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers. As it respects tracts for unbelievers, we especially aim at the diffusion of such as contain the truths of the Gospel clearly and simply expressed; and as it regards publications for believers, we desire to circulate such as may be instrumental in directing their minds to those truths which, in these last days, are more especially needed; or which have been particularly lost sight of, and may lead believers to return to the written Word of God.

Each branch of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution was very small at the commencement. In the first year we circulated 19,000 tracts, a small number only, but this was a beginning; for as time passed on, more was accomplished. It was not long before the 19,000 tracts were multiplied tenfold. But this was not all. Pamphlets and excellent books, of a truly spiritual character, were added; and these precious books and pamphlets were circulated in many hundreds, and even thousands of copies; and ere long there took place another tenfold increase; so that now we circulate a hundred times as many tracts as during the first year. But even there we did not stop, for that would have been One Million and Nine Hundred Thousand only; whereas we often issued in one year not only 2 Millions of books, pamphlets and tracts, but 2½ Millions, 3 Millions, and even as many as 3½ Millions. And thus the work has now been going on for many years. Let this encourage you therefore, dear Christian reader, in seeking to labour for God. Be not discouraged, because you cannot do great things at once, but go on labouring for God, letting your aim, however, TRULY be the glory of God; accompany your work, too habitually with earnest believing prayer, On no account relying upon your own exertions, but seeking the blessing of God; and, if this be done, it is impossible to say to what an extent you may be helped. During the past year we were able to circulate 154 times as many publications as we did the first year; but there have been years when the quantity was even 184 times greater than it was during the first year we began this branch of the Institution.

The whole number of books, pamphlets and tracts which we have been enabled to circulate now exceeds 83 Millions. They have been sent all over the world, and thousands of Christian men and women have helped in this service. Every year we receive many hundreds of applications for gratuitous grants of tracts, and, whenever the cases are suitable, 3,000, 4,500, 6,000, 10,000, and sometimes as many as 50,000 at one time have been sent out gratuitously.

Reflect, dear reader, on the greatness of the honour and privilege, which God has bestowed on us, in allowing us to send forth more than 83 Millions of books, pamphlets and tracts, wherein the plan of salvation is clearly set before the readers; and be encouraged to expect far greater help from God in your own service, than as yet you have ever had. Labour, as if every thing depended on your own diligence in service; and yet do not trust in the least in your exertions, but look to God alone for blessing, as the result of believing prayer. Thousands of tracts and books may be circulated without any good resulting from them; but, if God gives his blessing, one little tract used by Him may become the means of great spiritual blessing.

The circulation of tracts, is especially a work of faith, as regards the seeing of fruit; but, if you commit the whole to God, in believing, persevering prayer, then, though you should not SEE much fruit of your labour here on earth, you will yet reap abundantly at the appearing of the Lord Jesus. At least once a day, for more than forty years past, the blessing of God has been sought by me in believing, expecting prayer on this branch of the Institution only, and I expect to meet thousands of saved souls in the glory, as the result of this labour, in addition to the very many cases of blessing, which have already been brought to my knowledge.

There has been laid out for the circulation of Tracts, from May 26, 1884 to May 26, 1885, the sum of £844. 11s. 0½d.; and there have been circulated within the last year more than Two Million Nine Hundred and Twenty-Three Thousand (exactly 2,923,581) Tracts and Books. The sum total expended on this object, since November 19, 1840, amounts to £35,881. 8s. 10¼d.

The total number of Tracts and Books circulated since November 19, 1840 to May 26, 1885, is more than Eighty-Three Million One Hundred and Forty-Two Thousand (exactly 83,142,915).

More than Two Million Six Hundred and Sixty-Two Thousand of the tracts and books circulated during the year were distributed gratuitously.

There are now kept on sale, 1,400 different books, large and small; and 1,050 different Tracts, which number is continually added to.

The fifth Object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, and scripturally educate destitute children, who have lost BOTH parents by death.

Before entering upon the statistics of the Orphan Work for the year, I make the following statements.

It is quite true that my heart was affected by the deplorable physical condition in which I saw destitute Orphans, before I began to care for them; but a higher motive by far actuated me than merely seeking to benefit their health. For about fifty years we have constantly sought the physical well-being of the Orphans, and thousands of them have been benefited, even as it regards their health. The lives of many hundreds have been saved (humanly speaking) through their having been received under our care, and their health has been established, by the blessing of God, through wholesome food, proper clothing, thorough cleanliness, regular habits, and a healthy dwelling-place. The low death rate at the Orphan Houses, year after year, is in itself a proof, how the children are cared for physically.

It is further true, that I had a desire to benefit the Orphans by seeking to educate them; but I aimed at far more than this. For about half a century now, we have sought to develop and to cultivate their mental powers, and to what extent we have succeeded, will be seen by this, that, though the girls are more especially trained for domestic service, and the boys for trades, very many of the girls, by reason of their good education, have become house-keepers and book-keepers in establishments, and some are filling places of great responsibility. Many also are now teachers, and one of them is Post Mistress of a Branch Post Office. As it regards the boys, hundreds of them have now a business of their own, or are managers of businesses; some are partners in large houses of business, others are clerks in offices, a considerable number have become teachers, one of them (if not more) has passed a competitive examination for the Civil Service, and many are engaged in preaching the Gospel publicly, or labour otherwise in the Church of God, by seeking to spread the truth as it is in. Jesus.

As a further illustration of the kind of education which our Orphan boys and girls receive, I will now give the result of the last examination of the Orphans by our School Inspector, Mr. Horne.

"The Annual Examination of the children was held during the months of February and March. The subjects were Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Scripture, Dictation, Geography, History, Grammar, Composition and Singing.

The Children were examined and arranged in the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Standards, in many particulars according to the Government Code.

Each child was examined separately in reading.

Each child showed his or her Copy-book, to determine the Mark for Writing.

Ten Questions were put on each of the following subjects, viz., on Scripture, Geography, History and Grammar. The answers were given in writing.

Six Sums were given in Arithmetic. The answers were given on paper.

The average per cent. of all the Marks the children received during the Examination was 91.1."

To all who are acquainted with such matters, the last sentence will show, with what success our children are educated.

Further, when I began the Orphan Work, I aimed from the beginning at the salvation of the children. To make them see their lost and ruined condition by nature, through instructing them in the Word of God, and to lead them to put their trust in the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation, was my aim; and God has given us the joy of seeing thousands of them brought to believe in Him, so that few institutions, perhaps, have been more abundantly blessed in this respect than the Orphan Houses on Ashley Down have been; yet even this was not the primary object I had in view when I began to care for poor destitute children bereaved of both parents by death; but, in carrying on this work, simply through the instrumentality of prayer and faith, with out applying to any human being for help, my great desire was, that it might be seen, that, now in the nineteenth century, God is still the Living God, and that now, as well as thousands of years ago, He listens to the prayers of His children, and helps those who tru t in Him. In all the 23 countries through which I traveled during the past ten years of my missionary service, numberless instances came before me of the benefit which our Orphan Institution has been in this respect, not only in making men of the world see the reality of the things of God, and by converting them, but especially by leading the children of God more abundantly to give themselves to prayer, and by strengthening their faith. Far beyond what I at first expected to accomplish, the Lord has been pleased to give to me. But what I have seen as the fruit of my labour in this way, may not be the thousandth part of what I shall see when the Lord Jesus comes again, as day by day, for fifty years, I have earnestly laboured, in believing prayer, that God would be pleased more abundantly to bless this service in the way I have stated.

Further. When I began the Orphan work, its commencement was very small, as was the case with the other branches of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. I rented a house, furnished it, and received 30 children, which was a very humble beginning; but compare this with the magnitude of the five large Orphan Houses on Ashley Down, now the greatest Orphan Institution in the world, and let this fact be an especial encouragement to the children of God, who seek to labour for Him. On no account should they be discouraged, because they cannot begin with great things. If we truly seek the honour of God, and not our own, it is impossible to say to what an extent He may condescend to use us.

Lastly. At the time, when it was especially laid on my heart to labour for Orphans, the total accommodation in all the Orphan Institutions in England, was for 3,600 Orphans, and at the same time, there were 6,000 Orphans under 8 years of age in the prisons of England, according to public statistics. This deeply affected me, and I sought therefore to enlarge the Orphan work under my direction to the utmost of my power. This ended in providing accommodation for 2,050 Orphan and 112 helpers at a time, and the result of this has been, that, by means of other individuals, or through Societies, one Institution after another has been opened for the reception of 20, 30, 50, or 100 Orphans; or that Orphan Houses have been built for 200, 300, 400, and even 500 Orphans, so that now I am happy to say, there is accommodation in England alone for at least One Hundred Thousand Orphans. Orphan Institutions indeed have multiplied to such an extent since I first began to labour in this way, that some time since the secretary of an Orphan Institution for 500 children (but where they have not quite Three Hundred), wrote to me, stating that if we had applications for more Orphans than we could receive, this Institution would gladly take 50 of them. I praise and adore God, therefore, that he has allowed me to give such an impetus for good in this work, and that during the last forty years He has caused many scores of Orphan Institutions to be established.

I enter now upon the statistics of the Orphan work.

At the commencement of the last year of the Institution (May 27th, 1884), we had 1,894 Orphans in the five houses. During the past year, 216 were received, so that, had there been no changes, on May 26th, 1885, we should have had 2,110 children in the five houses. But of these 2,110, twenty died. Only twenty, for which we praise God! Of the 20 who died, one was an infant, twelve were believers, and some of them had been converted for a considerable time. Four girls we were obliged to expel from the Institution, but did so most reluctantly; in mercy, however, to the other Orphans, whom these ringleaders in evil sought to corrupt, their removal was absolutely necessary, but we still follow them with our prayers. Thirty-nine of the children were returned to their relatives, after most of them had been for a long time under our care, because they could not be recommended as apprentices or for domestic service, on account of physical, mental, or moral defects; and nineteen were given up to their relatives, because the latter were now in a position to provide for them, and desired to do so. Twenty-seven of the boys were apprenticed to trades or businesses, and 109 girls were sent out as domestic servants. Two of the Orphan girls were sent out as pupil teachers to assist in teaching in our schools in Purton and Exeter; and two young men, who had been, the one 7 and the other 8 years in the Orphan Houses, and who were afterwards trained in them for five years, were appointed assistant masters. The last four were believers; 9 of the boys also who were apprenticed were converted, as well as fifty-one of the girls who were sent out, and twelve died as believers; making 76 altogether whose hearts had been given to the Lord. We have therefore to deduct 222 from 2,110, so that on May 26th, 1885, we had 1,888 Orphans and 112 helpers in the five houses. From April, 1836, up to May 26, 1885, 7,108 Orphans altogether have been under our care.

During the last twelve years we have sought to train Christian lads and girls from among the Orphans to become teachers, if they manifest aptitude for teaching, have a desire to become teachers, and are in other respects suitable. The Lord has caused His especial blessing to rest upon this also, and we have been thus able to appoint many young men and young women already as assistant masters and mistresses at the Orphan Houses, and in the Day Schools, connected with the Institution.

Without any one having been personally applied to for any thing by me, £692,071. 5s. 1½d. has been given to me for the Orphans as the result of prayer to God, since the commencement of the work, which sum includes the amount received for the Building Fund for the five houses. It may also be interesting to the reader to know that the total amount given for the other objects, since the commencement of the work, amounts to £309,740. 11s. 10d.; that that which has come in by the sale of Bibles since the commencement, amounts to £15,224. 18s. 10d.; by the sale of Tracts, £18,370. 6s. 9¼d.; and by the payment of the children in the Day Schools from the commencement, £18,920. 18s. 4½d. In all, One Million Fifty-Four Thousand Three Hundred Twenty-Eight Pounds and One Shilling has been received by me, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1885. Besides this, a great variety of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, coal, &c., has also been given for the use of the Orphans.

by me, £692,071. 5s. 1½d. has been given to me for the Orphans as the result of prayer to God, since the commencement of the work, which sum includes the amount received for the Building Fund for the five houses. It may also be interesting to the reader to know that the total amount given for the other objects, since the commencement of the work, amounts to £309,740. 11s. 10d.; that that which has come in by the sale of Bibles since the commencement, amounts to £15,224. 18s. 10d.; by the sale of Tracts, £18,370. 6s. 9¼d.; and by the payment of the children in the Day Schools from the commencement, £18,920. 18s. 4½d. In all, One Million Fifty-Four Thousand Three Hundred Twenty-Eight Pounds and One Shilling has been received by me, from March 5, 1834 to May 26, 1885. Besides this, a great variety of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, coal, &c., has also been given for the use of the Orphans.

All the property, connected with the Orphan Houses, is vested in the hands of eleven Christian gentlemen, whom I have chosen as trustees, and the deeds are enrolled in Chancery.